Questions? Suggestions?

Dear wenchly readers, many years ago, when we first started this blog, we asked readers to send in questions and suggestions for things they'd like us to try to answer or blog about. IMG_2792

Two kinds of questions came flooding in — some were more substantial than others. Some could be answered in a paragraph or two.

If a wench uses one of the meatier questions for a blog, whoever sent in that question wins a wenchly book.

We use the shorter questions for our Ask-a-Wench mid-monthly post, where a handful of wenches would respond to the same question.

The thing is, dear readers, that early flow of questions and suggestions has slowed to a trickle, so we thought we'd put out a call for more, just as a reminder. We like to stay relevant to our readers. And a timely question or suggestion can inspire a wench deep in deadline frenzy.

You can either post them here, in the comments stream, or email them directly to Melissa, our Wenchly Whip at  thewordwenches@gmail.com

Thanks so much

Anne, on behalf of all the Word Wenches. And sending a small splash of summer color to keep all you chilly folk warm.

 

160 thoughts on “Questions? Suggestions?”

  1. I would love to hear views on the ‘Stream of Consciousness’ writing technique. I came across this while doing a futurelearn course on the modern novel and one example given was ‘The Lesser Bohemians’ by Eimere McBride. The audio book is available at Audible where the author reads her own work and a short sample can be heard for free. My impression was that the technique could be very interesting for writing action scenes, possibly for love or battle or sport. In these situations one can experience time slowing down as the mind becomes very focused on detail. By getting into a person’s mind in a very intimate way, the technique seems to me to have interesting possibilities which are worth exploring.
    Not sure if I sent this suggestion already … apologies if so.

    Reply
  2. I would love to hear views on the ‘Stream of Consciousness’ writing technique. I came across this while doing a futurelearn course on the modern novel and one example given was ‘The Lesser Bohemians’ by Eimere McBride. The audio book is available at Audible where the author reads her own work and a short sample can be heard for free. My impression was that the technique could be very interesting for writing action scenes, possibly for love or battle or sport. In these situations one can experience time slowing down as the mind becomes very focused on detail. By getting into a person’s mind in a very intimate way, the technique seems to me to have interesting possibilities which are worth exploring.
    Not sure if I sent this suggestion already … apologies if so.

    Reply
  3. I would love to hear views on the ‘Stream of Consciousness’ writing technique. I came across this while doing a futurelearn course on the modern novel and one example given was ‘The Lesser Bohemians’ by Eimere McBride. The audio book is available at Audible where the author reads her own work and a short sample can be heard for free. My impression was that the technique could be very interesting for writing action scenes, possibly for love or battle or sport. In these situations one can experience time slowing down as the mind becomes very focused on detail. By getting into a person’s mind in a very intimate way, the technique seems to me to have interesting possibilities which are worth exploring.
    Not sure if I sent this suggestion already … apologies if so.

    Reply
  4. I would love to hear views on the ‘Stream of Consciousness’ writing technique. I came across this while doing a futurelearn course on the modern novel and one example given was ‘The Lesser Bohemians’ by Eimere McBride. The audio book is available at Audible where the author reads her own work and a short sample can be heard for free. My impression was that the technique could be very interesting for writing action scenes, possibly for love or battle or sport. In these situations one can experience time slowing down as the mind becomes very focused on detail. By getting into a person’s mind in a very intimate way, the technique seems to me to have interesting possibilities which are worth exploring.
    Not sure if I sent this suggestion already … apologies if so.

    Reply
  5. I would love to hear views on the ‘Stream of Consciousness’ writing technique. I came across this while doing a futurelearn course on the modern novel and one example given was ‘The Lesser Bohemians’ by Eimere McBride. The audio book is available at Audible where the author reads her own work and a short sample can be heard for free. My impression was that the technique could be very interesting for writing action scenes, possibly for love or battle or sport. In these situations one can experience time slowing down as the mind becomes very focused on detail. By getting into a person’s mind in a very intimate way, the technique seems to me to have interesting possibilities which are worth exploring.
    Not sure if I sent this suggestion already … apologies if so.

    Reply
  6. You are all authors whose work I read and I like the blog to keep me posted on how you are and what you are writing. It is so personal and I can feel that you are friends of mine. Personal news from authors is important to readers.

    Reply
  7. You are all authors whose work I read and I like the blog to keep me posted on how you are and what you are writing. It is so personal and I can feel that you are friends of mine. Personal news from authors is important to readers.

    Reply
  8. You are all authors whose work I read and I like the blog to keep me posted on how you are and what you are writing. It is so personal and I can feel that you are friends of mine. Personal news from authors is important to readers.

    Reply
  9. You are all authors whose work I read and I like the blog to keep me posted on how you are and what you are writing. It is so personal and I can feel that you are friends of mine. Personal news from authors is important to readers.

    Reply
  10. You are all authors whose work I read and I like the blog to keep me posted on how you are and what you are writing. It is so personal and I can feel that you are friends of mine. Personal news from authors is important to readers.

    Reply
  11. I love this blog. You ladies come up with such interesting posts. I especially love any that involve historical data. And Anne, I love your quizzes.
    One thing that I have been wondering about lately is the editing and production of e-books. Some of them are very good, but others are so poorly edited, I can hardly bring myself to read them. I know that some of them are self published, but I don’t know exactly how that differs from companies like Untreed Reads. Just something I’m curious about.

