Reading Habits

Girlreading

Pat here:

I'm currently reading a fast-paced action mystery that is going to be impossible to solve because there are no clues. I'm interested in other elements of the story, so I'm fine with that. But I find myself skimming more and more as I progress into the story, looking for the elements that interest me. I'm skipping the sex scenes and only catching the dialogue in the action scenes. I really don’t care who boinks whom and how, any more than I care who gets shot with what caliber gun. I'm sure the book is well written and appeals to action fans, but I just don't care enough about the characters to read for anything except the fun elements like the puzzles and the ghosts. This is not a comment on the book so much as on my reading habits.

For example—I just finished a historical mystery that had almost nothing happening except the setting and the intriguing characters. I still settled in to happily wander through another time and place. I read every word, although I easily figured out the who of the mystery, so I didn’t even have the fun of a puzzle to keep me going. Reviews have described this book as boring, and I’m certain it is for people who love action and sex. But as I’ve already shown, my preference is for character and apparently setting, although they both have to be of a sort that intrigues me. I don’t read about bullies, for instance, and I have little interest in China.  Expectationscharacters

Is this just a character flaw of mine? How do others choose what to skim and what to read word-by-word? When I’m writing, I'm often stumped by how much information to put into my stories, probably because of my own weird reading habits. Finding a balance between my interest in entertaining bits of history, eccentric character traits, and the need to keep the action moving is a challenge.  I’d love to see how other people's reading habits correlate to mine.  Any insights?

And as an aside, for those of you who have expressed interest in e-versions of my Magic series, MUST BE MAGIC is now out at Regency Reads. And if nothing else, take a look at Leila's lovely rose arbor on the cover!

45 thoughts on “Reading Habits”

  1. I mostly read historicals, and I pretty much stick to Regencies. I like ones that have lots of detail. I want to know what the landscape looks like, what the people are wearing and what they eat. I love authors who can paint pictures with words. The best ones can put you into a different time and place without using an information dump.
    That said, I also like a little extra than the love in my romances. I like some mystery or action or a puzzle. The hero and heroine have to do something besides being in love.
    And I want great characters. I want to know what the hero and heroine think about the situation, but not have them agonize about it. Both H and H have to be properly heroic. They can have only minor flaws.
    As for the sex, a little is nice, as part of the love. Too much sex leaves less room for the story.
    I’ll read mysteries and fantasy. Action stories that are just action are boring.
    Now that some of your books are e-books, will your early Signets also come out as e-books?

    Reply
  2. I mostly read historicals, and I pretty much stick to Regencies. I like ones that have lots of detail. I want to know what the landscape looks like, what the people are wearing and what they eat. I love authors who can paint pictures with words. The best ones can put you into a different time and place without using an information dump.
    That said, I also like a little extra than the love in my romances. I like some mystery or action or a puzzle. The hero and heroine have to do something besides being in love.
    And I want great characters. I want to know what the hero and heroine think about the situation, but not have them agonize about it. Both H and H have to be properly heroic. They can have only minor flaws.
    As for the sex, a little is nice, as part of the love. Too much sex leaves less room for the story.
    I’ll read mysteries and fantasy. Action stories that are just action are boring.
    Now that some of your books are e-books, will your early Signets also come out as e-books?

    Reply
  3. I mostly read historicals, and I pretty much stick to Regencies. I like ones that have lots of detail. I want to know what the landscape looks like, what the people are wearing and what they eat. I love authors who can paint pictures with words. The best ones can put you into a different time and place without using an information dump.
    That said, I also like a little extra than the love in my romances. I like some mystery or action or a puzzle. The hero and heroine have to do something besides being in love.
    And I want great characters. I want to know what the hero and heroine think about the situation, but not have them agonize about it. Both H and H have to be properly heroic. They can have only minor flaws.
    As for the sex, a little is nice, as part of the love. Too much sex leaves less room for the story.
    I’ll read mysteries and fantasy. Action stories that are just action are boring.
    Now that some of your books are e-books, will your early Signets also come out as e-books?

