Reading for the First Time, Again

Moonspinnersby Mary Jo

"What books do you wish you could read for the first time again?"

I can't remember where I saw someone ask the question above, but I immediately thought how delightful the question would be for a monthly Ask A Wench topic. And indeed, the Word Wench answers are varied and fun. I did suggest that we didn't need to mention books by Mary Stewart and Georgette Heyer, which are pretty much a given in this crowd, but they did manage to sneak in. <G>

Pat Rice

I’m not entirely certain I can fully recreate the wonder of reading some books for the first time when the difference in experience is so enormous between then and now. I read Jane Eyre and Pride and Prejudice for the first time when I Catch22was nine years old. I still savor the joy in finding Real Books instead of the insipid garbage in the school library. Today—aging Britlit, even reading for the first time, would hardly be as engrossing.

What about Catch 22 or One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest? I was in awe of those as a freshman in college. They’re so brilliant, I might still experience some of the awe, and my cynicism now and then would still enjoy it. But after seeing the movies? Maybe not so much.

And I know many tomes don’t hold up to my more jaded eyes these days. I soaked up Woodiwiss’s Flame and the Flower as if I were a thirsty sponge back in the 70’s, but now? Please. Neither the story or writing would meet my standards today. I think experience impedes my enjoyment of most books these days. I’ll spend a few quiet hours of pleasure, but they’ll never reach the awestruck standards of those earlier books.

 

CrocodileontheSandbankFrom Andrea Penrose:

Oh, this is an interesting question. I can think of a lot of books that made a really special impression on me when I first read them—that sense of joy and wonder when a story really resonates right to the heart.

Discovering Austen through Pride and Prejudice and Mary Stewart through The Moonspinners are ones that leap to mind, along with Bronte’s Jane Eyre, Du Maurier’s Rebecca and . . . umm, actually the list could run on for pages. However, the question also sparked the thought of a series, and how having a long string of related books can be such a wonderful thing to look forward to.

That immediately brought to mind Elizabeth Peters and Amelia Peabody. It was love at the first sentence when I picked up Crocodile on the Sandbank oh-so-long ago. I’ve lost track of the countless hours I spent with Amelia and family over the years, anticipating the new releases and The Painted Queenglomming them up, and then in the re-reading the stories. They are my go-do reads when I’m feeling down—those wonderful friends who are always there to bring a smile to your face. So I guess I’d say, it would be fun to re-experience that first sense of wonder in finding “Croc" and have all those following books to experience for the first time.

It will be very poignant for me to read the final volume of the epic, when EP’s last manuscript, finished by Joan Hess, releases later on July 25th. It's called The Painted Queen.

Anne Gracie:

I've been trying to think of a good response to Mary Jo's question, and have found it very difficult. For many books, my enjoyment of them was inextricably linked with place and time and who I was then — an eleven year-old eagerly gobbling up Mapp&LuciaAudioHeyer, a university student drifting on the words of Virginia Woolf and the poetry of Donne, a backpacker in Greece discovering the delights of E.F. Benson's Mapp and Lucia books.

I doubt my early pleasure in those books could ever be repeated. Perhaps my rereading of Heyer and Benson is an attempt to re-experience it, but I don't think so — the pleasure in revisiting old book friends is very different to that of discovering new ones. And not all books and authors stand up well to a reread, but those like MagicFlutesHeyer and Benson and Eva Ibbotson (such as her Magic Flutes) still please me enormously, as do favorite titles of Amanda Quick/Jayne Ann Krentz, Mary Balogh and many others on my keeper shelves, including Wench books. But for me, the joy of discovering new-to-me authors and books is all in the now, linked to time and place and what I'm currently interested in. I just hope I keep discovering fabulous new authors, preferably with a substantial backlist.

From Nicola Cornick:

What an interesting question! Being keen on time slip, I definitely hanker after the experience of reading some of my keepers as though for the first time. To recapture that sense of discovery and wonder would be amazing. The fantasy stories of Alan Garner such as The Weirdstone of Brisingamen and The Moon of Gomrath are two I would like to discover anew. They opened up a world of magic and fantasy for me, where the real world could co-exist alongside the supernatural. That’s an idea that has intrigued me ever since.

Mary Stewart (I’m sure I won’t be the only one to mention her) also opened up new worlds in a different way. My first book of hers was Airs Above The Ground and it felt impossibly exotic – the continental location, glamour, adventure and excitement. Perhaps it was Mistoverpendlebecause I was a teenager at the time and looking to broaden my horizons. The books seemed full of possibilities. I still read and enjoy them but in a different way now.

And on the historical side I’d love to read Mist Over Pendle by Robert Neill for the very first time, or experience the sense of a rich and complex historical tapestry that I felt when I first read that book. Maybe it isn’t possible to experience that feeling of new worlds opening up in the same way anymore because it chimed with life and stage, but even now when I find a new to me author I savour a sense of being drawn into other worlds and that is very good indeed.

Susan King:

Oh, so many books–what to choose! These are the special reads, the reading experiences so vivid, the characters and story so compelling that as a first-time reader, I could not put these books down. I was gleaning something more than story, probably absorbing storytelling and writing craft without realizing it, mostly just falling in love with heroes and Greendarknessheroines, settings, and author voices too. There are far too many to list–from my all-time favorite Pippi Longstocking to books I've read just months ago–so here are a few that will always be very, very special to me and deeply affected me on some level.

I have to rank at the top Mary Stewart (I know, but it's Mary Stewart!!), Anya Seton, R.F. Delderfeld, Daphne Du Maurier, Dorothy Sayers, Elizabeth Peters and Barbara Michaels, Ellis Peters, Lindsay Davis … I first read historical romance through Woodiwiss, and so she holds a special place on my shelf too.

AnncambrayI discovered Mary Stewart in high school, as did we all, and The Moon-Spinners completely captivated me (though I remember seeing the Disney movie on TV before I even knew there was a book). Another unforgettable read for me was Green Darkness by Anya Seton–a revelation, a story that wrapped together so brilliantly a medieval story with a present day story. And Mary Lide's Ann of Cambray was a powerful read for me, beautiful fiction, medieval history–and perhaps more than any other story helped me to realize, as a new mom juggling grad school and babies, that there were other things one could do with a head crammed full of medieval history . . .

My bookshelves are filled with novels I loved upon the first reading, and I really do wish I could clear away all that I've learned since just to experience that magic of discovery on those pages again.

Joanna Bourne here:

What I want to do in some alternate world is pick up JRR Tolkein’s Fellowship of the Ring Jrrtolkein and say to myself, “Gee, this looks interesting.” I’d leaf through Volume One and Two and pick up Volume Three and say, “Looks kinda long. I don’t really have time for this.” This long list of things I’m supposed to do would unscroll in my mind, headed by “Change the cat box,” passing “Take garbage to the dump,” and going all the way to “Alphabetize the photos in my computer.”

Then I’d open a page at random, the way you do, just to check how the prose sounds.

About ten minutes later I’d stack Volumes One, Two, and Three up and head for checkout, still reading.

From Susanna Kearsley:

Oh, what a question! There are so many—far too many, really, to allow me to choose one above the others. But most of the titles that come to my mind straight away all share one thing in common—they’re mysteries. I think there’s something about reading a good mystery for the first time, without knowing who the culprit is or where the story’s taking you.

JamaicaInnAnd of those mysteries, the first one I thought of was Daphne du Maurier’s Jamaica Inn.

I read this for the first time on a grey and windy autumn day when I was maybe twelve years old. It was the first book I’d read by Du Maurier, and I was pulled into those pages right away by her amazing imagery and prose.

To have that feeling back—the sense of growing dread, the windy moors, the danger and the dark compelling romance, and the stab of shock and realization when the villain was revealed—I’d love to have that all again.

It’s still my favourite of her novels.

Musings by Mary Jo

The Wenches' varied replies sparked interesting thoughts. As Anne said, a great reading experience is so often linked to a particular time and place in our lives. We may reread the books later with pleasure, or embarrassment about our earlier tastes, but we can't really recapture that time and the emotions associated with that first read.

Another point is that some answers were about Great Books, others are about Great Reads. GameofKingsDunnettI'm firmly down on the side of Great Reads, and I always have been that way. When I was a kid and had vague ideas that it would be really cool to be a writer, I knew without specifying that I meant a novelist: a storyteller. Great stories have always been my heart's home.

There are lots of great stories that I'd love to read again for the first time, but one that ravished me when I first read it in high school was Dorothy Dunnett's Game of Kings, the first book in her Lymond Chronicles. The richness of prose, the fascinating, complex characters, the drama and conflict and emotion were utterly captivating.

Dunnett was a brilliant and complicated writer and it made her books worth reading over and over. I wolfed down each new Lymond volume as it came out and was so desperate for the last one, Checkmate, that I had my sister buy it when she was visiting England since it wasn't out in the US then. And I paid for HARDCOVER! The first one I ever bought, but I wanted that book so…

CurseofChalionAnother Great Read is Lois McMaster Bujold's The Curse of Chalion. I've read and loved most of her fantasy and science fiction, but Chalion, the first in a fantasy series set in a world not unlike medieval Spain, was the one I love best. The hero is one of the most tortured and fascinating I ever read, and his story just gets better and better and better as the book progresses.

Bujold's world-building is amazing and includes a marvelous five god theology that is the warp and woof of the story. I first read the book in manuscript to give it a quote, and I've read it again several times in every available format: hardcover, paperback, e-reader. I can't read it again for the first time–but I can re-read, and have. And will again!

So–what books would you love to read again for the first time? And how much is that connected to time and place? I look forward to hearing the answers!

Mary Jo

505 thoughts on “Reading for the First Time, Again”

  1. I remember reading the last chapters of Moonspinners on the bus on the way to see the movie with Haley Mills. My first comparison between book and movie. I can’t remember which I thought was better.

    Reply
  2. I remember reading the last chapters of Moonspinners on the bus on the way to see the movie with Haley Mills. My first comparison between book and movie. I can’t remember which I thought was better.

    Reply
  3. I remember reading the last chapters of Moonspinners on the bus on the way to see the movie with Haley Mills. My first comparison between book and movie. I can’t remember which I thought was better.

    Reply
  4. I remember reading the last chapters of Moonspinners on the bus on the way to see the movie with Haley Mills. My first comparison between book and movie. I can’t remember which I thought was better.

    Reply
  5. I remember reading the last chapters of Moonspinners on the bus on the way to see the movie with Haley Mills. My first comparison between book and movie. I can’t remember which I thought was better.

    Reply
  6. This was a difficult question as I reread so many of my books so often, but the one that sticks out to me is The Perilous Gard by Elizabeth Marie Pope. It’s a YA book that I first discovered as an adult and I fell in love with its tortured characters, captivating historical plot and hint of the supernatural. As far as I can discover, Pope only wrote two novels, this one and The Sherwood Ring, which I also loved because the hero(es) were so well written (and because it combined two of my favourite elements: orphans and time slips). I’ve reread both any times but nothing compares to that first discovery and the feeling of “how did I miss this as a young reader?” I suspect that I would still love the books if I first read them now, but I’m in a very different place in life and perhaps the loneliness of the characters wouldn’t resonate so deeply with me now as it did then.

    Reply
  7. This was a difficult question as I reread so many of my books so often, but the one that sticks out to me is The Perilous Gard by Elizabeth Marie Pope. It’s a YA book that I first discovered as an adult and I fell in love with its tortured characters, captivating historical plot and hint of the supernatural. As far as I can discover, Pope only wrote two novels, this one and The Sherwood Ring, which I also loved because the hero(es) were so well written (and because it combined two of my favourite elements: orphans and time slips). I’ve reread both any times but nothing compares to that first discovery and the feeling of “how did I miss this as a young reader?” I suspect that I would still love the books if I first read them now, but I’m in a very different place in life and perhaps the loneliness of the characters wouldn’t resonate so deeply with me now as it did then.

    Reply
  8. This was a difficult question as I reread so many of my books so often, but the one that sticks out to me is The Perilous Gard by Elizabeth Marie Pope. It’s a YA book that I first discovered as an adult and I fell in love with its tortured characters, captivating historical plot and hint of the supernatural. As far as I can discover, Pope only wrote two novels, this one and The Sherwood Ring, which I also loved because the hero(es) were so well written (and because it combined two of my favourite elements: orphans and time slips). I’ve reread both any times but nothing compares to that first discovery and the feeling of “how did I miss this as a young reader?” I suspect that I would still love the books if I first read them now, but I’m in a very different place in life and perhaps the loneliness of the characters wouldn’t resonate so deeply with me now as it did then.

    Reply
  9. This was a difficult question as I reread so many of my books so often, but the one that sticks out to me is The Perilous Gard by Elizabeth Marie Pope. It’s a YA book that I first discovered as an adult and I fell in love with its tortured characters, captivating historical plot and hint of the supernatural. As far as I can discover, Pope only wrote two novels, this one and The Sherwood Ring, which I also loved because the hero(es) were so well written (and because it combined two of my favourite elements: orphans and time slips). I’ve reread both any times but nothing compares to that first discovery and the feeling of “how did I miss this as a young reader?” I suspect that I would still love the books if I first read them now, but I’m in a very different place in life and perhaps the loneliness of the characters wouldn’t resonate so deeply with me now as it did then.

    Reply
  10. This was a difficult question as I reread so many of my books so often, but the one that sticks out to me is The Perilous Gard by Elizabeth Marie Pope. It’s a YA book that I first discovered as an adult and I fell in love with its tortured characters, captivating historical plot and hint of the supernatural. As far as I can discover, Pope only wrote two novels, this one and The Sherwood Ring, which I also loved because the hero(es) were so well written (and because it combined two of my favourite elements: orphans and time slips). I’ve reread both any times but nothing compares to that first discovery and the feeling of “how did I miss this as a young reader?” I suspect that I would still love the books if I first read them now, but I’m in a very different place in life and perhaps the loneliness of the characters wouldn’t resonate so deeply with me now as it did then.

    Reply
  11. Mapp and Lucia! I haven’t thought about them for years (um, decades), but I haven’t forgotten how much I enjoyed them. Some of my first Britlit, even before Heyer. I have the full set buried in my bookshelves and will have to find them for another read. Hope they’re as entertaining as I remember.

    Reply
  12. Mapp and Lucia! I haven’t thought about them for years (um, decades), but I haven’t forgotten how much I enjoyed them. Some of my first Britlit, even before Heyer. I have the full set buried in my bookshelves and will have to find them for another read. Hope they’re as entertaining as I remember.

    Reply
  13. Mapp and Lucia! I haven’t thought about them for years (um, decades), but I haven’t forgotten how much I enjoyed them. Some of my first Britlit, even before Heyer. I have the full set buried in my bookshelves and will have to find them for another read. Hope they’re as entertaining as I remember.

    Reply
  14. Mapp and Lucia! I haven’t thought about them for years (um, decades), but I haven’t forgotten how much I enjoyed them. Some of my first Britlit, even before Heyer. I have the full set buried in my bookshelves and will have to find them for another read. Hope they’re as entertaining as I remember.

    Reply
  15. Mapp and Lucia! I haven’t thought about them for years (um, decades), but I haven’t forgotten how much I enjoyed them. Some of my first Britlit, even before Heyer. I have the full set buried in my bookshelves and will have to find them for another read. Hope they’re as entertaining as I remember.

    Reply
  16. Wow. Great question. But how to choose? I would love to go back to The Lymond Chronicles by Dorothy Dunnett and Tolkien’s Ring trilogy and read them again without knowing the ending. They were stay up all night books. Also Cross Stitch (Outlander) by Diana Gabaldon. I’ve enjoyed most of the books mentioned, but reading as a teenager when the tropes or the quality of the writing were new and a revelation was wonderful. That sense of discovery, delight and wonder plus total absorption is hard to recreate in my 50s.

    Reply
  17. Wow. Great question. But how to choose? I would love to go back to The Lymond Chronicles by Dorothy Dunnett and Tolkien’s Ring trilogy and read them again without knowing the ending. They were stay up all night books. Also Cross Stitch (Outlander) by Diana Gabaldon. I’ve enjoyed most of the books mentioned, but reading as a teenager when the tropes or the quality of the writing were new and a revelation was wonderful. That sense of discovery, delight and wonder plus total absorption is hard to recreate in my 50s.

    Reply
  18. Wow. Great question. But how to choose? I would love to go back to The Lymond Chronicles by Dorothy Dunnett and Tolkien’s Ring trilogy and read them again without knowing the ending. They were stay up all night books. Also Cross Stitch (Outlander) by Diana Gabaldon. I’ve enjoyed most of the books mentioned, but reading as a teenager when the tropes or the quality of the writing were new and a revelation was wonderful. That sense of discovery, delight and wonder plus total absorption is hard to recreate in my 50s.

    Reply
  19. Wow. Great question. But how to choose? I would love to go back to The Lymond Chronicles by Dorothy Dunnett and Tolkien’s Ring trilogy and read them again without knowing the ending. They were stay up all night books. Also Cross Stitch (Outlander) by Diana Gabaldon. I’ve enjoyed most of the books mentioned, but reading as a teenager when the tropes or the quality of the writing were new and a revelation was wonderful. That sense of discovery, delight and wonder plus total absorption is hard to recreate in my 50s.