    Reply
  12. I love this blog. You ladies come up with such interesting posts. I especially love any that involve historical data. And Anne, I love your quizzes.
    One thing that I have been wondering about lately is the editing and production of e-books. Some of them are very good, but others are so poorly edited, I can hardly bring myself to read them. I know that some of them are self published, but I don’t know exactly how that differs from companies like Untreed Reads. Just something I’m curious about.

    Reply
  13. I love this blog. You ladies come up with such interesting posts. I especially love any that involve historical data. And Anne, I love your quizzes.
    One thing that I have been wondering about lately is the editing and production of e-books. Some of them are very good, but others are so poorly edited, I can hardly bring myself to read them. I know that some of them are self published, but I don’t know exactly how that differs from companies like Untreed Reads. Just something I’m curious about.

    Reply
  14. I love this blog. You ladies come up with such interesting posts. I especially love any that involve historical data. And Anne, I love your quizzes.
    One thing that I have been wondering about lately is the editing and production of e-books. Some of them are very good, but others are so poorly edited, I can hardly bring myself to read them. I know that some of them are self published, but I don’t know exactly how that differs from companies like Untreed Reads. Just something I’m curious about.

    Reply
  15. I love this blog. You ladies come up with such interesting posts. I especially love any that involve historical data. And Anne, I love your quizzes.
    One thing that I have been wondering about lately is the editing and production of e-books. Some of them are very good, but others are so poorly edited, I can hardly bring myself to read them. I know that some of them are self published, but I don’t know exactly how that differs from companies like Untreed Reads. Just something I’m curious about.

    Reply
  16. Me, i’m a process person, so I am always interested in the blog posts in which a Wench refers to what she’s doing to prepare for or finish a book. I’d like to hear more about how ideas are first turned into plans (outlines? Story boards? Cocktail napkins?) for future work. And, perhaps particularly, when do you know a story will become a series?
    It would also be very interesting to know how important humor is to each of you when creating characters. I’ve always found heroes with a self-deprecating sense of humor almost irresistible, and heroines who can match them in witty retort make it even better. But it can’t be easy to create that — or is it for the extremely talented writers you all are?
    And thanks very much for reaching out to us for questions/topics!

    Reply
  17. Me, i’m a process person, so I am always interested in the blog posts in which a Wench refers to what she’s doing to prepare for or finish a book. I’d like to hear more about how ideas are first turned into plans (outlines? Story boards? Cocktail napkins?) for future work. And, perhaps particularly, when do you know a story will become a series?
    It would also be very interesting to know how important humor is to each of you when creating characters. I’ve always found heroes with a self-deprecating sense of humor almost irresistible, and heroines who can match them in witty retort make it even better. But it can’t be easy to create that — or is it for the extremely talented writers you all are?
    And thanks very much for reaching out to us for questions/topics!

    Reply
  18. Me, i’m a process person, so I am always interested in the blog posts in which a Wench refers to what she’s doing to prepare for or finish a book. I’d like to hear more about how ideas are first turned into plans (outlines? Story boards? Cocktail napkins?) for future work. And, perhaps particularly, when do you know a story will become a series?
    It would also be very interesting to know how important humor is to each of you when creating characters. I’ve always found heroes with a self-deprecating sense of humor almost irresistible, and heroines who can match them in witty retort make it even better. But it can’t be easy to create that — or is it for the extremely talented writers you all are?
    And thanks very much for reaching out to us for questions/topics!

    Reply
  19. Me, i’m a process person, so I am always interested in the blog posts in which a Wench refers to what she’s doing to prepare for or finish a book. I’d like to hear more about how ideas are first turned into plans (outlines? Story boards? Cocktail napkins?) for future work. And, perhaps particularly, when do you know a story will become a series?
    It would also be very interesting to know how important humor is to each of you when creating characters. I’ve always found heroes with a self-deprecating sense of humor almost irresistible, and heroines who can match them in witty retort make it even better. But it can’t be easy to create that — or is it for the extremely talented writers you all are?
    And thanks very much for reaching out to us for questions/topics!

    Reply
  20. Me, i’m a process person, so I am always interested in the blog posts in which a Wench refers to what she’s doing to prepare for or finish a book. I’d like to hear more about how ideas are first turned into plans (outlines? Story boards? Cocktail napkins?) for future work. And, perhaps particularly, when do you know a story will become a series?
    It would also be very interesting to know how important humor is to each of you when creating characters. I’ve always found heroes with a self-deprecating sense of humor almost irresistible, and heroines who can match them in witty retort make it even better. But it can’t be easy to create that — or is it for the extremely talented writers you all are?
    And thanks very much for reaching out to us for questions/topics!

    Reply
  21. I admire each of you. And I have enjoyed the blog for some time, but not since the beginning.
    I was wondering how the original group came to be. Since each of you live in different areas of the world, how did you find one another. And when it became necessary to fill a void within the group, how was the next author chosen?
    Are all of you cousins who have known one another since you were toddlers? Inquiring minds want to know – or at least this single mind wants to know.

    Reply
  22. I admire each of you. And I have enjoyed the blog for some time, but not since the beginning.
    I was wondering how the original group came to be. Since each of you live in different areas of the world, how did you find one another. And when it became necessary to fill a void within the group, how was the next author chosen?
    Are all of you cousins who have known one another since you were toddlers? Inquiring minds want to know – or at least this single mind wants to know.