    Reply
  4. I mostly read historicals, and I pretty much stick to Regencies. I like ones that have lots of detail. I want to know what the landscape looks like, what the people are wearing and what they eat. I love authors who can paint pictures with words. The best ones can put you into a different time and place without using an information dump.
    That said, I also like a little extra than the love in my romances. I like some mystery or action or a puzzle. The hero and heroine have to do something besides being in love.
    And I want great characters. I want to know what the hero and heroine think about the situation, but not have them agonize about it. Both H and H have to be properly heroic. They can have only minor flaws.
    As for the sex, a little is nice, as part of the love. Too much sex leaves less room for the story.
    I’ll read mysteries and fantasy. Action stories that are just action are boring.
    Now that some of your books are e-books, will your early Signets also come out as e-books?

    Reply
  5. I mostly read historicals, and I pretty much stick to Regencies. I like ones that have lots of detail. I want to know what the landscape looks like, what the people are wearing and what they eat. I love authors who can paint pictures with words. The best ones can put you into a different time and place without using an information dump.
    That said, I also like a little extra than the love in my romances. I like some mystery or action or a puzzle. The hero and heroine have to do something besides being in love.
    And I want great characters. I want to know what the hero and heroine think about the situation, but not have them agonize about it. Both H and H have to be properly heroic. They can have only minor flaws.
    As for the sex, a little is nice, as part of the love. Too much sex leaves less room for the story.
    I’ll read mysteries and fantasy. Action stories that are just action are boring.
    Now that some of your books are e-books, will your early Signets also come out as e-books?

    Reply
  6. Linda, you’re my kind of reader! May there be many more of us.
    There is some confusion over who owns the rights to the early Signets, so I’ve been hesitant about preempting them. The time may come though…

    Reply
  7. Linda, you’re my kind of reader! May there be many more of us.
    There is some confusion over who owns the rights to the early Signets, so I’ve been hesitant about preempting them. The time may come though…

    Reply
  8. Linda, you’re my kind of reader! May there be many more of us.
    There is some confusion over who owns the rights to the early Signets, so I’ve been hesitant about preempting them. The time may come though…

    Reply
  9. Linda, you’re my kind of reader! May there be many more of us.
    There is some confusion over who owns the rights to the early Signets, so I’ve been hesitant about preempting them. The time may come though…

    Reply
  10. Linda, you’re my kind of reader! May there be many more of us.
    There is some confusion over who owns the rights to the early Signets, so I’ve been hesitant about preempting them. The time may come though…

