What’s for Pudding?

Anne here, asking what's for pudding? SteamedPud
That's what the English say when they're enquiring about dessert. In other parts of the English-speaking world people might ask what's for dessert, or what's for sweets, or "afters."

But puddings are not always sweet. There are savory puddings as well as sweet ones. They were the earliest puddings — minced meat — usually the less palatable parts of the animal— some kind of grain, fat — generally suet— and seasonings, mixed together and stuffed into the entrails or stomach of an animal, or sometimes a cloth, and then steamed or boiled to cook the contents. Sounds a bit gruesome, doesn't it, but that's more or less what a sausage is, only these days most sausages casings are made artificially.

Black-pudding-slicesAnd while the sausage is fairly ubiquitous, in some parts of the English-speaking world, some kinds of sausage are called black puddings or blood puddings, or by other pudding names. This is black pudding or blood pudding — looks a lot like salami, doesn't it, except it's most commonly sliced and fried and served hot. Apparently it was a favorite of Henry VIII's.

Some kinds of pudding are more famous than others. Do you know this quote?
Fair fa' your honest, sonsie face,
Great chieftain o' the pudding-race! Haggis
It's from Address to a Haggis, by Scots poet Robert Burns, and yes, haggis is a savory pudding. That's a haggis on your right.

When I was a little girl, my father used to read me stories about a magic pudding — he was called Albert and was very naughty and grumpy and used to run away. But the wonderful thing about Albert was that he was whatever kind of pudding you wanted him to be — you could cut a slice of steak-and-kidney pudding from him for your main course, and then he'd be a jam roll or plum pudding or apple dumplings for dessert. And no matter how much you ate, Albert never ran out. No wonder thieves were always trying to steal Albert. That's Albert, below.

AlbertA steak and kidney pudding (or just a steak one if you don't like kidney) is made with a savory pastry outside that's something between the texture of pastry and bread. It's made with suet and is steamed or boiled in a cloth or a pudding basin — just a heatproof basin covered with a cloth or a lid or foil. You can learn more about it here.

And of course, what would roast beef be without Yorkshire pudding, which is a light, eggy batter cooked in the hot drippings of the roast.

But I'd say that everybody's favorite kind of pudding is the sweet kind, and these days if you say "pudding" most people assume you mean a dessert. But what kind of pudding? In some places "pudding" refers to a cold, creamy mix, often made from a packet, that's rather like a custard.

Some puddings are boiled in a cloth — plum pudding or Christmas pudding is the classic one there, though for many people they now come in a tin. A proper Christmas pudding though has a wrinkled skin, marked by the cloth, like this one, below. Pudding

Other sweet puddings are steamed or boiled in a pudding basin. This picture at the top of this post is that kind of pudding. The pudding mix, which is rather like a cake mix, is placed in the basin, often on top of a large dollop of jam or some kind of syrup, or chocolate sauce, depending on the recipe,the whole thing is covered tightly, placed in a pot of boiling water and kept simmering. An hour or two later, a delicious pudding is yours, to be served with custard, cream or icecream. You can try this recipe if you like. It looks utterly delicious.

TrifleSo here are some famous traditional English puddings. Jam Roly Poly, Spotted Dick, Eton Mess, Flummery, Syllabub,Treacle Tart, Jam tart, Trifle (pictured left from this website), Plum Pudding, Bakewell Tart, Bread and Butter Pudding, Custard Tart, Queen of puddings, Apple Pie, Apple and Blackberry Crumble, Rice Pudding, Sticky Date Pudding, Lemon Tart, Summer Pudding.

Which ones have you tasted? Which intrigue you the most? Any favorites here? Any you've never heard of? Have I missed out on a favorite? Have you ever eaten haggis, or black pudding? Tell us about your favorite pudding.

220 thoughts on “What’s for Pudding?”

  1. Black pudding is lovely, it’s slightly spicy & peppery & is an essential element of the great Full English.As for Eton Mess, it’s glorious..& brilliantly easy to make(a fab dinner party cheat pud!).As for steak & kidney pudding- see Delia Smith for the best recipe ever.It’s a winter favourite in our house,served with cabbage & potatoes.My all time favourite pudding is Bakewell tart, and if you like almonds & raspberries, you’ll love it, especially if it’s served with double cream .. 🙂

    Reply
  2. Black pudding is lovely, it’s slightly spicy & peppery & is an essential element of the great Full English.As for Eton Mess, it’s glorious..& brilliantly easy to make(a fab dinner party cheat pud!).As for steak & kidney pudding- see Delia Smith for the best recipe ever.It’s a winter favourite in our house,served with cabbage & potatoes.My all time favourite pudding is Bakewell tart, and if you like almonds & raspberries, you’ll love it, especially if it’s served with double cream .. 🙂

    Reply
  3. Black pudding is lovely, it’s slightly spicy & peppery & is an essential element of the great Full English.As for Eton Mess, it’s glorious..& brilliantly easy to make(a fab dinner party cheat pud!).As for steak & kidney pudding- see Delia Smith for the best recipe ever.It’s a winter favourite in our house,served with cabbage & potatoes.My all time favourite pudding is Bakewell tart, and if you like almonds & raspberries, you’ll love it, especially if it’s served with double cream .. 🙂

    Reply
  4. Black pudding is lovely, it’s slightly spicy & peppery & is an essential element of the great Full English.As for Eton Mess, it’s glorious..& brilliantly easy to make(a fab dinner party cheat pud!).As for steak & kidney pudding- see Delia Smith for the best recipe ever.It’s a winter favourite in our house,served with cabbage & potatoes.My all time favourite pudding is Bakewell tart, and if you like almonds & raspberries, you’ll love it, especially if it’s served with double cream .. 🙂

    Reply
  5. Black pudding is lovely, it’s slightly spicy & peppery & is an essential element of the great Full English.As for Eton Mess, it’s glorious..& brilliantly easy to make(a fab dinner party cheat pud!).As for steak & kidney pudding- see Delia Smith for the best recipe ever.It’s a winter favourite in our house,served with cabbage & potatoes.My all time favourite pudding is Bakewell tart, and if you like almonds & raspberries, you’ll love it, especially if it’s served with double cream .. 🙂

    Reply
  6. Oh memory lane! After Mum died Dad used to get invited out a lot to people’s home for dinner. After a few such dinners he rang me up in horror. No one these days has a proper pudding! At best they’d have ice cream. He was both horrified and gypped! Poor old Mum cooked a two course meal every day for a family of six and yes we had puddings … You mention rice pudding. We also had ground rice pudding with a blob of jam in the middle of each dish And sago pudding, aka frogspawn. And of course the trusty blancmange, made from a packet of powder mixed with hot milk. And of course pies and crumbles and mousses and fools. Not sure what Dad missed most: Mum or her puddings!

    Reply
  7. Oh memory lane! After Mum died Dad used to get invited out a lot to people’s home for dinner. After a few such dinners he rang me up in horror. No one these days has a proper pudding! At best they’d have ice cream. He was both horrified and gypped! Poor old Mum cooked a two course meal every day for a family of six and yes we had puddings … You mention rice pudding. We also had ground rice pudding with a blob of jam in the middle of each dish And sago pudding, aka frogspawn. And of course the trusty blancmange, made from a packet of powder mixed with hot milk. And of course pies and crumbles and mousses and fools. Not sure what Dad missed most: Mum or her puddings!

    Reply
  8. Oh memory lane! After Mum died Dad used to get invited out a lot to people’s home for dinner. After a few such dinners he rang me up in horror. No one these days has a proper pudding! At best they’d have ice cream. He was both horrified and gypped! Poor old Mum cooked a two course meal every day for a family of six and yes we had puddings … You mention rice pudding. We also had ground rice pudding with a blob of jam in the middle of each dish And sago pudding, aka frogspawn. And of course the trusty blancmange, made from a packet of powder mixed with hot milk. And of course pies and crumbles and mousses and fools. Not sure what Dad missed most: Mum or her puddings!

    Reply
  9. Oh memory lane! After Mum died Dad used to get invited out a lot to people’s home for dinner. After a few such dinners he rang me up in horror. No one these days has a proper pudding! At best they’d have ice cream. He was both horrified and gypped! Poor old Mum cooked a two course meal every day for a family of six and yes we had puddings … You mention rice pudding. We also had ground rice pudding with a blob of jam in the middle of each dish And sago pudding, aka frogspawn. And of course the trusty blancmange, made from a packet of powder mixed with hot milk. And of course pies and crumbles and mousses and fools. Not sure what Dad missed most: Mum or her puddings!

    Reply
  10. Oh memory lane! After Mum died Dad used to get invited out a lot to people’s home for dinner. After a few such dinners he rang me up in horror. No one these days has a proper pudding! At best they’d have ice cream. He was both horrified and gypped! Poor old Mum cooked a two course meal every day for a family of six and yes we had puddings … You mention rice pudding. We also had ground rice pudding with a blob of jam in the middle of each dish And sago pudding, aka frogspawn. And of course the trusty blancmange, made from a packet of powder mixed with hot milk. And of course pies and crumbles and mousses and fools. Not sure what Dad missed most: Mum or her puddings!

    Reply
  11. Thanks, Cate, I, in fact like all of these, except perhaps Eton Mess, which is a little sweet for my taste. A friend of mine makes it all the time for her man, who is a coeliac and can't usually eat other puddings, but meringue, cream and berries is no problem for him.
    I like black pudding, though I've never had it with a full English breakfast, and steak and kidney pud is a favorite of mine. Mum used to make it, and it was delicious, but her mother made an even better one.
    I usually make it as a pie, with pastry rather than a pudding, but I'll have a look at Delia's —her recipes are usually excellent. And I agree, bakewell tart is delish, though not easy to get here.
    Thanks so much for popping in.