    Reply
  23. I admire each of you. And I have enjoyed the blog for some time, but not since the beginning.
    I was wondering how the original group came to be. Since each of you live in different areas of the world, how did you find one another. And when it became necessary to fill a void within the group, how was the next author chosen?
    Are all of you cousins who have known one another since you were toddlers? Inquiring minds want to know – or at least this single mind wants to know.

    Reply
  24. I admire each of you. And I have enjoyed the blog for some time, but not since the beginning.
    I was wondering how the original group came to be. Since each of you live in different areas of the world, how did you find one another. And when it became necessary to fill a void within the group, how was the next author chosen?
    Are all of you cousins who have known one another since you were toddlers? Inquiring minds want to know – or at least this single mind wants to know.

    Reply
  25. I admire each of you. And I have enjoyed the blog for some time, but not since the beginning.
    I was wondering how the original group came to be. Since each of you live in different areas of the world, how did you find one another. And when it became necessary to fill a void within the group, how was the next author chosen?
    Are all of you cousins who have known one another since you were toddlers? Inquiring minds want to know – or at least this single mind wants to know.

    Reply
  26. I have followed the blog for quite some time, but did not find you at the beginning.
    I was wondering how you became a group. Since you live in different parts of the world, how did you find one another? And when you needed to fill a void in the group, how do you choose the author to join the group?
    It appears from the outside that y’all are very close friends, has that grown because of the group, or have you always been close friends?

    Reply
  27. I have followed the blog for quite some time, but did not find you at the beginning.
    I was wondering how you became a group. Since you live in different parts of the world, how did you find one another? And when you needed to fill a void in the group, how do you choose the author to join the group?
    It appears from the outside that y’all are very close friends, has that grown because of the group, or have you always been close friends?

    Reply
  28. I have followed the blog for quite some time, but did not find you at the beginning.
    I was wondering how you became a group. Since you live in different parts of the world, how did you find one another? And when you needed to fill a void in the group, how do you choose the author to join the group?
    It appears from the outside that y’all are very close friends, has that grown because of the group, or have you always been close friends?

    Reply
  29. I have followed the blog for quite some time, but did not find you at the beginning.
    I was wondering how you became a group. Since you live in different parts of the world, how did you find one another? And when you needed to fill a void in the group, how do you choose the author to join the group?
    It appears from the outside that y’all are very close friends, has that grown because of the group, or have you always been close friends?

    Reply
  30. I have followed the blog for quite some time, but did not find you at the beginning.
    I was wondering how you became a group. Since you live in different parts of the world, how did you find one another? And when you needed to fill a void in the group, how do you choose the author to join the group?
    It appears from the outside that y’all are very close friends, has that grown because of the group, or have you always been close friends?

    Reply
  31. I echo Mary T’s question above. I’ve often wondered about the kindle publishing world. How would one go about it?
    I love these posts especially the one’s, ‘what we’re reading now’.

    Reply
  32. I echo Mary T’s question above. I’ve often wondered about the kindle publishing world. How would one go about it?
    I love these posts especially the one’s, ‘what we’re reading now’.

    Reply
  33. I echo Mary T’s question above. I’ve often wondered about the kindle publishing world. How would one go about it?
    I love these posts especially the one’s, ‘what we’re reading now’.

    Reply
  34. I echo Mary T’s question above. I’ve often wondered about the kindle publishing world. How would one go about it?
    I love these posts especially the one’s, ‘what we’re reading now’.

    Reply
  35. I echo Mary T’s question above. I’ve often wondered about the kindle publishing world. How would one go about it?
    I love these posts especially the one’s, ‘what we’re reading now’.

    Reply
  36. Thanks, Mary T. I enjoy making up the quizzes, so I’ll certainly continue that.
    As for the e-book question, I’m sure a number of the wenches could — and will — respond to that one.

    Reply
  37. Thanks, Mary T. I enjoy making up the quizzes, so I’ll certainly continue that.
    As for the e-book question, I’m sure a number of the wenches could — and will — respond to that one.

    Reply
  38. Thanks, Mary T. I enjoy making up the quizzes, so I’ll certainly continue that.
    As for the e-book question, I’m sure a number of the wenches could — and will — respond to that one.

    Reply
  39. Thanks, Mary T. I enjoy making up the quizzes, so I’ll certainly continue that.
    As for the e-book question, I’m sure a number of the wenches could — and will — respond to that one.

    Reply
  40. Thanks, Mary T. I enjoy making up the quizzes, so I’ll certainly continue that.
    As for the e-book question, I’m sure a number of the wenches could — and will — respond to that one.

    Reply
  41. I’m trying to finalize the first 50 pages of my first Regency for critique by one of you lovely ladies (she knows who she is!), but I am struggling with something. Say A is the POV character, and B the non-POV character. Where does the POV character’s observation about the non-POV character’s voice/visible reaction/action etc go? For instance:
    “Go to the devil,” B [non-POV character] said. Her voice dripped scorn.
    The ‘Her voice dripped scorn’ is the POV character’s observation, so does it belong in a new para, or does it stay in the same para with B’s dialogue? What if B, the non-POV character immediately says something else? I can’t quite work out what looks right on the page, so any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.

    Reply
  42. I’m trying to finalize the first 50 pages of my first Regency for critique by one of you lovely ladies (she knows who she is!), but I am struggling with something. Say A is the POV character, and B the non-POV character. Where does the POV character’s observation about the non-POV character’s voice/visible reaction/action etc go? For instance:
    “Go to the devil,” B [non-POV character] said. Her voice dripped scorn.
    The ‘Her voice dripped scorn’ is the POV character’s observation, so does it belong in a new para, or does it stay in the same para with B’s dialogue? What if B, the non-POV character immediately says something else? I can’t quite work out what looks right on the page, so any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.