    Reply
  11. Asking about why we read what we do is a little like why we fall in love with a particular person. 🙂 There are plenty of perfectly good books that don’t interest me, and this is no doubt to the jadedness that comes with being a writer for over twenty years.
    I like a book that takes me to a place I haven’t been before, whether it’s a setting, an industry, a state of mind. I want the characters to be basically likeable, and not stupid. I most certainly want a happy ending, or at least a satisfying one if it’s not a romance.
    Beyond that–there are some writers whose voices just captivate me, and I’ll read them even if the basic situation or plot isn’t one I like in general. Love is an elusive thing to define…
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  12. Asking about why we read what we do is a little like why we fall in love with a particular person. 🙂 There are plenty of perfectly good books that don’t interest me, and this is no doubt to the jadedness that comes with being a writer for over twenty years.
    I like a book that takes me to a place I haven’t been before, whether it’s a setting, an industry, a state of mind. I want the characters to be basically likeable, and not stupid. I most certainly want a happy ending, or at least a satisfying one if it’s not a romance.
    Beyond that–there are some writers whose voices just captivate me, and I’ll read them even if the basic situation or plot isn’t one I like in general. Love is an elusive thing to define…
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  13. Asking about why we read what we do is a little like why we fall in love with a particular person. 🙂 There are plenty of perfectly good books that don’t interest me, and this is no doubt to the jadedness that comes with being a writer for over twenty years.
    I like a book that takes me to a place I haven’t been before, whether it’s a setting, an industry, a state of mind. I want the characters to be basically likeable, and not stupid. I most certainly want a happy ending, or at least a satisfying one if it’s not a romance.
    Beyond that–there are some writers whose voices just captivate me, and I’ll read them even if the basic situation or plot isn’t one I like in general. Love is an elusive thing to define…
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  14. Asking about why we read what we do is a little like why we fall in love with a particular person. 🙂 There are plenty of perfectly good books that don’t interest me, and this is no doubt to the jadedness that comes with being a writer for over twenty years.
    I like a book that takes me to a place I haven’t been before, whether it’s a setting, an industry, a state of mind. I want the characters to be basically likeable, and not stupid. I most certainly want a happy ending, or at least a satisfying one if it’s not a romance.
    Beyond that–there are some writers whose voices just captivate me, and I’ll read them even if the basic situation or plot isn’t one I like in general. Love is an elusive thing to define…
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  15. Asking about why we read what we do is a little like why we fall in love with a particular person. 🙂 There are plenty of perfectly good books that don’t interest me, and this is no doubt to the jadedness that comes with being a writer for over twenty years.
    I like a book that takes me to a place I haven’t been before, whether it’s a setting, an industry, a state of mind. I want the characters to be basically likeable, and not stupid. I most certainly want a happy ending, or at least a satisfying one if it’s not a romance.
    Beyond that–there are some writers whose voices just captivate me, and I’ll read them even if the basic situation or plot isn’t one I like in general. Love is an elusive thing to define…
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  16. Sherrie here.
    I’m judging a contest right now, and as often happens, I’m finding two extremes: too much information and not enough information. Some of the entries are overly lavish with descriptions to the point where I’m mentally saying, “C’mon, let’s get the show on the road already.”
    The opposite is when the story dumps you into a scene that leaves you floundering because you have no idea where the scene is taking place, who’s doing the talking, or who’s the protagonist.
    I know it’s cliched to say it, but a good story is a good story. That good story may be spare in detail or rich, but if it’s done well and keeps me turning the pages I’m happy.
    I really like how you do your descriptions, Pat. You insert them naturally, dribbling them out here and there inconspicuously, but in a way that enhances the scene.

    Reply
  17. Sherrie here.
    I’m judging a contest right now, and as often happens, I’m finding two extremes: too much information and not enough information. Some of the entries are overly lavish with descriptions to the point where I’m mentally saying, “C’mon, let’s get the show on the road already.”
    The opposite is when the story dumps you into a scene that leaves you floundering because you have no idea where the scene is taking place, who’s doing the talking, or who’s the protagonist.
    I know it’s cliched to say it, but a good story is a good story. That good story may be spare in detail or rich, but if it’s done well and keeps me turning the pages I’m happy.
    I really like how you do your descriptions, Pat. You insert them naturally, dribbling them out here and there inconspicuously, but in a way that enhances the scene.

    Reply
  18. Sherrie here.
    I’m judging a contest right now, and as often happens, I’m finding two extremes: too much information and not enough information. Some of the entries are overly lavish with descriptions to the point where I’m mentally saying, “C’mon, let’s get the show on the road already.”
    The opposite is when the story dumps you into a scene that leaves you floundering because you have no idea where the scene is taking place, who’s doing the talking, or who’s the protagonist.
    I know it’s cliched to say it, but a good story is a good story. That good story may be spare in detail or rich, but if it’s done well and keeps me turning the pages I’m happy.
    I really like how you do your descriptions, Pat. You insert them naturally, dribbling them out here and there inconspicuously, but in a way that enhances the scene.

    Reply
  19. Sherrie here.
    I’m judging a contest right now, and as often happens, I’m finding two extremes: too much information and not enough information. Some of the entries are overly lavish with descriptions to the point where I’m mentally saying, “C’mon, let’s get the show on the road already.”
    The opposite is when the story dumps you into a scene that leaves you floundering because you have no idea where the scene is taking place, who’s doing the talking, or who’s the protagonist.
    I know it’s cliched to say it, but a good story is a good story. That good story may be spare in detail or rich, but if it’s done well and keeps me turning the pages I’m happy.
    I really like how you do your descriptions, Pat. You insert them naturally, dribbling them out here and there inconspicuously, but in a way that enhances the scene.

