Quiz β€” English Names

Anne here, just off a plane from Brisbane and landing in my home town, Melbourne. People from outside Australia usually pronounce these names as they're written — ie Briz-bayn and Mel-born, but locals will always say Briz b'n and Melb'n.  Bertie-wooster

Thinking about that started me pondering the many English names that are pronounced differently from the way they look, and which visitors so often get wrong, so I thought it might be fun to explore a few of them in a little quiz. Some of them I'm sure you'll know, but others might have you saying, "Whaaaat?"  Make a note of your answers, and at ther bottom of the quiz there's a page where you can check your answers.

1) How would an Englishman called Beauchamp pronounce his name?
    a)  Bow sham
    b)  Bee shawm
    c)  Bay chum
    d)  Beech um

2) How do locals say Magdalen College Oxford? Magdalen_College_0
    a)  Maudlin College Oxford
    b)  Mag da len College Oxford
    c)  Mag da layne College Oxford
    d)  Meg lin College Oxford

3) What's the correct pronunciation for Worcestershire?
    a)  Wor ses ter shyre
    b)  Wor ses ter sheer
    c)  Woos ter sheer
    d)  Waster shyre

4) What's the correct pronunciation for Leicester?
    a)  Lee ses ter
    b)  Lay ses ter
    c)  Lester
    d)  Leek ster

 5) How should one pronounce  Featherstonehaugh?
    a)  Feather stun haw
    b)  Fan shaw
    c)  Fay stone haw
    d)  Feather stone hog

6) What's the correct pronunciation for Cholmondley?
    a)  Chumley
    b)  Chol mond lee
    c)  Chol mond lay
    d)  Chaw man lay

 7) How would an Englishman called Mr Marjoribanks say his name? HughLaurie-BertieWooster
    a)  Marj banks
    b)  March banks
    c)  Mar jori banks
    d)  Major banks 

8) How does one pronounce Calke Abbey?
    a)  Cal key Abbey
    b)  Car key Abbey
    c)  Cake Abbey
    d)  Cork Abbey

 9) What's the correct English pronounciation of Marlborough?
    a)  Marl burra
    b)  Mel bra
    c)  Marl boro
    d)  Mawl br'uh

10) What's the correct pronunciation for Leomenster?   
    a)  Lemster
    b)  Lee omster
    c)  Leo  main ster
    d)  Lee menster

 11) What's the correct pronunciation for Ruthven?
    a) Rooth ven
    b) Roo ven
    c) Rivven
    d) Ray ban 

12) What's the correct way to say Belvoir Castle? Belvoir_Castle
    a)  Bell ver  Castle
    b)  Beaver Castle
    c)  Bell vw ar Castle
    d)  Bell vor Castle

Now, click on the link to check your answers, then come back and tell us how you went. Do you know any other names  (English or otherwise) that confuse people because the spelling is different to the way they're locally pronounced? Are there any other English names you're not sure how to pronounce? Try them out with the wenchly community.

 

375 thoughts on “Quiz β€” English Names”

  1. This was great fun! I missed 2 (#8 & #12). I only learned #2 a few weeks ago, and that was from listening to a romance novel audio tape!

    Reply
  2. This was great fun! I missed 2 (#8 & #12). I only learned #2 a few weeks ago, and that was from listening to a romance novel audio tape!

    Reply
  3. This was great fun! I missed 2 (#8 & #12). I only learned #2 a few weeks ago, and that was from listening to a romance novel audio tape!

    Reply
  4. This was great fun! I missed 2 (#8 & #12). I only learned #2 a few weeks ago, and that was from listening to a romance novel audio tape!

    Reply
  5. This was great fun! I missed 2 (#8 & #12). I only learned #2 a few weeks ago, and that was from listening to a romance novel audio tape!

    Reply
  6. I got all but 3 right, not bad for an American! Although the only reason I got the pronunciation of Magdalene College correct is I have a friend who is at Magdalene College in Cambridge. I missed Calke Abbey, Marlborough, and Belvoir Castle,

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  7. I got all but 3 right, not bad for an American! Although the only reason I got the pronunciation of Magdalene College correct is I have a friend who is at Magdalene College in Cambridge. I missed Calke Abbey, Marlborough, and Belvoir Castle,

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  8. I got all but 3 right, not bad for an American! Although the only reason I got the pronunciation of Magdalene College correct is I have a friend who is at Magdalene College in Cambridge. I missed Calke Abbey, Marlborough, and Belvoir Castle,

    Reply
  9. I got all but 3 right, not bad for an American! Although the only reason I got the pronunciation of Magdalene College correct is I have a friend who is at Magdalene College in Cambridge. I missed Calke Abbey, Marlborough, and Belvoir Castle,

    Reply
  10. I got all but 3 right, not bad for an American! Although the only reason I got the pronunciation of Magdalene College correct is I have a friend who is at Magdalene College in Cambridge. I missed Calke Abbey, Marlborough, and Belvoir Castle,

    Reply
  11. I missed 3 but 1 of them was because there’s a neighbourhood in my city called Marlborough, pronounced as written. Ruthven I waffled on and landed the wrong way and Belvoir as Beaver is just messed up! The rest I knew.

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  12. I missed 3 but 1 of them was because there’s a neighbourhood in my city called Marlborough, pronounced as written. Ruthven I waffled on and landed the wrong way and Belvoir as Beaver is just messed up! The rest I knew.

    Reply
  13. I missed 3 but 1 of them was because there’s a neighbourhood in my city called Marlborough, pronounced as written. Ruthven I waffled on and landed the wrong way and Belvoir as Beaver is just messed up! The rest I knew.

    Reply
  14. I missed 3 but 1 of them was because there’s a neighbourhood in my city called Marlborough, pronounced as written. Ruthven I waffled on and landed the wrong way and Belvoir as Beaver is just messed up! The rest I knew.

    Reply
  15. I missed 3 but 1 of them was because there’s a neighbourhood in my city called Marlborough, pronounced as written. Ruthven I waffled on and landed the wrong way and Belvoir as Beaver is just messed up! The rest I knew.