    Reply
  43. I’m trying to finalize the first 50 pages of my first Regency for critique by one of you lovely ladies (she knows who she is!), but I am struggling with something. Say A is the POV character, and B the non-POV character. Where does the POV character’s observation about the non-POV character’s voice/visible reaction/action etc go? For instance:
    “Go to the devil,” B [non-POV character] said. Her voice dripped scorn.
    The ‘Her voice dripped scorn’ is the POV character’s observation, so does it belong in a new para, or does it stay in the same para with B’s dialogue? What if B, the non-POV character immediately says something else? I can’t quite work out what looks right on the page, so any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.

    Reply
  44. I’m trying to finalize the first 50 pages of my first Regency for critique by one of you lovely ladies (she knows who she is!), but I am struggling with something. Say A is the POV character, and B the non-POV character. Where does the POV character’s observation about the non-POV character’s voice/visible reaction/action etc go? For instance:
    “Go to the devil,” B [non-POV character] said. Her voice dripped scorn.
    The ‘Her voice dripped scorn’ is the POV character’s observation, so does it belong in a new para, or does it stay in the same para with B’s dialogue? What if B, the non-POV character immediately says something else? I can’t quite work out what looks right on the page, so any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.

    Reply
  45. I’m trying to finalize the first 50 pages of my first Regency for critique by one of you lovely ladies (she knows who she is!), but I am struggling with something. Say A is the POV character, and B the non-POV character. Where does the POV character’s observation about the non-POV character’s voice/visible reaction/action etc go? For instance:
    “Go to the devil,” B [non-POV character] said. Her voice dripped scorn.
    The ‘Her voice dripped scorn’ is the POV character’s observation, so does it belong in a new para, or does it stay in the same para with B’s dialogue? What if B, the non-POV character immediately says something else? I can’t quite work out what looks right on the page, so any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.

    Reply
  46. I have a couple: In your own reading of romance books over the years which alpha hero has been your favorite, the one you remember after all this time? On the flip side: which beta hero has been your favorite? And, why. It doesn’t necessarily have to be one of your own books.
    Authors: Even though we all know your books are perfect, is there an ending to one of your books you wish you’d ended differently?

    Reply
  47. I have a couple: In your own reading of romance books over the years which alpha hero has been your favorite, the one you remember after all this time? On the flip side: which beta hero has been your favorite? And, why. It doesn’t necessarily have to be one of your own books.
    Authors: Even though we all know your books are perfect, is there an ending to one of your books you wish you’d ended differently?

    Reply
  48. I have a couple: In your own reading of romance books over the years which alpha hero has been your favorite, the one you remember after all this time? On the flip side: which beta hero has been your favorite? And, why. It doesn’t necessarily have to be one of your own books.
    Authors: Even though we all know your books are perfect, is there an ending to one of your books you wish you’d ended differently?

    Reply
  49. I have a couple: In your own reading of romance books over the years which alpha hero has been your favorite, the one you remember after all this time? On the flip side: which beta hero has been your favorite? And, why. It doesn’t necessarily have to be one of your own books.
    Authors: Even though we all know your books are perfect, is there an ending to one of your books you wish you’d ended differently?

    Reply
  50. I have a couple: In your own reading of romance books over the years which alpha hero has been your favorite, the one you remember after all this time? On the flip side: which beta hero has been your favorite? And, why. It doesn’t necessarily have to be one of your own books.
    Authors: Even though we all know your books are perfect, is there an ending to one of your books you wish you’d ended differently?

    Reply
  51. I’d love to hear about the marketing and fan interaction. How it has changed since you were published. What you did then, vs. what you do now. What works, what doesn’t, and what you aren’t sure about. If you have tried new things, or if you’ve decided it’s too much bother. It’s not about self-interest for my mother’s books, it’s about being amazed by the shifts. I recently learned the new president or Novelists inc is a self-published author/former trucker. He’s actually exceedingly nice, admit I haven’t read him yet. But how have the changes to publishing and expected marketing by the author changed your lives if at all? Do you get help, or do it all yourself or opt out? All of this interests me. <3

    Reply
  52. I’d love to hear about the marketing and fan interaction. How it has changed since you were published. What you did then, vs. what you do now. What works, what doesn’t, and what you aren’t sure about. If you have tried new things, or if you’ve decided it’s too much bother. It’s not about self-interest for my mother’s books, it’s about being amazed by the shifts. I recently learned the new president or Novelists inc is a self-published author/former trucker. He’s actually exceedingly nice, admit I haven’t read him yet. But how have the changes to publishing and expected marketing by the author changed your lives if at all? Do you get help, or do it all yourself or opt out? All of this interests me. <3

    Reply
  53. I’d love to hear about the marketing and fan interaction. How it has changed since you were published. What you did then, vs. what you do now. What works, what doesn’t, and what you aren’t sure about. If you have tried new things, or if you’ve decided it’s too much bother. It’s not about self-interest for my mother’s books, it’s about being amazed by the shifts. I recently learned the new president or Novelists inc is a self-published author/former trucker. He’s actually exceedingly nice, admit I haven’t read him yet. But how have the changes to publishing and expected marketing by the author changed your lives if at all? Do you get help, or do it all yourself or opt out? All of this interests me. <3