    Reply
  12. Thanks, Cate, I, in fact like all of these, except perhaps Eton Mess, which is a little sweet for my taste. A friend of mine makes it all the time for her man, who is a coeliac and can't usually eat other puddings, but meringue, cream and berries is no problem for him.
    I like black pudding, though I've never had it with a full English breakfast, and steak and kidney pud is a favorite of mine. Mum used to make it, and it was delicious, but her mother made an even better one.
    I usually make it as a pie, with pastry rather than a pudding, but I'll have a look at Delia's —her recipes are usually excellent. And I agree, bakewell tart is delish, though not easy to get here.
    Thanks so much for popping in.

    Reply
  13. Thanks, Cate, I, in fact like all of these, except perhaps Eton Mess, which is a little sweet for my taste. A friend of mine makes it all the time for her man, who is a coeliac and can't usually eat other puddings, but meringue, cream and berries is no problem for him.
    I like black pudding, though I've never had it with a full English breakfast, and steak and kidney pud is a favorite of mine. Mum used to make it, and it was delicious, but her mother made an even better one.
    I usually make it as a pie, with pastry rather than a pudding, but I'll have a look at Delia's —her recipes are usually excellent. And I agree, bakewell tart is delish, though not easy to get here.
    Thanks so much for popping in.

    Reply
  14. Thanks, Cate, I, in fact like all of these, except perhaps Eton Mess, which is a little sweet for my taste. A friend of mine makes it all the time for her man, who is a coeliac and can't usually eat other puddings, but meringue, cream and berries is no problem for him.
    I like black pudding, though I've never had it with a full English breakfast, and steak and kidney pud is a favorite of mine. Mum used to make it, and it was delicious, but her mother made an even better one.
    I usually make it as a pie, with pastry rather than a pudding, but I'll have a look at Delia's —her recipes are usually excellent. And I agree, bakewell tart is delish, though not easy to get here.
    Thanks so much for popping in.

    Reply
  15. Thanks, Cate, I, in fact like all of these, except perhaps Eton Mess, which is a little sweet for my taste. A friend of mine makes it all the time for her man, who is a coeliac and can't usually eat other puddings, but meringue, cream and berries is no problem for him.
    I like black pudding, though I've never had it with a full English breakfast, and steak and kidney pud is a favorite of mine. Mum used to make it, and it was delicious, but her mother made an even better one.
    I usually make it as a pie, with pastry rather than a pudding, but I'll have a look at Delia's —her recipes are usually excellent. And I agree, bakewell tart is delish, though not easy to get here.
    Thanks so much for popping in.

    Reply
  16. Most confusing was when I first moved to London and was working in pubs there. Customers would ask if we had any puddings, and we (the other Australian barmaid and I) would always answer no. It took a while before we learnt they were asking if we had any desserts on the menu!
    I HATE the English-style Christmas pudding, and it gives my mother migraines. Once my friend served us Christmas lunch with massive individual puddings and I had to sneak it away bit-by-bit into the bin when she wasn’t looking… :/

    Reply
  17. Most confusing was when I first moved to London and was working in pubs there. Customers would ask if we had any puddings, and we (the other Australian barmaid and I) would always answer no. It took a while before we learnt they were asking if we had any desserts on the menu!
    I HATE the English-style Christmas pudding, and it gives my mother migraines. Once my friend served us Christmas lunch with massive individual puddings and I had to sneak it away bit-by-bit into the bin when she wasn’t looking… :/

    Reply
  18. Most confusing was when I first moved to London and was working in pubs there. Customers would ask if we had any puddings, and we (the other Australian barmaid and I) would always answer no. It took a while before we learnt they were asking if we had any desserts on the menu!
    I HATE the English-style Christmas pudding, and it gives my mother migraines. Once my friend served us Christmas lunch with massive individual puddings and I had to sneak it away bit-by-bit into the bin when she wasn’t looking… :/

    Reply
  19. Most confusing was when I first moved to London and was working in pubs there. Customers would ask if we had any puddings, and we (the other Australian barmaid and I) would always answer no. It took a while before we learnt they were asking if we had any desserts on the menu!
    I HATE the English-style Christmas pudding, and it gives my mother migraines. Once my friend served us Christmas lunch with massive individual puddings and I had to sneak it away bit-by-bit into the bin when she wasn’t looking… :/

    Reply
  20. Most confusing was when I first moved to London and was working in pubs there. Customers would ask if we had any puddings, and we (the other Australian barmaid and I) would always answer no. It took a while before we learnt they were asking if we had any desserts on the menu!
    I HATE the English-style Christmas pudding, and it gives my mother migraines. Once my friend served us Christmas lunch with massive individual puddings and I had to sneak it away bit-by-bit into the bin when she wasn’t looking… :/

    Reply
  21. Sara, the same happened when my grandmother died — she was an excellent cook and had set such a high standard, Pop pretty soon became quite proficient in the kitchen/ When i was a kid we had very similar kinds of puddings — unlike Mary Jane I liked rice pudding (What's the matter with mary jane, she's crying with all her might and main… and it's lovely rice pudding for dinner again.) Ground rice was my favorite, though, and I also liked sago. I looked for a pic of roly ply pudding, but couldn't find one anything like Mum used to make — some of them looked like swiss rolls in custard. Pttoey! Mind you these days, the only time I make or eat pudding is when I have dinner guests.

    Reply
  22. Sara, the same happened when my grandmother died — she was an excellent cook and had set such a high standard, Pop pretty soon became quite proficient in the kitchen/ When i was a kid we had very similar kinds of puddings — unlike Mary Jane I liked rice pudding (What's the matter with mary jane, she's crying with all her might and main… and it's lovely rice pudding for dinner again.) Ground rice was my favorite, though, and I also liked sago. I looked for a pic of roly ply pudding, but couldn't find one anything like Mum used to make — some of them looked like swiss rolls in custard. Pttoey! Mind you these days, the only time I make or eat pudding is when I have dinner guests.

    Reply
  23. Sara, the same happened when my grandmother died — she was an excellent cook and had set such a high standard, Pop pretty soon became quite proficient in the kitchen/ When i was a kid we had very similar kinds of puddings — unlike Mary Jane I liked rice pudding (What's the matter with mary jane, she's crying with all her might and main… and it's lovely rice pudding for dinner again.) Ground rice was my favorite, though, and I also liked sago. I looked for a pic of roly ply pudding, but couldn't find one anything like Mum used to make — some of them looked like swiss rolls in custard. Pttoey! Mind you these days, the only time I make or eat pudding is when I have dinner guests.

    Reply
  24. Sara, the same happened when my grandmother died — she was an excellent cook and had set such a high standard, Pop pretty soon became quite proficient in the kitchen/ When i was a kid we had very similar kinds of puddings — unlike Mary Jane I liked rice pudding (What's the matter with mary jane, she's crying with all her might and main… and it's lovely rice pudding for dinner again.) Ground rice was my favorite, though, and I also liked sago. I looked for a pic of roly ply pudding, but couldn't find one anything like Mum used to make — some of them looked like swiss rolls in custard. Pttoey! Mind you these days, the only time I make or eat pudding is when I have dinner guests.

    Reply
  25. Sara, the same happened when my grandmother died — she was an excellent cook and had set such a high standard, Pop pretty soon became quite proficient in the kitchen/ When i was a kid we had very similar kinds of puddings — unlike Mary Jane I liked rice pudding (What's the matter with mary jane, she's crying with all her might and main… and it's lovely rice pudding for dinner again.) Ground rice was my favorite, though, and I also liked sago. I looked for a pic of roly ply pudding, but couldn't find one anything like Mum used to make — some of them looked like swiss rolls in custard. Pttoey! Mind you these days, the only time I make or eat pudding is when I have dinner guests.

    Reply
  26. Yes, indeed, Sonya — the nuances of language variations take a while to pick up on. Having been brought up on delicious home-made Christmas pudding, it's still very much a treat for me, so much so that I truly find it hard to understand there are people in the world who don't like it. *g*

    Reply
  27. Yes, indeed, Sonya — the nuances of language variations take a while to pick up on. Having been brought up on delicious home-made Christmas pudding, it's still very much a treat for me, so much so that I truly find it hard to understand there are people in the world who don't like it. *g*

    Reply
  28. Yes, indeed, Sonya — the nuances of language variations take a while to pick up on. Having been brought up on delicious home-made Christmas pudding, it's still very much a treat for me, so much so that I truly find it hard to understand there are people in the world who don't like it. *g*

    Reply
  29. Yes, indeed, Sonya — the nuances of language variations take a while to pick up on. Having been brought up on delicious home-made Christmas pudding, it's still very much a treat for me, so much so that I truly find it hard to understand there are people in the world who don't like it. *g*

    Reply
  30. Yes, indeed, Sonya — the nuances of language variations take a while to pick up on. Having been brought up on delicious home-made Christmas pudding, it's still very much a treat for me, so much so that I truly find it hard to understand there are people in the world who don't like it. *g*

    Reply
  31. Oooh, Shannon, that looks delicious.
    Mind you, I've never met a steamed pudding I didn't like.
    I don't think people in the US are as keen on puddings as people are in the UK and Australia/NZ. Not sure about Canada. But most of the desserts I've come across in the US were variations on a pie or a cake

    Reply
  32. Oooh, Shannon, that looks delicious.
    Mind you, I've never met a steamed pudding I didn't like.
    I don't think people in the US are as keen on puddings as people are in the UK and Australia/NZ. Not sure about Canada. But most of the desserts I've come across in the US were variations on a pie or a cake

    Reply
  33. Oooh, Shannon, that looks delicious.
    Mind you, I've never met a steamed pudding I didn't like.
    I don't think people in the US are as keen on puddings as people are in the UK and Australia/NZ. Not sure about Canada. But most of the desserts I've come across in the US were variations on a pie or a cake

    Reply
  34. Oooh, Shannon, that looks delicious.
    Mind you, I've never met a steamed pudding I didn't like.
    I don't think people in the US are as keen on puddings as people are in the UK and Australia/NZ. Not sure about Canada. But most of the desserts I've come across in the US were variations on a pie or a cake

    Reply
  35. Oooh, Shannon, that looks delicious.
    Mind you, I've never met a steamed pudding I didn't like.
    I don't think people in the US are as keen on puddings as people are in the UK and Australia/NZ. Not sure about Canada. But most of the desserts I've come across in the US were variations on a pie or a cake

    Reply
  36. South Africa also has a rich tradition of English puddings! There are also local puddings to add to the mix, like Malva pudding, and no fête is complete without a pudding and custard table.