    Reply
  16. Missed Calke Abbey. The rest I had down from a lifetime of reading books set in Britain and watching shows and movies made there. Years ago on the show “Nanny and the Professor” there was a character named Cholmondley Featherstonehaugh, so I learned those early on.

    Reply
  17. Missed Calke Abbey. The rest I had down from a lifetime of reading books set in Britain and watching shows and movies made there. Years ago on the show “Nanny and the Professor” there was a character named Cholmondley Featherstonehaugh, so I learned those early on.

    Reply
  18. Missed Calke Abbey. The rest I had down from a lifetime of reading books set in Britain and watching shows and movies made there. Years ago on the show “Nanny and the Professor” there was a character named Cholmondley Featherstonehaugh, so I learned those early on.

    Reply
  19. Missed Calke Abbey. The rest I had down from a lifetime of reading books set in Britain and watching shows and movies made there. Years ago on the show “Nanny and the Professor” there was a character named Cholmondley Featherstonehaugh, so I learned those early on.

    Reply
  20. Missed Calke Abbey. The rest I had down from a lifetime of reading books set in Britain and watching shows and movies made there. Years ago on the show “Nanny and the Professor” there was a character named Cholmondley Featherstonehaugh, so I learned those early on.

    Reply
  21. Being a gal from the mid-west in the good ole USA. I didn’t expect to do too well – and boy, was that an understatement. I had only one right. The funny thing is that the one I had right was worcestershire, which is in reality a real tongue twister for me. I feel like I’m sneezing every time I pronounce it.
    One thing that I love about my kindle is that you can tap on a word and get a definition. But I’m waiting for them to improve it and put a phonic spelling with the word.

    Reply
  22. Being a gal from the mid-west in the good ole USA. I didn’t expect to do too well – and boy, was that an understatement. I had only one right. The funny thing is that the one I had right was worcestershire, which is in reality a real tongue twister for me. I feel like I’m sneezing every time I pronounce it.
    One thing that I love about my kindle is that you can tap on a word and get a definition. But I’m waiting for them to improve it and put a phonic spelling with the word.

    Reply
  23. Being a gal from the mid-west in the good ole USA. I didn’t expect to do too well – and boy, was that an understatement. I had only one right. The funny thing is that the one I had right was worcestershire, which is in reality a real tongue twister for me. I feel like I’m sneezing every time I pronounce it.
    One thing that I love about my kindle is that you can tap on a word and get a definition. But I’m waiting for them to improve it and put a phonic spelling with the word.

    Reply
  24. Being a gal from the mid-west in the good ole USA. I didn’t expect to do too well – and boy, was that an understatement. I had only one right. The funny thing is that the one I had right was worcestershire, which is in reality a real tongue twister for me. I feel like I’m sneezing every time I pronounce it.
    One thing that I love about my kindle is that you can tap on a word and get a definition. But I’m waiting for them to improve it and put a phonic spelling with the word.

    Reply
  25. Being a gal from the mid-west in the good ole USA. I didn’t expect to do too well – and boy, was that an understatement. I had only one right. The funny thing is that the one I had right was worcestershire, which is in reality a real tongue twister for me. I feel like I’m sneezing every time I pronounce it.
    One thing that I love about my kindle is that you can tap on a word and get a definition. But I’m waiting for them to improve it and put a phonic spelling with the word.

    Reply
  26. The advantage of having lived in Massachusetts is that there are a number of places there named after ones on the list, so I knew how to say them without too much difficulty. As a Gilbert & Sullivan fan, Ruthven was also easy because there’s a character in “Ruddigore” with that name. All these advantages did not, however, lead to a perfect score, as I didn’t know Calke or Beauvoir.

    Reply
  27. The advantage of having lived in Massachusetts is that there are a number of places there named after ones on the list, so I knew how to say them without too much difficulty. As a Gilbert & Sullivan fan, Ruthven was also easy because there’s a character in “Ruddigore” with that name. All these advantages did not, however, lead to a perfect score, as I didn’t know Calke or Beauvoir.

    Reply
  28. The advantage of having lived in Massachusetts is that there are a number of places there named after ones on the list, so I knew how to say them without too much difficulty. As a Gilbert & Sullivan fan, Ruthven was also easy because there’s a character in “Ruddigore” with that name. All these advantages did not, however, lead to a perfect score, as I didn’t know Calke or Beauvoir.

    Reply
  29. The advantage of having lived in Massachusetts is that there are a number of places there named after ones on the list, so I knew how to say them without too much difficulty. As a Gilbert & Sullivan fan, Ruthven was also easy because there’s a character in “Ruddigore” with that name. All these advantages did not, however, lead to a perfect score, as I didn’t know Calke or Beauvoir.

    Reply
  30. The advantage of having lived in Massachusetts is that there are a number of places there named after ones on the list, so I knew how to say them without too much difficulty. As a Gilbert & Sullivan fan, Ruthven was also easy because there’s a character in “Ruddigore” with that name. All these advantages did not, however, lead to a perfect score, as I didn’t know Calke or Beauvoir.

    Reply
  31. What I would really love is for someone to go back to 15 years ago when I was in a theatre trivia contest (boys vs. girls) and the girls “lost” because we said that Ralph Fiennes was pronounced “Rafe” and not the Americanized “Ralph”. We were ruled incorrect, but deep down we know we were robbed and that we were right. Do you have a quiz for that so I can go on facebok and show those boys who’s boss?

    Reply
  32. What I would really love is for someone to go back to 15 years ago when I was in a theatre trivia contest (boys vs. girls) and the girls “lost” because we said that Ralph Fiennes was pronounced “Rafe” and not the Americanized “Ralph”. We were ruled incorrect, but deep down we know we were robbed and that we were right. Do you have a quiz for that so I can go on facebok and show those boys who’s boss?

    Reply
  33. What I would really love is for someone to go back to 15 years ago when I was in a theatre trivia contest (boys vs. girls) and the girls “lost” because we said that Ralph Fiennes was pronounced “Rafe” and not the Americanized “Ralph”. We were ruled incorrect, but deep down we know we were robbed and that we were right. Do you have a quiz for that so I can go on facebok and show those boys who’s boss?