    Reply
  20. Wow. Great question. But how to choose? I would love to go back to The Lymond Chronicles by Dorothy Dunnett and Tolkien’s Ring trilogy and read them again without knowing the ending. They were stay up all night books. Also Cross Stitch (Outlander) by Diana Gabaldon. I’ve enjoyed most of the books mentioned, but reading as a teenager when the tropes or the quality of the writing were new and a revelation was wonderful. That sense of discovery, delight and wonder plus total absorption is hard to recreate in my 50s.

    Reply
  21. Fascinating discussion!
    After reading a couple of my wife’s Georgette Heyer books I discovered that I rather liked romance novels but was put off by garish covers and the rather trashy reputation that accompanied chick-lit books. To find quality authors in the genre (sometimes I can be an awful snob!) I googled for romance and academic authors and came up with Eloisa James who was a Shakespeare professor and was sure to write good stuff. I joined her wonderful blog … sadly no more … to discover that I appeared to be the only male contributor (although Eloisa did confide that she had a number of male admirers). From this blog I found Julia Quinn’s fabulous Bridgerton series and I was hooked!
    To recreate that early impact I would recommend getting an audio version with a good narrator. Listening to audio can be a quite different experience to reading, being closer to drama, and I am now revisiting the Bridgertons in audio and enjoying them even more than when I first read them all those years ago!

    Reply
  22. Fascinating discussion!
    After reading a couple of my wife’s Georgette Heyer books I discovered that I rather liked romance novels but was put off by garish covers and the rather trashy reputation that accompanied chick-lit books. To find quality authors in the genre (sometimes I can be an awful snob!) I googled for romance and academic authors and came up with Eloisa James who was a Shakespeare professor and was sure to write good stuff. I joined her wonderful blog … sadly no more … to discover that I appeared to be the only male contributor (although Eloisa did confide that she had a number of male admirers). From this blog I found Julia Quinn’s fabulous Bridgerton series and I was hooked!
    To recreate that early impact I would recommend getting an audio version with a good narrator. Listening to audio can be a quite different experience to reading, being closer to drama, and I am now revisiting the Bridgertons in audio and enjoying them even more than when I first read them all those years ago!

    Reply
  23. Fascinating discussion!
    After reading a couple of my wife’s Georgette Heyer books I discovered that I rather liked romance novels but was put off by garish covers and the rather trashy reputation that accompanied chick-lit books. To find quality authors in the genre (sometimes I can be an awful snob!) I googled for romance and academic authors and came up with Eloisa James who was a Shakespeare professor and was sure to write good stuff. I joined her wonderful blog … sadly no more … to discover that I appeared to be the only male contributor (although Eloisa did confide that she had a number of male admirers). From this blog I found Julia Quinn’s fabulous Bridgerton series and I was hooked!
    To recreate that early impact I would recommend getting an audio version with a good narrator. Listening to audio can be a quite different experience to reading, being closer to drama, and I am now revisiting the Bridgertons in audio and enjoying them even more than when I first read them all those years ago!

    Reply
  24. Fascinating discussion!
    After reading a couple of my wife’s Georgette Heyer books I discovered that I rather liked romance novels but was put off by garish covers and the rather trashy reputation that accompanied chick-lit books. To find quality authors in the genre (sometimes I can be an awful snob!) I googled for romance and academic authors and came up with Eloisa James who was a Shakespeare professor and was sure to write good stuff. I joined her wonderful blog … sadly no more … to discover that I appeared to be the only male contributor (although Eloisa did confide that she had a number of male admirers). From this blog I found Julia Quinn’s fabulous Bridgerton series and I was hooked!
    To recreate that early impact I would recommend getting an audio version with a good narrator. Listening to audio can be a quite different experience to reading, being closer to drama, and I am now revisiting the Bridgertons in audio and enjoying them even more than when I first read them all those years ago!

    Reply
  25. Fascinating discussion!
    After reading a couple of my wife’s Georgette Heyer books I discovered that I rather liked romance novels but was put off by garish covers and the rather trashy reputation that accompanied chick-lit books. To find quality authors in the genre (sometimes I can be an awful snob!) I googled for romance and academic authors and came up with Eloisa James who was a Shakespeare professor and was sure to write good stuff. I joined her wonderful blog … sadly no more … to discover that I appeared to be the only male contributor (although Eloisa did confide that she had a number of male admirers). From this blog I found Julia Quinn’s fabulous Bridgerton series and I was hooked!
    To recreate that early impact I would recommend getting an audio version with a good narrator. Listening to audio can be a quite different experience to reading, being closer to drama, and I am now revisiting the Bridgertons in audio and enjoying them even more than when I first read them all those years ago!

    Reply
  26. When I was seven or eight years old, I was given a book of 365 bedtime stories for Christmas. The stories were short– a couple of paragraphs — but that book changed my life. Up until then, my reading had been totally school or the Bible– and a comic book or two when we could find one. That book gave me the wonderful gift of reading for pleasure. Books were for fun– it ignited a pleasure for reading that has never diminished. It isn’t the words of that book, but the sense of wonder at the realization that reading wasn’t only for school and religion.
    PS I agree with Quantum that most covers for Romance novels are not enticing. some of that is avoided by e-books.There are some covers that repel rather than attract to the point I don’t even look at the contents.

    Reply
  27. When I was seven or eight years old, I was given a book of 365 bedtime stories for Christmas. The stories were short– a couple of paragraphs — but that book changed my life. Up until then, my reading had been totally school or the Bible– and a comic book or two when we could find one. That book gave me the wonderful gift of reading for pleasure. Books were for fun– it ignited a pleasure for reading that has never diminished. It isn’t the words of that book, but the sense of wonder at the realization that reading wasn’t only for school and religion.
    PS I agree with Quantum that most covers for Romance novels are not enticing. some of that is avoided by e-books.There are some covers that repel rather than attract to the point I don’t even look at the contents.

    Reply
  28. When I was seven or eight years old, I was given a book of 365 bedtime stories for Christmas. The stories were short– a couple of paragraphs — but that book changed my life. Up until then, my reading had been totally school or the Bible– and a comic book or two when we could find one. That book gave me the wonderful gift of reading for pleasure. Books were for fun– it ignited a pleasure for reading that has never diminished. It isn’t the words of that book, but the sense of wonder at the realization that reading wasn’t only for school and religion.
    PS I agree with Quantum that most covers for Romance novels are not enticing. some of that is avoided by e-books.There are some covers that repel rather than attract to the point I don’t even look at the contents.

    Reply
  29. When I was seven or eight years old, I was given a book of 365 bedtime stories for Christmas. The stories were short– a couple of paragraphs — but that book changed my life. Up until then, my reading had been totally school or the Bible– and a comic book or two when we could find one. That book gave me the wonderful gift of reading for pleasure. Books were for fun– it ignited a pleasure for reading that has never diminished. It isn’t the words of that book, but the sense of wonder at the realization that reading wasn’t only for school and religion.
    PS I agree with Quantum that most covers for Romance novels are not enticing. some of that is avoided by e-books.There are some covers that repel rather than attract to the point I don’t even look at the contents.

    Reply
  30. When I was seven or eight years old, I was given a book of 365 bedtime stories for Christmas. The stories were short– a couple of paragraphs — but that book changed my life. Up until then, my reading had been totally school or the Bible– and a comic book or two when we could find one. That book gave me the wonderful gift of reading for pleasure. Books were for fun– it ignited a pleasure for reading that has never diminished. It isn’t the words of that book, but the sense of wonder at the realization that reading wasn’t only for school and religion.
    PS I agree with Quantum that most covers for Romance novels are not enticing. some of that is avoided by e-books.There are some covers that repel rather than attract to the point I don’t even look at the contents.

    Reply
  31. I could easily second many of the books already mentioned. And some others are probably going to be on my “check these out” list.
    But I will mention 4 books by Mary Elgin. They are are loosely connected, but not exactly a series. Very few people seem to know of these books. But sometime back (probably more than a year ago) someone else mentioned these four novels.
    I’m “sorta” hoping that the someone will read this. Because that poster mentioned the four books. Every other reference (except my own memory) limits the list to three titles.
    I think the appeal the fist time was because they were straight-forward romances, rather than taels of romantic suspense, but they had much the same appeal for me.
    Since then, of course, I have found many other romances of that type. But I still re-read the three Elgin titles that I own: A Man from the Mist, Highland Masquerade, and The Wood and the Trees.

    Reply
  32. I could easily second many of the books already mentioned. And some others are probably going to be on my “check these out” list.
    But I will mention 4 books by Mary Elgin. They are are loosely connected, but not exactly a series. Very few people seem to know of these books. But sometime back (probably more than a year ago) someone else mentioned these four novels.
    I’m “sorta” hoping that the someone will read this. Because that poster mentioned the four books. Every other reference (except my own memory) limits the list to three titles.
    I think the appeal the fist time was because they were straight-forward romances, rather than taels of romantic suspense, but they had much the same appeal for me.
    Since then, of course, I have found many other romances of that type. But I still re-read the three Elgin titles that I own: A Man from the Mist, Highland Masquerade, and The Wood and the Trees.

    Reply
  33. I could easily second many of the books already mentioned. And some others are probably going to be on my “check these out” list.
    But I will mention 4 books by Mary Elgin. They are are loosely connected, but not exactly a series. Very few people seem to know of these books. But sometime back (probably more than a year ago) someone else mentioned these four novels.
    I’m “sorta” hoping that the someone will read this. Because that poster mentioned the four books. Every other reference (except my own memory) limits the list to three titles.
    I think the appeal the fist time was because they were straight-forward romances, rather than taels of romantic suspense, but they had much the same appeal for me.
    Since then, of course, I have found many other romances of that type. But I still re-read the three Elgin titles that I own: A Man from the Mist, Highland Masquerade, and The Wood and the Trees.

    Reply
  34. I could easily second many of the books already mentioned. And some others are probably going to be on my “check these out” list.
    But I will mention 4 books by Mary Elgin. They are are loosely connected, but not exactly a series. Very few people seem to know of these books. But sometime back (probably more than a year ago) someone else mentioned these four novels.
    I’m “sorta” hoping that the someone will read this. Because that poster mentioned the four books. Every other reference (except my own memory) limits the list to three titles.
    I think the appeal the fist time was because they were straight-forward romances, rather than taels of romantic suspense, but they had much the same appeal for me.
    Since then, of course, I have found many other romances of that type. But I still re-read the three Elgin titles that I own: A Man from the Mist, Highland Masquerade, and The Wood and the Trees.

    Reply
  35. I could easily second many of the books already mentioned. And some others are probably going to be on my “check these out” list.
    But I will mention 4 books by Mary Elgin. They are are loosely connected, but not exactly a series. Very few people seem to know of these books. But sometime back (probably more than a year ago) someone else mentioned these four novels.
    I’m “sorta” hoping that the someone will read this. Because that poster mentioned the four books. Every other reference (except my own memory) limits the list to three titles.
    I think the appeal the fist time was because they were straight-forward romances, rather than taels of romantic suspense, but they had much the same appeal for me.
    Since then, of course, I have found many other romances of that type. But I still re-read the three Elgin titles that I own: A Man from the Mist, Highland Masquerade, and The Wood and the Trees.

    Reply
  36. I recently worked in an elementary school and would find books I loved as a child and reread them. I was always pleasantly surprised by how much I still love them. Reading books from my younger days (including high school) as a much older person really is like reading them for the first time as I have experiences of my own to add to the adventures found in books. The Wenches have mentioned that reading is a 2 person activity. Both the author and the reader contribute to the story and meaning of any text.
    And yes, I will gladly reread any Mary Stewart novels.

    Reply
  37. I recently worked in an elementary school and would find books I loved as a child and reread them. I was always pleasantly surprised by how much I still love them. Reading books from my younger days (including high school) as a much older person really is like reading them for the first time as I have experiences of my own to add to the adventures found in books. The Wenches have mentioned that reading is a 2 person activity. Both the author and the reader contribute to the story and meaning of any text.
    And yes, I will gladly reread any Mary Stewart novels.

    Reply
  38. I recently worked in an elementary school and would find books I loved as a child and reread them. I was always pleasantly surprised by how much I still love them. Reading books from my younger days (including high school) as a much older person really is like reading them for the first time as I have experiences of my own to add to the adventures found in books. The Wenches have mentioned that reading is a 2 person activity. Both the author and the reader contribute to the story and meaning of any text.
    And yes, I will gladly reread any Mary Stewart novels.

    Reply
  39. I recently worked in an elementary school and would find books I loved as a child and reread them. I was always pleasantly surprised by how much I still love them. Reading books from my younger days (including high school) as a much older person really is like reading them for the first time as I have experiences of my own to add to the adventures found in books. The Wenches have mentioned that reading is a 2 person activity. Both the author and the reader contribute to the story and meaning of any text.
    And yes, I will gladly reread any Mary Stewart novels.

    Reply
  40. I recently worked in an elementary school and would find books I loved as a child and reread them. I was always pleasantly surprised by how much I still love them. Reading books from my younger days (including high school) as a much older person really is like reading them for the first time as I have experiences of my own to add to the adventures found in books. The Wenches have mentioned that reading is a 2 person activity. Both the author and the reader contribute to the story and meaning of any text.
    And yes, I will gladly reread any Mary Stewart novels.

    Reply
  41. There are several books that I could name that I would love to re-read for the first time,
    including Daphne du Maurier’s entire body of work. Another which most will not recognize
    would be KATIE MULHOLLAND by Catherine Cookson. I read this when I was 20 and
    remember crying my eyes out during the last 6 chapters! Naturally, Mary Stewart was
    a big favorite (I know I think all of us ladies ‘of an age’ will always mention her). And I must
    mention that this list would not be complete without mentioning Jo Beverly’s MALLOREN
    series!

    Reply
  42. There are several books that I could name that I would love to re-read for the first time,
    including Daphne du Maurier’s entire body of work. Another which most will not recognize
    would be KATIE MULHOLLAND by Catherine Cookson. I read this when I was 20 and
    remember crying my eyes out during the last 6 chapters! Naturally, Mary Stewart was
    a big favorite (I know I think all of us ladies ‘of an age’ will always mention her). And I must
    mention that this list would not be complete without mentioning Jo Beverly’s MALLOREN
    series!

    Reply
  43. There are several books that I could name that I would love to re-read for the first time,
    including Daphne du Maurier’s entire body of work. Another which most will not recognize
    would be KATIE MULHOLLAND by Catherine Cookson. I read this when I was 20 and
    remember crying my eyes out during the last 6 chapters! Naturally, Mary Stewart was
    a big favorite (I know I think all of us ladies ‘of an age’ will always mention her). And I must
    mention that this list would not be complete without mentioning Jo Beverly’s MALLOREN
    series!

    Reply
  44. There are several books that I could name that I would love to re-read for the first time,
    including Daphne du Maurier’s entire body of work. Another which most will not recognize
    would be KATIE MULHOLLAND by Catherine Cookson. I read this when I was 20 and
    remember crying my eyes out during the last 6 chapters! Naturally, Mary Stewart was
    a big favorite (I know I think all of us ladies ‘of an age’ will always mention her). And I must
    mention that this list would not be complete without mentioning Jo Beverly’s MALLOREN
    series!

    Reply
  45. There are several books that I could name that I would love to re-read for the first time,
    including Daphne du Maurier’s entire body of work. Another which most will not recognize
    would be KATIE MULHOLLAND by Catherine Cookson. I read this when I was 20 and
    remember crying my eyes out during the last 6 chapters! Naturally, Mary Stewart was
    a big favorite (I know I think all of us ladies ‘of an age’ will always mention her). And I must
    mention that this list would not be complete without mentioning Jo Beverly’s MALLOREN
    series!

    Reply
  46. There’s a book I read as a child, before I paid attention to things like authors and titles, that I always wished I could find again. It was about a family of children—they may have been orphans—going to visit relatives in the country. On the train they try to hit the passing telephone poles with hard boiled eggs that had been packed for their lunch. Later in the story they go wading in a stream to collect the leeches the attach themselves to their legs so they can sell them to a doctor. (Both activities made an indelible impression on me.)
    Two books I read in high school had an enormous impact at the time. Precious Bane by Mary Webb seemed to me so terribly romantic, though I’m not at all sure I would react the same way now. A much more powerful book was Man on a Donkey by H.F.M. Prescott, a historical novel about the Pilgrimage of Grace in the time of Henry VIII. It certainly cemented my interest in history, but it also guaranteed that I could never write a romance set in Tudor times—the period is too overlaid with tragedy.

    Reply
  47. There’s a book I read as a child, before I paid attention to things like authors and titles, that I always wished I could find again. It was about a family of children—they may have been orphans—going to visit relatives in the country. On the train they try to hit the passing telephone poles with hard boiled eggs that had been packed for their lunch. Later in the story they go wading in a stream to collect the leeches the attach themselves to their legs so they can sell them to a doctor. (Both activities made an indelible impression on me.)
    Two books I read in high school had an enormous impact at the time. Precious Bane by Mary Webb seemed to me so terribly romantic, though I’m not at all sure I would react the same way now. A much more powerful book was Man on a Donkey by H.F.M. Prescott, a historical novel about the Pilgrimage of Grace in the time of Henry VIII. It certainly cemented my interest in history, but it also guaranteed that I could never write a romance set in Tudor times—the period is too overlaid with tragedy.