    Reply
  20. Sherrie here.
    I’m judging a contest right now, and as often happens, I’m finding two extremes: too much information and not enough information. Some of the entries are overly lavish with descriptions to the point where I’m mentally saying, “C’mon, let’s get the show on the road already.”
    The opposite is when the story dumps you into a scene that leaves you floundering because you have no idea where the scene is taking place, who’s doing the talking, or who’s the protagonist.
    I know it’s cliched to say it, but a good story is a good story. That good story may be spare in detail or rich, but if it’s done well and keeps me turning the pages I’m happy.
    I really like how you do your descriptions, Pat. You insert them naturally, dribbling them out here and there inconspicuously, but in a way that enhances the scene.

    Reply
  21. I’ll try just about anything (romance, mystery, sf, fantasy). My main reading problem is “slump in the middle.” I’m interested in the set-up for the characters and plot, but about page 75, if nothing seems to be happening, I’ll skip over, read the last five chapters, and then either (1) put the book in the pile to go to the library book sale or (2) go back and read the middle, because the end was so good.
    I sometimes have trouble maintaining interest in a series as the later volumes come out. This isn’t always a problem. I’m still reading Sue Grafton and Carole Nelson Douglas as they make their way through the alphabet. I’m still reading Elizabeth Peters’ Amelia Peabody, and Anne Perry’s Pitt and Monk books.
    I have no problem with Janet Evanovich because I regard each of her Stephanie books as a commedia del’ arte episode rather than as part of a progressing series, so can enjoy each of them independently of the others.
    I thoroughly detest long and clinical sex scenes which occupy space that could be given to moving the plot along (e.g. Jillian Hunter’s Boscastle series for historicals; Dakota Cassidy’s recent “accidental” series for paranormals). I feel like I’ve only bought 2/3 of a book, particularly when the scenes are so repetitious of the ones in other books in the series that I end up suspecting cut-and-paste.

    Reply
  22. I’ll try just about anything (romance, mystery, sf, fantasy). My main reading problem is “slump in the middle.” I’m interested in the set-up for the characters and plot, but about page 75, if nothing seems to be happening, I’ll skip over, read the last five chapters, and then either (1) put the book in the pile to go to the library book sale or (2) go back and read the middle, because the end was so good.
    I sometimes have trouble maintaining interest in a series as the later volumes come out. This isn’t always a problem. I’m still reading Sue Grafton and Carole Nelson Douglas as they make their way through the alphabet. I’m still reading Elizabeth Peters’ Amelia Peabody, and Anne Perry’s Pitt and Monk books.
    I have no problem with Janet Evanovich because I regard each of her Stephanie books as a commedia del’ arte episode rather than as part of a progressing series, so can enjoy each of them independently of the others.
    I thoroughly detest long and clinical sex scenes which occupy space that could be given to moving the plot along (e.g. Jillian Hunter’s Boscastle series for historicals; Dakota Cassidy’s recent “accidental” series for paranormals). I feel like I’ve only bought 2/3 of a book, particularly when the scenes are so repetitious of the ones in other books in the series that I end up suspecting cut-and-paste.

    Reply
  23. I’ll try just about anything (romance, mystery, sf, fantasy). My main reading problem is “slump in the middle.” I’m interested in the set-up for the characters and plot, but about page 75, if nothing seems to be happening, I’ll skip over, read the last five chapters, and then either (1) put the book in the pile to go to the library book sale or (2) go back and read the middle, because the end was so good.
    I sometimes have trouble maintaining interest in a series as the later volumes come out. This isn’t always a problem. I’m still reading Sue Grafton and Carole Nelson Douglas as they make their way through the alphabet. I’m still reading Elizabeth Peters’ Amelia Peabody, and Anne Perry’s Pitt and Monk books.
    I have no problem with Janet Evanovich because I regard each of her Stephanie books as a commedia del’ arte episode rather than as part of a progressing series, so can enjoy each of them independently of the others.
    I thoroughly detest long and clinical sex scenes which occupy space that could be given to moving the plot along (e.g. Jillian Hunter’s Boscastle series for historicals; Dakota Cassidy’s recent “accidental” series for paranormals). I feel like I’ve only bought 2/3 of a book, particularly when the scenes are so repetitious of the ones in other books in the series that I end up suspecting cut-and-paste.