    Reply
  34. What I would really love is for someone to go back to 15 years ago when I was in a theatre trivia contest (boys vs. girls) and the girls “lost” because we said that Ralph Fiennes was pronounced “Rafe” and not the Americanized “Ralph”. We were ruled incorrect, but deep down we know we were robbed and that we were right. Do you have a quiz for that so I can go on facebok and show those boys who’s boss?

    Reply
  35. What I would really love is for someone to go back to 15 years ago when I was in a theatre trivia contest (boys vs. girls) and the girls “lost” because we said that Ralph Fiennes was pronounced “Rafe” and not the Americanized “Ralph”. We were ruled incorrect, but deep down we know we were robbed and that we were right. Do you have a quiz for that so I can go on facebok and show those boys who’s boss?

    Reply
  36. We don’t even need to discuss my score! [I hadn’t known you were a Melbourne native, Anne. Many (MANY) moons ago, I lived in Moorabbin as a child.]

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  37. We don’t even need to discuss my score! [I hadn’t known you were a Melbourne native, Anne. Many (MANY) moons ago, I lived in Moorabbin as a child.]

    Reply
  38. We don’t even need to discuss my score! [I hadn’t known you were a Melbourne native, Anne. Many (MANY) moons ago, I lived in Moorabbin as a child.]

    Reply
  39. We don’t even need to discuss my score! [I hadn’t known you were a Melbourne native, Anne. Many (MANY) moons ago, I lived in Moorabbin as a child.]

    Reply
  40. We don’t even need to discuss my score! [I hadn’t known you were a Melbourne native, Anne. Many (MANY) moons ago, I lived in Moorabbin as a child.]

    Reply
  41. Thanks, Melissa. Well done. But you can’t always believe audio tapes — the woman who narrated my Marry in Haste pronounced Berkeley Square as Berk -ly instead of the correct Bark-ly

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  42. Thanks, Melissa. Well done. But you can’t always believe audio tapes — the woman who narrated my Marry in Haste pronounced Berkeley Square as Berk -ly instead of the correct Bark-ly

    Reply
  43. Thanks, Melissa. Well done. But you can’t always believe audio tapes — the woman who narrated my Marry in Haste pronounced Berkeley Square as Berk -ly instead of the correct Bark-ly

    Reply
  44. Thanks, Melissa. Well done. But you can’t always believe audio tapes — the woman who narrated my Marry in Haste pronounced Berkeley Square as Berk -ly instead of the correct Bark-ly

    Reply
  45. Thanks, Melissa. Well done. But you can’t always believe audio tapes — the woman who narrated my Marry in Haste pronounced Berkeley Square as Berk -ly instead of the correct Bark-ly

    Reply
  46. We moved around a lot when I was a kid, Kareni, but I did my last few years of school and all my university years here, and have lived in Melbourne ever since. BTW my mum’s uncle was the mayor of Moorabbin at one stage.

    Reply
  47. We moved around a lot when I was a kid, Kareni, but I did my last few years of school and all my university years here, and have lived in Melbourne ever since. BTW my mum’s uncle was the mayor of Moorabbin at one stage.

    Reply
  48. We moved around a lot when I was a kid, Kareni, but I did my last few years of school and all my university years here, and have lived in Melbourne ever since. BTW my mum’s uncle was the mayor of Moorabbin at one stage.

    Reply
  49. We moved around a lot when I was a kid, Kareni, but I did my last few years of school and all my university years here, and have lived in Melbourne ever since. BTW my mum’s uncle was the mayor of Moorabbin at one stage.

    Reply
  50. We moved around a lot when I was a kid, Kareni, but I did my last few years of school and all my university years here, and have lived in Melbourne ever since. BTW my mum’s uncle was the mayor of Moorabbin at one stage.

    Reply
  51. Yes, that’s the trouble, isn’t it, Virginia β€” knowing when correctness is correct and when it’s going to sound pretentious. We have a Ruthven Station near my former workplace, and I suppose it’s called Roothven.

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  52. Yes, that’s the trouble, isn’t it, Virginia β€” knowing when correctness is correct and when it’s going to sound pretentious. We have a Ruthven Station near my former workplace, and I suppose it’s called Roothven.

    Reply
  53. Yes, that’s the trouble, isn’t it, Virginia β€” knowing when correctness is correct and when it’s going to sound pretentious. We have a Ruthven Station near my former workplace, and I suppose it’s called Roothven.

    Reply
  54. Yes, that’s the trouble, isn’t it, Virginia β€” knowing when correctness is correct and when it’s going to sound pretentious. We have a Ruthven Station near my former workplace, and I suppose it’s called Roothven.

    Reply
  55. Yes, that’s the trouble, isn’t it, Virginia β€” knowing when correctness is correct and when it’s going to sound pretentious. We have a Ruthven Station near my former workplace, and I suppose it’s called Roothven.

    Reply
  56. Brilliant, Anne! Such fun and as a Brit I still had to think hard about Ruthven. Some people over here are real sticklers for getting these things correct. I remember a lady on one of my Ashdown tours correcting me when I referred to the Villiers family as Vil-e-ers and she said snootily “actually it’s pronounced villas.” Okay!

    Reply
  57. Brilliant, Anne! Such fun and as a Brit I still had to think hard about Ruthven. Some people over here are real sticklers for getting these things correct. I remember a lady on one of my Ashdown tours correcting me when I referred to the Villiers family as Vil-e-ers and she said snootily “actually it’s pronounced villas.” Okay!

    Reply
  58. Brilliant, Anne! Such fun and as a Brit I still had to think hard about Ruthven. Some people over here are real sticklers for getting these things correct. I remember a lady on one of my Ashdown tours correcting me when I referred to the Villiers family as Vil-e-ers and she said snootily “actually it’s pronounced villas.” Okay!

    Reply
  59. Brilliant, Anne! Such fun and as a Brit I still had to think hard about Ruthven. Some people over here are real sticklers for getting these things correct. I remember a lady on one of my Ashdown tours correcting me when I referred to the Villiers family as Vil-e-ers and she said snootily “actually it’s pronounced villas.” Okay!