    Reply
  48. There’s a book I read as a child, before I paid attention to things like authors and titles, that I always wished I could find again. It was about a family of children—they may have been orphans—going to visit relatives in the country. On the train they try to hit the passing telephone poles with hard boiled eggs that had been packed for their lunch. Later in the story they go wading in a stream to collect the leeches the attach themselves to their legs so they can sell them to a doctor. (Both activities made an indelible impression on me.)
    Two books I read in high school had an enormous impact at the time. Precious Bane by Mary Webb seemed to me so terribly romantic, though I’m not at all sure I would react the same way now. A much more powerful book was Man on a Donkey by H.F.M. Prescott, a historical novel about the Pilgrimage of Grace in the time of Henry VIII. It certainly cemented my interest in history, but it also guaranteed that I could never write a romance set in Tudor times—the period is too overlaid with tragedy.

    Reply
  49. There’s a book I read as a child, before I paid attention to things like authors and titles, that I always wished I could find again. It was about a family of children—they may have been orphans—going to visit relatives in the country. On the train they try to hit the passing telephone poles with hard boiled eggs that had been packed for their lunch. Later in the story they go wading in a stream to collect the leeches the attach themselves to their legs so they can sell them to a doctor. (Both activities made an indelible impression on me.)
    Two books I read in high school had an enormous impact at the time. Precious Bane by Mary Webb seemed to me so terribly romantic, though I’m not at all sure I would react the same way now. A much more powerful book was Man on a Donkey by H.F.M. Prescott, a historical novel about the Pilgrimage of Grace in the time of Henry VIII. It certainly cemented my interest in history, but it also guaranteed that I could never write a romance set in Tudor times—the period is too overlaid with tragedy.

    Reply
  50. There’s a book I read as a child, before I paid attention to things like authors and titles, that I always wished I could find again. It was about a family of children—they may have been orphans—going to visit relatives in the country. On the train they try to hit the passing telephone poles with hard boiled eggs that had been packed for their lunch. Later in the story they go wading in a stream to collect the leeches the attach themselves to their legs so they can sell them to a doctor. (Both activities made an indelible impression on me.)
    Two books I read in high school had an enormous impact at the time. Precious Bane by Mary Webb seemed to me so terribly romantic, though I’m not at all sure I would react the same way now. A much more powerful book was Man on a Donkey by H.F.M. Prescott, a historical novel about the Pilgrimage of Grace in the time of Henry VIII. It certainly cemented my interest in history, but it also guaranteed that I could never write a romance set in Tudor times—the period is too overlaid with tragedy.

    Reply
  51. Two books kind of jump out at me. The first is a book I read as a young teen. It was CELIA GARTH by Gwen Bristow. I don’t know why it had such an impact. I had actually read JANE EYRE before that book, but for some reason I really connected with Ms. Bristow’s writing.
    The second one I read shortly after I retired. I hadn’t been reading much before I retired, so I wasn’t up on the current authors. I found a book in the library called SIMPLY LOVE by Mary Balogh. That book had me from the get-go even though it was a little confusing at time because of the large number of side characters. This was a book from the middle of a series that had characters from that series as well as the previous series. Made a total fan girl of me.
    I think what struck me with both of these books (and many others I have discovered) is the feeling that I struck gold. Found a writer whose work touched me deeply.

    Reply
  52. Two books kind of jump out at me. The first is a book I read as a young teen. It was CELIA GARTH by Gwen Bristow. I don’t know why it had such an impact. I had actually read JANE EYRE before that book, but for some reason I really connected with Ms. Bristow’s writing.
    The second one I read shortly after I retired. I hadn’t been reading much before I retired, so I wasn’t up on the current authors. I found a book in the library called SIMPLY LOVE by Mary Balogh. That book had me from the get-go even though it was a little confusing at time because of the large number of side characters. This was a book from the middle of a series that had characters from that series as well as the previous series. Made a total fan girl of me.
    I think what struck me with both of these books (and many others I have discovered) is the feeling that I struck gold. Found a writer whose work touched me deeply.

    Reply
  53. Two books kind of jump out at me. The first is a book I read as a young teen. It was CELIA GARTH by Gwen Bristow. I don’t know why it had such an impact. I had actually read JANE EYRE before that book, but for some reason I really connected with Ms. Bristow’s writing.
    The second one I read shortly after I retired. I hadn’t been reading much before I retired, so I wasn’t up on the current authors. I found a book in the library called SIMPLY LOVE by Mary Balogh. That book had me from the get-go even though it was a little confusing at time because of the large number of side characters. This was a book from the middle of a series that had characters from that series as well as the previous series. Made a total fan girl of me.
    I think what struck me with both of these books (and many others I have discovered) is the feeling that I struck gold. Found a writer whose work touched me deeply.

    Reply
  54. Two books kind of jump out at me. The first is a book I read as a young teen. It was CELIA GARTH by Gwen Bristow. I don’t know why it had such an impact. I had actually read JANE EYRE before that book, but for some reason I really connected with Ms. Bristow’s writing.
    The second one I read shortly after I retired. I hadn’t been reading much before I retired, so I wasn’t up on the current authors. I found a book in the library called SIMPLY LOVE by Mary Balogh. That book had me from the get-go even though it was a little confusing at time because of the large number of side characters. This was a book from the middle of a series that had characters from that series as well as the previous series. Made a total fan girl of me.
    I think what struck me with both of these books (and many others I have discovered) is the feeling that I struck gold. Found a writer whose work touched me deeply.

    Reply
  55. Two books kind of jump out at me. The first is a book I read as a young teen. It was CELIA GARTH by Gwen Bristow. I don’t know why it had such an impact. I had actually read JANE EYRE before that book, but for some reason I really connected with Ms. Bristow’s writing.
    The second one I read shortly after I retired. I hadn’t been reading much before I retired, so I wasn’t up on the current authors. I found a book in the library called SIMPLY LOVE by Mary Balogh. That book had me from the get-go even though it was a little confusing at time because of the large number of side characters. This was a book from the middle of a series that had characters from that series as well as the previous series. Made a total fan girl of me.
    I think what struck me with both of these books (and many others I have discovered) is the feeling that I struck gold. Found a writer whose work touched me deeply.

    Reply
  56. we are all snobs in our own way, as you can tell from our reading experiences. But you did a good job of researching the genre. I wish I could listen to audio, but I’m a speed reader, and I’m way too impatient for the narrator to move on.

    Reply
  57. we are all snobs in our own way, as you can tell from our reading experiences. But you did a good job of researching the genre. I wish I could listen to audio, but I’m a speed reader, and I’m way too impatient for the narrator to move on.

    Reply
  58. we are all snobs in our own way, as you can tell from our reading experiences. But you did a good job of researching the genre. I wish I could listen to audio, but I’m a speed reader, and I’m way too impatient for the narrator to move on.

    Reply
  59. we are all snobs in our own way, as you can tell from our reading experiences. But you did a good job of researching the genre. I wish I could listen to audio, but I’m a speed reader, and I’m way too impatient for the narrator to move on.

    Reply
  60. we are all snobs in our own way, as you can tell from our reading experiences. But you did a good job of researching the genre. I wish I could listen to audio, but I’m a speed reader, and I’m way too impatient for the narrator to move on.

    Reply
  61. Marry in Haste (Jane Aiken Hodge); Regency Buck (Georgette Heyer); Crocodile on the Sandbank (Elizabeth Peters); A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (Smith) These are all great “first time” books, and I’ve certainly enjoyed a second time also!

    Reply
  62. Marry in Haste (Jane Aiken Hodge); Regency Buck (Georgette Heyer); Crocodile on the Sandbank (Elizabeth Peters); A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (Smith) These are all great “first time” books, and I’ve certainly enjoyed a second time also!

    Reply
  63. Marry in Haste (Jane Aiken Hodge); Regency Buck (Georgette Heyer); Crocodile on the Sandbank (Elizabeth Peters); A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (Smith) These are all great “first time” books, and I’ve certainly enjoyed a second time also!

    Reply
  64. Marry in Haste (Jane Aiken Hodge); Regency Buck (Georgette Heyer); Crocodile on the Sandbank (Elizabeth Peters); A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (Smith) These are all great “first time” books, and I’ve certainly enjoyed a second time also!

    Reply
  65. Marry in Haste (Jane Aiken Hodge); Regency Buck (Georgette Heyer); Crocodile on the Sandbank (Elizabeth Peters); A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (Smith) These are all great “first time” books, and I’ve certainly enjoyed a second time also!

    Reply
  66. Okay, Quantum, you’re a snob. *G* But as a tribute to your scientific training, you did research and tested the theories developed thereby and as a result, have found yourself lots of great reading. For the record, PhDs and lawyers are not particularly uncommon among romance writers, but ultimately, education matters much less than having great story telling instincts, and the discipline to translate them into books.

    Reply
  67. Okay, Quantum, you’re a snob. *G* But as a tribute to your scientific training, you did research and tested the theories developed thereby and as a result, have found yourself lots of great reading. For the record, PhDs and lawyers are not particularly uncommon among romance writers, but ultimately, education matters much less than having great story telling instincts, and the discipline to translate them into books.

    Reply
  68. Okay, Quantum, you’re a snob. *G* But as a tribute to your scientific training, you did research and tested the theories developed thereby and as a result, have found yourself lots of great reading. For the record, PhDs and lawyers are not particularly uncommon among romance writers, but ultimately, education matters much less than having great story telling instincts, and the discipline to translate them into books.

    Reply
  69. Okay, Quantum, you’re a snob. *G* But as a tribute to your scientific training, you did research and tested the theories developed thereby and as a result, have found yourself lots of great reading. For the record, PhDs and lawyers are not particularly uncommon among romance writers, but ultimately, education matters much less than having great story telling instincts, and the discipline to translate them into books.

    Reply
  70. Okay, Quantum, you’re a snob. *G* But as a tribute to your scientific training, you did research and tested the theories developed thereby and as a result, have found yourself lots of great reading. For the record, PhDs and lawyers are not particularly uncommon among romance writers, but ultimately, education matters much less than having great story telling instincts, and the discipline to translate them into books.

    Reply
  71. Nancy, how wonderful that you were given that Christmas gift of bedtime stories! The key to unlocking what has proved to be a life long love of stories. (And yes, some covers are pretty awful!)

    Reply
  72. Nancy, how wonderful that you were given that Christmas gift of bedtime stories! The key to unlocking what has proved to be a life long love of stories. (And yes, some covers are pretty awful!)

    Reply
  73. Nancy, how wonderful that you were given that Christmas gift of bedtime stories! The key to unlocking what has proved to be a life long love of stories. (And yes, some covers are pretty awful!)

    Reply
  74. Nancy, how wonderful that you were given that Christmas gift of bedtime stories! The key to unlocking what has proved to be a life long love of stories. (And yes, some covers are pretty awful!)

    Reply
  75. Nancy, how wonderful that you were given that Christmas gift of bedtime stories! The key to unlocking what has proved to be a life long love of stories. (And yes, some covers are pretty awful!)

    Reply
  76. Sue, I read and loved those first two Mary Elgin books. I wonder if they’re available in digital?
    Alas, no, I just checked. Only old and often expensive used print editions. But I see that the fourth book is RETURN TO GLENSHAEL.

    Reply
  77. Sue, I read and loved those first two Mary Elgin books. I wonder if they’re available in digital?
    Alas, no, I just checked. Only old and often expensive used print editions. But I see that the fourth book is RETURN TO GLENSHAEL.

    Reply
  78. Sue, I read and loved those first two Mary Elgin books. I wonder if they’re available in digital?
    Alas, no, I just checked. Only old and often expensive used print editions. But I see that the fourth book is RETURN TO GLENSHAEL.

    Reply
  79. Sue, I read and loved those first two Mary Elgin books. I wonder if they’re available in digital?
    Alas, no, I just checked. Only old and often expensive used print editions. But I see that the fourth book is RETURN TO GLENSHAEL.

    Reply
  80. Sue, I read and loved those first two Mary Elgin books. I wonder if they’re available in digital?
    Alas, no, I just checked. Only old and often expensive used print editions. But I see that the fourth book is RETURN TO GLENSHAEL.

    Reply
  81. As a young teen, Pride & Prejudice was my first Austen. I was about 13 and was forever hooked on Jane. As an adult, The Winter Sea by Susanna Kearsley. The first time in a very long time I was sucked into a book and lost complete track of time and space. To go back even further, I was a very sheltered child and someone gave me LM Montgomery’s Anne of Green Gables and Emily of New Moon which helped me see that my imagination wasn’t a bad thing but then I was introduced to The Lion The Witch and the Wardrobe. I was forever changed into a girl who believed that dreams and fantasy and imagination are okay and that feeling of self…amazing as a child.

    Reply
  82. As a young teen, Pride & Prejudice was my first Austen. I was about 13 and was forever hooked on Jane. As an adult, The Winter Sea by Susanna Kearsley. The first time in a very long time I was sucked into a book and lost complete track of time and space. To go back even further, I was a very sheltered child and someone gave me LM Montgomery’s Anne of Green Gables and Emily of New Moon which helped me see that my imagination wasn’t a bad thing but then I was introduced to The Lion The Witch and the Wardrobe. I was forever changed into a girl who believed that dreams and fantasy and imagination are okay and that feeling of self…amazing as a child.

    Reply
  83. As a young teen, Pride & Prejudice was my first Austen. I was about 13 and was forever hooked on Jane. As an adult, The Winter Sea by Susanna Kearsley. The first time in a very long time I was sucked into a book and lost complete track of time and space. To go back even further, I was a very sheltered child and someone gave me LM Montgomery’s Anne of Green Gables and Emily of New Moon which helped me see that my imagination wasn’t a bad thing but then I was introduced to The Lion The Witch and the Wardrobe. I was forever changed into a girl who believed that dreams and fantasy and imagination are okay and that feeling of self…amazing as a child.

    Reply
  84. As a young teen, Pride & Prejudice was my first Austen. I was about 13 and was forever hooked on Jane. As an adult, The Winter Sea by Susanna Kearsley. The first time in a very long time I was sucked into a book and lost complete track of time and space. To go back even further, I was a very sheltered child and someone gave me LM Montgomery’s Anne of Green Gables and Emily of New Moon which helped me see that my imagination wasn’t a bad thing but then I was introduced to The Lion The Witch and the Wardrobe. I was forever changed into a girl who believed that dreams and fantasy and imagination are okay and that feeling of self…amazing as a child.

    Reply
  85. As a young teen, Pride & Prejudice was my first Austen. I was about 13 and was forever hooked on Jane. As an adult, The Winter Sea by Susanna Kearsley. The first time in a very long time I was sucked into a book and lost complete track of time and space. To go back even further, I was a very sheltered child and someone gave me LM Montgomery’s Anne of Green Gables and Emily of New Moon which helped me see that my imagination wasn’t a bad thing but then I was introduced to The Lion The Witch and the Wardrobe. I was forever changed into a girl who believed that dreams and fantasy and imagination are okay and that feeling of self…amazing as a child.

    Reply
  86. I would love to read for the first time all over again:
    Any of the Tacey and Tib books; Any of the Nancy Drew Books; Any Amelia Peabody book ( Like Andrea, I am heartbroken that there will be a Last Book); Any of the early Susan Elizabeth Phillips books; Any of the early Amanda Quick one word titles.
    As you can see, I like books which make me laugh.
    I loved the classics too, but now I want to go back and read the books which provided a warm and fuzzy feeling.
    Some of my earliest reads were books about WWII written by men who participated. My father had tons of those books and I was allowed to read anything I chose. That was a heck of a way to start off and it was very serious stuff. So now, I want to spend my time smiling.

    Reply
  87. I would love to read for the first time all over again:
    Any of the Tacey and Tib books; Any of the Nancy Drew Books; Any Amelia Peabody book ( Like Andrea, I am heartbroken that there will be a Last Book); Any of the early Susan Elizabeth Phillips books; Any of the early Amanda Quick one word titles.
    As you can see, I like books which make me laugh.
    I loved the classics too, but now I want to go back and read the books which provided a warm and fuzzy feeling.
    Some of my earliest reads were books about WWII written by men who participated. My father had tons of those books and I was allowed to read anything I chose. That was a heck of a way to start off and it was very serious stuff. So now, I want to spend my time smiling.

    Reply
  88. I would love to read for the first time all over again:
    Any of the Tacey and Tib books; Any of the Nancy Drew Books; Any Amelia Peabody book ( Like Andrea, I am heartbroken that there will be a Last Book); Any of the early Susan Elizabeth Phillips books; Any of the early Amanda Quick one word titles.
    As you can see, I like books which make me laugh.
    I loved the classics too, but now I want to go back and read the books which provided a warm and fuzzy feeling.
    Some of my earliest reads were books about WWII written by men who participated. My father had tons of those books and I was allowed to read anything I chose. That was a heck of a way to start off and it was very serious stuff. So now, I want to spend my time smiling.

    Reply
  89. I would love to read for the first time all over again:
    Any of the Tacey and Tib books; Any of the Nancy Drew Books; Any Amelia Peabody book ( Like Andrea, I am heartbroken that there will be a Last Book); Any of the early Susan Elizabeth Phillips books; Any of the early Amanda Quick one word titles.
    As you can see, I like books which make me laugh.
    I loved the classics too, but now I want to go back and read the books which provided a warm and fuzzy feeling.
    Some of my earliest reads were books about WWII written by men who participated. My father had tons of those books and I was allowed to read anything I chose. That was a heck of a way to start off and it was very serious stuff. So now, I want to spend my time smiling.