    Reply
  54. I’d love to hear about the marketing and fan interaction. How it has changed since you were published. What you did then, vs. what you do now. What works, what doesn’t, and what you aren’t sure about. If you have tried new things, or if you’ve decided it’s too much bother. It’s not about self-interest for my mother’s books, it’s about being amazed by the shifts. I recently learned the new president or Novelists inc is a self-published author/former trucker. He’s actually exceedingly nice, admit I haven’t read him yet. But how have the changes to publishing and expected marketing by the author changed your lives if at all? Do you get help, or do it all yourself or opt out? All of this interests me. <3

    Reply
  55. I’d love to hear about the marketing and fan interaction. How it has changed since you were published. What you did then, vs. what you do now. What works, what doesn’t, and what you aren’t sure about. If you have tried new things, or if you’ve decided it’s too much bother. It’s not about self-interest for my mother’s books, it’s about being amazed by the shifts. I recently learned the new president or Novelists inc is a self-published author/former trucker. He’s actually exceedingly nice, admit I haven’t read him yet. But how have the changes to publishing and expected marketing by the author changed your lives if at all? Do you get help, or do it all yourself or opt out? All of this interests me. <3

    Reply
  56. Since most of you are long time authors, I’d love to hear your impressions of how the romance writing world has changed over the last 20 or 30 years-good, bad or indifferent.
    I remember in the early, pre-internet days of my reading, I would just haunt the book store and hope that a book by an author I liked would eventually turn up. But I had no contact with other readers, or any way to get book recommendations and find new authors, it was totally hit and miss.

    Reply
  57. Since most of you are long time authors, I’d love to hear your impressions of how the romance writing world has changed over the last 20 or 30 years-good, bad or indifferent.
    I remember in the early, pre-internet days of my reading, I would just haunt the book store and hope that a book by an author I liked would eventually turn up. But I had no contact with other readers, or any way to get book recommendations and find new authors, it was totally hit and miss.

    Reply
  58. Since most of you are long time authors, I’d love to hear your impressions of how the romance writing world has changed over the last 20 or 30 years-good, bad or indifferent.
    I remember in the early, pre-internet days of my reading, I would just haunt the book store and hope that a book by an author I liked would eventually turn up. But I had no contact with other readers, or any way to get book recommendations and find new authors, it was totally hit and miss.

    Reply
  59. Since most of you are long time authors, I’d love to hear your impressions of how the romance writing world has changed over the last 20 or 30 years-good, bad or indifferent.
    I remember in the early, pre-internet days of my reading, I would just haunt the book store and hope that a book by an author I liked would eventually turn up. But I had no contact with other readers, or any way to get book recommendations and find new authors, it was totally hit and miss.

    Reply
  60. Since most of you are long time authors, I’d love to hear your impressions of how the romance writing world has changed over the last 20 or 30 years-good, bad or indifferent.
    I remember in the early, pre-internet days of my reading, I would just haunt the book store and hope that a book by an author I liked would eventually turn up. But I had no contact with other readers, or any way to get book recommendations and find new authors, it was totally hit and miss.

    Reply
  61. Have a question regarding retiring rooms. What did the men do in regards to relief and repairs? I think as there is mention of the women’s rooms and generally some sort of conversation between the heroine and other ball goers, there should be the same for the hero.

    Reply
  62. Have a question regarding retiring rooms. What did the men do in regards to relief and repairs? I think as there is mention of the women’s rooms and generally some sort of conversation between the heroine and other ball goers, there should be the same for the hero.

    Reply
  63. Have a question regarding retiring rooms. What did the men do in regards to relief and repairs? I think as there is mention of the women’s rooms and generally some sort of conversation between the heroine and other ball goers, there should be the same for the hero.

    Reply
  64. Have a question regarding retiring rooms. What did the men do in regards to relief and repairs? I think as there is mention of the women’s rooms and generally some sort of conversation between the heroine and other ball goers, there should be the same for the hero.

    Reply
  65. Have a question regarding retiring rooms. What did the men do in regards to relief and repairs? I think as there is mention of the women’s rooms and generally some sort of conversation between the heroine and other ball goers, there should be the same for the hero.

    Reply
  66. I love the posts about what you all are reading and have enjoyed reading. I enjoy the posts about where you’re all travelling and the view from your window as it were. I guess I have nothing constructive to add, but I just wanted to say how much I love those pieces.

    Reply
  67. I love the posts about what you all are reading and have enjoyed reading. I enjoy the posts about where you’re all travelling and the view from your window as it were. I guess I have nothing constructive to add, but I just wanted to say how much I love those pieces.

    Reply
  68. I love the posts about what you all are reading and have enjoyed reading. I enjoy the posts about where you’re all travelling and the view from your window as it were. I guess I have nothing constructive to add, but I just wanted to say how much I love those pieces.

    Reply
  69. I love the posts about what you all are reading and have enjoyed reading. I enjoy the posts about where you’re all travelling and the view from your window as it were. I guess I have nothing constructive to add, but I just wanted to say how much I love those pieces.

    Reply
  70. I love the posts about what you all are reading and have enjoyed reading. I enjoy the posts about where you’re all travelling and the view from your window as it were. I guess I have nothing constructive to add, but I just wanted to say how much I love those pieces.