    Reply
  60. Brilliant, Anne! Such fun and as a Brit I still had to think hard about Ruthven. Some people over here are real sticklers for getting these things correct. I remember a lady on one of my Ashdown tours correcting me when I referred to the Villiers family as Vil-e-ers and she said snootily “actually it’s pronounced villas.” Okay!

    Reply
  61. The only one I knew I would get right was Ruthven. The Richard Jury mystery series has a butler named Ruthven and his name provides comic relief when pronounced by Aunt Agatha, an American. Great quiz!

    Reply
  62. The only one I knew I would get right was Ruthven. The Richard Jury mystery series has a butler named Ruthven and his name provides comic relief when pronounced by Aunt Agatha, an American. Great quiz!

    Reply
  63. The only one I knew I would get right was Ruthven. The Richard Jury mystery series has a butler named Ruthven and his name provides comic relief when pronounced by Aunt Agatha, an American. Great quiz!

    Reply
  64. The only one I knew I would get right was Ruthven. The Richard Jury mystery series has a butler named Ruthven and his name provides comic relief when pronounced by Aunt Agatha, an American. Great quiz!

    Reply
  65. The only one I knew I would get right was Ruthven. The Richard Jury mystery series has a butler named Ruthven and his name provides comic relief when pronounced by Aunt Agatha, an American. Great quiz!

    Reply
  66. What fun. I got most of them right. Place names in Maine in the US can be a challenge, too. We have our own way of pronouncing Calais, Madrid, Avon, and Vienna. And of course, Bangor (it’s Ban-gore, despite what you might hear in the song “King of the Road”

    Reply
  67. What fun. I got most of them right. Place names in Maine in the US can be a challenge, too. We have our own way of pronouncing Calais, Madrid, Avon, and Vienna. And of course, Bangor (it’s Ban-gore, despite what you might hear in the song “King of the Road”

    Reply
  68. What fun. I got most of them right. Place names in Maine in the US can be a challenge, too. We have our own way of pronouncing Calais, Madrid, Avon, and Vienna. And of course, Bangor (it’s Ban-gore, despite what you might hear in the song “King of the Road”

    Reply
  69. What fun. I got most of them right. Place names in Maine in the US can be a challenge, too. We have our own way of pronouncing Calais, Madrid, Avon, and Vienna. And of course, Bangor (it’s Ban-gore, despite what you might hear in the song “King of the Road”

    Reply
  70. What fun. I got most of them right. Place names in Maine in the US can be a challenge, too. We have our own way of pronouncing Calais, Madrid, Avon, and Vienna. And of course, Bangor (it’s Ban-gore, despite what you might hear in the song “King of the Road”

    Reply
  71. lol – People in the UK struggle, too. I lived and worked in Holborn in London for a few years, and even most Londoners had no idea about the pronunciation of “Holborn” and “Aldwych”!
    It’s a really regional thing…

    Reply
  72. lol – People in the UK struggle, too. I lived and worked in Holborn in London for a few years, and even most Londoners had no idea about the pronunciation of “Holborn” and “Aldwych”!
    It’s a really regional thing…

    Reply
  73. lol – People in the UK struggle, too. I lived and worked in Holborn in London for a few years, and even most Londoners had no idea about the pronunciation of “Holborn” and “Aldwych”!
    It’s a really regional thing…

    Reply
  74. lol – People in the UK struggle, too. I lived and worked in Holborn in London for a few years, and even most Londoners had no idea about the pronunciation of “Holborn” and “Aldwych”!
    It’s a really regional thing…

    Reply
  75. lol – People in the UK struggle, too. I lived and worked in Holborn in London for a few years, and even most Londoners had no idea about the pronunciation of “Holborn” and “Aldwych”!
    It’s a really regional thing…

    Reply
  76. I did well until the last 3. Regional pronunications are a way of saying, “You ain’t from ’round here, er ya?” I live in Texas and we have our own way of pronouncing many common place names. For example, Hebron, named for a place in Israel. Most would say Heh-bron. We say Hee-brun.

    Reply
  77. I did well until the last 3. Regional pronunications are a way of saying, “You ain’t from ’round here, er ya?” I live in Texas and we have our own way of pronouncing many common place names. For example, Hebron, named for a place in Israel. Most would say Heh-bron. We say Hee-brun.

    Reply
  78. I did well until the last 3. Regional pronunications are a way of saying, “You ain’t from ’round here, er ya?” I live in Texas and we have our own way of pronouncing many common place names. For example, Hebron, named for a place in Israel. Most would say Heh-bron. We say Hee-brun.

    Reply
  79. I did well until the last 3. Regional pronunications are a way of saying, “You ain’t from ’round here, er ya?” I live in Texas and we have our own way of pronouncing many common place names. For example, Hebron, named for a place in Israel. Most would say Heh-bron. We say Hee-brun.

    Reply
  80. I did well until the last 3. Regional pronunications are a way of saying, “You ain’t from ’round here, er ya?” I live in Texas and we have our own way of pronouncing many common place names. For example, Hebron, named for a place in Israel. Most would say Heh-bron. We say Hee-brun.

    Reply
  81. Well, 50% is not the end of the world I presume…LOL 6 right and 6 wrong. I knew before I started that I had an upward climb and actually pleased myself with what I DID know. πŸ™‚

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  82. Well, 50% is not the end of the world I presume…LOL 6 right and 6 wrong. I knew before I started that I had an upward climb and actually pleased myself with what I DID know. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  83. Well, 50% is not the end of the world I presume…LOL 6 right and 6 wrong. I knew before I started that I had an upward climb and actually pleased myself with what I DID know. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  84. Well, 50% is not the end of the world I presume…LOL 6 right and 6 wrong. I knew before I started that I had an upward climb and actually pleased myself with what I DID know. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  85. Well, 50% is not the end of the world I presume…LOL 6 right and 6 wrong. I knew before I started that I had an upward climb and actually pleased myself with what I DID know. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  86. I’m in Oklahoma. We have a Miami here. My-am-ee is Florida…My-am-uh is Oklahoma. LOL Along with so many others. We also have so many towns/cities with names that I don’t think ANYONE knows for sure how they are pronounced correctly. We just all go with whatever we’re used to. Sapulpa, Dewar, Wapanucka, Checotah, Eufaula…etc. LOL