    Reply
  90. I would love to read for the first time all over again:
    Any of the Tacey and Tib books; Any of the Nancy Drew Books; Any Amelia Peabody book ( Like Andrea, I am heartbroken that there will be a Last Book); Any of the early Susan Elizabeth Phillips books; Any of the early Amanda Quick one word titles.
    As you can see, I like books which make me laugh.
    I loved the classics too, but now I want to go back and read the books which provided a warm and fuzzy feeling.
    Some of my earliest reads were books about WWII written by men who participated. My father had tons of those books and I was allowed to read anything I chose. That was a heck of a way to start off and it was very serious stuff. So now, I want to spend my time smiling.

    Reply
  91. Oh my that’s a tough question. I have many, many books from my childhood that I would love to be able to read again for the first time. They were my friends and got me through my childhood. However, if I absolutely had to pick one it would probably be One Summer at Deersleap by Elizabeth Elgin. I read all her books in the eighties but oh my word this one really stayed with me. It’s time slip, which I love, and it was the most wonderful story. Actually now that I’m thinking about it again I think it’s time for a reread. Thanks for a lovely post.

    Reply
  92. Oh my that’s a tough question. I have many, many books from my childhood that I would love to be able to read again for the first time. They were my friends and got me through my childhood. However, if I absolutely had to pick one it would probably be One Summer at Deersleap by Elizabeth Elgin. I read all her books in the eighties but oh my word this one really stayed with me. It’s time slip, which I love, and it was the most wonderful story. Actually now that I’m thinking about it again I think it’s time for a reread. Thanks for a lovely post.

    Reply
  93. Oh my that’s a tough question. I have many, many books from my childhood that I would love to be able to read again for the first time. They were my friends and got me through my childhood. However, if I absolutely had to pick one it would probably be One Summer at Deersleap by Elizabeth Elgin. I read all her books in the eighties but oh my word this one really stayed with me. It’s time slip, which I love, and it was the most wonderful story. Actually now that I’m thinking about it again I think it’s time for a reread. Thanks for a lovely post.

    Reply
  94. Oh my that’s a tough question. I have many, many books from my childhood that I would love to be able to read again for the first time. They were my friends and got me through my childhood. However, if I absolutely had to pick one it would probably be One Summer at Deersleap by Elizabeth Elgin. I read all her books in the eighties but oh my word this one really stayed with me. It’s time slip, which I love, and it was the most wonderful story. Actually now that I’m thinking about it again I think it’s time for a reread. Thanks for a lovely post.

    Reply
  95. Oh my that’s a tough question. I have many, many books from my childhood that I would love to be able to read again for the first time. They were my friends and got me through my childhood. However, if I absolutely had to pick one it would probably be One Summer at Deersleap by Elizabeth Elgin. I read all her books in the eighties but oh my word this one really stayed with me. It’s time slip, which I love, and it was the most wonderful story. Actually now that I’m thinking about it again I think it’s time for a reread. Thanks for a lovely post.

    Reply
  96. The Perilous Gard was a Newberyy Honour book so it might be easier to find. The books are unrelated, but both are historical. I hope you find and enjoy them!

    Reply
  97. The Perilous Gard was a Newberyy Honour book so it might be easier to find. The books are unrelated, but both are historical. I hope you find and enjoy them!

    Reply
  98. The Perilous Gard was a Newberyy Honour book so it might be easier to find. The books are unrelated, but both are historical. I hope you find and enjoy them!

    Reply
  99. The Perilous Gard was a Newberyy Honour book so it might be easier to find. The books are unrelated, but both are historical. I hope you find and enjoy them!

    Reply
  100. The Perilous Gard was a Newberyy Honour book so it might be easier to find. The books are unrelated, but both are historical. I hope you find and enjoy them!

    Reply
  101. Joanna Bourne and I are on the same page; it would be The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings for me — except that I reread them often anyway and each time, I swear, it feels all new again.
    An author I would not like to be reading for the first time again is Jane Austen. I love her books but they take several readings to absorb the nuances in her prose. I almost never read them again after college for that reason.

    Reply
  102. Joanna Bourne and I are on the same page; it would be The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings for me — except that I reread them often anyway and each time, I swear, it feels all new again.
    An author I would not like to be reading for the first time again is Jane Austen. I love her books but they take several readings to absorb the nuances in her prose. I almost never read them again after college for that reason.

    Reply
  103. Joanna Bourne and I are on the same page; it would be The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings for me — except that I reread them often anyway and each time, I swear, it feels all new again.
    An author I would not like to be reading for the first time again is Jane Austen. I love her books but they take several readings to absorb the nuances in her prose. I almost never read them again after college for that reason.

    Reply
  104. Joanna Bourne and I are on the same page; it would be The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings for me — except that I reread them often anyway and each time, I swear, it feels all new again.
    An author I would not like to be reading for the first time again is Jane Austen. I love her books but they take several readings to absorb the nuances in her prose. I almost never read them again after college for that reason.

    Reply
  105. Joanna Bourne and I are on the same page; it would be The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings for me — except that I reread them often anyway and each time, I swear, it feels all new again.
    An author I would not like to be reading for the first time again is Jane Austen. I love her books but they take several readings to absorb the nuances in her prose. I almost never read them again after college for that reason.

    Reply
  106. Pat, I haven’t done it but I believe the play back speed for audio books can be adjusted,for example in itunes or on many mp3 players, though if you like to skip text to get to the most interesting bits, then that could be difficult with audio.
    Using text-to-speech software with computer voices e.g. for proof reading, also allows adjustment of playback speed.

    Reply
  107. Pat, I haven’t done it but I believe the play back speed for audio books can be adjusted,for example in itunes or on many mp3 players, though if you like to skip text to get to the most interesting bits, then that could be difficult with audio.
    Using text-to-speech software with computer voices e.g. for proof reading, also allows adjustment of playback speed.

    Reply
  108. Pat, I haven’t done it but I believe the play back speed for audio books can be adjusted,for example in itunes or on many mp3 players, though if you like to skip text to get to the most interesting bits, then that could be difficult with audio.
    Using text-to-speech software with computer voices e.g. for proof reading, also allows adjustment of playback speed.

    Reply
  109. Pat, I haven’t done it but I believe the play back speed for audio books can be adjusted,for example in itunes or on many mp3 players, though if you like to skip text to get to the most interesting bits, then that could be difficult with audio.
    Using text-to-speech software with computer voices e.g. for proof reading, also allows adjustment of playback speed.

    Reply
  110. Pat, I haven’t done it but I believe the play back speed for audio books can be adjusted,for example in itunes or on many mp3 players, though if you like to skip text to get to the most interesting bits, then that could be difficult with audio.
    Using text-to-speech software with computer voices e.g. for proof reading, also allows adjustment of playback speed.

    Reply
  111. To pick a few——
    Dorothy Sayers: Gaudy Night and Busman’s Honeymoon
    julia Quinn: Romancing Mr. Bridgerton
    A.C.Doyle: A Study in scarlet
    Elizabeth Peters: The crocodile on the sandbank
    Alcott-Little Women
    Austen- of course
    Sabatini: Scaramouche
    Laurie King: The Beekeeper’s Apprentice.
    Balogh- the slighly series.
    Busman’s Honeymoon has the most incredible description of romantic ecstasy that I have read in any book. Dorothy Sayers also quotes John Donne- and she has picked out terrific parts to quote.
    I was moved to tears the first time I read the conclusion of “Romancing Mr. Bridgerton” though it doesn’t have quite the same effect on re-reading.
    and, as I have mentioned before, your own “the Rake”, especially when preceded by ” the Diabolical Baron”

    Reply
  112. To pick a few——
    Dorothy Sayers: Gaudy Night and Busman’s Honeymoon
    julia Quinn: Romancing Mr. Bridgerton
    A.C.Doyle: A Study in scarlet
    Elizabeth Peters: The crocodile on the sandbank
    Alcott-Little Women
    Austen- of course
    Sabatini: Scaramouche
    Laurie King: The Beekeeper’s Apprentice.
    Balogh- the slighly series.
    Busman’s Honeymoon has the most incredible description of romantic ecstasy that I have read in any book. Dorothy Sayers also quotes John Donne- and she has picked out terrific parts to quote.
    I was moved to tears the first time I read the conclusion of “Romancing Mr. Bridgerton” though it doesn’t have quite the same effect on re-reading.
    and, as I have mentioned before, your own “the Rake”, especially when preceded by ” the Diabolical Baron”

    Reply
  113. To pick a few——
    Dorothy Sayers: Gaudy Night and Busman’s Honeymoon
    julia Quinn: Romancing Mr. Bridgerton
    A.C.Doyle: A Study in scarlet
    Elizabeth Peters: The crocodile on the sandbank
    Alcott-Little Women
    Austen- of course
    Sabatini: Scaramouche
    Laurie King: The Beekeeper’s Apprentice.
    Balogh- the slighly series.
    Busman’s Honeymoon has the most incredible description of romantic ecstasy that I have read in any book. Dorothy Sayers also quotes John Donne- and she has picked out terrific parts to quote.
    I was moved to tears the first time I read the conclusion of “Romancing Mr. Bridgerton” though it doesn’t have quite the same effect on re-reading.
    and, as I have mentioned before, your own “the Rake”, especially when preceded by ” the Diabolical Baron”

    Reply
  114. To pick a few——
    Dorothy Sayers: Gaudy Night and Busman’s Honeymoon
    julia Quinn: Romancing Mr. Bridgerton
    A.C.Doyle: A Study in scarlet
    Elizabeth Peters: The crocodile on the sandbank
    Alcott-Little Women
    Austen- of course
    Sabatini: Scaramouche
    Laurie King: The Beekeeper’s Apprentice.
    Balogh- the slighly series.
    Busman’s Honeymoon has the most incredible description of romantic ecstasy that I have read in any book. Dorothy Sayers also quotes John Donne- and she has picked out terrific parts to quote.
    I was moved to tears the first time I read the conclusion of “Romancing Mr. Bridgerton” though it doesn’t have quite the same effect on re-reading.
    and, as I have mentioned before, your own “the Rake”, especially when preceded by ” the Diabolical Baron”

    Reply
  115. To pick a few——
    Dorothy Sayers: Gaudy Night and Busman’s Honeymoon
    julia Quinn: Romancing Mr. Bridgerton
    A.C.Doyle: A Study in scarlet
    Elizabeth Peters: The crocodile on the sandbank
    Alcott-Little Women
    Austen- of course
    Sabatini: Scaramouche
    Laurie King: The Beekeeper’s Apprentice.
    Balogh- the slighly series.
    Busman’s Honeymoon has the most incredible description of romantic ecstasy that I have read in any book. Dorothy Sayers also quotes John Donne- and she has picked out terrific parts to quote.
    I was moved to tears the first time I read the conclusion of “Romancing Mr. Bridgerton” though it doesn’t have quite the same effect on re-reading.
    and, as I have mentioned before, your own “the Rake”, especially when preceded by ” the Diabolical Baron”

    Reply
  116. Speaking of books you’d want to read again – does anyone know what happened to Suzanne Robinson / Lynda S. Robinson? I really enjoyed her tied together romances and then the Lord Meren series. She never finished it.

    Reply
  117. Speaking of books you’d want to read again – does anyone know what happened to Suzanne Robinson / Lynda S. Robinson? I really enjoyed her tied together romances and then the Lord Meren series. She never finished it.

    Reply
  118. Speaking of books you’d want to read again – does anyone know what happened to Suzanne Robinson / Lynda S. Robinson? I really enjoyed her tied together romances and then the Lord Meren series. She never finished it.

    Reply
  119. Speaking of books you’d want to read again – does anyone know what happened to Suzanne Robinson / Lynda S. Robinson? I really enjoyed her tied together romances and then the Lord Meren series. She never finished it.

    Reply
  120. Speaking of books you’d want to read again – does anyone know what happened to Suzanne Robinson / Lynda S. Robinson? I really enjoyed her tied together romances and then the Lord Meren series. She never finished it.

    Reply
  121. Really?!! And they don’t sound like Donald Duck? As soon as I figure out if we have an mp3 player, I’ll have to experiment! (You can tell I’m not a techie ) Thank you!

    Reply
  122. Really?!! And they don’t sound like Donald Duck? As soon as I figure out if we have an mp3 player, I’ll have to experiment! (You can tell I’m not a techie ) Thank you!

    Reply
  123. Really?!! And they don’t sound like Donald Duck? As soon as I figure out if we have an mp3 player, I’ll have to experiment! (You can tell I’m not a techie ) Thank you!

    Reply
  124. Really?!! And they don’t sound like Donald Duck? As soon as I figure out if we have an mp3 player, I’ll have to experiment! (You can tell I’m not a techie ) Thank you!

    Reply
  125. Really?!! And they don’t sound like Donald Duck? As soon as I figure out if we have an mp3 player, I’ll have to experiment! (You can tell I’m not a techie ) Thank you!

    Reply
  126. I have memory of books where the kids got leeches in the creek and vaguely remember one collecting leeches for some purpose, but no way will I ever remember what books they were, sorry! And yes, our early reading experiences seem to have a heavy influence on our later ones–all the more reason we should all read to kids every chance we get!

    Reply
  127. I have memory of books where the kids got leeches in the creek and vaguely remember one collecting leeches for some purpose, but no way will I ever remember what books they were, sorry! And yes, our early reading experiences seem to have a heavy influence on our later ones–all the more reason we should all read to kids every chance we get!

    Reply
  128. I have memory of books where the kids got leeches in the creek and vaguely remember one collecting leeches for some purpose, but no way will I ever remember what books they were, sorry! And yes, our early reading experiences seem to have a heavy influence on our later ones–all the more reason we should all read to kids every chance we get!

    Reply
  129. I have memory of books where the kids got leeches in the creek and vaguely remember one collecting leeches for some purpose, but no way will I ever remember what books they were, sorry! And yes, our early reading experiences seem to have a heavy influence on our later ones–all the more reason we should all read to kids every chance we get!

    Reply
  130. I have memory of books where the kids got leeches in the creek and vaguely remember one collecting leeches for some purpose, but no way will I ever remember what books they were, sorry! And yes, our early reading experiences seem to have a heavy influence on our later ones–all the more reason we should all read to kids every chance we get!

    Reply
  131. I came to Dorothy Dunnett only fairly recently, and I’m still discovering her. I’m surprised I never read her earlier, but I didn’t and it was only because a wide range of writers I admired all adored her books that I started reading her.
    Tolkien I tried to read several times as a kid, and never got into him. I haven’t even seen the movies. I know, shocking. *g*
    I adored Cross Stitch and followed all the books until they went to the USA, after which for some reason I lost interest.

    Reply
  132. I came to Dorothy Dunnett only fairly recently, and I’m still discovering her. I’m surprised I never read her earlier, but I didn’t and it was only because a wide range of writers I admired all adored her books that I started reading her.
    Tolkien I tried to read several times as a kid, and never got into him. I haven’t even seen the movies. I know, shocking. *g*
    I adored Cross Stitch and followed all the books until they went to the USA, after which for some reason I lost interest.

    Reply
  133. I came to Dorothy Dunnett only fairly recently, and I’m still discovering her. I’m surprised I never read her earlier, but I didn’t and it was only because a wide range of writers I admired all adored her books that I started reading her.
    Tolkien I tried to read several times as a kid, and never got into him. I haven’t even seen the movies. I know, shocking. *g*
    I adored Cross Stitch and followed all the books until they went to the USA, after which for some reason I lost interest.

    Reply
  134. I came to Dorothy Dunnett only fairly recently, and I’m still discovering her. I’m surprised I never read her earlier, but I didn’t and it was only because a wide range of writers I admired all adored her books that I started reading her.
    Tolkien I tried to read several times as a kid, and never got into him. I haven’t even seen the movies. I know, shocking. *g*
    I adored Cross Stitch and followed all the books until they went to the USA, after which for some reason I lost interest.

    Reply
  135. I came to Dorothy Dunnett only fairly recently, and I’m still discovering her. I’m surprised I never read her earlier, but I didn’t and it was only because a wide range of writers I admired all adored her books that I started reading her.
    Tolkien I tried to read several times as a kid, and never got into him. I haven’t even seen the movies. I know, shocking. *g*
    I adored Cross Stitch and followed all the books until they went to the USA, after which for some reason I lost interest.

    Reply
  136. I use the text-to-speech software for a lot of my own writing. It’s very useful.
    Quantum, I think most people are given a poor impression of romances at the beginning — I was certainly very snobbish about it in my youth and disdained to read what I thought were romances. (I didn’t count Georgette Heyer or Mary Stewart). But all it takes is one or two good experiences and that snobbishness evaporates. I’d also suggest that even some of the books with the worst, trashiest covers contain some wonderful stories and are well worth reading.

    Reply
  137. I use the text-to-speech software for a lot of my own writing. It’s very useful.
    Quantum, I think most people are given a poor impression of romances at the beginning — I was certainly very snobbish about it in my youth and disdained to read what I thought were romances. (I didn’t count Georgette Heyer or Mary Stewart). But all it takes is one or two good experiences and that snobbishness evaporates. I’d also suggest that even some of the books with the worst, trashiest covers contain some wonderful stories and are well worth reading.

    Reply
  138. I use the text-to-speech software for a lot of my own writing. It’s very useful.
    Quantum, I think most people are given a poor impression of romances at the beginning — I was certainly very snobbish about it in my youth and disdained to read what I thought were romances. (I didn’t count Georgette Heyer or Mary Stewart). But all it takes is one or two good experiences and that snobbishness evaporates. I’d also suggest that even some of the books with the worst, trashiest covers contain some wonderful stories and are well worth reading.