    Reply
  37. South Africa also has a rich tradition of English puddings! There are also local puddings to add to the mix, like Malva pudding, and no fête is complete without a pudding and custard table.

    Reply
  38. South Africa also has a rich tradition of English puddings! There are also local puddings to add to the mix, like Malva pudding, and no fête is complete without a pudding and custard table.

    Reply
  39. South Africa also has a rich tradition of English puddings! There are also local puddings to add to the mix, like Malva pudding, and no fête is complete without a pudding and custard table.

    Reply
  40. South Africa also has a rich tradition of English puddings! There are also local puddings to add to the mix, like Malva pudding, and no fête is complete without a pudding and custard table.

    Reply
  41. Anne,
    I’m not fond of steak and kidney pudding even without the kidney. I enjoy simpler puddings such as lemon tart, but my favorite is warm home-made chocolate pudding. Stirred, not shaken.
    ~Jillian

    Reply
  42. Anne,
    I’m not fond of steak and kidney pudding even without the kidney. I enjoy simpler puddings such as lemon tart, but my favorite is warm home-made chocolate pudding. Stirred, not shaken.
    ~Jillian

    Reply
  43. Anne,
    I’m not fond of steak and kidney pudding even without the kidney. I enjoy simpler puddings such as lemon tart, but my favorite is warm home-made chocolate pudding. Stirred, not shaken.
    ~Jillian

    Reply
  44. Anne,
    I’m not fond of steak and kidney pudding even without the kidney. I enjoy simpler puddings such as lemon tart, but my favorite is warm home-made chocolate pudding. Stirred, not shaken.
    ~Jillian

    Reply
  45. Anne,
    I’m not fond of steak and kidney pudding even without the kidney. I enjoy simpler puddings such as lemon tart, but my favorite is warm home-made chocolate pudding. Stirred, not shaken.
    ~Jillian

    Reply
  46. Oh, we had it forced on us by a determined grandmother (and after she died I inherited her recipe)! But after one too many Christmases that ended in migraines, my mother put her foot down a few decades ago. 🙂
    I do know lots of people who just LOVE it, however.

    Reply
  47. Oh, we had it forced on us by a determined grandmother (and after she died I inherited her recipe)! But after one too many Christmases that ended in migraines, my mother put her foot down a few decades ago. 🙂
    I do know lots of people who just LOVE it, however.

    Reply
  48. Oh, we had it forced on us by a determined grandmother (and after she died I inherited her recipe)! But after one too many Christmases that ended in migraines, my mother put her foot down a few decades ago. 🙂
    I do know lots of people who just LOVE it, however.

    Reply
  49. Oh, we had it forced on us by a determined grandmother (and after she died I inherited her recipe)! But after one too many Christmases that ended in migraines, my mother put her foot down a few decades ago. 🙂
    I do know lots of people who just LOVE it, however.

    Reply
  50. Oh, we had it forced on us by a determined grandmother (and after she died I inherited her recipe)! But after one too many Christmases that ended in migraines, my mother put her foot down a few decades ago. 🙂
    I do know lots of people who just LOVE it, however.

    Reply
  51. Haggis – one of those tricky foods. First bite – a wonderful bouquet of spice explodes in the mouth…then, that aftertaste of animal-insides that will only leave the mouth after a swig of whiskey.

    Reply
  52. Haggis – one of those tricky foods. First bite – a wonderful bouquet of spice explodes in the mouth…then, that aftertaste of animal-insides that will only leave the mouth after a swig of whiskey.

    Reply
  53. Haggis – one of those tricky foods. First bite – a wonderful bouquet of spice explodes in the mouth…then, that aftertaste of animal-insides that will only leave the mouth after a swig of whiskey.

    Reply
  54. Haggis – one of those tricky foods. First bite – a wonderful bouquet of spice explodes in the mouth…then, that aftertaste of animal-insides that will only leave the mouth after a swig of whiskey.

    Reply
  55. Haggis – one of those tricky foods. First bite – a wonderful bouquet of spice explodes in the mouth…then, that aftertaste of animal-insides that will only leave the mouth after a swig of whiskey.

    Reply
  56. Albert sounds like a cranky cornucopia, and a most excellent star in children’s stories, since children are usually hungry. *G* I learned about English puddings at the source and like them fine, though not the kidney in a steak and kidney pud. But Yankee that I am, I still prefer a fine fruit pie.
    A good thing supper is coming, I’m getting hungry!

    Reply
  57. Albert sounds like a cranky cornucopia, and a most excellent star in children’s stories, since children are usually hungry. *G* I learned about English puddings at the source and like them fine, though not the kidney in a steak and kidney pud. But Yankee that I am, I still prefer a fine fruit pie.
    A good thing supper is coming, I’m getting hungry!

    Reply
  58. Albert sounds like a cranky cornucopia, and a most excellent star in children’s stories, since children are usually hungry. *G* I learned about English puddings at the source and like them fine, though not the kidney in a steak and kidney pud. But Yankee that I am, I still prefer a fine fruit pie.
    A good thing supper is coming, I’m getting hungry!

    Reply
  59. Albert sounds like a cranky cornucopia, and a most excellent star in children’s stories, since children are usually hungry. *G* I learned about English puddings at the source and like them fine, though not the kidney in a steak and kidney pud. But Yankee that I am, I still prefer a fine fruit pie.
    A good thing supper is coming, I’m getting hungry!

    Reply
  60. Albert sounds like a cranky cornucopia, and a most excellent star in children’s stories, since children are usually hungry. *G* I learned about English puddings at the source and like them fine, though not the kidney in a steak and kidney pud. But Yankee that I am, I still prefer a fine fruit pie.
    A good thing supper is coming, I’m getting hungry!

    Reply
  61. I hate any form of offal so steak and kidney and suet is out for me. But my mother made the best Christmas pudding in the world from a recipe from my grandmother (my father’s mother not her mother) served with brandy cream. Yum! My nephew has taken up the tradition of Christmas pud cook now.
    My mother also used to make golden syrup steamed pudding which was a particular favourite of mine. I have the recipe somewhere and I can see some baking in my life this weekend!

    Reply
  62. I hate any form of offal so steak and kidney and suet is out for me. But my mother made the best Christmas pudding in the world from a recipe from my grandmother (my father’s mother not her mother) served with brandy cream. Yum! My nephew has taken up the tradition of Christmas pud cook now.
    My mother also used to make golden syrup steamed pudding which was a particular favourite of mine. I have the recipe somewhere and I can see some baking in my life this weekend!

    Reply
  63. I hate any form of offal so steak and kidney and suet is out for me. But my mother made the best Christmas pudding in the world from a recipe from my grandmother (my father’s mother not her mother) served with brandy cream. Yum! My nephew has taken up the tradition of Christmas pud cook now.
    My mother also used to make golden syrup steamed pudding which was a particular favourite of mine. I have the recipe somewhere and I can see some baking in my life this weekend!

    Reply
  64. I hate any form of offal so steak and kidney and suet is out for me. But my mother made the best Christmas pudding in the world from a recipe from my grandmother (my father’s mother not her mother) served with brandy cream. Yum! My nephew has taken up the tradition of Christmas pud cook now.
    My mother also used to make golden syrup steamed pudding which was a particular favourite of mine. I have the recipe somewhere and I can see some baking in my life this weekend!

    Reply
  65. I hate any form of offal so steak and kidney and suet is out for me. But my mother made the best Christmas pudding in the world from a recipe from my grandmother (my father’s mother not her mother) served with brandy cream. Yum! My nephew has taken up the tradition of Christmas pud cook now.
    My mother also used to make golden syrup steamed pudding which was a particular favourite of mine. I have the recipe somewhere and I can see some baking in my life this weekend!

    Reply
  66. Sharon, I wondered about South Africans when I was writing this, but I didn't know what particular puddings they would delight in. But I know the English and Africaans heritage would include a lot of luscious puddings and sweets, not to mention cooking influences from other cultures. Love the sound of the fetes with puddings and custards — sounds like our big community or family gatherings where the dessert table would groan with pavlovas, trifles, cream sponges and other yummy sweet treats. I'm off to check out Malva pudding. Thanks.

    Reply
  67. Sharon, I wondered about South Africans when I was writing this, but I didn't know what particular puddings they would delight in. But I know the English and Africaans heritage would include a lot of luscious puddings and sweets, not to mention cooking influences from other cultures. Love the sound of the fetes with puddings and custards — sounds like our big community or family gatherings where the dessert table would groan with pavlovas, trifles, cream sponges and other yummy sweet treats. I'm off to check out Malva pudding. Thanks.

    Reply
  68. Sharon, I wondered about South Africans when I was writing this, but I didn't know what particular puddings they would delight in. But I know the English and Africaans heritage would include a lot of luscious puddings and sweets, not to mention cooking influences from other cultures. Love the sound of the fetes with puddings and custards — sounds like our big community or family gatherings where the dessert table would groan with pavlovas, trifles, cream sponges and other yummy sweet treats. I'm off to check out Malva pudding. Thanks.