    Reply
  87. I’m in Oklahoma. We have a Miami here. My-am-ee is Florida…My-am-uh is Oklahoma. LOL Along with so many others. We also have so many towns/cities with names that I don’t think ANYONE knows for sure how they are pronounced correctly. We just all go with whatever we’re used to. Sapulpa, Dewar, Wapanucka, Checotah, Eufaula…etc. LOL

    Reply
  88. I’m in Oklahoma. We have a Miami here. My-am-ee is Florida…My-am-uh is Oklahoma. LOL Along with so many others. We also have so many towns/cities with names that I don’t think ANYONE knows for sure how they are pronounced correctly. We just all go with whatever we’re used to. Sapulpa, Dewar, Wapanucka, Checotah, Eufaula…etc. LOL

    Reply
  89. I’m in Oklahoma. We have a Miami here. My-am-ee is Florida…My-am-uh is Oklahoma. LOL Along with so many others. We also have so many towns/cities with names that I don’t think ANYONE knows for sure how they are pronounced correctly. We just all go with whatever we’re used to. Sapulpa, Dewar, Wapanucka, Checotah, Eufaula…etc. LOL

    Reply
  90. I’m in Oklahoma. We have a Miami here. My-am-ee is Florida…My-am-uh is Oklahoma. LOL Along with so many others. We also have so many towns/cities with names that I don’t think ANYONE knows for sure how they are pronounced correctly. We just all go with whatever we’re used to. Sapulpa, Dewar, Wapanucka, Checotah, Eufaula…etc. LOL

    Reply
  91. I did fairly well, but didn’t try to keep score. I was taught to pronounce Worcestershire correctly because that’s the way I was taught to pronounce the cooking ingredient (sauce).
    There is a fictional character I would dearly love to pronounce correctly. Even now that she has her own book, Stephanie Laurens hasn’t told us how to pronounce Osbaldstone! I am only positive it is NOT Oz-bald-stone (as any English speaker would, if unprepared for quirks) and am guessing that the final syllable is stun.

    Reply
  92. I did fairly well, but didn’t try to keep score. I was taught to pronounce Worcestershire correctly because that’s the way I was taught to pronounce the cooking ingredient (sauce).
    There is a fictional character I would dearly love to pronounce correctly. Even now that she has her own book, Stephanie Laurens hasn’t told us how to pronounce Osbaldstone! I am only positive it is NOT Oz-bald-stone (as any English speaker would, if unprepared for quirks) and am guessing that the final syllable is stun.

    Reply
  93. I did fairly well, but didn’t try to keep score. I was taught to pronounce Worcestershire correctly because that’s the way I was taught to pronounce the cooking ingredient (sauce).
    There is a fictional character I would dearly love to pronounce correctly. Even now that she has her own book, Stephanie Laurens hasn’t told us how to pronounce Osbaldstone! I am only positive it is NOT Oz-bald-stone (as any English speaker would, if unprepared for quirks) and am guessing that the final syllable is stun.

    Reply
  94. I did fairly well, but didn’t try to keep score. I was taught to pronounce Worcestershire correctly because that’s the way I was taught to pronounce the cooking ingredient (sauce).
    There is a fictional character I would dearly love to pronounce correctly. Even now that she has her own book, Stephanie Laurens hasn’t told us how to pronounce Osbaldstone! I am only positive it is NOT Oz-bald-stone (as any English speaker would, if unprepared for quirks) and am guessing that the final syllable is stun.

    Reply
  95. I did fairly well, but didn’t try to keep score. I was taught to pronounce Worcestershire correctly because that’s the way I was taught to pronounce the cooking ingredient (sauce).
    There is a fictional character I would dearly love to pronounce correctly. Even now that she has her own book, Stephanie Laurens hasn’t told us how to pronounce Osbaldstone! I am only positive it is NOT Oz-bald-stone (as any English speaker would, if unprepared for quirks) and am guessing that the final syllable is stun.

    Reply
  96. OK – it is obvious that though I was born in the United States, English must be a second or third of 300th language for me.
    This was fun and I thank you for the quiz.

    Reply
  97. OK – it is obvious that though I was born in the United States, English must be a second or third of 300th language for me.
    This was fun and I thank you for the quiz.

    Reply
  98. OK – it is obvious that though I was born in the United States, English must be a second or third of 300th language for me.
    This was fun and I thank you for the quiz.

    Reply
  99. OK – it is obvious that though I was born in the United States, English must be a second or third of 300th language for me.
    This was fun and I thank you for the quiz.

    Reply
  100. OK – it is obvious that though I was born in the United States, English must be a second or third of 300th language for me.
    This was fun and I thank you for the quiz.

    Reply
  101. Got two wrong-7 and 8. Good old abbey. I now live in UK not too far from Belvoir Castle so that was easy. Short tour guide explanation: Anglo-Saxons either couldn’t prounce Norman names or deliberately mangled them. Here’s my two Great Stukeley and Alconbury. They’re within 5 miles of each other. As for Shrewsbury, I followed a BMH FB thread on its pronunciation: more than one hundred posts with two different local pronunciations competing. Also Bath. Some northerners will pronounce it the American way which confuses me to no end.

    Reply
  102. Got two wrong-7 and 8. Good old abbey. I now live in UK not too far from Belvoir Castle so that was easy. Short tour guide explanation: Anglo-Saxons either couldn’t prounce Norman names or deliberately mangled them. Here’s my two Great Stukeley and Alconbury. They’re within 5 miles of each other. As for Shrewsbury, I followed a BMH FB thread on its pronunciation: more than one hundred posts with two different local pronunciations competing. Also Bath. Some northerners will pronounce it the American way which confuses me to no end.

    Reply
  103. Got two wrong-7 and 8. Good old abbey. I now live in UK not too far from Belvoir Castle so that was easy. Short tour guide explanation: Anglo-Saxons either couldn’t prounce Norman names or deliberately mangled them. Here’s my two Great Stukeley and Alconbury. They’re within 5 miles of each other. As for Shrewsbury, I followed a BMH FB thread on its pronunciation: more than one hundred posts with two different local pronunciations competing. Also Bath. Some northerners will pronounce it the American way which confuses me to no end.