    Reply
  139. I use the text-to-speech software for a lot of my own writing. It’s very useful.
    Quantum, I think most people are given a poor impression of romances at the beginning — I was certainly very snobbish about it in my youth and disdained to read what I thought were romances. (I didn’t count Georgette Heyer or Mary Stewart). But all it takes is one or two good experiences and that snobbishness evaporates. I’d also suggest that even some of the books with the worst, trashiest covers contain some wonderful stories and are well worth reading.

    Reply
  140. I use the text-to-speech software for a lot of my own writing. It’s very useful.
    Quantum, I think most people are given a poor impression of romances at the beginning — I was certainly very snobbish about it in my youth and disdained to read what I thought were romances. (I didn’t count Georgette Heyer or Mary Stewart). But all it takes is one or two good experiences and that snobbishness evaporates. I’d also suggest that even some of the books with the worst, trashiest covers contain some wonderful stories and are well worth reading.

    Reply
  141. You all have such interesting choices that make my reading tastes (when younger) look extremely simplistic–I blame my older brother for forcing me to read V.C. Andrews Flowers in the Attic, which in turn cemented my firm belief that I was a forever HEA gal. So in no particular order, the books I read/re-read when younger were: Black Velvet; Anne of Green Gables; Nancy Drew; Florence Nightingale; and my first introduction to romance, at the age of 13, was The Promise by Danielle Steele, which I did re-read in 2012. But the one book I wish I could read again for the first time would be, Are You there God? It’s me Margaret. Seemed to me that Judy Blume wrote that book just for me, when I had a whole lot of questions (about everything) but couldn’t ask anyone. And lol, how times have changed; I just purchased for my daughter A Vindication of the Rights of Women, to add to her growing list of reading material for her gender studies courses.

    Reply
  142. You all have such interesting choices that make my reading tastes (when younger) look extremely simplistic–I blame my older brother for forcing me to read V.C. Andrews Flowers in the Attic, which in turn cemented my firm belief that I was a forever HEA gal. So in no particular order, the books I read/re-read when younger were: Black Velvet; Anne of Green Gables; Nancy Drew; Florence Nightingale; and my first introduction to romance, at the age of 13, was The Promise by Danielle Steele, which I did re-read in 2012. But the one book I wish I could read again for the first time would be, Are You there God? It’s me Margaret. Seemed to me that Judy Blume wrote that book just for me, when I had a whole lot of questions (about everything) but couldn’t ask anyone. And lol, how times have changed; I just purchased for my daughter A Vindication of the Rights of Women, to add to her growing list of reading material for her gender studies courses.

    Reply
  143. You all have such interesting choices that make my reading tastes (when younger) look extremely simplistic–I blame my older brother for forcing me to read V.C. Andrews Flowers in the Attic, which in turn cemented my firm belief that I was a forever HEA gal. So in no particular order, the books I read/re-read when younger were: Black Velvet; Anne of Green Gables; Nancy Drew; Florence Nightingale; and my first introduction to romance, at the age of 13, was The Promise by Danielle Steele, which I did re-read in 2012. But the one book I wish I could read again for the first time would be, Are You there God? It’s me Margaret. Seemed to me that Judy Blume wrote that book just for me, when I had a whole lot of questions (about everything) but couldn’t ask anyone. And lol, how times have changed; I just purchased for my daughter A Vindication of the Rights of Women, to add to her growing list of reading material for her gender studies courses.

    Reply
  144. You all have such interesting choices that make my reading tastes (when younger) look extremely simplistic–I blame my older brother for forcing me to read V.C. Andrews Flowers in the Attic, which in turn cemented my firm belief that I was a forever HEA gal. So in no particular order, the books I read/re-read when younger were: Black Velvet; Anne of Green Gables; Nancy Drew; Florence Nightingale; and my first introduction to romance, at the age of 13, was The Promise by Danielle Steele, which I did re-read in 2012. But the one book I wish I could read again for the first time would be, Are You there God? It’s me Margaret. Seemed to me that Judy Blume wrote that book just for me, when I had a whole lot of questions (about everything) but couldn’t ask anyone. And lol, how times have changed; I just purchased for my daughter A Vindication of the Rights of Women, to add to her growing list of reading material for her gender studies courses.

    Reply
  145. You all have such interesting choices that make my reading tastes (when younger) look extremely simplistic–I blame my older brother for forcing me to read V.C. Andrews Flowers in the Attic, which in turn cemented my firm belief that I was a forever HEA gal. So in no particular order, the books I read/re-read when younger were: Black Velvet; Anne of Green Gables; Nancy Drew; Florence Nightingale; and my first introduction to romance, at the age of 13, was The Promise by Danielle Steele, which I did re-read in 2012. But the one book I wish I could read again for the first time would be, Are You there God? It’s me Margaret. Seemed to me that Judy Blume wrote that book just for me, when I had a whole lot of questions (about everything) but couldn’t ask anyone. And lol, how times have changed; I just purchased for my daughter A Vindication of the Rights of Women, to add to her growing list of reading material for her gender studies courses.

    Reply
  146. The first book I received as a gift was Swiss Family Robinson and I’m still in love. “The Secret Garden” by Burnett was a favorite and I love that Kate Morton pays homage to it in her book. Also anything by Madeline Brent . Yes Quantum, she was a he.
    A little off topic, a new read “Jane Steele” which portrays Jane Eyre as a serial killer appealed to my love of Dickens and to that Shirley Temple movie “The Little Princess” which was a childhood favorite as well.

    Reply
  147. The first book I received as a gift was Swiss Family Robinson and I’m still in love. “The Secret Garden” by Burnett was a favorite and I love that Kate Morton pays homage to it in her book. Also anything by Madeline Brent . Yes Quantum, she was a he.
    A little off topic, a new read “Jane Steele” which portrays Jane Eyre as a serial killer appealed to my love of Dickens and to that Shirley Temple movie “The Little Princess” which was a childhood favorite as well.

    Reply
  148. The first book I received as a gift was Swiss Family Robinson and I’m still in love. “The Secret Garden” by Burnett was a favorite and I love that Kate Morton pays homage to it in her book. Also anything by Madeline Brent . Yes Quantum, she was a he.
    A little off topic, a new read “Jane Steele” which portrays Jane Eyre as a serial killer appealed to my love of Dickens and to that Shirley Temple movie “The Little Princess” which was a childhood favorite as well.

    Reply
  149. The first book I received as a gift was Swiss Family Robinson and I’m still in love. “The Secret Garden” by Burnett was a favorite and I love that Kate Morton pays homage to it in her book. Also anything by Madeline Brent . Yes Quantum, she was a he.
    A little off topic, a new read “Jane Steele” which portrays Jane Eyre as a serial killer appealed to my love of Dickens and to that Shirley Temple movie “The Little Princess” which was a childhood favorite as well.

    Reply
  150. The first book I received as a gift was Swiss Family Robinson and I’m still in love. “The Secret Garden” by Burnett was a favorite and I love that Kate Morton pays homage to it in her book. Also anything by Madeline Brent . Yes Quantum, she was a he.
    A little off topic, a new read “Jane Steele” which portrays Jane Eyre as a serial killer appealed to my love of Dickens and to that Shirley Temple movie “The Little Princess” which was a childhood favorite as well.

    Reply
  151. I remember reading Pride & Prejudice in 6th grade, as well as Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights(which somewhat bypassed me). My friend introduced me to Barbara Cartland in 7th grade, which led to Georgette Heyer. I always say I learned more about the Napoleonic Wars from Barbara Cartland than any history class. Other faves – Phyllis Whitney, Victoria Holt, Agatha Christie, Dell Shannon, the list is endless. Sigh. So many books, so little time, even when retired!

    Reply
  152. I remember reading Pride & Prejudice in 6th grade, as well as Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights(which somewhat bypassed me). My friend introduced me to Barbara Cartland in 7th grade, which led to Georgette Heyer. I always say I learned more about the Napoleonic Wars from Barbara Cartland than any history class. Other faves – Phyllis Whitney, Victoria Holt, Agatha Christie, Dell Shannon, the list is endless. Sigh. So many books, so little time, even when retired!

    Reply
  153. I remember reading Pride & Prejudice in 6th grade, as well as Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights(which somewhat bypassed me). My friend introduced me to Barbara Cartland in 7th grade, which led to Georgette Heyer. I always say I learned more about the Napoleonic Wars from Barbara Cartland than any history class. Other faves – Phyllis Whitney, Victoria Holt, Agatha Christie, Dell Shannon, the list is endless. Sigh. So many books, so little time, even when retired!

    Reply
  154. I remember reading Pride & Prejudice in 6th grade, as well as Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights(which somewhat bypassed me). My friend introduced me to Barbara Cartland in 7th grade, which led to Georgette Heyer. I always say I learned more about the Napoleonic Wars from Barbara Cartland than any history class. Other faves – Phyllis Whitney, Victoria Holt, Agatha Christie, Dell Shannon, the list is endless. Sigh. So many books, so little time, even when retired!

    Reply
  155. I remember reading Pride & Prejudice in 6th grade, as well as Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights(which somewhat bypassed me). My friend introduced me to Barbara Cartland in 7th grade, which led to Georgette Heyer. I always say I learned more about the Napoleonic Wars from Barbara Cartland than any history class. Other faves – Phyllis Whitney, Victoria Holt, Agatha Christie, Dell Shannon, the list is endless. Sigh. So many books, so little time, even when retired!

    Reply
  156. Quantum, you seem to love audio books so much that you’re making me wish I could listen to them. I just find it hard to follow a story that way. I seem to nned the visual prompt of the written word. (Plus I do like the tactile feeling of turning a page.)
    (You certainly found the a great introduction to good romance with Eloisa and Julia!)

    Reply
  157. Quantum, you seem to love audio books so much that you’re making me wish I could listen to them. I just find it hard to follow a story that way. I seem to nned the visual prompt of the written word. (Plus I do like the tactile feeling of turning a page.)
    (You certainly found the a great introduction to good romance with Eloisa and Julia!)

    Reply
  158. Quantum, you seem to love audio books so much that you’re making me wish I could listen to them. I just find it hard to follow a story that way. I seem to nned the visual prompt of the written word. (Plus I do like the tactile feeling of turning a page.)
    (You certainly found the a great introduction to good romance with Eloisa and Julia!)

    Reply
  159. Quantum, you seem to love audio books so much that you’re making me wish I could listen to them. I just find it hard to follow a story that way. I seem to nned the visual prompt of the written word. (Plus I do like the tactile feeling of turning a page.)
    (You certainly found the a great introduction to good romance with Eloisa and Julia!)

    Reply
  160. Quantum, you seem to love audio books so much that you’re making me wish I could listen to them. I just find it hard to follow a story that way. I seem to nned the visual prompt of the written word. (Plus I do like the tactile feeling of turning a page.)
    (You certainly found the a great introduction to good romance with Eloisa and Julia!)

    Reply
  161. Nancy Drew sent me to The Moonspiners. The librarian called my mother for permission to check it out to me! I was 12, and went on to read all of Mary Stewart’s books.

    Reply
  162. Nancy Drew sent me to The Moonspiners. The librarian called my mother for permission to check it out to me! I was 12, and went on to read all of Mary Stewart’s books.

    Reply
  163. Nancy Drew sent me to The Moonspiners. The librarian called my mother for permission to check it out to me! I was 12, and went on to read all of Mary Stewart’s books.

    Reply
  164. Nancy Drew sent me to The Moonspiners. The librarian called my mother for permission to check it out to me! I was 12, and went on to read all of Mary Stewart’s books.

    Reply
  165. Nancy Drew sent me to The Moonspiners. The librarian called my mother for permission to check it out to me! I was 12, and went on to read all of Mary Stewart’s books.

    Reply
  166. I totally agree with you Anne. My early snobbishness towards the romance genre has now totally evaporated. Having found many great authors I pay little attention to the covers …. though many are excellent.
    I once hid a romance book inside the covers of Wittgenstein’s Tractatus, while travelling by rail. Hummm, perhaps traces of that snobbishness are still there! *G*

    Reply
  167. I totally agree with you Anne. My early snobbishness towards the romance genre has now totally evaporated. Having found many great authors I pay little attention to the covers …. though many are excellent.
    I once hid a romance book inside the covers of Wittgenstein’s Tractatus, while travelling by rail. Hummm, perhaps traces of that snobbishness are still there! *G*

    Reply
  168. I totally agree with you Anne. My early snobbishness towards the romance genre has now totally evaporated. Having found many great authors I pay little attention to the covers …. though many are excellent.
    I once hid a romance book inside the covers of Wittgenstein’s Tractatus, while travelling by rail. Hummm, perhaps traces of that snobbishness are still there! *G*

    Reply
  169. I totally agree with you Anne. My early snobbishness towards the romance genre has now totally evaporated. Having found many great authors I pay little attention to the covers …. though many are excellent.
    I once hid a romance book inside the covers of Wittgenstein’s Tractatus, while travelling by rail. Hummm, perhaps traces of that snobbishness are still there! *G*

    Reply
  170. I totally agree with you Anne. My early snobbishness towards the romance genre has now totally evaporated. Having found many great authors I pay little attention to the covers …. though many are excellent.
    I once hid a romance book inside the covers of Wittgenstein’s Tractatus, while travelling by rail. Hummm, perhaps traces of that snobbishness are still there! *G*

    Reply
  171. My favorite Mary Stewart’s are Madam, Will You Talk and The Ivy Tree? Georgette Heyer was discovered at the age of 13 and she introduced me to the Regency World which I still love. My favorite Elizabeth Peters are Crocodile on a Sandbank and The Man in the Green Velvet Coat. Such a fun jaunt with the reader never knowing exactly who the hero is until the end. Tolkien made a deep impression on me but didn’t encourage me to re-read them. Terry Brooks and The Sword of Shannara plus the Magic Kingdom books are incredible.
    For comedic mysteries, Donna Andrews third Meg Langslow book The Revenge of the Wrought Iron Flamingo kept me laughing so I hard I had to go back and find the others. I still enjoying reading her again.
    There are so many that I could mention. The good thing is that I still find new authors that affect me the same way. Kerry Greenwood and the Miss Fisher Mysteries. Kristen Britain and Green Rider. Lois Buchold. Anne McCaffrey and her Powers that Be.
    If only there were an unlimited time pocket to just lock one’s self away in as long as one wanted, then return to normal life without having missed anything.

    Reply
  172. My favorite Mary Stewart’s are Madam, Will You Talk and The Ivy Tree? Georgette Heyer was discovered at the age of 13 and she introduced me to the Regency World which I still love. My favorite Elizabeth Peters are Crocodile on a Sandbank and The Man in the Green Velvet Coat. Such a fun jaunt with the reader never knowing exactly who the hero is until the end. Tolkien made a deep impression on me but didn’t encourage me to re-read them. Terry Brooks and The Sword of Shannara plus the Magic Kingdom books are incredible.
    For comedic mysteries, Donna Andrews third Meg Langslow book The Revenge of the Wrought Iron Flamingo kept me laughing so I hard I had to go back and find the others. I still enjoying reading her again.
    There are so many that I could mention. The good thing is that I still find new authors that affect me the same way. Kerry Greenwood and the Miss Fisher Mysteries. Kristen Britain and Green Rider. Lois Buchold. Anne McCaffrey and her Powers that Be.
    If only there were an unlimited time pocket to just lock one’s self away in as long as one wanted, then return to normal life without having missed anything.

    Reply
  173. My favorite Mary Stewart’s are Madam, Will You Talk and The Ivy Tree? Georgette Heyer was discovered at the age of 13 and she introduced me to the Regency World which I still love. My favorite Elizabeth Peters are Crocodile on a Sandbank and The Man in the Green Velvet Coat. Such a fun jaunt with the reader never knowing exactly who the hero is until the end. Tolkien made a deep impression on me but didn’t encourage me to re-read them. Terry Brooks and The Sword of Shannara plus the Magic Kingdom books are incredible.
    For comedic mysteries, Donna Andrews third Meg Langslow book The Revenge of the Wrought Iron Flamingo kept me laughing so I hard I had to go back and find the others. I still enjoying reading her again.
    There are so many that I could mention. The good thing is that I still find new authors that affect me the same way. Kerry Greenwood and the Miss Fisher Mysteries. Kristen Britain and Green Rider. Lois Buchold. Anne McCaffrey and her Powers that Be.
    If only there were an unlimited time pocket to just lock one’s self away in as long as one wanted, then return to normal life without having missed anything.

    Reply
  174. My favorite Mary Stewart’s are Madam, Will You Talk and The Ivy Tree? Georgette Heyer was discovered at the age of 13 and she introduced me to the Regency World which I still love. My favorite Elizabeth Peters are Crocodile on a Sandbank and The Man in the Green Velvet Coat. Such a fun jaunt with the reader never knowing exactly who the hero is until the end. Tolkien made a deep impression on me but didn’t encourage me to re-read them. Terry Brooks and The Sword of Shannara plus the Magic Kingdom books are incredible.
    For comedic mysteries, Donna Andrews third Meg Langslow book The Revenge of the Wrought Iron Flamingo kept me laughing so I hard I had to go back and find the others. I still enjoying reading her again.
    There are so many that I could mention. The good thing is that I still find new authors that affect me the same way. Kerry Greenwood and the Miss Fisher Mysteries. Kristen Britain and Green Rider. Lois Buchold. Anne McCaffrey and her Powers that Be.
    If only there were an unlimited time pocket to just lock one’s self away in as long as one wanted, then return to normal life without having missed anything.