    Reply
  69. Sharon, I wondered about South Africans when I was writing this, but I didn't know what particular puddings they would delight in. But I know the English and Africaans heritage would include a lot of luscious puddings and sweets, not to mention cooking influences from other cultures. Love the sound of the fetes with puddings and custards — sounds like our big community or family gatherings where the dessert table would groan with pavlovas, trifles, cream sponges and other yummy sweet treats. I'm off to check out Malva pudding. Thanks.

    Reply
  70. Sharon, I wondered about South Africans when I was writing this, but I didn't know what particular puddings they would delight in. But I know the English and Africaans heritage would include a lot of luscious puddings and sweets, not to mention cooking influences from other cultures. Love the sound of the fetes with puddings and custards — sounds like our big community or family gatherings where the dessert table would groan with pavlovas, trifles, cream sponges and other yummy sweet treats. I'm off to check out Malva pudding. Thanks.

    Reply
  71. Jillian, you've just named one of my favorites – two, actually. I adore lemon tart, but if I had the choice between a chocolate pudding and a lemon tart I'd dither madly, especially if the chocolate pudding had a thick, yummy chocolate sauce to go with it. I might have to depend on the weather to make my choice — hot weather for the lemon tart and chocolate pudding for a cold, damp winter night. Thanks for joining in the conversation.

    Reply
  72. Jillian, you've just named one of my favorites – two, actually. I adore lemon tart, but if I had the choice between a chocolate pudding and a lemon tart I'd dither madly, especially if the chocolate pudding had a thick, yummy chocolate sauce to go with it. I might have to depend on the weather to make my choice — hot weather for the lemon tart and chocolate pudding for a cold, damp winter night. Thanks for joining in the conversation.

    Reply
  73. Jillian, you've just named one of my favorites – two, actually. I adore lemon tart, but if I had the choice between a chocolate pudding and a lemon tart I'd dither madly, especially if the chocolate pudding had a thick, yummy chocolate sauce to go with it. I might have to depend on the weather to make my choice — hot weather for the lemon tart and chocolate pudding for a cold, damp winter night. Thanks for joining in the conversation.

    Reply
  74. Jillian, you've just named one of my favorites – two, actually. I adore lemon tart, but if I had the choice between a chocolate pudding and a lemon tart I'd dither madly, especially if the chocolate pudding had a thick, yummy chocolate sauce to go with it. I might have to depend on the weather to make my choice — hot weather for the lemon tart and chocolate pudding for a cold, damp winter night. Thanks for joining in the conversation.

    Reply
  75. Jillian, you've just named one of my favorites – two, actually. I adore lemon tart, but if I had the choice between a chocolate pudding and a lemon tart I'd dither madly, especially if the chocolate pudding had a thick, yummy chocolate sauce to go with it. I might have to depend on the weather to make my choice — hot weather for the lemon tart and chocolate pudding for a cold, damp winter night. Thanks for joining in the conversation.

    Reply
  76. Oh yes, if it resulted in a migraine, of course you wouldn't want it. I wonder what the ingredient was that caused the migraine? My mother used to get a reaction from chocolate, and also from pork, and my dad was allergic to some particular preservatives, but I can't think what there would be in Christmas pudding, except for dried fruit, butter, eggs and flour and spice — maybe it was the spices. I'm assuming it was home-made. If bought, all bets are off — I couldn't begin to guess what might be put into bought puds. Anyway, it's not as if there is only one kind of pudding in the world — a lovely sponge pudding or bread-and-butter custard (which in my case always has jam, currants and coconut as well) is always a good alternative. Or lemon tart. Or creme brulée. Chocolate mousse? Am I getting a tad carried away here? 🙂

    Reply
  77. Oh yes, if it resulted in a migraine, of course you wouldn't want it. I wonder what the ingredient was that caused the migraine? My mother used to get a reaction from chocolate, and also from pork, and my dad was allergic to some particular preservatives, but I can't think what there would be in Christmas pudding, except for dried fruit, butter, eggs and flour and spice — maybe it was the spices. I'm assuming it was home-made. If bought, all bets are off — I couldn't begin to guess what might be put into bought puds. Anyway, it's not as if there is only one kind of pudding in the world — a lovely sponge pudding or bread-and-butter custard (which in my case always has jam, currants and coconut as well) is always a good alternative. Or lemon tart. Or creme brulée. Chocolate mousse? Am I getting a tad carried away here? 🙂

    Reply
  78. Oh yes, if it resulted in a migraine, of course you wouldn't want it. I wonder what the ingredient was that caused the migraine? My mother used to get a reaction from chocolate, and also from pork, and my dad was allergic to some particular preservatives, but I can't think what there would be in Christmas pudding, except for dried fruit, butter, eggs and flour and spice — maybe it was the spices. I'm assuming it was home-made. If bought, all bets are off — I couldn't begin to guess what might be put into bought puds. Anyway, it's not as if there is only one kind of pudding in the world — a lovely sponge pudding or bread-and-butter custard (which in my case always has jam, currants and coconut as well) is always a good alternative. Or lemon tart. Or creme brulée. Chocolate mousse? Am I getting a tad carried away here? 🙂

    Reply
  79. Oh yes, if it resulted in a migraine, of course you wouldn't want it. I wonder what the ingredient was that caused the migraine? My mother used to get a reaction from chocolate, and also from pork, and my dad was allergic to some particular preservatives, but I can't think what there would be in Christmas pudding, except for dried fruit, butter, eggs and flour and spice — maybe it was the spices. I'm assuming it was home-made. If bought, all bets are off — I couldn't begin to guess what might be put into bought puds. Anyway, it's not as if there is only one kind of pudding in the world — a lovely sponge pudding or bread-and-butter custard (which in my case always has jam, currants and coconut as well) is always a good alternative. Or lemon tart. Or creme brulée. Chocolate mousse? Am I getting a tad carried away here? 🙂

    Reply
  80. Oh yes, if it resulted in a migraine, of course you wouldn't want it. I wonder what the ingredient was that caused the migraine? My mother used to get a reaction from chocolate, and also from pork, and my dad was allergic to some particular preservatives, but I can't think what there would be in Christmas pudding, except for dried fruit, butter, eggs and flour and spice — maybe it was the spices. I'm assuming it was home-made. If bought, all bets are off — I couldn't begin to guess what might be put into bought puds. Anyway, it's not as if there is only one kind of pudding in the world — a lovely sponge pudding or bread-and-butter custard (which in my case always has jam, currants and coconut as well) is always a good alternative. Or lemon tart. Or creme brulée. Chocolate mousse? Am I getting a tad carried away here? 🙂

    Reply
  81. Kay, to me, that sounds like a perfect way to eat haggis — a mouthful of haggis, a mouthful of whisky, a mouthful of haggis, a mouthful of whisky.
    Recipe for a fun evening. But then I do like a whisky. *g* Thanks for joining in.

    Reply
  82. Kay, to me, that sounds like a perfect way to eat haggis — a mouthful of haggis, a mouthful of whisky, a mouthful of haggis, a mouthful of whisky.
    Recipe for a fun evening. But then I do like a whisky. *g* Thanks for joining in.

    Reply
  83. Kay, to me, that sounds like a perfect way to eat haggis — a mouthful of haggis, a mouthful of whisky, a mouthful of haggis, a mouthful of whisky.
    Recipe for a fun evening. But then I do like a whisky. *g* Thanks for joining in.

    Reply
  84. Kay, to me, that sounds like a perfect way to eat haggis — a mouthful of haggis, a mouthful of whisky, a mouthful of haggis, a mouthful of whisky.
    Recipe for a fun evening. But then I do like a whisky. *g* Thanks for joining in.

    Reply
  85. Kay, to me, that sounds like a perfect way to eat haggis — a mouthful of haggis, a mouthful of whisky, a mouthful of haggis, a mouthful of whisky.
    Recipe for a fun evening. But then I do like a whisky. *g* Thanks for joining in.

    Reply
  86. Mary Jo, Albert, the magic pudding is a fun character. He's gruff and grumpy and always complaining — he has this song, which I've known all my life:
    "Oh who would be a puddin
    A puddin in a pot
    A puddin which is stood on
    A fire which is hot
    Oh, sad indeed the lot
    Of puddins in a pot."
    That's from memory, so if I've made a mistake, anyone, forgive me. According to Wikipedia and other sources, The Magic Pudding is said to have been written to settle an argument: a friend of Lindsay's said that children like to read about fairies, while Lindsay asserted that they would rather read about food and fighting.
    I suspect he proved his case.*g*

    Reply
  87. Mary Jo, Albert, the magic pudding is a fun character. He's gruff and grumpy and always complaining — he has this song, which I've known all my life:
    "Oh who would be a puddin
    A puddin in a pot
    A puddin which is stood on
    A fire which is hot
    Oh, sad indeed the lot
    Of puddins in a pot."
    That's from memory, so if I've made a mistake, anyone, forgive me. According to Wikipedia and other sources, The Magic Pudding is said to have been written to settle an argument: a friend of Lindsay's said that children like to read about fairies, while Lindsay asserted that they would rather read about food and fighting.
    I suspect he proved his case.*g*

    Reply
  88. Mary Jo, Albert, the magic pudding is a fun character. He's gruff and grumpy and always complaining — he has this song, which I've known all my life:
    "Oh who would be a puddin
    A puddin in a pot
    A puddin which is stood on
    A fire which is hot
    Oh, sad indeed the lot
    Of puddins in a pot."
    That's from memory, so if I've made a mistake, anyone, forgive me. According to Wikipedia and other sources, The Magic Pudding is said to have been written to settle an argument: a friend of Lindsay's said that children like to read about fairies, while Lindsay asserted that they would rather read about food and fighting.
    I suspect he proved his case.*g*