    Reply
  71. Annette, I can see you had trouble posting — so annoying when that happens. It happened to me, too when I commented on Susan’s post, and then I found multiple messages from some people. I released them all from spam and then deleted the duplicates.
    Thanks for your questions. Am chuckling at the “cousins” notion.

    Reply
  72. Annette, I can see you had trouble posting — so annoying when that happens. It happened to me, too when I commented on Susan’s post, and then I found multiple messages from some people. I released them all from spam and then deleted the duplicates.
    Thanks for your questions. Am chuckling at the “cousins” notion.

    Reply
  73. Annette, I can see you had trouble posting — so annoying when that happens. It happened to me, too when I commented on Susan’s post, and then I found multiple messages from some people. I released them all from spam and then deleted the duplicates.
    Thanks for your questions. Am chuckling at the “cousins” notion.

    Reply
  74. Annette, I can see you had trouble posting — so annoying when that happens. It happened to me, too when I commented on Susan’s post, and then I found multiple messages from some people. I released them all from spam and then deleted the duplicates.
    Thanks for your questions. Am chuckling at the “cousins” notion.

    Reply
  75. Annette, I can see you had trouble posting — so annoying when that happens. It happened to me, too when I commented on Susan’s post, and then I found multiple messages from some people. I released them all from spam and then deleted the duplicates.
    Thanks for your questions. Am chuckling at the “cousins” notion.

    Reply
  76. Hi Susie, this is a huuuuge question, or series of questions, and I doubt even one or two posts would cover them. I’ll put them on the list, but really, things are changing so fast in publishing, it would probably be better for you to join one of the on-line communities where these sorts of questions are discussed all the time. Marie Force has one. Other Wenches might know others.
    Self publishing has revolutionized publishing — and thank goodness it’s possible, otherwise your mother’s books would not still be available.
    (Susie’s mother was beloved wench, Edith Layton, for those who are wondering.)

    Reply
  77. Hi Susie, this is a huuuuge question, or series of questions, and I doubt even one or two posts would cover them. I’ll put them on the list, but really, things are changing so fast in publishing, it would probably be better for you to join one of the on-line communities where these sorts of questions are discussed all the time. Marie Force has one. Other Wenches might know others.
    Self publishing has revolutionized publishing — and thank goodness it’s possible, otherwise your mother’s books would not still be available.
    (Susie’s mother was beloved wench, Edith Layton, for those who are wondering.)

    Reply
  78. Hi Susie, this is a huuuuge question, or series of questions, and I doubt even one or two posts would cover them. I’ll put them on the list, but really, things are changing so fast in publishing, it would probably be better for you to join one of the on-line communities where these sorts of questions are discussed all the time. Marie Force has one. Other Wenches might know others.
    Self publishing has revolutionized publishing — and thank goodness it’s possible, otherwise your mother’s books would not still be available.
    (Susie’s mother was beloved wench, Edith Layton, for those who are wondering.)

    Reply
  79. Hi Susie, this is a huuuuge question, or series of questions, and I doubt even one or two posts would cover them. I’ll put them on the list, but really, things are changing so fast in publishing, it would probably be better for you to join one of the on-line communities where these sorts of questions are discussed all the time. Marie Force has one. Other Wenches might know others.
    Self publishing has revolutionized publishing — and thank goodness it’s possible, otherwise your mother’s books would not still be available.
    (Susie’s mother was beloved wench, Edith Layton, for those who are wondering.)

    Reply
  80. Hi Susie, this is a huuuuge question, or series of questions, and I doubt even one or two posts would cover them. I’ll put them on the list, but really, things are changing so fast in publishing, it would probably be better for you to join one of the on-line communities where these sorts of questions are discussed all the time. Marie Force has one. Other Wenches might know others.
    Self publishing has revolutionized publishing — and thank goodness it’s possible, otherwise your mother’s books would not still be available.
    (Susie’s mother was beloved wench, Edith Layton, for those who are wondering.)

    Reply
  81. Karin, thanks for the question. I certainly remember those days. Here in Australia it was much more miss than hit, too, as most of the bricks and mortar bookshops didn’t (and still don’t) stock much romance.

    Reply
  82. Karin, thanks for the question. I certainly remember those days. Here in Australia it was much more miss than hit, too, as most of the bricks and mortar bookshops didn’t (and still don’t) stock much romance.

    Reply
  83. Karin, thanks for the question. I certainly remember those days. Here in Australia it was much more miss than hit, too, as most of the bricks and mortar bookshops didn’t (and still don’t) stock much romance.

    Reply
  84. Karin, thanks for the question. I certainly remember those days. Here in Australia it was much more miss than hit, too, as most of the bricks and mortar bookshops didn’t (and still don’t) stock much romance.

    Reply
  85. Karin, thanks for the question. I certainly remember those days. Here in Australia it was much more miss than hit, too, as most of the bricks and mortar bookshops didn’t (and still don’t) stock much romance.

    Reply
  86. Thanks for the question, Jill. It’s the kind of thing Jo Beverley would have loved to answer. I suspect it was something simple and basic, but we’ll see if the other wenches know.

    Reply
  87. Thanks for the question, Jill. It’s the kind of thing Jo Beverley would have loved to answer. I suspect it was something simple and basic, but we’ll see if the other wenches know.

    Reply
  88. Thanks for the question, Jill. It’s the kind of thing Jo Beverley would have loved to answer. I suspect it was something simple and basic, but we’ll see if the other wenches know.