    Reply
  24. I’ll try just about anything (romance, mystery, sf, fantasy). My main reading problem is “slump in the middle.” I’m interested in the set-up for the characters and plot, but about page 75, if nothing seems to be happening, I’ll skip over, read the last five chapters, and then either (1) put the book in the pile to go to the library book sale or (2) go back and read the middle, because the end was so good.
    I sometimes have trouble maintaining interest in a series as the later volumes come out. This isn’t always a problem. I’m still reading Sue Grafton and Carole Nelson Douglas as they make their way through the alphabet. I’m still reading Elizabeth Peters’ Amelia Peabody, and Anne Perry’s Pitt and Monk books.
    I have no problem with Janet Evanovich because I regard each of her Stephanie books as a commedia del’ arte episode rather than as part of a progressing series, so can enjoy each of them independently of the others.
    I thoroughly detest long and clinical sex scenes which occupy space that could be given to moving the plot along (e.g. Jillian Hunter’s Boscastle series for historicals; Dakota Cassidy’s recent “accidental” series for paranormals). I feel like I’ve only bought 2/3 of a book, particularly when the scenes are so repetitious of the ones in other books in the series that I end up suspecting cut-and-paste.

    Reply
  25. I’ll try just about anything (romance, mystery, sf, fantasy). My main reading problem is “slump in the middle.” I’m interested in the set-up for the characters and plot, but about page 75, if nothing seems to be happening, I’ll skip over, read the last five chapters, and then either (1) put the book in the pile to go to the library book sale or (2) go back and read the middle, because the end was so good.
    I sometimes have trouble maintaining interest in a series as the later volumes come out. This isn’t always a problem. I’m still reading Sue Grafton and Carole Nelson Douglas as they make their way through the alphabet. I’m still reading Elizabeth Peters’ Amelia Peabody, and Anne Perry’s Pitt and Monk books.
    I have no problem with Janet Evanovich because I regard each of her Stephanie books as a commedia del’ arte episode rather than as part of a progressing series, so can enjoy each of them independently of the others.
    I thoroughly detest long and clinical sex scenes which occupy space that could be given to moving the plot along (e.g. Jillian Hunter’s Boscastle series for historicals; Dakota Cassidy’s recent “accidental” series for paranormals). I feel like I’ve only bought 2/3 of a book, particularly when the scenes are so repetitious of the ones in other books in the series that I end up suspecting cut-and-paste.

    Reply
  26. You’ve hit on something here that’s being discussed in several readers’ groups I belong to. First — the gratuitous sex scenes. There seem to be more and more of them in the historical romances I read. I too find myself skipping over them. I prefer sensual love scenes over explicit ones any day! Second is the tendency by authors to wander off the path. My philosophy is — if it doesn’t advance the plot, if it doesn’t give the reader deeper insight into the character, it doesn’t belong in the story.

    Reply
  27. You’ve hit on something here that’s being discussed in several readers’ groups I belong to. First — the gratuitous sex scenes. There seem to be more and more of them in the historical romances I read. I too find myself skipping over them. I prefer sensual love scenes over explicit ones any day! Second is the tendency by authors to wander off the path. My philosophy is — if it doesn’t advance the plot, if it doesn’t give the reader deeper insight into the character, it doesn’t belong in the story.

    Reply
  28. You’ve hit on something here that’s being discussed in several readers’ groups I belong to. First — the gratuitous sex scenes. There seem to be more and more of them in the historical romances I read. I too find myself skipping over them. I prefer sensual love scenes over explicit ones any day! Second is the tendency by authors to wander off the path. My philosophy is — if it doesn’t advance the plot, if it doesn’t give the reader deeper insight into the character, it doesn’t belong in the story.

    Reply
  29. You’ve hit on something here that’s being discussed in several readers’ groups I belong to. First — the gratuitous sex scenes. There seem to be more and more of them in the historical romances I read. I too find myself skipping over them. I prefer sensual love scenes over explicit ones any day! Second is the tendency by authors to wander off the path. My philosophy is — if it doesn’t advance the plot, if it doesn’t give the reader deeper insight into the character, it doesn’t belong in the story.