    Reply
  89. Mary Jo, Albert, the magic pudding is a fun character. He's gruff and grumpy and always complaining — he has this song, which I've known all my life:
    "Oh who would be a puddin
    A puddin in a pot
    A puddin which is stood on
    A fire which is hot
    Oh, sad indeed the lot
    Of puddins in a pot."
    That's from memory, so if I've made a mistake, anyone, forgive me. According to Wikipedia and other sources, The Magic Pudding is said to have been written to settle an argument: a friend of Lindsay's said that children like to read about fairies, while Lindsay asserted that they would rather read about food and fighting.
    I suspect he proved his case.*g*

    Reply
  90. Mary Jo, Albert, the magic pudding is a fun character. He's gruff and grumpy and always complaining — he has this song, which I've known all my life:
    "Oh who would be a puddin
    A puddin in a pot
    A puddin which is stood on
    A fire which is hot
    Oh, sad indeed the lot
    Of puddins in a pot."
    That's from memory, so if I've made a mistake, anyone, forgive me. According to Wikipedia and other sources, The Magic Pudding is said to have been written to settle an argument: a friend of Lindsay's said that children like to read about fairies, while Lindsay asserted that they would rather read about food and fighting.
    I suspect he proved his case.*g*

    Reply
  91. Keziah, when I was looking for a good steamed pudding recipe to link to in this post, I'd planned to use a golden syrup pudding recipe, but then thought that maybe people in Nth America and other places might not know what golden syrup is and stress (it's a kind of light molasses, I think, but then I've never tasted molasses, so can't be sure.) So I went with chocolate and hazlenut, which is pretty universal. But golden syrup pudding is delish, I agree.
    Funny how many people can't stand the taste or smell of kidneys and other offal — or sometimes it's just the idea of them. I guess you have to be brought up on it, and my Irish nana and my mother ate everything — mum even loved sheep's brains — bleagh! Though i never actually tasted them, so for all I know they might be delicious. Suet in a pudding, you can't actually taste much difference, but it's the texture that's so good, and you can't get the texture with anything else.
    Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  92. Keziah, when I was looking for a good steamed pudding recipe to link to in this post, I'd planned to use a golden syrup pudding recipe, but then thought that maybe people in Nth America and other places might not know what golden syrup is and stress (it's a kind of light molasses, I think, but then I've never tasted molasses, so can't be sure.) So I went with chocolate and hazlenut, which is pretty universal. But golden syrup pudding is delish, I agree.
    Funny how many people can't stand the taste or smell of kidneys and other offal — or sometimes it's just the idea of them. I guess you have to be brought up on it, and my Irish nana and my mother ate everything — mum even loved sheep's brains — bleagh! Though i never actually tasted them, so for all I know they might be delicious. Suet in a pudding, you can't actually taste much difference, but it's the texture that's so good, and you can't get the texture with anything else.
    Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  93. Keziah, when I was looking for a good steamed pudding recipe to link to in this post, I'd planned to use a golden syrup pudding recipe, but then thought that maybe people in Nth America and other places might not know what golden syrup is and stress (it's a kind of light molasses, I think, but then I've never tasted molasses, so can't be sure.) So I went with chocolate and hazlenut, which is pretty universal. But golden syrup pudding is delish, I agree.
    Funny how many people can't stand the taste or smell of kidneys and other offal — or sometimes it's just the idea of them. I guess you have to be brought up on it, and my Irish nana and my mother ate everything — mum even loved sheep's brains — bleagh! Though i never actually tasted them, so for all I know they might be delicious. Suet in a pudding, you can't actually taste much difference, but it's the texture that's so good, and you can't get the texture with anything else.
    Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  94. Keziah, when I was looking for a good steamed pudding recipe to link to in this post, I'd planned to use a golden syrup pudding recipe, but then thought that maybe people in Nth America and other places might not know what golden syrup is and stress (it's a kind of light molasses, I think, but then I've never tasted molasses, so can't be sure.) So I went with chocolate and hazlenut, which is pretty universal. But golden syrup pudding is delish, I agree.
    Funny how many people can't stand the taste or smell of kidneys and other offal — or sometimes it's just the idea of them. I guess you have to be brought up on it, and my Irish nana and my mother ate everything — mum even loved sheep's brains — bleagh! Though i never actually tasted them, so for all I know they might be delicious. Suet in a pudding, you can't actually taste much difference, but it's the texture that's so good, and you can't get the texture with anything else.
    Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  95. Keziah, when I was looking for a good steamed pudding recipe to link to in this post, I'd planned to use a golden syrup pudding recipe, but then thought that maybe people in Nth America and other places might not know what golden syrup is and stress (it's a kind of light molasses, I think, but then I've never tasted molasses, so can't be sure.) So I went with chocolate and hazlenut, which is pretty universal. But golden syrup pudding is delish, I agree.
    Funny how many people can't stand the taste or smell of kidneys and other offal — or sometimes it's just the idea of them. I guess you have to be brought up on it, and my Irish nana and my mother ate everything — mum even loved sheep's brains — bleagh! Though i never actually tasted them, so for all I know they might be delicious. Suet in a pudding, you can't actually taste much difference, but it's the texture that's so good, and you can't get the texture with anything else.
    Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  96. I like Yorkshire pudding and have made it myself. I’ve done homemade banana pudding from scratch. I had a treacle tart in England a long time ago, and it was really good. But my very favorite is “flan”, which I have made at home many times. It is easier than it appears to be, and well worth the trouble. Right now, I am on a bread pudding kick and am trying different recipes to find the best one.

    Reply
  97. I like Yorkshire pudding and have made it myself. I’ve done homemade banana pudding from scratch. I had a treacle tart in England a long time ago, and it was really good. But my very favorite is “flan”, which I have made at home many times. It is easier than it appears to be, and well worth the trouble. Right now, I am on a bread pudding kick and am trying different recipes to find the best one.

    Reply
  98. I like Yorkshire pudding and have made it myself. I’ve done homemade banana pudding from scratch. I had a treacle tart in England a long time ago, and it was really good. But my very favorite is “flan”, which I have made at home many times. It is easier than it appears to be, and well worth the trouble. Right now, I am on a bread pudding kick and am trying different recipes to find the best one.

    Reply
  99. I like Yorkshire pudding and have made it myself. I’ve done homemade banana pudding from scratch. I had a treacle tart in England a long time ago, and it was really good. But my very favorite is “flan”, which I have made at home many times. It is easier than it appears to be, and well worth the trouble. Right now, I am on a bread pudding kick and am trying different recipes to find the best one.

    Reply
  100. I like Yorkshire pudding and have made it myself. I’ve done homemade banana pudding from scratch. I had a treacle tart in England a long time ago, and it was really good. But my very favorite is “flan”, which I have made at home many times. It is easier than it appears to be, and well worth the trouble. Right now, I am on a bread pudding kick and am trying different recipes to find the best one.

    Reply
  101. Hi Linnea, I've eaten "flan" and it's very similar to the dessert we call creme caramel. And yes, it's quite easy to make, and very yummy.
    When I was a kid it was my job to make the pudding for sunday dinner

    Reply
  102. Hi Linnea, I've eaten "flan" and it's very similar to the dessert we call creme caramel. And yes, it's quite easy to make, and very yummy.
    When I was a kid it was my job to make the pudding for sunday dinner

    Reply
  103. Hi Linnea, I've eaten "flan" and it's very similar to the dessert we call creme caramel. And yes, it's quite easy to make, and very yummy.
    When I was a kid it was my job to make the pudding for sunday dinner

    Reply
  104. Hi Linnea, I've eaten "flan" and it's very similar to the dessert we call creme caramel. And yes, it's quite easy to make, and very yummy.
    When I was a kid it was my job to make the pudding for sunday dinner

    Reply
  105. Hi Linnea, I've eaten "flan" and it's very similar to the dessert we call creme caramel. And yes, it's quite easy to make, and very yummy.
    When I was a kid it was my job to make the pudding for sunday dinner

    Reply
  106. For some reason the rest of my comment got cut off. Here it is:
    When I was a kid it was my job to make the pudding for sunday dinner — I mainly made bread pudding (the bread buttered and spread with jam, sprinkled with currants ana a bot of coconut, then make an egg custard and pour over, then bake in a bain-marie. My other main pudding was a fruit sponge — home grown and preserved apricots, or apply and blackberry, or apple and rhubarb, pr stewed plums, with a sponge topping (SR flour, sugar, egg, milk and butter and sometimes a pinch of cinnamon), baked in the oven and served with custard in winter or cream or icecream in summer. I still remember the recipes for both.

    Reply
  107. For some reason the rest of my comment got cut off. Here it is:
    When I was a kid it was my job to make the pudding for sunday dinner — I mainly made bread pudding (the bread buttered and spread with jam, sprinkled with currants ana a bot of coconut, then make an egg custard and pour over, then bake in a bain-marie. My other main pudding was a fruit sponge — home grown and preserved apricots, or apply and blackberry, or apple and rhubarb, pr stewed plums, with a sponge topping (SR flour, sugar, egg, milk and butter and sometimes a pinch of cinnamon), baked in the oven and served with custard in winter or cream or icecream in summer. I still remember the recipes for both.

    Reply
  108. For some reason the rest of my comment got cut off. Here it is:
    When I was a kid it was my job to make the pudding for sunday dinner — I mainly made bread pudding (the bread buttered and spread with jam, sprinkled with currants ana a bot of coconut, then make an egg custard and pour over, then bake in a bain-marie. My other main pudding was a fruit sponge — home grown and preserved apricots, or apply and blackberry, or apple and rhubarb, pr stewed plums, with a sponge topping (SR flour, sugar, egg, milk and butter and sometimes a pinch of cinnamon), baked in the oven and served with custard in winter or cream or icecream in summer. I still remember the recipes for both.