    Reply
  104. Got two wrong-7 and 8. Good old abbey. I now live in UK not too far from Belvoir Castle so that was easy. Short tour guide explanation: Anglo-Saxons either couldn’t prounce Norman names or deliberately mangled them. Here’s my two Great Stukeley and Alconbury. They’re within 5 miles of each other. As for Shrewsbury, I followed a BMH FB thread on its pronunciation: more than one hundred posts with two different local pronunciations competing. Also Bath. Some northerners will pronounce it the American way which confuses me to no end.

    Reply
  105. Got two wrong-7 and 8. Good old abbey. I now live in UK not too far from Belvoir Castle so that was easy. Short tour guide explanation: Anglo-Saxons either couldn’t prounce Norman names or deliberately mangled them. Here’s my two Great Stukeley and Alconbury. They’re within 5 miles of each other. As for Shrewsbury, I followed a BMH FB thread on its pronunciation: more than one hundred posts with two different local pronunciations competing. Also Bath. Some northerners will pronounce it the American way which confuses me to no end.

    Reply
  106. Bath β€” American way? Our Welsh speaking tour guide said what I’d expect, so either it’s also the Welsh way OR he tailored his speech to his mostly U. S. clients.

    Reply
  107. Bath β€” American way? Our Welsh speaking tour guide said what I’d expect, so either it’s also the Welsh way OR he tailored his speech to his mostly U. S. clients.

    Reply
  108. Bath β€” American way? Our Welsh speaking tour guide said what I’d expect, so either it’s also the Welsh way OR he tailored his speech to his mostly U. S. clients.

    Reply
  109. Bath β€” American way? Our Welsh speaking tour guide said what I’d expect, so either it’s also the Welsh way OR he tailored his speech to his mostly U. S. clients.

    Reply
  110. Bath β€” American way? Our Welsh speaking tour guide said what I’d expect, so either it’s also the Welsh way OR he tailored his speech to his mostly U. S. clients.

    Reply
  111. Indeed, Sonya — I know about Holborn (pronounced Ho b’n) but Aldwych, I would pronounce a bit like Old wich – the Ald being not quite “old” but more like the sound in all.

    Reply
  112. Indeed, Sonya — I know about Holborn (pronounced Ho b’n) but Aldwych, I would pronounce a bit like Old wich – the Ald being not quite “old” but more like the sound in all.

    Reply
  113. Indeed, Sonya — I know about Holborn (pronounced Ho b’n) but Aldwych, I would pronounce a bit like Old wich – the Ald being not quite “old” but more like the sound in all.

    Reply
  114. Indeed, Sonya — I know about Holborn (pronounced Ho b’n) but Aldwych, I would pronounce a bit like Old wich – the Ald being not quite “old” but more like the sound in all.

    Reply
  115. Indeed, Sonya — I know about Holborn (pronounced Ho b’n) but Aldwych, I would pronounce a bit like Old wich – the Ald being not quite “old” but more like the sound in all.

    Reply
  116. Kathy that reminds me of the first time I visited new Orleans. It was Saturday night, 14th July (Bastille Day) and I’d been wandering along Bourbon St enjoying the sights and music until the wee small hours (My body was still in Australian time, so I was wide awake)
    Eventually it was time to go back to my hotel, and I asked a mounted policeman the way to Decatur st — using my best French accent to pronounce Decatur. It took me a few goes to get him to understand. “Oh you mean d’cater st” — it rhymed with gator)
    But now enquiring minds need to know — how do you pronounce Calais, Madrid, Avon, and Vienna in your neck of the woods?

    Reply
  117. Kathy that reminds me of the first time I visited new Orleans. It was Saturday night, 14th July (Bastille Day) and I’d been wandering along Bourbon St enjoying the sights and music until the wee small hours (My body was still in Australian time, so I was wide awake)
    Eventually it was time to go back to my hotel, and I asked a mounted policeman the way to Decatur st — using my best French accent to pronounce Decatur. It took me a few goes to get him to understand. “Oh you mean d’cater st” — it rhymed with gator)
    But now enquiring minds need to know — how do you pronounce Calais, Madrid, Avon, and Vienna in your neck of the woods?

    Reply
  118. Kathy that reminds me of the first time I visited new Orleans. It was Saturday night, 14th July (Bastille Day) and I’d been wandering along Bourbon St enjoying the sights and music until the wee small hours (My body was still in Australian time, so I was wide awake)
    Eventually it was time to go back to my hotel, and I asked a mounted policeman the way to Decatur st — using my best French accent to pronounce Decatur. It took me a few goes to get him to understand. “Oh you mean d’cater st” — it rhymed with gator)
    But now enquiring minds need to know — how do you pronounce Calais, Madrid, Avon, and Vienna in your neck of the woods?

    Reply
  119. Kathy that reminds me of the first time I visited new Orleans. It was Saturday night, 14th July (Bastille Day) and I’d been wandering along Bourbon St enjoying the sights and music until the wee small hours (My body was still in Australian time, so I was wide awake)
    Eventually it was time to go back to my hotel, and I asked a mounted policeman the way to Decatur st — using my best French accent to pronounce Decatur. It took me a few goes to get him to understand. “Oh you mean d’cater st” — it rhymed with gator)
    But now enquiring minds need to know — how do you pronounce Calais, Madrid, Avon, and Vienna in your neck of the woods?

    Reply
  120. Kathy that reminds me of the first time I visited new Orleans. It was Saturday night, 14th July (Bastille Day) and I’d been wandering along Bourbon St enjoying the sights and music until the wee small hours (My body was still in Australian time, so I was wide awake)
    Eventually it was time to go back to my hotel, and I asked a mounted policeman the way to Decatur st — using my best French accent to pronounce Decatur. It took me a few goes to get him to understand. “Oh you mean d’cater st” — it rhymed with gator)
    But now enquiring minds need to know — how do you pronounce Calais, Madrid, Avon, and Vienna in your neck of the woods?

    Reply
  121. Sue, I grew up with Worcestershire sauce, too. As for Osbaldstone, I’ll ask Stephanie for you. But you’d be right about the “stun” or “st’n” ending. English (and Australians) rarely pronounce any “stone” suffix like stone-as-in -rock. It’s almost always st’n.