    Reply
  30. You’ve hit on something here that’s being discussed in several readers’ groups I belong to. First — the gratuitous sex scenes. There seem to be more and more of them in the historical romances I read. I too find myself skipping over them. I prefer sensual love scenes over explicit ones any day! Second is the tendency by authors to wander off the path. My philosophy is — if it doesn’t advance the plot, if it doesn’t give the reader deeper insight into the character, it doesn’t belong in the story.

    Reply
  31. Bless you, Sherrie, and your check–literally–is in the mail. “G” I just judged a contest, too, and ran across a few talking head entries, and a few that wasted their entire page count on useless description, but on the whole, I found some very nice balances.
    Virginia, the sagging middle problem really ought to be a beginner’s mistake. Back when books were longer, we often used episodic scenes to carry us that many pages. These days, there’s really no excuse not to understand story structure. But I’ve read the same things you have, apparently, and I do the same–skip to the end to see if it turned out any differently than I expected. “G”
    Joanna, that’s interesting that the overdone sex scenes is a subject for discussion. I need to steal some time to poke around. A lot of editors demand sex scenes because they think the readers want them. I keep hoping erotica will bleed off those readers so the rest of us can have sex where it belongs and no more!

    Reply
  32. Bless you, Sherrie, and your check–literally–is in the mail. “G” I just judged a contest, too, and ran across a few talking head entries, and a few that wasted their entire page count on useless description, but on the whole, I found some very nice balances.
    Virginia, the sagging middle problem really ought to be a beginner’s mistake. Back when books were longer, we often used episodic scenes to carry us that many pages. These days, there’s really no excuse not to understand story structure. But I’ve read the same things you have, apparently, and I do the same–skip to the end to see if it turned out any differently than I expected. “G”
    Joanna, that’s interesting that the overdone sex scenes is a subject for discussion. I need to steal some time to poke around. A lot of editors demand sex scenes because they think the readers want them. I keep hoping erotica will bleed off those readers so the rest of us can have sex where it belongs and no more!

    Reply
  33. Bless you, Sherrie, and your check–literally–is in the mail. “G” I just judged a contest, too, and ran across a few talking head entries, and a few that wasted their entire page count on useless description, but on the whole, I found some very nice balances.
    Virginia, the sagging middle problem really ought to be a beginner’s mistake. Back when books were longer, we often used episodic scenes to carry us that many pages. These days, there’s really no excuse not to understand story structure. But I’ve read the same things you have, apparently, and I do the same–skip to the end to see if it turned out any differently than I expected. “G”
    Joanna, that’s interesting that the overdone sex scenes is a subject for discussion. I need to steal some time to poke around. A lot of editors demand sex scenes because they think the readers want them. I keep hoping erotica will bleed off those readers so the rest of us can have sex where it belongs and no more!

    Reply
  34. Bless you, Sherrie, and your check–literally–is in the mail. “G” I just judged a contest, too, and ran across a few talking head entries, and a few that wasted their entire page count on useless description, but on the whole, I found some very nice balances.
    Virginia, the sagging middle problem really ought to be a beginner’s mistake. Back when books were longer, we often used episodic scenes to carry us that many pages. These days, there’s really no excuse not to understand story structure. But I’ve read the same things you have, apparently, and I do the same–skip to the end to see if it turned out any differently than I expected. “G”
    Joanna, that’s interesting that the overdone sex scenes is a subject for discussion. I need to steal some time to poke around. A lot of editors demand sex scenes because they think the readers want them. I keep hoping erotica will bleed off those readers so the rest of us can have sex where it belongs and no more!

    Reply
  35. Bless you, Sherrie, and your check–literally–is in the mail. “G” I just judged a contest, too, and ran across a few talking head entries, and a few that wasted their entire page count on useless description, but on the whole, I found some very nice balances.
    Virginia, the sagging middle problem really ought to be a beginner’s mistake. Back when books were longer, we often used episodic scenes to carry us that many pages. These days, there’s really no excuse not to understand story structure. But I’ve read the same things you have, apparently, and I do the same–skip to the end to see if it turned out any differently than I expected. “G”
    Joanna, that’s interesting that the overdone sex scenes is a subject for discussion. I need to steal some time to poke around. A lot of editors demand sex scenes because they think the readers want them. I keep hoping erotica will bleed off those readers so the rest of us can have sex where it belongs and no more!