    Reply
  109. For some reason the rest of my comment got cut off. Here it is:
    When I was a kid it was my job to make the pudding for sunday dinner — I mainly made bread pudding (the bread buttered and spread with jam, sprinkled with currants ana a bot of coconut, then make an egg custard and pour over, then bake in a bain-marie. My other main pudding was a fruit sponge — home grown and preserved apricots, or apply and blackberry, or apple and rhubarb, pr stewed plums, with a sponge topping (SR flour, sugar, egg, milk and butter and sometimes a pinch of cinnamon), baked in the oven and served with custard in winter or cream or icecream in summer. I still remember the recipes for both.

    Reply
  110. For some reason the rest of my comment got cut off. Here it is:
    When I was a kid it was my job to make the pudding for sunday dinner — I mainly made bread pudding (the bread buttered and spread with jam, sprinkled with currants ana a bot of coconut, then make an egg custard and pour over, then bake in a bain-marie. My other main pudding was a fruit sponge — home grown and preserved apricots, or apply and blackberry, or apple and rhubarb, pr stewed plums, with a sponge topping (SR flour, sugar, egg, milk and butter and sometimes a pinch of cinnamon), baked in the oven and served with custard in winter or cream or icecream in summer. I still remember the recipes for both.

    Reply
  111. Oh wonderful. I like all these puddings. In fact I am having steak and kidley tonight. Black pudding is delish but not terribly healthy because of all the salt and fat, so I have to limit to a couple of times a year. Also haggis, but that is hard to get on a regular basis and I am not a cook. But then rice pudding, and steamed pudding – just keep naming them and I’m happy to eat them. Especially during the winter months.

    Reply
  112. Oh wonderful. I like all these puddings. In fact I am having steak and kidley tonight. Black pudding is delish but not terribly healthy because of all the salt and fat, so I have to limit to a couple of times a year. Also haggis, but that is hard to get on a regular basis and I am not a cook. But then rice pudding, and steamed pudding – just keep naming them and I’m happy to eat them. Especially during the winter months.

    Reply
  113. Oh wonderful. I like all these puddings. In fact I am having steak and kidley tonight. Black pudding is delish but not terribly healthy because of all the salt and fat, so I have to limit to a couple of times a year. Also haggis, but that is hard to get on a regular basis and I am not a cook. But then rice pudding, and steamed pudding – just keep naming them and I’m happy to eat them. Especially during the winter months.

    Reply
  114. Oh wonderful. I like all these puddings. In fact I am having steak and kidley tonight. Black pudding is delish but not terribly healthy because of all the salt and fat, so I have to limit to a couple of times a year. Also haggis, but that is hard to get on a regular basis and I am not a cook. But then rice pudding, and steamed pudding – just keep naming them and I’m happy to eat them. Especially during the winter months.

    Reply
  115. Oh wonderful. I like all these puddings. In fact I am having steak and kidley tonight. Black pudding is delish but not terribly healthy because of all the salt and fat, so I have to limit to a couple of times a year. Also haggis, but that is hard to get on a regular basis and I am not a cook. But then rice pudding, and steamed pudding – just keep naming them and I’m happy to eat them. Especially during the winter months.

    Reply
  116. Enjoy your steak and kidney tonight, Jenny. I usually make mine with garlic, a little red wine and thyme. Delish. Might have to make it soon.
    And yes, winter is the best time for a steamed pudding, isn't it, with hot custard poured over. Comfort food.

    Reply
  117. Enjoy your steak and kidney tonight, Jenny. I usually make mine with garlic, a little red wine and thyme. Delish. Might have to make it soon.
    And yes, winter is the best time for a steamed pudding, isn't it, with hot custard poured over. Comfort food.

    Reply
  118. Enjoy your steak and kidney tonight, Jenny. I usually make mine with garlic, a little red wine and thyme. Delish. Might have to make it soon.
    And yes, winter is the best time for a steamed pudding, isn't it, with hot custard poured over. Comfort food.

    Reply
  119. Enjoy your steak and kidney tonight, Jenny. I usually make mine with garlic, a little red wine and thyme. Delish. Might have to make it soon.
    And yes, winter is the best time for a steamed pudding, isn't it, with hot custard poured over. Comfort food.

    Reply
  120. Enjoy your steak and kidney tonight, Jenny. I usually make mine with garlic, a little red wine and thyme. Delish. Might have to make it soon.
    And yes, winter is the best time for a steamed pudding, isn't it, with hot custard poured over. Comfort food.

    Reply
  121. My mom made bread pudding. Whenever there was stale bread my mom had to make sure it didn’t go to waste. Mom was into recycling before it became popular. Her bread pudding was wonderful too.

    Reply
  122. My mom made bread pudding. Whenever there was stale bread my mom had to make sure it didn’t go to waste. Mom was into recycling before it became popular. Her bread pudding was wonderful too.

    Reply
  123. My mom made bread pudding. Whenever there was stale bread my mom had to make sure it didn’t go to waste. Mom was into recycling before it became popular. Her bread pudding was wonderful too.

    Reply
  124. My mom made bread pudding. Whenever there was stale bread my mom had to make sure it didn’t go to waste. Mom was into recycling before it became popular. Her bread pudding was wonderful too.

    Reply
  125. My mom made bread pudding. Whenever there was stale bread my mom had to make sure it didn’t go to waste. Mom was into recycling before it became popular. Her bread pudding was wonderful too.

    Reply
  126. I love Eton Mess as it is light and creamy. A really easy chocolate trifle recipe is: make a chocolate sheet cake, cut in 1″ pieces. Get 6 plastic cups of premade chocolate pudding and 1 container of thawed Cool Whip. Crush 6 Heath or toffee bars. Layer cake, pudding, Cool Whip, and Heath bars twice in a nice bowl. Cover with the last of the Cool Whip and Heath bars. This can be stored overnight in the fridge, but it gets gooey-er the longer it sits.

    Reply
  127. I love Eton Mess as it is light and creamy. A really easy chocolate trifle recipe is: make a chocolate sheet cake, cut in 1″ pieces. Get 6 plastic cups of premade chocolate pudding and 1 container of thawed Cool Whip. Crush 6 Heath or toffee bars. Layer cake, pudding, Cool Whip, and Heath bars twice in a nice bowl. Cover with the last of the Cool Whip and Heath bars. This can be stored overnight in the fridge, but it gets gooey-er the longer it sits.

    Reply
  128. I love Eton Mess as it is light and creamy. A really easy chocolate trifle recipe is: make a chocolate sheet cake, cut in 1″ pieces. Get 6 plastic cups of premade chocolate pudding and 1 container of thawed Cool Whip. Crush 6 Heath or toffee bars. Layer cake, pudding, Cool Whip, and Heath bars twice in a nice bowl. Cover with the last of the Cool Whip and Heath bars. This can be stored overnight in the fridge, but it gets gooey-er the longer it sits.

    Reply
  129. I love Eton Mess as it is light and creamy. A really easy chocolate trifle recipe is: make a chocolate sheet cake, cut in 1″ pieces. Get 6 plastic cups of premade chocolate pudding and 1 container of thawed Cool Whip. Crush 6 Heath or toffee bars. Layer cake, pudding, Cool Whip, and Heath bars twice in a nice bowl. Cover with the last of the Cool Whip and Heath bars. This can be stored overnight in the fridge, but it gets gooey-er the longer it sits.

    Reply
  130. I love Eton Mess as it is light and creamy. A really easy chocolate trifle recipe is: make a chocolate sheet cake, cut in 1″ pieces. Get 6 plastic cups of premade chocolate pudding and 1 container of thawed Cool Whip. Crush 6 Heath or toffee bars. Layer cake, pudding, Cool Whip, and Heath bars twice in a nice bowl. Cover with the last of the Cool Whip and Heath bars. This can be stored overnight in the fridge, but it gets gooey-er the longer it sits.

    Reply
  131. I just thought of this this morning, but if Christmas pudding is made with lots of dried fruits, bought from the store, that could be causing the migraines. Fruit preserved with sulfer can cause LOTS of problems. Which is why I don’t buy commercially dried fruit unless it specifically says sulfer free.
    But all those sweet puddings do sound wonderful! I grew up on rice pudding and banana pudding. And plain pudding which I assume would be custard in England? As an adult, I’ve made the cake that makes its own pudding sauce when you cook it (to die for).
    After my mom and dad’s last trip to England/Scotland, my mom decided we should all try Spotted Dick and Sticky Toffee pudding. True they were commercially canned but they were tasty and I could see how “real” would be soooo good.
    Growing up, we only had dessert on special occasions. It was never a part of “regular” meals. When we did have dessert it would be cakes, pies, brownies, bar cookies, gingerbread, cookies, ice cream, etc. In my family it is homemade ice cream, only rarely is it store bought.
    Now, 40 years later, when we have Family Dinners we ALWAYS have dessert. Sometimes we end up with 4 desserts depending on the occasion!!

    Reply
  132. I just thought of this this morning, but if Christmas pudding is made with lots of dried fruits, bought from the store, that could be causing the migraines. Fruit preserved with sulfer can cause LOTS of problems. Which is why I don’t buy commercially dried fruit unless it specifically says sulfer free.
    But all those sweet puddings do sound wonderful! I grew up on rice pudding and banana pudding. And plain pudding which I assume would be custard in England? As an adult, I’ve made the cake that makes its own pudding sauce when you cook it (to die for).
    After my mom and dad’s last trip to England/Scotland, my mom decided we should all try Spotted Dick and Sticky Toffee pudding. True they were commercially canned but they were tasty and I could see how “real” would be soooo good.
    Growing up, we only had dessert on special occasions. It was never a part of “regular” meals. When we did have dessert it would be cakes, pies, brownies, bar cookies, gingerbread, cookies, ice cream, etc. In my family it is homemade ice cream, only rarely is it store bought.
    Now, 40 years later, when we have Family Dinners we ALWAYS have dessert. Sometimes we end up with 4 desserts depending on the occasion!!