    Reply
  122. Sue, I grew up with Worcestershire sauce, too. As for Osbaldstone, I’ll ask Stephanie for you. But you’d be right about the “stun” or “st’n” ending. English (and Australians) rarely pronounce any “stone” suffix like stone-as-in -rock. It’s almost always st’n.

    Reply
  123. Sue, I grew up with Worcestershire sauce, too. As for Osbaldstone, I’ll ask Stephanie for you. But you’d be right about the “stun” or “st’n” ending. English (and Australians) rarely pronounce any “stone” suffix like stone-as-in -rock. It’s almost always st’n.

    Reply
  124. Sue, I grew up with Worcestershire sauce, too. As for Osbaldstone, I’ll ask Stephanie for you. But you’d be right about the “stun” or “st’n” ending. English (and Australians) rarely pronounce any “stone” suffix like stone-as-in -rock. It’s almost always st’n.

    Reply
  125. Sue, I grew up with Worcestershire sauce, too. As for Osbaldstone, I’ll ask Stephanie for you. But you’d be right about the “stun” or “st’n” ending. English (and Australians) rarely pronounce any “stone” suffix like stone-as-in -rock. It’s almost always st’n.

    Reply
  126. Thanks for that explanation, Shannon. As for Shrewsbury, I’ve heard a few variations myself. And Bath can have the long a or the short one, Bath to rhyme with math. I’m the long a – to rhyme with path and hearth. Ah, English — I love its quirks and idiosyncrasies.

    Reply
  127. Thanks for that explanation, Shannon. As for Shrewsbury, I’ve heard a few variations myself. And Bath can have the long a or the short one, Bath to rhyme with math. I’m the long a – to rhyme with path and hearth. Ah, English — I love its quirks and idiosyncrasies.

    Reply
  128. Thanks for that explanation, Shannon. As for Shrewsbury, I’ve heard a few variations myself. And Bath can have the long a or the short one, Bath to rhyme with math. I’m the long a – to rhyme with path and hearth. Ah, English — I love its quirks and idiosyncrasies.

    Reply
  129. Thanks for that explanation, Shannon. As for Shrewsbury, I’ve heard a few variations myself. And Bath can have the long a or the short one, Bath to rhyme with math. I’m the long a – to rhyme with path and hearth. Ah, English — I love its quirks and idiosyncrasies.

    Reply
  130. Thanks for that explanation, Shannon. As for Shrewsbury, I’ve heard a few variations myself. And Bath can have the long a or the short one, Bath to rhyme with math. I’m the long a – to rhyme with path and hearth. Ah, English — I love its quirks and idiosyncrasies.

    Reply
  131. Missed #12 but only because I don’t remember ever hearing my Veddy Brrrrrritish Grandmother speak of it.
    Hello! Yes, still kicking. Just…not commenting much but I read everything on the blog!

    Reply
  132. Missed #12 but only because I don’t remember ever hearing my Veddy Brrrrrritish Grandmother speak of it.
    Hello! Yes, still kicking. Just…not commenting much but I read everything on the blog!

    Reply
  133. Missed #12 but only because I don’t remember ever hearing my Veddy Brrrrrritish Grandmother speak of it.
    Hello! Yes, still kicking. Just…not commenting much but I read everything on the blog!

    Reply
  134. Missed #12 but only because I don’t remember ever hearing my Veddy Brrrrrritish Grandmother speak of it.
    Hello! Yes, still kicking. Just…not commenting much but I read everything on the blog!

    Reply
  135. Missed #12 but only because I don’t remember ever hearing my Veddy Brrrrrritish Grandmother speak of it.
    Hello! Yes, still kicking. Just…not commenting much but I read everything on the blog!

    Reply
  136. Calus with accent on the first syllable
    Vienna and Madrid have the accent on the first syllable
    Avon has a long a and the accent on the second syllable
    And then, of course, we have Madawaska, Norridgewock, Damariscotta, and the Skidompha Library for tongue twisters.

    Reply
  137. Calus with accent on the first syllable
    Vienna and Madrid have the accent on the first syllable
    Avon has a long a and the accent on the second syllable
    And then, of course, we have Madawaska, Norridgewock, Damariscotta, and the Skidompha Library for tongue twisters.

    Reply
  138. Calus with accent on the first syllable
    Vienna and Madrid have the accent on the first syllable
    Avon has a long a and the accent on the second syllable
    And then, of course, we have Madawaska, Norridgewock, Damariscotta, and the Skidompha Library for tongue twisters.

    Reply
  139. Calus with accent on the first syllable
    Vienna and Madrid have the accent on the first syllable
    Avon has a long a and the accent on the second syllable
    And then, of course, we have Madawaska, Norridgewock, Damariscotta, and the Skidompha Library for tongue twisters.

    Reply
  140. Calus with accent on the first syllable
    Vienna and Madrid have the accent on the first syllable
    Avon has a long a and the accent on the second syllable
    And then, of course, we have Madawaska, Norridgewock, Damariscotta, and the Skidompha Library for tongue twisters.

    Reply
  141. When I’m in London or Bath, its Baaath, with a long baaa and a very short, soft th. But I get to northern Derbyshire or parts north, it’s pronounced Bath, rhyming with math. As for Wales, we never got beyond discussing where to go in Wales, so the subject of English towns or cities didn’t come up.

    Reply
  142. When I’m in London or Bath, its Baaath, with a long baaa and a very short, soft th. But I get to northern Derbyshire or parts north, it’s pronounced Bath, rhyming with math. As for Wales, we never got beyond discussing where to go in Wales, so the subject of English towns or cities didn’t come up.

    Reply
  143. When I’m in London or Bath, its Baaath, with a long baaa and a very short, soft th. But I get to northern Derbyshire or parts north, it’s pronounced Bath, rhyming with math. As for Wales, we never got beyond discussing where to go in Wales, so the subject of English towns or cities didn’t come up.

    Reply
  144. When I’m in London or Bath, its Baaath, with a long baaa and a very short, soft th. But I get to northern Derbyshire or parts north, it’s pronounced Bath, rhyming with math. As for Wales, we never got beyond discussing where to go in Wales, so the subject of English towns or cities didn’t come up.