    Reply
  175. My favorite Mary Stewart’s are Madam, Will You Talk and The Ivy Tree? Georgette Heyer was discovered at the age of 13 and she introduced me to the Regency World which I still love. My favorite Elizabeth Peters are Crocodile on a Sandbank and The Man in the Green Velvet Coat. Such a fun jaunt with the reader never knowing exactly who the hero is until the end. Tolkien made a deep impression on me but didn’t encourage me to re-read them. Terry Brooks and The Sword of Shannara plus the Magic Kingdom books are incredible.
    For comedic mysteries, Donna Andrews third Meg Langslow book The Revenge of the Wrought Iron Flamingo kept me laughing so I hard I had to go back and find the others. I still enjoying reading her again.
    There are so many that I could mention. The good thing is that I still find new authors that affect me the same way. Kerry Greenwood and the Miss Fisher Mysteries. Kristen Britain and Green Rider. Lois Buchold. Anne McCaffrey and her Powers that Be.
    If only there were an unlimited time pocket to just lock one’s self away in as long as one wanted, then return to normal life without having missed anything.

    Reply
  176. Leanne Davis, your preferences for Mary Stewart and Elizabeth Peters exactly match mine! Ditto on Tolkien–read once and that was enough. Have you tried Kerry Greenwood’s Corinna Chapmen books? The heroine is a plus size baker in modern Melbourne, and they’re wonderful. Very different from Miss Fisher, but wonderful.

    Reply
  177. Leanne Davis, your preferences for Mary Stewart and Elizabeth Peters exactly match mine! Ditto on Tolkien–read once and that was enough. Have you tried Kerry Greenwood’s Corinna Chapmen books? The heroine is a plus size baker in modern Melbourne, and they’re wonderful. Very different from Miss Fisher, but wonderful.

    Reply
  178. Leanne Davis, your preferences for Mary Stewart and Elizabeth Peters exactly match mine! Ditto on Tolkien–read once and that was enough. Have you tried Kerry Greenwood’s Corinna Chapmen books? The heroine is a plus size baker in modern Melbourne, and they’re wonderful. Very different from Miss Fisher, but wonderful.

    Reply
  179. Leanne Davis, your preferences for Mary Stewart and Elizabeth Peters exactly match mine! Ditto on Tolkien–read once and that was enough. Have you tried Kerry Greenwood’s Corinna Chapmen books? The heroine is a plus size baker in modern Melbourne, and they’re wonderful. Very different from Miss Fisher, but wonderful.

    Reply
  180. Leanne Davis, your preferences for Mary Stewart and Elizabeth Peters exactly match mine! Ditto on Tolkien–read once and that was enough. Have you tried Kerry Greenwood’s Corinna Chapmen books? The heroine is a plus size baker in modern Melbourne, and they’re wonderful. Very different from Miss Fisher, but wonderful.

    Reply
  181. Janice, you’re right: Jane Austen books are multi-layer and take time and concentration. They’re probably wasted on the young *G*, but the young have more time to read and reread them.

    Reply
  182. Janice, you’re right: Jane Austen books are multi-layer and take time and concentration. They’re probably wasted on the young *G*, but the young have more time to read and reread them.

    Reply
  183. Janice, you’re right: Jane Austen books are multi-layer and take time and concentration. They’re probably wasted on the young *G*, but the young have more time to read and reread them.

    Reply
  184. Janice, you’re right: Jane Austen books are multi-layer and take time and concentration. They’re probably wasted on the young *G*, but the young have more time to read and reread them.

    Reply
  185. Janice, you’re right: Jane Austen books are multi-layer and take time and concentration. They’re probably wasted on the young *G*, but the young have more time to read and reread them.

    Reply
  186. Merry, I also love Lord Peter Wimsey, especially the books with Harriet Vane. The extended series books by another writer are also very good. Thanks for the kind words about THE RAKE. Reggie does make quite a turnaround once he sobers u. He was such a jerk in The Diabolical Baron. But he grew on me *G*

    Reply
  187. Merry, I also love Lord Peter Wimsey, especially the books with Harriet Vane. The extended series books by another writer are also very good. Thanks for the kind words about THE RAKE. Reggie does make quite a turnaround once he sobers u. He was such a jerk in The Diabolical Baron. But he grew on me *G*

    Reply
  188. Merry, I also love Lord Peter Wimsey, especially the books with Harriet Vane. The extended series books by another writer are also very good. Thanks for the kind words about THE RAKE. Reggie does make quite a turnaround once he sobers u. He was such a jerk in The Diabolical Baron. But he grew on me *G*

    Reply
  189. Merry, I also love Lord Peter Wimsey, especially the books with Harriet Vane. The extended series books by another writer are also very good. Thanks for the kind words about THE RAKE. Reggie does make quite a turnaround once he sobers u. He was such a jerk in The Diabolical Baron. But he grew on me *G*

    Reply
  190. Merry, I also love Lord Peter Wimsey, especially the books with Harriet Vane. The extended series books by another writer are also very good. Thanks for the kind words about THE RAKE. Reggie does make quite a turnaround once he sobers u. He was such a jerk in The Diabolical Baron. But he grew on me *G*

    Reply
  191. Mary T, Gwen Bristow wrote a lot of really good books, including JUBILEE TRAIL and CALICO PALACE. She was a very good writer, and perhaps the American settings made her easier to connect with. I’ve read and reread a number of her books. Some are now available in e-book form.

    Reply
  192. Mary T, Gwen Bristow wrote a lot of really good books, including JUBILEE TRAIL and CALICO PALACE. She was a very good writer, and perhaps the American settings made her easier to connect with. I’ve read and reread a number of her books. Some are now available in e-book form.

    Reply
  193. Mary T, Gwen Bristow wrote a lot of really good books, including JUBILEE TRAIL and CALICO PALACE. She was a very good writer, and perhaps the American settings made her easier to connect with. I’ve read and reread a number of her books. Some are now available in e-book form.

    Reply
  194. Mary T, Gwen Bristow wrote a lot of really good books, including JUBILEE TRAIL and CALICO PALACE. She was a very good writer, and perhaps the American settings made her easier to connect with. I’ve read and reread a number of her books. Some are now available in e-book form.

    Reply
  195. Mary T, Gwen Bristow wrote a lot of really good books, including JUBILEE TRAIL and CALICO PALACE. She was a very good writer, and perhaps the American settings made her easier to connect with. I’ve read and reread a number of her books. Some are now available in e-book form.

    Reply
  196. This is such an interesting topic. Cannot believe how many authors/titles already mentioned that I have read through the years. Thankfully, books were always in the home starting very young with some Mickey Mouse books. My sister introduced me to Georgette Heyer when I was 13/14 and I still love rereading all of them. Some of the “bodice rippers” that I loved from the early 70s did not stand up for me on a later rereading, but the one series I keep going back and rereading is the Angelique series by Serge and Anne Golon. And the Harry Potter series by JR Rowling. Every time I read them I see something new and enjoy it all over again. That’s usually the same with most of my favorites which is partly due to growing older and new experiences.

    Reply
  197. This is such an interesting topic. Cannot believe how many authors/titles already mentioned that I have read through the years. Thankfully, books were always in the home starting very young with some Mickey Mouse books. My sister introduced me to Georgette Heyer when I was 13/14 and I still love rereading all of them. Some of the “bodice rippers” that I loved from the early 70s did not stand up for me on a later rereading, but the one series I keep going back and rereading is the Angelique series by Serge and Anne Golon. And the Harry Potter series by JR Rowling. Every time I read them I see something new and enjoy it all over again. That’s usually the same with most of my favorites which is partly due to growing older and new experiences.

    Reply
  198. This is such an interesting topic. Cannot believe how many authors/titles already mentioned that I have read through the years. Thankfully, books were always in the home starting very young with some Mickey Mouse books. My sister introduced me to Georgette Heyer when I was 13/14 and I still love rereading all of them. Some of the “bodice rippers” that I loved from the early 70s did not stand up for me on a later rereading, but the one series I keep going back and rereading is the Angelique series by Serge and Anne Golon. And the Harry Potter series by JR Rowling. Every time I read them I see something new and enjoy it all over again. That’s usually the same with most of my favorites which is partly due to growing older and new experiences.

    Reply
  199. This is such an interesting topic. Cannot believe how many authors/titles already mentioned that I have read through the years. Thankfully, books were always in the home starting very young with some Mickey Mouse books. My sister introduced me to Georgette Heyer when I was 13/14 and I still love rereading all of them. Some of the “bodice rippers” that I loved from the early 70s did not stand up for me on a later rereading, but the one series I keep going back and rereading is the Angelique series by Serge and Anne Golon. And the Harry Potter series by JR Rowling. Every time I read them I see something new and enjoy it all over again. That’s usually the same with most of my favorites which is partly due to growing older and new experiences.

    Reply
  200. This is such an interesting topic. Cannot believe how many authors/titles already mentioned that I have read through the years. Thankfully, books were always in the home starting very young with some Mickey Mouse books. My sister introduced me to Georgette Heyer when I was 13/14 and I still love rereading all of them. Some of the “bodice rippers” that I loved from the early 70s did not stand up for me on a later rereading, but the one series I keep going back and rereading is the Angelique series by Serge and Anne Golon. And the Harry Potter series by JR Rowling. Every time I read them I see something new and enjoy it all over again. That’s usually the same with most of my favorites which is partly due to growing older and new experiences.

    Reply
  201. What a great question and how fun to think of my answer! This group — both wenches and commenters — is so my tribe! You’ve listed so many books that leapt to mind and others I didn’t think of and thought yes! Those too!
    Now I need to chase down all the mentions I haven’t read yet for my new first times.

    Reply
  202. What a great question and how fun to think of my answer! This group — both wenches and commenters — is so my tribe! You’ve listed so many books that leapt to mind and others I didn’t think of and thought yes! Those too!
    Now I need to chase down all the mentions I haven’t read yet for my new first times.

    Reply
  203. What a great question and how fun to think of my answer! This group — both wenches and commenters — is so my tribe! You’ve listed so many books that leapt to mind and others I didn’t think of and thought yes! Those too!
    Now I need to chase down all the mentions I haven’t read yet for my new first times.

    Reply
  204. What a great question and how fun to think of my answer! This group — both wenches and commenters — is so my tribe! You’ve listed so many books that leapt to mind and others I didn’t think of and thought yes! Those too!
    Now I need to chase down all the mentions I haven’t read yet for my new first times.

    Reply
  205. What a great question and how fun to think of my answer! This group — both wenches and commenters — is so my tribe! You’ve listed so many books that leapt to mind and others I didn’t think of and thought yes! Those too!
    Now I need to chase down all the mentions I haven’t read yet for my new first times.

    Reply
  206. What an interesting topic! I’ve enjoyed reading all of the varied replies which mentioned many books that I’ve read.
    Some books that I loved when I was younger I have no desire to read again — I’m thinking of the 100 plus Barbara Cartland books I owned when I was a young teen. Others I’m scared to read again for fear that they won’t live up to my memory and love of them — I’m thinking of The Cheerleader by Ruth Doan MacDougall. [That last book also makes me think of the messages that we take away from books. The Cheerleader left me with two messages. First, that a good housekeeper always washes the butter dish when the butter runs out. Second, that college is the place where you can make friends that last a lifetime. For someone who moved every year or two as a child, you can bet that I looked forward to college as a place to BE for four years and make lasting friends. Messages that we take from books — a topic for a future post?]
    One book I’d enjoy reading again for the first time is Joanna Bourne’s The Spymaster’s Lady. After finishing it, I immediately re-read the first hundred pages or so to determine how I’d come to make an erroneous assumption.

    Reply
  207. What an interesting topic! I’ve enjoyed reading all of the varied replies which mentioned many books that I’ve read.
    Some books that I loved when I was younger I have no desire to read again — I’m thinking of the 100 plus Barbara Cartland books I owned when I was a young teen. Others I’m scared to read again for fear that they won’t live up to my memory and love of them — I’m thinking of The Cheerleader by Ruth Doan MacDougall. [That last book also makes me think of the messages that we take away from books. The Cheerleader left me with two messages. First, that a good housekeeper always washes the butter dish when the butter runs out. Second, that college is the place where you can make friends that last a lifetime. For someone who moved every year or two as a child, you can bet that I looked forward to college as a place to BE for four years and make lasting friends. Messages that we take from books — a topic for a future post?]
    One book I’d enjoy reading again for the first time is Joanna Bourne’s The Spymaster’s Lady. After finishing it, I immediately re-read the first hundred pages or so to determine how I’d come to make an erroneous assumption.

    Reply
  208. What an interesting topic! I’ve enjoyed reading all of the varied replies which mentioned many books that I’ve read.
    Some books that I loved when I was younger I have no desire to read again — I’m thinking of the 100 plus Barbara Cartland books I owned when I was a young teen. Others I’m scared to read again for fear that they won’t live up to my memory and love of them — I’m thinking of The Cheerleader by Ruth Doan MacDougall. [That last book also makes me think of the messages that we take away from books. The Cheerleader left me with two messages. First, that a good housekeeper always washes the butter dish when the butter runs out. Second, that college is the place where you can make friends that last a lifetime. For someone who moved every year or two as a child, you can bet that I looked forward to college as a place to BE for four years and make lasting friends. Messages that we take from books — a topic for a future post?]
    One book I’d enjoy reading again for the first time is Joanna Bourne’s The Spymaster’s Lady. After finishing it, I immediately re-read the first hundred pages or so to determine how I’d come to make an erroneous assumption.

    Reply
  209. What an interesting topic! I’ve enjoyed reading all of the varied replies which mentioned many books that I’ve read.
    Some books that I loved when I was younger I have no desire to read again — I’m thinking of the 100 plus Barbara Cartland books I owned when I was a young teen. Others I’m scared to read again for fear that they won’t live up to my memory and love of them — I’m thinking of The Cheerleader by Ruth Doan MacDougall. [That last book also makes me think of the messages that we take away from books. The Cheerleader left me with two messages. First, that a good housekeeper always washes the butter dish when the butter runs out. Second, that college is the place where you can make friends that last a lifetime. For someone who moved every year or two as a child, you can bet that I looked forward to college as a place to BE for four years and make lasting friends. Messages that we take from books — a topic for a future post?]
    One book I’d enjoy reading again for the first time is Joanna Bourne’s The Spymaster’s Lady. After finishing it, I immediately re-read the first hundred pages or so to determine how I’d come to make an erroneous assumption.

    Reply
  210. What an interesting topic! I’ve enjoyed reading all of the varied replies which mentioned many books that I’ve read.
    Some books that I loved when I was younger I have no desire to read again — I’m thinking of the 100 plus Barbara Cartland books I owned when I was a young teen. Others I’m scared to read again for fear that they won’t live up to my memory and love of them — I’m thinking of The Cheerleader by Ruth Doan MacDougall. [That last book also makes me think of the messages that we take away from books. The Cheerleader left me with two messages. First, that a good housekeeper always washes the butter dish when the butter runs out. Second, that college is the place where you can make friends that last a lifetime. For someone who moved every year or two as a child, you can bet that I looked forward to college as a place to BE for four years and make lasting friends. Messages that we take from books — a topic for a future post?]
    One book I’d enjoy reading again for the first time is Joanna Bourne’s The Spymaster’s Lady. After finishing it, I immediately re-read the first hundred pages or so to determine how I’d come to make an erroneous assumption.

    Reply
  211. Sue: From my ex-Library hardcover copy of Highland Masquerade “This book was published in England under the title Return to Glenshael.” I truly believe that there are only 3 books by Mary Elgin. If you know of the fourth, please let us know.

    Reply
  212. Sue: From my ex-Library hardcover copy of Highland Masquerade “This book was published in England under the title Return to Glenshael.” I truly believe that there are only 3 books by Mary Elgin. If you know of the fourth, please let us know.

    Reply
  213. Sue: From my ex-Library hardcover copy of Highland Masquerade “This book was published in England under the title Return to Glenshael.” I truly believe that there are only 3 books by Mary Elgin. If you know of the fourth, please let us know.

    Reply
  214. Sue: From my ex-Library hardcover copy of Highland Masquerade “This book was published in England under the title Return to Glenshael.” I truly believe that there are only 3 books by Mary Elgin. If you know of the fourth, please let us know.

    Reply
  215. Sue: From my ex-Library hardcover copy of Highland Masquerade “This book was published in England under the title Return to Glenshael.” I truly believe that there are only 3 books by Mary Elgin. If you know of the fourth, please let us know.