    Reply
  133. I just thought of this this morning, but if Christmas pudding is made with lots of dried fruits, bought from the store, that could be causing the migraines. Fruit preserved with sulfer can cause LOTS of problems. Which is why I don’t buy commercially dried fruit unless it specifically says sulfer free.
    But all those sweet puddings do sound wonderful! I grew up on rice pudding and banana pudding. And plain pudding which I assume would be custard in England? As an adult, I’ve made the cake that makes its own pudding sauce when you cook it (to die for).
    After my mom and dad’s last trip to England/Scotland, my mom decided we should all try Spotted Dick and Sticky Toffee pudding. True they were commercially canned but they were tasty and I could see how “real” would be soooo good.
    Growing up, we only had dessert on special occasions. It was never a part of “regular” meals. When we did have dessert it would be cakes, pies, brownies, bar cookies, gingerbread, cookies, ice cream, etc. In my family it is homemade ice cream, only rarely is it store bought.
    Now, 40 years later, when we have Family Dinners we ALWAYS have dessert. Sometimes we end up with 4 desserts depending on the occasion!!

    Reply
  134. I just thought of this this morning, but if Christmas pudding is made with lots of dried fruits, bought from the store, that could be causing the migraines. Fruit preserved with sulfer can cause LOTS of problems. Which is why I don’t buy commercially dried fruit unless it specifically says sulfer free.
    But all those sweet puddings do sound wonderful! I grew up on rice pudding and banana pudding. And plain pudding which I assume would be custard in England? As an adult, I’ve made the cake that makes its own pudding sauce when you cook it (to die for).
    After my mom and dad’s last trip to England/Scotland, my mom decided we should all try Spotted Dick and Sticky Toffee pudding. True they were commercially canned but they were tasty and I could see how “real” would be soooo good.
    Growing up, we only had dessert on special occasions. It was never a part of “regular” meals. When we did have dessert it would be cakes, pies, brownies, bar cookies, gingerbread, cookies, ice cream, etc. In my family it is homemade ice cream, only rarely is it store bought.
    Now, 40 years later, when we have Family Dinners we ALWAYS have dessert. Sometimes we end up with 4 desserts depending on the occasion!!

    Reply
  135. I just thought of this this morning, but if Christmas pudding is made with lots of dried fruits, bought from the store, that could be causing the migraines. Fruit preserved with sulfer can cause LOTS of problems. Which is why I don’t buy commercially dried fruit unless it specifically says sulfer free.
    But all those sweet puddings do sound wonderful! I grew up on rice pudding and banana pudding. And plain pudding which I assume would be custard in England? As an adult, I’ve made the cake that makes its own pudding sauce when you cook it (to die for).
    After my mom and dad’s last trip to England/Scotland, my mom decided we should all try Spotted Dick and Sticky Toffee pudding. True they were commercially canned but they were tasty and I could see how “real” would be soooo good.
    Growing up, we only had dessert on special occasions. It was never a part of “regular” meals. When we did have dessert it would be cakes, pies, brownies, bar cookies, gingerbread, cookies, ice cream, etc. In my family it is homemade ice cream, only rarely is it store bought.
    Now, 40 years later, when we have Family Dinners we ALWAYS have dessert. Sometimes we end up with 4 desserts depending on the occasion!!

    Reply
  136. Jackie, my mum was a waste-not type of person too. I guess that was the source of the original bread puddings — using what people had — stale bread and eggs from their own hens. And so many of those simple old recipes were delicious. Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  137. Jackie, my mum was a waste-not type of person too. I guess that was the source of the original bread puddings — using what people had — stale bread and eggs from their own hens. And so many of those simple old recipes were delicious. Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  138. Jackie, my mum was a waste-not type of person too. I guess that was the source of the original bread puddings — using what people had — stale bread and eggs from their own hens. And so many of those simple old recipes were delicious. Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  139. Jackie, my mum was a waste-not type of person too. I guess that was the source of the original bread puddings — using what people had — stale bread and eggs from their own hens. And so many of those simple old recipes were delicious. Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  140. Jackie, my mum was a waste-not type of person too. I guess that was the source of the original bread puddings — using what people had — stale bread and eggs from their own hens. And so many of those simple old recipes were delicious. Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  141. Yes, it could have been the dried fruit, Vicki — as you say, some commercial dried fruits are made using various chemicals, and people can be allergic to them.
    "And plain pudding which I assume would be custard in England?"
    Sort of. If I told people I was serving a plain pudding I think they'd expect a plain steamed pudding (like plain cake) with jam and some kind of sauce. *g*
    I think what Americans call "pudding"and we call it "instant pudding" in Australia (because it comes from a packet mix) is a bit like a custard in texture. Not sure what they'd call it in England. 
    Custard can come in many forms there's runny custard that's for pouring over a pudding or stewed fruit. It's mainly served hot, but can be served cold, too. 
    And there's baked custard, which sets when cooked and is firmer when cooled. And it can be a dish on its own, or part of bread pudding or rice custard or anything else. It's more like the texture of flan or creme caramel or creme brulée. 

    Reply
  142. Yes, it could have been the dried fruit, Vicki — as you say, some commercial dried fruits are made using various chemicals, and people can be allergic to them.
    "And plain pudding which I assume would be custard in England?"
    Sort of. If I told people I was serving a plain pudding I think they'd expect a plain steamed pudding (like plain cake) with jam and some kind of sauce. *g*
    I think what Americans call "pudding"and we call it "instant pudding" in Australia (because it comes from a packet mix) is a bit like a custard in texture. Not sure what they'd call it in England. 
    Custard can come in many forms there's runny custard that's for pouring over a pudding or stewed fruit. It's mainly served hot, but can be served cold, too. 
    And there's baked custard, which sets when cooked and is firmer when cooled. And it can be a dish on its own, or part of bread pudding or rice custard or anything else. It's more like the texture of flan or creme caramel or creme brulée. 

    Reply
  143. Yes, it could have been the dried fruit, Vicki — as you say, some commercial dried fruits are made using various chemicals, and people can be allergic to them.
    "And plain pudding which I assume would be custard in England?"
    Sort of. If I told people I was serving a plain pudding I think they'd expect a plain steamed pudding (like plain cake) with jam and some kind of sauce. *g*
    I think what Americans call "pudding"and we call it "instant pudding" in Australia (because it comes from a packet mix) is a bit like a custard in texture. Not sure what they'd call it in England. 
    Custard can come in many forms there's runny custard that's for pouring over a pudding or stewed fruit. It's mainly served hot, but can be served cold, too. 
    And there's baked custard, which sets when cooked and is firmer when cooled. And it can be a dish on its own, or part of bread pudding or rice custard or anything else. It's more like the texture of flan or creme caramel or creme brulée. 

    Reply
  144. Yes, it could have been the dried fruit, Vicki — as you say, some commercial dried fruits are made using various chemicals, and people can be allergic to them.
    "And plain pudding which I assume would be custard in England?"
    Sort of. If I told people I was serving a plain pudding I think they'd expect a plain steamed pudding (like plain cake) with jam and some kind of sauce. *g*
    I think what Americans call "pudding"and we call it "instant pudding" in Australia (because it comes from a packet mix) is a bit like a custard in texture. Not sure what they'd call it in England. 
    Custard can come in many forms there's runny custard that's for pouring over a pudding or stewed fruit. It's mainly served hot, but can be served cold, too. 
    And there's baked custard, which sets when cooked and is firmer when cooled. And it can be a dish on its own, or part of bread pudding or rice custard or anything else. It's more like the texture of flan or creme caramel or creme brulée. 

    Reply
  145. Yes, it could have been the dried fruit, Vicki — as you say, some commercial dried fruits are made using various chemicals, and people can be allergic to them.
    "And plain pudding which I assume would be custard in England?"
    Sort of. If I told people I was serving a plain pudding I think they'd expect a plain steamed pudding (like plain cake) with jam and some kind of sauce. *g*
    I think what Americans call "pudding"and we call it "instant pudding" in Australia (because it comes from a packet mix) is a bit like a custard in texture. Not sure what they'd call it in England. 
    Custard can come in many forms there's runny custard that's for pouring over a pudding or stewed fruit. It's mainly served hot, but can be served cold, too. 
    And there's baked custard, which sets when cooked and is firmer when cooled. And it can be a dish on its own, or part of bread pudding or rice custard or anything else. It's more like the texture of flan or creme caramel or creme brulée. 

    Reply
  146. I adore sweet puddings of any kind, with a special fondness for custards. I’ve only had one savory pudding and I wasn’t impressed. Actually, over here we call it a popover, which I understand is the American version of a Yorkshire pudding. I followed the recipe exactly, but it was just okay. Not something I’d make again. was a Yorkshire pudding, and I think you have to grow up in a place where it’s often served, where you’re familiar with it.
    One of my favorite recipes is Hot Fudge Pudding Cake. It’s absolutely to die for. You have to serve it with vanilla ice cream or plain cream because it is sooooo rich. It’s easy to make, and is an old tried and true recipe. It’s so good you just want to get down and roll around in it.