    Reply
  89. Thanks for the question, Jill. It’s the kind of thing Jo Beverley would have loved to answer. I suspect it was something simple and basic, but we’ll see if the other wenches know.

    Reply
  90. Thanks for the question, Jill. It’s the kind of thing Jo Beverley would have loved to answer. I suspect it was something simple and basic, but we’ll see if the other wenches know.

    Reply
  91. I have been reading historical romance all my life starting with Zane Gray and the gothics then onto regencies and the bodice rippers,etc. I would probably like to see an annual column on what the group sees as the most recent trends in historical romance and the romance genre in general.I have not been very happy with the whole BDSM thing and I did not like it when a popular historical romance author had a spanking scene in which the heroine liked it. I hope there are better things to come in all romance genres.

    Reply
  92. I have been reading historical romance all my life starting with Zane Gray and the gothics then onto regencies and the bodice rippers,etc. I would probably like to see an annual column on what the group sees as the most recent trends in historical romance and the romance genre in general.I have not been very happy with the whole BDSM thing and I did not like it when a popular historical romance author had a spanking scene in which the heroine liked it. I hope there are better things to come in all romance genres.

    Reply
  93. I have been reading historical romance all my life starting with Zane Gray and the gothics then onto regencies and the bodice rippers,etc. I would probably like to see an annual column on what the group sees as the most recent trends in historical romance and the romance genre in general.I have not been very happy with the whole BDSM thing and I did not like it when a popular historical romance author had a spanking scene in which the heroine liked it. I hope there are better things to come in all romance genres.

    Reply
  94. I have been reading historical romance all my life starting with Zane Gray and the gothics then onto regencies and the bodice rippers,etc. I would probably like to see an annual column on what the group sees as the most recent trends in historical romance and the romance genre in general.I have not been very happy with the whole BDSM thing and I did not like it when a popular historical romance author had a spanking scene in which the heroine liked it. I hope there are better things to come in all romance genres.

    Reply
  95. I have been reading historical romance all my life starting with Zane Gray and the gothics then onto regencies and the bodice rippers,etc. I would probably like to see an annual column on what the group sees as the most recent trends in historical romance and the romance genre in general.I have not been very happy with the whole BDSM thing and I did not like it when a popular historical romance author had a spanking scene in which the heroine liked it. I hope there are better things to come in all romance genres.

    Reply
  96. Annette–the answer to this is conferences! I think I met everyone of the other Wenches at a conference. Our tribal gatherings. I could expand on this, but better to save it for a blog, I think!

    Reply
  97. Annette–the answer to this is conferences! I think I met everyone of the other Wenches at a conference. Our tribal gatherings. I could expand on this, but better to save it for a blog, I think!

    Reply
  98. Annette–the answer to this is conferences! I think I met everyone of the other Wenches at a conference. Our tribal gatherings. I could expand on this, but better to save it for a blog, I think!

    Reply
  99. Annette–the answer to this is conferences! I think I met everyone of the other Wenches at a conference. Our tribal gatherings. I could expand on this, but better to save it for a blog, I think!

    Reply
  100. Annette–the answer to this is conferences! I think I met everyone of the other Wenches at a conference. Our tribal gatherings. I could expand on this, but better to save it for a blog, I think!

    Reply
  101. I have been trying to come up with a discussion topic for a blog post but have had very little luck.
    Though just now I had the this thought….have you (as in all the wenches) upped your level of DNF’s over the years? Me, I was always compelled to finish a book once I started it. A few years ago I started allowing myself to DNF.
    Now I routinely have DNF’s due to a lower tolerance of bad writing (at least what I consider bad writing) and angsty in the head characters. Or they are whiney or just boring. Or ……..
    Though I do admit that I will skip to the last 30 pages and see what the end says even if I didn’t “invest” in the entire book. My motto is..if it doesn’t keep me interested toss it because I have another 300 on the shelf waiting to be read. Ahem…Library sales break bookshelves.
    I always enjoy the posts on this blog and the great discussions in the comments. I’ve learned so much about so MANY topics I would never have thought further about but which have enriched my view of the past and of books.
    Travel posts are always fun because there is ALWAYS a historical/cultural component.
    As a huge fangirl, I’d probably like a Wenchly discussion of the phone book if you (as in all you) wrote one… 🙂

    Reply
  102. I have been trying to come up with a discussion topic for a blog post but have had very little luck.
    Though just now I had the this thought….have you (as in all the wenches) upped your level of DNF’s over the years? Me, I was always compelled to finish a book once I started it. A few years ago I started allowing myself to DNF.
    Now I routinely have DNF’s due to a lower tolerance of bad writing (at least what I consider bad writing) and angsty in the head characters. Or they are whiney or just boring. Or ……..
    Though I do admit that I will skip to the last 30 pages and see what the end says even if I didn’t “invest” in the entire book. My motto is..if it doesn’t keep me interested toss it because I have another 300 on the shelf waiting to be read. Ahem…Library sales break bookshelves.
    I always enjoy the posts on this blog and the great discussions in the comments. I’ve learned so much about so MANY topics I would never have thought further about but which have enriched my view of the past and of books.
    Travel posts are always fun because there is ALWAYS a historical/cultural component.
    As a huge fangirl, I’d probably like a Wenchly discussion of the phone book if you (as in all you) wrote one… 🙂