    Reply
  216. This is a great question….and I agree with so many of the books that were listed as ones that “stuck”.
    Agree also about the early Amanda Quick’s – they are so much more fun than the later ones. If you think about all of JAK’s books, the early ones from all 3 of her “names) from the 80’s and 90’s
    Several people have mentioned the fact that “life experiences” affect what you find is a great book now. I have also found that I should never read a book I’ve been anticipating if I’m tired. That really does influence my perception of the book.
    Who would have ever known that Madeleine Brent was a man. He did do excellent female POV. Have several of his/her books on my keeper shelf.
    It is very hard trying to decide who I would want to read again for the first time…because they wouldn’t hit me the same way I don’t think. Apparently the ones on my keeper shelf would have hit the right note as well.
    Looking at what is on my current keeper shelf the books I have kept have a different feel than the ones that I had in the beginning. Before the weeding, I had kept Everything!
    I know when I did a serious weed out of the Regencies & Historicals that I had accumulated in HS, College, early adulthood (late 70’s through early 90s)- the ones I kept tended to have more humor, depth of character, be more compelling in some way or the other.
    Some authors I did end up keeping everything they ever wrote (Mary Jo) but other’s I kept just a few here and there.. Not saying anything against the rest of the Wenches but I wasn’t collecting them in the 70’s & 80’s…
    Funny about re-reading books from Jr High days…when my sister became the Media Specialist ie Librarian at the Jr. High we all attended she had to weed out the book collection. There were many books she could tell that where I had been the last person to have read the book – 40 years before!
    All the books she found with my name on the library card she gave to me to read again. Half of them still stood the test of time! The others I was like huh…don’t remember and this is a stupid book. Oddly enough the ones that stood the test of time I could remember having read before I started the book.

    Reply
  217. This is a great question….and I agree with so many of the books that were listed as ones that “stuck”.
    Agree also about the early Amanda Quick’s – they are so much more fun than the later ones. If you think about all of JAK’s books, the early ones from all 3 of her “names) from the 80’s and 90’s
    Several people have mentioned the fact that “life experiences” affect what you find is a great book now. I have also found that I should never read a book I’ve been anticipating if I’m tired. That really does influence my perception of the book.
    Who would have ever known that Madeleine Brent was a man. He did do excellent female POV. Have several of his/her books on my keeper shelf.
    It is very hard trying to decide who I would want to read again for the first time…because they wouldn’t hit me the same way I don’t think. Apparently the ones on my keeper shelf would have hit the right note as well.
    Looking at what is on my current keeper shelf the books I have kept have a different feel than the ones that I had in the beginning. Before the weeding, I had kept Everything!
    I know when I did a serious weed out of the Regencies & Historicals that I had accumulated in HS, College, early adulthood (late 70’s through early 90s)- the ones I kept tended to have more humor, depth of character, be more compelling in some way or the other.
    Some authors I did end up keeping everything they ever wrote (Mary Jo) but other’s I kept just a few here and there.. Not saying anything against the rest of the Wenches but I wasn’t collecting them in the 70’s & 80’s…
    Funny about re-reading books from Jr High days…when my sister became the Media Specialist ie Librarian at the Jr. High we all attended she had to weed out the book collection. There were many books she could tell that where I had been the last person to have read the book – 40 years before!
    All the books she found with my name on the library card she gave to me to read again. Half of them still stood the test of time! The others I was like huh…don’t remember and this is a stupid book. Oddly enough the ones that stood the test of time I could remember having read before I started the book.

    Reply
  218. This is a great question….and I agree with so many of the books that were listed as ones that “stuck”.
    Agree also about the early Amanda Quick’s – they are so much more fun than the later ones. If you think about all of JAK’s books, the early ones from all 3 of her “names) from the 80’s and 90’s
    Several people have mentioned the fact that “life experiences” affect what you find is a great book now. I have also found that I should never read a book I’ve been anticipating if I’m tired. That really does influence my perception of the book.
    Who would have ever known that Madeleine Brent was a man. He did do excellent female POV. Have several of his/her books on my keeper shelf.
    It is very hard trying to decide who I would want to read again for the first time…because they wouldn’t hit me the same way I don’t think. Apparently the ones on my keeper shelf would have hit the right note as well.
    Looking at what is on my current keeper shelf the books I have kept have a different feel than the ones that I had in the beginning. Before the weeding, I had kept Everything!
    I know when I did a serious weed out of the Regencies & Historicals that I had accumulated in HS, College, early adulthood (late 70’s through early 90s)- the ones I kept tended to have more humor, depth of character, be more compelling in some way or the other.
    Some authors I did end up keeping everything they ever wrote (Mary Jo) but other’s I kept just a few here and there.. Not saying anything against the rest of the Wenches but I wasn’t collecting them in the 70’s & 80’s…
    Funny about re-reading books from Jr High days…when my sister became the Media Specialist ie Librarian at the Jr. High we all attended she had to weed out the book collection. There were many books she could tell that where I had been the last person to have read the book – 40 years before!
    All the books she found with my name on the library card she gave to me to read again. Half of them still stood the test of time! The others I was like huh…don’t remember and this is a stupid book. Oddly enough the ones that stood the test of time I could remember having read before I started the book.

    Reply
  219. This is a great question….and I agree with so many of the books that were listed as ones that “stuck”.
    Agree also about the early Amanda Quick’s – they are so much more fun than the later ones. If you think about all of JAK’s books, the early ones from all 3 of her “names) from the 80’s and 90’s
    Several people have mentioned the fact that “life experiences” affect what you find is a great book now. I have also found that I should never read a book I’ve been anticipating if I’m tired. That really does influence my perception of the book.
    Who would have ever known that Madeleine Brent was a man. He did do excellent female POV. Have several of his/her books on my keeper shelf.
    It is very hard trying to decide who I would want to read again for the first time…because they wouldn’t hit me the same way I don’t think. Apparently the ones on my keeper shelf would have hit the right note as well.
    Looking at what is on my current keeper shelf the books I have kept have a different feel than the ones that I had in the beginning. Before the weeding, I had kept Everything!
    I know when I did a serious weed out of the Regencies & Historicals that I had accumulated in HS, College, early adulthood (late 70’s through early 90s)- the ones I kept tended to have more humor, depth of character, be more compelling in some way or the other.
    Some authors I did end up keeping everything they ever wrote (Mary Jo) but other’s I kept just a few here and there.. Not saying anything against the rest of the Wenches but I wasn’t collecting them in the 70’s & 80’s…
    Funny about re-reading books from Jr High days…when my sister became the Media Specialist ie Librarian at the Jr. High we all attended she had to weed out the book collection. There were many books she could tell that where I had been the last person to have read the book – 40 years before!
    All the books she found with my name on the library card she gave to me to read again. Half of them still stood the test of time! The others I was like huh…don’t remember and this is a stupid book. Oddly enough the ones that stood the test of time I could remember having read before I started the book.

    Reply
  220. This is a great question….and I agree with so many of the books that were listed as ones that “stuck”.
    Agree also about the early Amanda Quick’s – they are so much more fun than the later ones. If you think about all of JAK’s books, the early ones from all 3 of her “names) from the 80’s and 90’s
    Several people have mentioned the fact that “life experiences” affect what you find is a great book now. I have also found that I should never read a book I’ve been anticipating if I’m tired. That really does influence my perception of the book.
    Who would have ever known that Madeleine Brent was a man. He did do excellent female POV. Have several of his/her books on my keeper shelf.
    It is very hard trying to decide who I would want to read again for the first time…because they wouldn’t hit me the same way I don’t think. Apparently the ones on my keeper shelf would have hit the right note as well.
    Looking at what is on my current keeper shelf the books I have kept have a different feel than the ones that I had in the beginning. Before the weeding, I had kept Everything!
    I know when I did a serious weed out of the Regencies & Historicals that I had accumulated in HS, College, early adulthood (late 70’s through early 90s)- the ones I kept tended to have more humor, depth of character, be more compelling in some way or the other.
    Some authors I did end up keeping everything they ever wrote (Mary Jo) but other’s I kept just a few here and there.. Not saying anything against the rest of the Wenches but I wasn’t collecting them in the 70’s & 80’s…
    Funny about re-reading books from Jr High days…when my sister became the Media Specialist ie Librarian at the Jr. High we all attended she had to weed out the book collection. There were many books she could tell that where I had been the last person to have read the book – 40 years before!
    All the books she found with my name on the library card she gave to me to read again. Half of them still stood the test of time! The others I was like huh…don’t remember and this is a stupid book. Oddly enough the ones that stood the test of time I could remember having read before I started the book.

    Reply
  221. I’m sure of that! I’m making a list of those I haven’t read yet, but so many mention that I do remember well and how wonderful they were!

    Reply
  222. I’m sure of that! I’m making a list of those I haven’t read yet, but so many mention that I do remember well and how wonderful they were!

    Reply
  223. I’m sure of that! I’m making a list of those I haven’t read yet, but so many mention that I do remember well and how wonderful they were!

    Reply
  224. I’m sure of that! I’m making a list of those I haven’t read yet, but so many mention that I do remember well and how wonderful they were!

    Reply
  225. I’m sure of that! I’m making a list of those I haven’t read yet, but so many mention that I do remember well and how wonderful they were!

    Reply
  226. Daphne duMaurier’s Frenchman’s Creek. And Gone With The Wind. And my first Georgette Heyer, I can’t remember which one it was, I devoured all they had at the Library in short order.

    Reply
  227. Daphne duMaurier’s Frenchman’s Creek. And Gone With The Wind. And my first Georgette Heyer, I can’t remember which one it was, I devoured all they had at the Library in short order.

    Reply
  228. Daphne duMaurier’s Frenchman’s Creek. And Gone With The Wind. And my first Georgette Heyer, I can’t remember which one it was, I devoured all they had at the Library in short order.

    Reply
  229. Daphne duMaurier’s Frenchman’s Creek. And Gone With The Wind. And my first Georgette Heyer, I can’t remember which one it was, I devoured all they had at the Library in short order.

    Reply
  230. Daphne duMaurier’s Frenchman’s Creek. And Gone With The Wind. And my first Georgette Heyer, I can’t remember which one it was, I devoured all they had at the Library in short order.

    Reply
  231. Pat, If you use windows 10 then the windows media player will do the job nicely:
    1) open the audio file in the media player
    2) select ‘now playing’ mode
    3) right click on main window and select enhancements
    4 select speed settings.
    5)Adjust speed with the slider
    Hope this helps

    Reply
  232. Pat, If you use windows 10 then the windows media player will do the job nicely:
    1) open the audio file in the media player
    2) select ‘now playing’ mode
    3) right click on main window and select enhancements
    4 select speed settings.
    5)Adjust speed with the slider
    Hope this helps

    Reply
  233. Pat, If you use windows 10 then the windows media player will do the job nicely:
    1) open the audio file in the media player
    2) select ‘now playing’ mode
    3) right click on main window and select enhancements
    4 select speed settings.
    5)Adjust speed with the slider
    Hope this helps

    Reply
  234. Pat, If you use windows 10 then the windows media player will do the job nicely:
    1) open the audio file in the media player
    2) select ‘now playing’ mode
    3) right click on main window and select enhancements
    4 select speed settings.
    5)Adjust speed with the slider
    Hope this helps

    Reply
  235. Pat, If you use windows 10 then the windows media player will do the job nicely:
    1) open the audio file in the media player
    2) select ‘now playing’ mode
    3) right click on main window and select enhancements
    4 select speed settings.
    5)Adjust speed with the slider
    Hope this helps

    Reply
  236. I’m guessing people either love or hate the Mapp and Lucia books. (I’m in the first category.) They are hilarious if you know enough about British society in the early 20th century, but I can imagine lots of people wondering what all the fuss was about.

    Reply
  237. I’m guessing people either love or hate the Mapp and Lucia books. (I’m in the first category.) They are hilarious if you know enough about British society in the early 20th century, but I can imagine lots of people wondering what all the fuss was about.

    Reply
  238. I’m guessing people either love or hate the Mapp and Lucia books. (I’m in the first category.) They are hilarious if you know enough about British society in the early 20th century, but I can imagine lots of people wondering what all the fuss was about.

    Reply
  239. I’m guessing people either love or hate the Mapp and Lucia books. (I’m in the first category.) They are hilarious if you know enough about British society in the early 20th century, but I can imagine lots of people wondering what all the fuss was about.

    Reply
  240. I’m guessing people either love or hate the Mapp and Lucia books. (I’m in the first category.) They are hilarious if you know enough about British society in the early 20th century, but I can imagine lots of people wondering what all the fuss was about.

    Reply
  241. Andrea, I love a good audio book for when I’m driving, especially long distances, and also when I’m doing a dreary chore at home — like cleaning out cupboards, or stripping wallpaper or that kind of thing. It makes the chore and the time fly.
    I’m also wondering whether an affinity for audio books is in any way related to (in my case) a youth listening to radio — we didn’t have TV for most of my childhood. Dad didn’t approve of it. And also a lot of the radio I listened to was the ABC — like the BBC — a lot of talk, and serials and plays and audio-documentaries — not the talkback shock-jock radio you get on so many radio stations now. So often I’d spend an evening lying in front of the fire, with the radio going while I drew or did puzzles or some kind of craft, my hands in the present, while my brain was in ancient Rome, or on the high seas, or with the Goons..

    Reply
  242. Andrea, I love a good audio book for when I’m driving, especially long distances, and also when I’m doing a dreary chore at home — like cleaning out cupboards, or stripping wallpaper or that kind of thing. It makes the chore and the time fly.
    I’m also wondering whether an affinity for audio books is in any way related to (in my case) a youth listening to radio — we didn’t have TV for most of my childhood. Dad didn’t approve of it. And also a lot of the radio I listened to was the ABC — like the BBC — a lot of talk, and serials and plays and audio-documentaries — not the talkback shock-jock radio you get on so many radio stations now. So often I’d spend an evening lying in front of the fire, with the radio going while I drew or did puzzles or some kind of craft, my hands in the present, while my brain was in ancient Rome, or on the high seas, or with the Goons..

    Reply
  243. Andrea, I love a good audio book for when I’m driving, especially long distances, and also when I’m doing a dreary chore at home — like cleaning out cupboards, or stripping wallpaper or that kind of thing. It makes the chore and the time fly.
    I’m also wondering whether an affinity for audio books is in any way related to (in my case) a youth listening to radio — we didn’t have TV for most of my childhood. Dad didn’t approve of it. And also a lot of the radio I listened to was the ABC — like the BBC — a lot of talk, and serials and plays and audio-documentaries — not the talkback shock-jock radio you get on so many radio stations now. So often I’d spend an evening lying in front of the fire, with the radio going while I drew or did puzzles or some kind of craft, my hands in the present, while my brain was in ancient Rome, or on the high seas, or with the Goons..

    Reply
  244. Andrea, I love a good audio book for when I’m driving, especially long distances, and also when I’m doing a dreary chore at home — like cleaning out cupboards, or stripping wallpaper or that kind of thing. It makes the chore and the time fly.
    I’m also wondering whether an affinity for audio books is in any way related to (in my case) a youth listening to radio — we didn’t have TV for most of my childhood. Dad didn’t approve of it. And also a lot of the radio I listened to was the ABC — like the BBC — a lot of talk, and serials and plays and audio-documentaries — not the talkback shock-jock radio you get on so many radio stations now. So often I’d spend an evening lying in front of the fire, with the radio going while I drew or did puzzles or some kind of craft, my hands in the present, while my brain was in ancient Rome, or on the high seas, or with the Goons..

    Reply
  245. Andrea, I love a good audio book for when I’m driving, especially long distances, and also when I’m doing a dreary chore at home — like cleaning out cupboards, or stripping wallpaper or that kind of thing. It makes the chore and the time fly.
    I’m also wondering whether an affinity for audio books is in any way related to (in my case) a youth listening to radio — we didn’t have TV for most of my childhood. Dad didn’t approve of it. And also a lot of the radio I listened to was the ABC — like the BBC — a lot of talk, and serials and plays and audio-documentaries — not the talkback shock-jock radio you get on so many radio stations now. So often I’d spend an evening lying in front of the fire, with the radio going while I drew or did puzzles or some kind of craft, my hands in the present, while my brain was in ancient Rome, or on the high seas, or with the Goons..

    Reply
  246. Lillian, Precious Bane was one of my 20c discoveries from the antique shop I used to browse through when I was a teen. (They sold antiques and the books were very cheap, and piled up the back — from deceased estate clearances) I loved it, and I have several copies, because I can’t bear to see them tossed away.

    Reply
  247. Lillian, Precious Bane was one of my 20c discoveries from the antique shop I used to browse through when I was a teen. (They sold antiques and the books were very cheap, and piled up the back — from deceased estate clearances) I loved it, and I have several copies, because I can’t bear to see them tossed away.

    Reply
  248. Lillian, Precious Bane was one of my 20c discoveries from the antique shop I used to browse through when I was a teen. (They sold antiques and the books were very cheap, and piled up the back — from deceased estate clearances) I loved it, and I have several copies, because I can’t bear to see them tossed away.

    Reply
  249. Lillian, Precious Bane was one of my 20c discoveries from the antique shop I used to browse through when I was a teen. (They sold antiques and the books were very cheap, and piled up the back — from deceased estate clearances) I loved it, and I have several copies, because I can’t bear to see them tossed away.

    Reply
  250. Lillian, Precious Bane was one of my 20c discoveries from the antique shop I used to browse through when I was a teen. (They sold antiques and the books were very cheap, and piled up the back — from deceased estate clearances) I loved it, and I have several copies, because I can’t bear to see them tossed away.

    Reply
  251. Rose, I loved all the Frances Hodgson Burnett books — the Secret Garden, The Little Princess and others. I also loved Madeline Brent and remember being surprised when I learned she was a man. I have all of them still.

    Reply
  252. Rose, I loved all the Frances Hodgson Burnett books — the Secret Garden, The Little Princess and others. I also loved Madeline Brent and remember being surprised when I learned she was a man. I have all of them still.

    Reply
  253. Rose, I loved all the Frances Hodgson Burnett books — the Secret Garden, The Little Princess and others. I also loved Madeline Brent and remember being surprised when I learned she was a man. I have all of them still.