    Reply
  147. I adore sweet puddings of any kind, with a special fondness for custards. I’ve only had one savory pudding and I wasn’t impressed. Actually, over here we call it a popover, which I understand is the American version of a Yorkshire pudding. I followed the recipe exactly, but it was just okay. Not something I’d make again. was a Yorkshire pudding, and I think you have to grow up in a place where it’s often served, where you’re familiar with it.
    One of my favorite recipes is Hot Fudge Pudding Cake. It’s absolutely to die for. You have to serve it with vanilla ice cream or plain cream because it is sooooo rich. It’s easy to make, and is an old tried and true recipe. It’s so good you just want to get down and roll around in it.

    Reply
  148. I adore sweet puddings of any kind, with a special fondness for custards. I’ve only had one savory pudding and I wasn’t impressed. Actually, over here we call it a popover, which I understand is the American version of a Yorkshire pudding. I followed the recipe exactly, but it was just okay. Not something I’d make again. was a Yorkshire pudding, and I think you have to grow up in a place where it’s often served, where you’re familiar with it.
    One of my favorite recipes is Hot Fudge Pudding Cake. It’s absolutely to die for. You have to serve it with vanilla ice cream or plain cream because it is sooooo rich. It’s easy to make, and is an old tried and true recipe. It’s so good you just want to get down and roll around in it.

    Reply
  149. I adore sweet puddings of any kind, with a special fondness for custards. I’ve only had one savory pudding and I wasn’t impressed. Actually, over here we call it a popover, which I understand is the American version of a Yorkshire pudding. I followed the recipe exactly, but it was just okay. Not something I’d make again. was a Yorkshire pudding, and I think you have to grow up in a place where it’s often served, where you’re familiar with it.
    One of my favorite recipes is Hot Fudge Pudding Cake. It’s absolutely to die for. You have to serve it with vanilla ice cream or plain cream because it is sooooo rich. It’s easy to make, and is an old tried and true recipe. It’s so good you just want to get down and roll around in it.

    Reply
  150. I adore sweet puddings of any kind, with a special fondness for custards. I’ve only had one savory pudding and I wasn’t impressed. Actually, over here we call it a popover, which I understand is the American version of a Yorkshire pudding. I followed the recipe exactly, but it was just okay. Not something I’d make again. was a Yorkshire pudding, and I think you have to grow up in a place where it’s often served, where you’re familiar with it.
    One of my favorite recipes is Hot Fudge Pudding Cake. It’s absolutely to die for. You have to serve it with vanilla ice cream or plain cream because it is sooooo rich. It’s easy to make, and is an old tried and true recipe. It’s so good you just want to get down and roll around in it.

    Reply
  151. Sherrie, I've never had a popover, but I'll keep a lookout for one while in the US in July. Yorkshire pudding isn't a dish in itself, just an accompaniment to a roast dinner. But I suspect anyone who enjoys sausages would like black pudding.
    As for your fudge cake, that sounds very much like our chocolate self-saucing pudding — recipe here —
    http://www.taste.com.au/recipes/7789/chocolate+self+saucing+pudding
    I've made this one and it's very easy and delicious.

    Reply
  152. Sherrie, I've never had a popover, but I'll keep a lookout for one while in the US in July. Yorkshire pudding isn't a dish in itself, just an accompaniment to a roast dinner. But I suspect anyone who enjoys sausages would like black pudding.
    As for your fudge cake, that sounds very much like our chocolate self-saucing pudding — recipe here —
    http://www.taste.com.au/recipes/7789/chocolate+self+saucing+pudding
    I've made this one and it's very easy and delicious.

    Reply
  153. Sherrie, I've never had a popover, but I'll keep a lookout for one while in the US in July. Yorkshire pudding isn't a dish in itself, just an accompaniment to a roast dinner. But I suspect anyone who enjoys sausages would like black pudding.
    As for your fudge cake, that sounds very much like our chocolate self-saucing pudding — recipe here —
    http://www.taste.com.au/recipes/7789/chocolate+self+saucing+pudding
    I've made this one and it's very easy and delicious.

    Reply
  154. Sherrie, I've never had a popover, but I'll keep a lookout for one while in the US in July. Yorkshire pudding isn't a dish in itself, just an accompaniment to a roast dinner. But I suspect anyone who enjoys sausages would like black pudding.
    As for your fudge cake, that sounds very much like our chocolate self-saucing pudding — recipe here —
    http://www.taste.com.au/recipes/7789/chocolate+self+saucing+pudding
    I've made this one and it's very easy and delicious.

    Reply
  155. Sherrie, I've never had a popover, but I'll keep a lookout for one while in the US in July. Yorkshire pudding isn't a dish in itself, just an accompaniment to a roast dinner. But I suspect anyone who enjoys sausages would like black pudding.
    As for your fudge cake, that sounds very much like our chocolate self-saucing pudding — recipe here —
    http://www.taste.com.au/recipes/7789/chocolate+self+saucing+pudding
    I've made this one and it's very easy and delicious.

    Reply
  156. I tried blood pudding when I was in England many years ago. They had it on the breakfast buffet at the Holiday Inn we stayed at in England. To be honest, I didn’t know what it was when I first tried it. I don’t think I would have if I did. 🙂

    Reply
  157. I tried blood pudding when I was in England many years ago. They had it on the breakfast buffet at the Holiday Inn we stayed at in England. To be honest, I didn’t know what it was when I first tried it. I don’t think I would have if I did. 🙂

    Reply
  158. I tried blood pudding when I was in England many years ago. They had it on the breakfast buffet at the Holiday Inn we stayed at in England. To be honest, I didn’t know what it was when I first tried it. I don’t think I would have if I did. 🙂

    Reply
  159. I tried blood pudding when I was in England many years ago. They had it on the breakfast buffet at the Holiday Inn we stayed at in England. To be honest, I didn’t know what it was when I first tried it. I don’t think I would have if I did. 🙂

    Reply
  160. I tried blood pudding when I was in England many years ago. They had it on the breakfast buffet at the Holiday Inn we stayed at in England. To be honest, I didn’t know what it was when I first tried it. I don’t think I would have if I did. 🙂

    Reply
  161. Can you remember what it tasted like, Glenda? Some meaty sausagey thing?
    I'm sure it's the name that puts people off. Just as knowing that haggis is offal and oatmeal cooked in the stomach of a sheep puts people off.
    But call it some kind of sausage, and it's a whole 'nother thing.

    Reply
  162. Can you remember what it tasted like, Glenda? Some meaty sausagey thing?
    I'm sure it's the name that puts people off. Just as knowing that haggis is offal and oatmeal cooked in the stomach of a sheep puts people off.
    But call it some kind of sausage, and it's a whole 'nother thing.

    Reply
  163. Can you remember what it tasted like, Glenda? Some meaty sausagey thing?
    I'm sure it's the name that puts people off. Just as knowing that haggis is offal and oatmeal cooked in the stomach of a sheep puts people off.
    But call it some kind of sausage, and it's a whole 'nother thing.

    Reply
  164. Can you remember what it tasted like, Glenda? Some meaty sausagey thing?
    I'm sure it's the name that puts people off. Just as knowing that haggis is offal and oatmeal cooked in the stomach of a sheep puts people off.
    But call it some kind of sausage, and it's a whole 'nother thing.

    Reply
  165. Can you remember what it tasted like, Glenda? Some meaty sausagey thing?
    I'm sure it's the name that puts people off. Just as knowing that haggis is offal and oatmeal cooked in the stomach of a sheep puts people off.
    But call it some kind of sausage, and it's a whole 'nother thing.

    Reply
  166. I’ve only had rice pudding and trifle. I think I am totally deprived and would so love to taste all of them, whether sweet or savory.

    Reply
  167. I’ve only had rice pudding and trifle. I think I am totally deprived and would so love to taste all of them, whether sweet or savory.

    Reply
  168. I’ve only had rice pudding and trifle. I think I am totally deprived and would so love to taste all of them, whether sweet or savory.

    Reply
  169. I’ve only had rice pudding and trifle. I think I am totally deprived and would so love to taste all of them, whether sweet or savory.

    Reply
  170. I’ve only had rice pudding and trifle. I think I am totally deprived and would so love to taste all of them, whether sweet or savory.

    Reply
  171. Yes, Angelina — a lot of people can't get past the idea of what's in black pudding and haggis.
    Sweet pudding on the other hand, have no such problems. 🙂
    Thanks for visiting.

    Reply
  172. Yes, Angelina — a lot of people can't get past the idea of what's in black pudding and haggis.
    Sweet pudding on the other hand, have no such problems. 🙂
    Thanks for visiting.

    Reply
  173. Yes, Angelina — a lot of people can't get past the idea of what's in black pudding and haggis.
    Sweet pudding on the other hand, have no such problems. 🙂
    Thanks for visiting.

    Reply
  174. Yes, Angelina — a lot of people can't get past the idea of what's in black pudding and haggis.
    Sweet pudding on the other hand, have no such problems. 🙂
    Thanks for visiting.

    Reply
  175. Yes, Angelina — a lot of people can't get past the idea of what's in black pudding and haggis.
    Sweet pudding on the other hand, have no such problems. 🙂
    Thanks for visiting.

    Reply
  176. I saved this post until I could read it, and I’m glad I did. I love haggis. Black pudding is very nice. Summer pudding is my favorite dessert.

    Reply
  177. I saved this post until I could read it, and I’m glad I did. I love haggis. Black pudding is very nice. Summer pudding is my favorite dessert.

    Reply
  178. I saved this post until I could read it, and I’m glad I did. I love haggis. Black pudding is very nice. Summer pudding is my favorite dessert.

    Reply
  179. I saved this post until I could read it, and I’m glad I did. I love haggis. Black pudding is very nice. Summer pudding is my favorite dessert.

    Reply
  180. I saved this post until I could read it, and I’m glad I did. I love haggis. Black pudding is very nice. Summer pudding is my favorite dessert.

    Reply

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