    Reply
  103. I have been trying to come up with a discussion topic for a blog post but have had very little luck.
    Though just now I had the this thought….have you (as in all the wenches) upped your level of DNF’s over the years? Me, I was always compelled to finish a book once I started it. A few years ago I started allowing myself to DNF.
    Now I routinely have DNF’s due to a lower tolerance of bad writing (at least what I consider bad writing) and angsty in the head characters. Or they are whiney or just boring. Or ……..
    Though I do admit that I will skip to the last 30 pages and see what the end says even if I didn’t “invest” in the entire book. My motto is..if it doesn’t keep me interested toss it because I have another 300 on the shelf waiting to be read. Ahem…Library sales break bookshelves.
    I always enjoy the posts on this blog and the great discussions in the comments. I’ve learned so much about so MANY topics I would never have thought further about but which have enriched my view of the past and of books.
    Travel posts are always fun because there is ALWAYS a historical/cultural component.
    As a huge fangirl, I’d probably like a Wenchly discussion of the phone book if you (as in all you) wrote one… 🙂

    Reply
  104. I have been trying to come up with a discussion topic for a blog post but have had very little luck.
    Though just now I had the this thought….have you (as in all the wenches) upped your level of DNF’s over the years? Me, I was always compelled to finish a book once I started it. A few years ago I started allowing myself to DNF.
    Now I routinely have DNF’s due to a lower tolerance of bad writing (at least what I consider bad writing) and angsty in the head characters. Or they are whiney or just boring. Or ……..
    Though I do admit that I will skip to the last 30 pages and see what the end says even if I didn’t “invest” in the entire book. My motto is..if it doesn’t keep me interested toss it because I have another 300 on the shelf waiting to be read. Ahem…Library sales break bookshelves.
    I always enjoy the posts on this blog and the great discussions in the comments. I’ve learned so much about so MANY topics I would never have thought further about but which have enriched my view of the past and of books.
    Travel posts are always fun because there is ALWAYS a historical/cultural component.
    As a huge fangirl, I’d probably like a Wenchly discussion of the phone book if you (as in all you) wrote one… 🙂

    Reply
  105. I have been trying to come up with a discussion topic for a blog post but have had very little luck.
    Though just now I had the this thought….have you (as in all the wenches) upped your level of DNF’s over the years? Me, I was always compelled to finish a book once I started it. A few years ago I started allowing myself to DNF.
    Now I routinely have DNF’s due to a lower tolerance of bad writing (at least what I consider bad writing) and angsty in the head characters. Or they are whiney or just boring. Or ……..
    Though I do admit that I will skip to the last 30 pages and see what the end says even if I didn’t “invest” in the entire book. My motto is..if it doesn’t keep me interested toss it because I have another 300 on the shelf waiting to be read. Ahem…Library sales break bookshelves.
    I always enjoy the posts on this blog and the great discussions in the comments. I’ve learned so much about so MANY topics I would never have thought further about but which have enriched my view of the past and of books.
    Travel posts are always fun because there is ALWAYS a historical/cultural component.
    As a huge fangirl, I’d probably like a Wenchly discussion of the phone book if you (as in all you) wrote one… 🙂

    Reply
  106. Ha! I don’t know what happened in real life, but I’ve noticed that in fiction men go out to the terrace to smoke cigars when they want to converse and move the plot along.

    Reply
  107. Ha! I don’t know what happened in real life, but I’ve noticed that in fiction men go out to the terrace to smoke cigars when they want to converse and move the plot along.

    Reply
  108. Ha! I don’t know what happened in real life, but I’ve noticed that in fiction men go out to the terrace to smoke cigars when they want to converse and move the plot along.

    Reply
  109. Ha! I don’t know what happened in real life, but I’ve noticed that in fiction men go out to the terrace to smoke cigars when they want to converse and move the plot along.

    Reply
  110. Ha! I don’t know what happened in real life, but I’ve noticed that in fiction men go out to the terrace to smoke cigars when they want to converse and move the plot along.

    Reply
  111. A question I enjoy discussing with other readers is what they experience when they read ~ some see a movie complete with dialogue (and can change the looks of characters to suit themselves) while others, like me, begin by reading the words aloud in my head and then become immersed in the book (with no audio or visuals); others have different experiences. What do the Wenches experience when they read?

    Reply
  112. A question I enjoy discussing with other readers is what they experience when they read ~ some see a movie complete with dialogue (and can change the looks of characters to suit themselves) while others, like me, begin by reading the words aloud in my head and then become immersed in the book (with no audio or visuals); others have different experiences. What do the Wenches experience when they read?

    Reply
  113. A question I enjoy discussing with other readers is what they experience when they read ~ some see a movie complete with dialogue (and can change the looks of characters to suit themselves) while others, like me, begin by reading the words aloud in my head and then become immersed in the book (with no audio or visuals); others have different experiences. What do the Wenches experience when they read?

    Reply
  114. A question I enjoy discussing with other readers is what they experience when they read ~ some see a movie complete with dialogue (and can change the looks of characters to suit themselves) while others, like me, begin by reading the words aloud in my head and then become immersed in the book (with no audio or visuals); others have different experiences. What do the Wenches experience when they read?

    Reply
  115. A question I enjoy discussing with other readers is what they experience when they read ~ some see a movie complete with dialogue (and can change the looks of characters to suit themselves) while others, like me, begin by reading the words aloud in my head and then become immersed in the book (with no audio or visuals); others have different experiences. What do the Wenches experience when they read?

    Reply

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