    Reply
  36. Pat, I doubt I could define what I like or what I skip. Some scenic descriptions I love, others I’ll skip. Same with sex scenes: I’ll usually skip the blow-by blow descriptions of “the docking procedure” (as a friend of mine calls it ;)) but if the love-making scenes are revealing of character or plot-driven or simply really well-written, I read them.
    I suspect it’s a matter of voice. And, as MJP said, of being a bit jaded. I love it when a book really excites or surprises me, because that happens less and less frequently.

    Reply
  37. Pat, I doubt I could define what I like or what I skip. Some scenic descriptions I love, others I’ll skip. Same with sex scenes: I’ll usually skip the blow-by blow descriptions of “the docking procedure” (as a friend of mine calls it ;)) but if the love-making scenes are revealing of character or plot-driven or simply really well-written, I read them.
    I suspect it’s a matter of voice. And, as MJP said, of being a bit jaded. I love it when a book really excites or surprises me, because that happens less and less frequently.

    Reply
  38. Pat, I doubt I could define what I like or what I skip. Some scenic descriptions I love, others I’ll skip. Same with sex scenes: I’ll usually skip the blow-by blow descriptions of “the docking procedure” (as a friend of mine calls it ;)) but if the love-making scenes are revealing of character or plot-driven or simply really well-written, I read them.
    I suspect it’s a matter of voice. And, as MJP said, of being a bit jaded. I love it when a book really excites or surprises me, because that happens less and less frequently.

    Reply
  39. Pat, I doubt I could define what I like or what I skip. Some scenic descriptions I love, others I’ll skip. Same with sex scenes: I’ll usually skip the blow-by blow descriptions of “the docking procedure” (as a friend of mine calls it ;)) but if the love-making scenes are revealing of character or plot-driven or simply really well-written, I read them.
    I suspect it’s a matter of voice. And, as MJP said, of being a bit jaded. I love it when a book really excites or surprises me, because that happens less and less frequently.

    Reply
  40. Pat, I doubt I could define what I like or what I skip. Some scenic descriptions I love, others I’ll skip. Same with sex scenes: I’ll usually skip the blow-by blow descriptions of “the docking procedure” (as a friend of mine calls it ;)) but if the love-making scenes are revealing of character or plot-driven or simply really well-written, I read them.
    I suspect it’s a matter of voice. And, as MJP said, of being a bit jaded. I love it when a book really excites or surprises me, because that happens less and less frequently.

    Reply
  41. Ha ha ha, Anne, “docking procedure”!! so funny…- but true! I hate buying a book only to find there is less story than sex manual. Why do editors think we readers want that? We are still buying re-issues of Georgette Heyer, and she had no sex scenes at all. In many of her books, the hero and heroine don’t even kiss!

    Reply
  42. Ha ha ha, Anne, “docking procedure”!! so funny…- but true! I hate buying a book only to find there is less story than sex manual. Why do editors think we readers want that? We are still buying re-issues of Georgette Heyer, and she had no sex scenes at all. In many of her books, the hero and heroine don’t even kiss!

    Reply
  43. Ha ha ha, Anne, “docking procedure”!! so funny…- but true! I hate buying a book only to find there is less story than sex manual. Why do editors think we readers want that? We are still buying re-issues of Georgette Heyer, and she had no sex scenes at all. In many of her books, the hero and heroine don’t even kiss!

    Reply
  44. Ha ha ha, Anne, “docking procedure”!! so funny…- but true! I hate buying a book only to find there is less story than sex manual. Why do editors think we readers want that? We are still buying re-issues of Georgette Heyer, and she had no sex scenes at all. In many of her books, the hero and heroine don’t even kiss!

    Reply
  45. Ha ha ha, Anne, “docking procedure”!! so funny…- but true! I hate buying a book only to find there is less story than sex manual. Why do editors think we readers want that? We are still buying re-issues of Georgette Heyer, and she had no sex scenes at all. In many of her books, the hero and heroine don’t even kiss!

    Reply

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