    Reply
  254. Rose, I loved all the Frances Hodgson Burnett books — the Secret Garden, The Little Princess and others. I also loved Madeline Brent and remember being surprised when I learned she was a man. I have all of them still.

    Reply
  255. Rose, I loved all the Frances Hodgson Burnett books — the Secret Garden, The Little Princess and others. I also loved Madeline Brent and remember being surprised when I learned she was a man. I have all of them still.

    Reply
  256. Heyer, Dunnett, Balogh are all on this list. Bujold- both fantasy aND Sci First (she is a big Heyer fan). Lloyd Alexander’so Prydian series are some of the best junior fantasy, as well as Madeleine Lingle’s.

    Reply
  257. Heyer, Dunnett, Balogh are all on this list. Bujold- both fantasy aND Sci First (she is a big Heyer fan). Lloyd Alexander’so Prydian series are some of the best junior fantasy, as well as Madeleine Lingle’s.

    Reply
  258. Heyer, Dunnett, Balogh are all on this list. Bujold- both fantasy aND Sci First (she is a big Heyer fan). Lloyd Alexander’so Prydian series are some of the best junior fantasy, as well as Madeleine Lingle’s.

    Reply
  259. Heyer, Dunnett, Balogh are all on this list. Bujold- both fantasy aND Sci First (she is a big Heyer fan). Lloyd Alexander’so Prydian series are some of the best junior fantasy, as well as Madeleine Lingle’s.

    Reply
  260. Heyer, Dunnett, Balogh are all on this list. Bujold- both fantasy aND Sci First (she is a big Heyer fan). Lloyd Alexander’so Prydian series are some of the best junior fantasy, as well as Madeleine Lingle’s.

    Reply
  261. Oh Mary Stewart… I felt so grown up reading her stories in my early teens. But Katherine by Anya Seton remains the top of the list. Even though it was written in 1957, I am still sometimes asked if I am that Anya Seton! (I do sometimes wonder whether my choice of pen name was influenced sub consciously by my love of her books.)

    Reply
  262. Oh Mary Stewart… I felt so grown up reading her stories in my early teens. But Katherine by Anya Seton remains the top of the list. Even though it was written in 1957, I am still sometimes asked if I am that Anya Seton! (I do sometimes wonder whether my choice of pen name was influenced sub consciously by my love of her books.)

    Reply
  263. Oh Mary Stewart… I felt so grown up reading her stories in my early teens. But Katherine by Anya Seton remains the top of the list. Even though it was written in 1957, I am still sometimes asked if I am that Anya Seton! (I do sometimes wonder whether my choice of pen name was influenced sub consciously by my love of her books.)

    Reply
  264. Oh Mary Stewart… I felt so grown up reading her stories in my early teens. But Katherine by Anya Seton remains the top of the list. Even though it was written in 1957, I am still sometimes asked if I am that Anya Seton! (I do sometimes wonder whether my choice of pen name was influenced sub consciously by my love of her books.)

    Reply
  265. Oh Mary Stewart… I felt so grown up reading her stories in my early teens. But Katherine by Anya Seton remains the top of the list. Even though it was written in 1957, I am still sometimes asked if I am that Anya Seton! (I do sometimes wonder whether my choice of pen name was influenced sub consciously by my love of her books.)

    Reply
  266. Oh, yes, I agree with the Betsy-Tracy books! There’s an active Betsy-Tacy Society that owns and administers “Betsy’s” and “Tacy’s” houses in Mankato, MN. I’ve given those books to several little girls to enjoy.

    Reply
  267. Oh, yes, I agree with the Betsy-Tracy books! There’s an active Betsy-Tacy Society that owns and administers “Betsy’s” and “Tacy’s” houses in Mankato, MN. I’ve given those books to several little girls to enjoy.

    Reply
  268. Oh, yes, I agree with the Betsy-Tracy books! There’s an active Betsy-Tacy Society that owns and administers “Betsy’s” and “Tacy’s” houses in Mankato, MN. I’ve given those books to several little girls to enjoy.

    Reply
  269. Oh, yes, I agree with the Betsy-Tracy books! There’s an active Betsy-Tacy Society that owns and administers “Betsy’s” and “Tacy’s” houses in Mankato, MN. I’ve given those books to several little girls to enjoy.

    Reply
  270. Oh, yes, I agree with the Betsy-Tracy books! There’s an active Betsy-Tacy Society that owns and administers “Betsy’s” and “Tacy’s” houses in Mankato, MN. I’ve given those books to several little girls to enjoy.

    Reply
  271. Is there any chance the books about the family of children might have been the Bobbsey Twins? I have no idea where this memory has resurfaced from!

    Reply
  272. Is there any chance the books about the family of children might have been the Bobbsey Twins? I have no idea where this memory has resurfaced from!

    Reply
  273. Is there any chance the books about the family of children might have been the Bobbsey Twins? I have no idea where this memory has resurfaced from!

    Reply
  274. Is there any chance the books about the family of children might have been the Bobbsey Twins? I have no idea where this memory has resurfaced from!

    Reply
  275. Is there any chance the books about the family of children might have been the Bobbsey Twins? I have no idea where this memory has resurfaced from!

    Reply
  276. I still “remember” a fourth book. All three heroines are introduced to their romances through the same employment agency. The fourth book is about that agency. It is possible that I “read” this in a dream — I do dream that I’m reading a novel — but I truly think it did exist.
    As I said above, sometime in the relatively recent WordWench discussions, some reader mentioned owning “all four books” which would exclude the two titles for “Highland Masquerade.”
    Any way, I keep trying to validate my memory.

    Reply
  277. I still “remember” a fourth book. All three heroines are introduced to their romances through the same employment agency. The fourth book is about that agency. It is possible that I “read” this in a dream — I do dream that I’m reading a novel — but I truly think it did exist.
    As I said above, sometime in the relatively recent WordWench discussions, some reader mentioned owning “all four books” which would exclude the two titles for “Highland Masquerade.”
    Any way, I keep trying to validate my memory.

    Reply
  278. I still “remember” a fourth book. All three heroines are introduced to their romances through the same employment agency. The fourth book is about that agency. It is possible that I “read” this in a dream — I do dream that I’m reading a novel — but I truly think it did exist.
    As I said above, sometime in the relatively recent WordWench discussions, some reader mentioned owning “all four books” which would exclude the two titles for “Highland Masquerade.”
    Any way, I keep trying to validate my memory.

    Reply
  279. I still “remember” a fourth book. All three heroines are introduced to their romances through the same employment agency. The fourth book is about that agency. It is possible that I “read” this in a dream — I do dream that I’m reading a novel — but I truly think it did exist.
    As I said above, sometime in the relatively recent WordWench discussions, some reader mentioned owning “all four books” which would exclude the two titles for “Highland Masquerade.”
    Any way, I keep trying to validate my memory.

    Reply
  280. I still “remember” a fourth book. All three heroines are introduced to their romances through the same employment agency. The fourth book is about that agency. It is possible that I “read” this in a dream — I do dream that I’m reading a novel — but I truly think it did exist.
    As I said above, sometime in the relatively recent WordWench discussions, some reader mentioned owning “all four books” which would exclude the two titles for “Highland Masquerade.”
    Any way, I keep trying to validate my memory.

    Reply
  281. Fire and Hemlock by Diana Wynne Jones. Started reading her on the advice of my then editor, the late, great Jacqui Bianchi, and couldn’t believe the wonderful world I found myself in. Each new (to me) book was a delight. But Fire and Hemlock was The One. Re-read it regularly but that first slow burning realisation that this is going to be a jewel and MIGHT not end well will never come again. (It does.)
    By the way, her books were aimed by her publisher at children and a Young Adults. But I think she’s like Alan Garner, the books stand on their own two feet without any need for age discrimination.

    Reply
  282. Fire and Hemlock by Diana Wynne Jones. Started reading her on the advice of my then editor, the late, great Jacqui Bianchi, and couldn’t believe the wonderful world I found myself in. Each new (to me) book was a delight. But Fire and Hemlock was The One. Re-read it regularly but that first slow burning realisation that this is going to be a jewel and MIGHT not end well will never come again. (It does.)
    By the way, her books were aimed by her publisher at children and a Young Adults. But I think she’s like Alan Garner, the books stand on their own two feet without any need for age discrimination.

    Reply
  283. Fire and Hemlock by Diana Wynne Jones. Started reading her on the advice of my then editor, the late, great Jacqui Bianchi, and couldn’t believe the wonderful world I found myself in. Each new (to me) book was a delight. But Fire and Hemlock was The One. Re-read it regularly but that first slow burning realisation that this is going to be a jewel and MIGHT not end well will never come again. (It does.)
    By the way, her books were aimed by her publisher at children and a Young Adults. But I think she’s like Alan Garner, the books stand on their own two feet without any need for age discrimination.

    Reply
  284. Fire and Hemlock by Diana Wynne Jones. Started reading her on the advice of my then editor, the late, great Jacqui Bianchi, and couldn’t believe the wonderful world I found myself in. Each new (to me) book was a delight. But Fire and Hemlock was The One. Re-read it regularly but that first slow burning realisation that this is going to be a jewel and MIGHT not end well will never come again. (It does.)
    By the way, her books were aimed by her publisher at children and a Young Adults. But I think she’s like Alan Garner, the books stand on their own two feet without any need for age discrimination.

    Reply
  285. Fire and Hemlock by Diana Wynne Jones. Started reading her on the advice of my then editor, the late, great Jacqui Bianchi, and couldn’t believe the wonderful world I found myself in. Each new (to me) book was a delight. But Fire and Hemlock was The One. Re-read it regularly but that first slow burning realisation that this is going to be a jewel and MIGHT not end well will never come again. (It does.)
    By the way, her books were aimed by her publisher at children and a Young Adults. But I think she’s like Alan Garner, the books stand on their own two feet without any need for age discrimination.

    Reply
  286. Georgette Heyer books have been re-read many times by me. Especially These Old Shades and Devil’s Cub. Love Mary Balogh and read her Slightly Dangerous often. Read Mary Jo Putney’s Lost Lords many times. I think the emotional content of the stories just appeal to my mind. 🙂

    Reply
  287. Georgette Heyer books have been re-read many times by me. Especially These Old Shades and Devil’s Cub. Love Mary Balogh and read her Slightly Dangerous often. Read Mary Jo Putney’s Lost Lords many times. I think the emotional content of the stories just appeal to my mind. 🙂

    Reply
  288. Georgette Heyer books have been re-read many times by me. Especially These Old Shades and Devil’s Cub. Love Mary Balogh and read her Slightly Dangerous often. Read Mary Jo Putney’s Lost Lords many times. I think the emotional content of the stories just appeal to my mind. 🙂

    Reply
  289. Georgette Heyer books have been re-read many times by me. Especially These Old Shades and Devil’s Cub. Love Mary Balogh and read her Slightly Dangerous often. Read Mary Jo Putney’s Lost Lords many times. I think the emotional content of the stories just appeal to my mind. 🙂

    Reply
  290. Georgette Heyer books have been re-read many times by me. Especially These Old Shades and Devil’s Cub. Love Mary Balogh and read her Slightly Dangerous often. Read Mary Jo Putney’s Lost Lords many times. I think the emotional content of the stories just appeal to my mind. 🙂

    Reply
  291. I’m happy to make your list, Prema! I agree that some authors just resonate with us. Others might be just as good in writing terms, but they just aren’t on the same wavelength in the same way.

    Reply
  292. I’m happy to make your list, Prema! I agree that some authors just resonate with us. Others might be just as good in writing terms, but they just aren’t on the same wavelength in the same way.

    Reply
  293. I’m happy to make your list, Prema! I agree that some authors just resonate with us. Others might be just as good in writing terms, but they just aren’t on the same wavelength in the same way.

    Reply
  294. I’m happy to make your list, Prema! I agree that some authors just resonate with us. Others might be just as good in writing terms, but they just aren’t on the same wavelength in the same way.

    Reply
  295. I’m happy to make your list, Prema! I agree that some authors just resonate with us. Others might be just as good in writing terms, but they just aren’t on the same wavelength in the same way.

    Reply
  296. I agree that Mary Stewart(This Rough Magic being my favourite), Daphne du Maurier(Jamaica Inn) and Georgette Heyer are all authors I am happy to return to. For reasons of work/family I had not done much reading for a number of years but have returned with a vengeance over the last three to four years. In the case of Heyer I have an extremely tattered copy of These Old Shades which I cannot bear to part with despite having an e book version. I have reread most of Heyer’s Georgian/Regency novels over that period but read Venetia for the first time. I am not sure why I had not read it before as it completely enchanted me. The wit and humour and the love story all appealed to me in a particular way. I have reread a few of Kathleen Woodiwiss’ books but they no longer appeal for some reason. Of recently discovered authors I really enjoy Elizabeth Chadwick particularly her Wild Hunt series as well as Lucinda Brant and Elizabeth Hoyt. I also adore Mary Balogh Bedwyn series which also resonates with Jo Beverley’s Malloren series. There is something about the characters of Wulf and Bey which really appeals to me.

    Reply
  297. I agree that Mary Stewart(This Rough Magic being my favourite), Daphne du Maurier(Jamaica Inn) and Georgette Heyer are all authors I am happy to return to. For reasons of work/family I had not done much reading for a number of years but have returned with a vengeance over the last three to four years. In the case of Heyer I have an extremely tattered copy of These Old Shades which I cannot bear to part with despite having an e book version. I have reread most of Heyer’s Georgian/Regency novels over that period but read Venetia for the first time. I am not sure why I had not read it before as it completely enchanted me. The wit and humour and the love story all appealed to me in a particular way. I have reread a few of Kathleen Woodiwiss’ books but they no longer appeal for some reason. Of recently discovered authors I really enjoy Elizabeth Chadwick particularly her Wild Hunt series as well as Lucinda Brant and Elizabeth Hoyt. I also adore Mary Balogh Bedwyn series which also resonates with Jo Beverley’s Malloren series. There is something about the characters of Wulf and Bey which really appeals to me.

    Reply
  298. I agree that Mary Stewart(This Rough Magic being my favourite), Daphne du Maurier(Jamaica Inn) and Georgette Heyer are all authors I am happy to return to. For reasons of work/family I had not done much reading for a number of years but have returned with a vengeance over the last three to four years. In the case of Heyer I have an extremely tattered copy of These Old Shades which I cannot bear to part with despite having an e book version. I have reread most of Heyer’s Georgian/Regency novels over that period but read Venetia for the first time. I am not sure why I had not read it before as it completely enchanted me. The wit and humour and the love story all appealed to me in a particular way. I have reread a few of Kathleen Woodiwiss’ books but they no longer appeal for some reason. Of recently discovered authors I really enjoy Elizabeth Chadwick particularly her Wild Hunt series as well as Lucinda Brant and Elizabeth Hoyt. I also adore Mary Balogh Bedwyn series which also resonates with Jo Beverley’s Malloren series. There is something about the characters of Wulf and Bey which really appeals to me.

    Reply
  299. I agree that Mary Stewart(This Rough Magic being my favourite), Daphne du Maurier(Jamaica Inn) and Georgette Heyer are all authors I am happy to return to. For reasons of work/family I had not done much reading for a number of years but have returned with a vengeance over the last three to four years. In the case of Heyer I have an extremely tattered copy of These Old Shades which I cannot bear to part with despite having an e book version. I have reread most of Heyer’s Georgian/Regency novels over that period but read Venetia for the first time. I am not sure why I had not read it before as it completely enchanted me. The wit and humour and the love story all appealed to me in a particular way. I have reread a few of Kathleen Woodiwiss’ books but they no longer appeal for some reason. Of recently discovered authors I really enjoy Elizabeth Chadwick particularly her Wild Hunt series as well as Lucinda Brant and Elizabeth Hoyt. I also adore Mary Balogh Bedwyn series which also resonates with Jo Beverley’s Malloren series. There is something about the characters of Wulf and Bey which really appeals to me.

    Reply
  300. I agree that Mary Stewart(This Rough Magic being my favourite), Daphne du Maurier(Jamaica Inn) and Georgette Heyer are all authors I am happy to return to. For reasons of work/family I had not done much reading for a number of years but have returned with a vengeance over the last three to four years. In the case of Heyer I have an extremely tattered copy of These Old Shades which I cannot bear to part with despite having an e book version. I have reread most of Heyer’s Georgian/Regency novels over that period but read Venetia for the first time. I am not sure why I had not read it before as it completely enchanted me. The wit and humour and the love story all appealed to me in a particular way. I have reread a few of Kathleen Woodiwiss’ books but they no longer appeal for some reason. Of recently discovered authors I really enjoy Elizabeth Chadwick particularly her Wild Hunt series as well as Lucinda Brant and Elizabeth Hoyt. I also adore Mary Balogh Bedwyn series which also resonates with Jo Beverley’s Malloren series. There is something about the characters of Wulf and Bey which really appeals to me.

    Reply
  301. Thanks for checking. I’ve checked all over the internet and left notes on Amazon discussions about her books. Nobody seems to know.

    Reply
  302. Thanks for checking. I’ve checked all over the internet and left notes on Amazon discussions about her books. Nobody seems to know.

    Reply
  303. Thanks for checking. I’ve checked all over the internet and left notes on Amazon discussions about her books. Nobody seems to know.

    Reply
  304. Thanks for checking. I’ve checked all over the internet and left notes on Amazon discussions about her books. Nobody seems to know.