    Reply
  145. When I’m in London or Bath, its Baaath, with a long baaa and a very short, soft th. But I get to northern Derbyshire or parts north, it’s pronounced Bath, rhyming with math. As for Wales, we never got beyond discussing where to go in Wales, so the subject of English towns or cities didn’t come up.

    Reply
  146. Oh lovely — I might chase them up. I remember reading some of her books that were all named after old English inns — but I haven’t read her for ages. I assumed they’d been made into a TV series.

    Reply
  147. Oh lovely — I might chase them up. I remember reading some of her books that were all named after old English inns — but I haven’t read her for ages. I assumed they’d been made into a TV series.

    Reply
  148. Oh lovely — I might chase them up. I remember reading some of her books that were all named after old English inns — but I haven’t read her for ages. I assumed they’d been made into a TV series.

    Reply
  149. Oh lovely — I might chase them up. I remember reading some of her books that were all named after old English inns — but I haven’t read her for ages. I assumed they’d been made into a TV series.

    Reply
  150. Oh lovely — I might chase them up. I remember reading some of her books that were all named after old English inns — but I haven’t read her for ages. I assumed they’d been made into a TV series.

    Reply
  151. that was fun, missed more than I thought I would, I missed Leicester#4, Ruthven #11 and Belvoir Castle #12, need to find out how to pronounce some of the streets in London and some of the cities. Janice Layton Dunlap

    Reply
  152. that was fun, missed more than I thought I would, I missed Leicester#4, Ruthven #11 and Belvoir Castle #12, need to find out how to pronounce some of the streets in London and some of the cities. Janice Layton Dunlap

    Reply
  153. that was fun, missed more than I thought I would, I missed Leicester#4, Ruthven #11 and Belvoir Castle #12, need to find out how to pronounce some of the streets in London and some of the cities. Janice Layton Dunlap

    Reply
  154. that was fun, missed more than I thought I would, I missed Leicester#4, Ruthven #11 and Belvoir Castle #12, need to find out how to pronounce some of the streets in London and some of the cities. Janice Layton Dunlap

    Reply
  155. that was fun, missed more than I thought I would, I missed Leicester#4, Ruthven #11 and Belvoir Castle #12, need to find out how to pronounce some of the streets in London and some of the cities. Janice Layton Dunlap

    Reply
  156. My grandmother and her family in northern Alabama, and before that I believeNorth Carolina, were Chumleys. Family stories say it used to be Cholmondeley, but in the New World, it got simplified.
    Abigail Miller

    Reply
  157. My grandmother and her family in northern Alabama, and before that I believeNorth Carolina, were Chumleys. Family stories say it used to be Cholmondeley, but in the New World, it got simplified.
    Abigail Miller

    Reply
  158. My grandmother and her family in northern Alabama, and before that I believeNorth Carolina, were Chumleys. Family stories say it used to be Cholmondeley, but in the New World, it got simplified.
    Abigail Miller

    Reply
  159. My grandmother and her family in northern Alabama, and before that I believeNorth Carolina, were Chumleys. Family stories say it used to be Cholmondeley, but in the New World, it got simplified.
    Abigail Miller

    Reply
  160. My grandmother and her family in northern Alabama, and before that I believeNorth Carolina, were Chumleys. Family stories say it used to be Cholmondeley, but in the New World, it got simplified.
    Abigail Miller

    Reply
  161. Thanks for the great quiz tho’ I only got about half right. It is true that you can’t trust the pronunciations in audiobooks: I was listening to one set on a plantation in SC on the Edisto river which they pronounced “a-DIS’-toe”. It took me half the book to realize they meant the “ED’-is-toe.” We do have some weird pronunciations around here: The county that Myrtle Beach is located in is Horry, but the H is silent: “Or’-ree”. Legare Street is “La-gree’.” Our Beaufort is “Bu-ford” and NC’s is “Bo-fort.” It’s definitely local.

    Reply
  162. Thanks for the great quiz tho’ I only got about half right. It is true that you can’t trust the pronunciations in audiobooks: I was listening to one set on a plantation in SC on the Edisto river which they pronounced “a-DIS’-toe”. It took me half the book to realize they meant the “ED’-is-toe.” We do have some weird pronunciations around here: The county that Myrtle Beach is located in is Horry, but the H is silent: “Or’-ree”. Legare Street is “La-gree’.” Our Beaufort is “Bu-ford” and NC’s is “Bo-fort.” It’s definitely local.

    Reply
  163. Thanks for the great quiz tho’ I only got about half right. It is true that you can’t trust the pronunciations in audiobooks: I was listening to one set on a plantation in SC on the Edisto river which they pronounced “a-DIS’-toe”. It took me half the book to realize they meant the “ED’-is-toe.” We do have some weird pronunciations around here: The county that Myrtle Beach is located in is Horry, but the H is silent: “Or’-ree”. Legare Street is “La-gree’.” Our Beaufort is “Bu-ford” and NC’s is “Bo-fort.” It’s definitely local.

    Reply
  164. Thanks for the great quiz tho’ I only got about half right. It is true that you can’t trust the pronunciations in audiobooks: I was listening to one set on a plantation in SC on the Edisto river which they pronounced “a-DIS’-toe”. It took me half the book to realize they meant the “ED’-is-toe.” We do have some weird pronunciations around here: The county that Myrtle Beach is located in is Horry, but the H is silent: “Or’-ree”. Legare Street is “La-gree’.” Our Beaufort is “Bu-ford” and NC’s is “Bo-fort.” It’s definitely local.

    Reply
  165. Thanks for the great quiz tho’ I only got about half right. It is true that you can’t trust the pronunciations in audiobooks: I was listening to one set on a plantation in SC on the Edisto river which they pronounced “a-DIS’-toe”. It took me half the book to realize they meant the “ED’-is-toe.” We do have some weird pronunciations around here: The county that Myrtle Beach is located in is Horry, but the H is silent: “Or’-ree”. Legare Street is “La-gree’.” Our Beaufort is “Bu-ford” and NC’s is “Bo-fort.” It’s definitely local.

    Reply

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