Pub crawling, or sort of….

Hi, here’s Jo, late for her day. No real excuse except forgetting what day of the week is what.

Billy_charlie_nytimes_balloon
Things are still going well for A Lady’s Secret. It’ll be #10 on the NYT this Sunday, and it’s also on the Publishers Weekly list for the third week. We threw a party last weekend chez Beverley, and someone sent a balloon, as exhibited by the Cabbage Patch Kids and other toys. (Also duly admiring the list in the paper, and Billy dazzled by reflected glory!)*G*

I’ve been having fun researching Doncaster for my next book. The main action starts in Sheffield, but before I knew it, they were off to Doncaster about which I know nothing other than that It’s a racing town. (Growing up in England in a family that listens to the radio a lot, the young mind accumulates strange things. There’s the daily weather report for the fishing trade, talking about places like Dogger Bank, and there’s the regular reports from horse racing, including places like Thirsk (which was one setting in Secrets of the Night) and Doncaster.)

Doncaster was actually the setting for the first modern horse race, in England at least — the Doncaster Cup, and then later for the much more famous St Leger.
All about the St Leger That was started by Major General St Legerwhose career is typical of the period of the Malloren novels, and the Marquess of Rockingham, who both surely knew Rothgar and the Countess of Arradale.Scrubsingletonup

There’s one of Rockingham’s horses of the time.

Below, we have Rockingham in his peerage robes. Does it bother you or turn you on to think of Rothgar in a similar get up for a state event? Even the baddest-boy peer hero had to wear such outfits. I sometimes amuse myself with that image.*G* There are more period portraits here. Check out, too, the portrait of the Montague sisters, and the explanation of the bared shoulder. Portraits are so fascinating.

Rockingham
My wandering research trail thus led me to Rotherham, particularly connected to St. Leger the person, and a nice site with historical links. History of Rotheram which included a couple of enclosure acts in the early 1760s and some details of weekly wages in a variety of industries at the time.The wages page.

I wasn’t so much interested in the lace making in Bedford or even the potteries in Rotheram, but the plating and cutlery in Sheffield was nice, even though the detailsl will probably not make it into Christian’s book. How does Major Lord Grandiston end up in Sheffield and Doncaster? Thereby hangs a tale, to be called The Secret Wedding, but unavailable until next year, even to me, as I’m only about half way through.

Men earned 14s 6d, women 4s, and girls 3s The only reason I can see off the top of my head for there being no boys’ wages there is that they were all apprentices, who wouldn’t be paid in a regular manner. Such figures give context to the expenditures of the more highly born, but only to an extent, as there was a huge divide. A traveler might spend at least half of that man’s weekly wage to stay one night at an inn if he has a carriage and horses.

But come to think of it, the price of a good hotel room today — say $200? — could be half  the weekly income of someone on the poverty line. Those 14/6 men, however, were prosperous skilled workers.

If you don’t know, s is a shilling, and there were 20 to a pound. d is a penny (from the  Roman dinari, they say) and there were 12 to a shilling. And there were halfpennies and  farthings back then, too. (Farthing was a quarter of a penny.) Arithmetical problems about the price of apples were lots of fun when I was a child.

The same page also shows the price of mutton as a reference for the value of the wages, and it seems to have been about 2s a stone, I assume for the undressed carcass. (A stone is 14 lbs). Never know when it comes in useful!

In addition, I wanted to find out about the inns and pubs in Doncaster. First I found a good website about the modern state of affairs. Which now will not let me access it. I’ll post the link later. That led me to fire off a query to the Doncaster Local Studies Library about which inns existed in 1764, which came through brilliantly, and then with maps from the period!

But, but, looking at the list I see this:

Black Bull – opened 1760, rebuilt 1920. Nice, as that’s one I had down to mention.

AND: The Black Swan – opened 1730, no record of landlord in 1764, 1st landlord
mentioned John Webster in 1775

Those of you who’ve read A Lady’s Secret will know that an inn called The Black Swan has some minor significance, even though that one is far away in the south.

It’s the sort of detail that makes the writer’s heart take a turn, for both good and bad reasons. It could be a gift, or a major disturbance in the storyline. If this was Ithorne’s boo, I couldn’t ignore an inn called The Black Swan if it was anywhere in his range. With Christian, I think I can. It would be a distraction. So it’s a nice turn of the heart — a little nod to alternate reality.

And it sent me looking for Black Swan Inns anywhere in the UK that were open in 1764.
I found this one. Can you find more?

Thank you, internet!

Jo

55 thoughts on “Pub crawling, or sort of….”

  1. I saw St. Leger’s and had a heart attack. You know I have a total obsession with John Hayes St. Leger (portrait on my wall). And doing research on him, which was very hard. John Hayes was also the lover of the lovely Duchess of Rutland. What an interesting family, there was even one that was bitten my a rapid dog and contracted rabies. I eventually made contact with Maura St. Leger and purchased a book she had written about her family. She was also nice enough to include a pedigree chart. She was able to have better access to the family records than I. How nice to have access to those kind of family records. Can you imagine being in a family that has that kind of history?

    Reply
  2. I saw St. Leger’s and had a heart attack. You know I have a total obsession with John Hayes St. Leger (portrait on my wall). And doing research on him, which was very hard. John Hayes was also the lover of the lovely Duchess of Rutland. What an interesting family, there was even one that was bitten my a rapid dog and contracted rabies. I eventually made contact with Maura St. Leger and purchased a book she had written about her family. She was also nice enough to include a pedigree chart. She was able to have better access to the family records than I. How nice to have access to those kind of family records. Can you imagine being in a family that has that kind of history?

    Reply
  3. I saw St. Leger’s and had a heart attack. You know I have a total obsession with John Hayes St. Leger (portrait on my wall). And doing research on him, which was very hard. John Hayes was also the lover of the lovely Duchess of Rutland. What an interesting family, there was even one that was bitten my a rapid dog and contracted rabies. I eventually made contact with Maura St. Leger and purchased a book she had written about her family. She was also nice enough to include a pedigree chart. She was able to have better access to the family records than I. How nice to have access to those kind of family records. Can you imagine being in a family that has that kind of history?

    Reply
  4. I saw St. Leger’s and had a heart attack. You know I have a total obsession with John Hayes St. Leger (portrait on my wall). And doing research on him, which was very hard. John Hayes was also the lover of the lovely Duchess of Rutland. What an interesting family, there was even one that was bitten my a rapid dog and contracted rabies. I eventually made contact with Maura St. Leger and purchased a book she had written about her family. She was also nice enough to include a pedigree chart. She was able to have better access to the family records than I. How nice to have access to those kind of family records. Can you imagine being in a family that has that kind of history?

    Reply
  5. I saw St. Leger’s and had a heart attack. You know I have a total obsession with John Hayes St. Leger (portrait on my wall). And doing research on him, which was very hard. John Hayes was also the lover of the lovely Duchess of Rutland. What an interesting family, there was even one that was bitten my a rapid dog and contracted rabies. I eventually made contact with Maura St. Leger and purchased a book she had written about her family. She was also nice enough to include a pedigree chart. She was able to have better access to the family records than I. How nice to have access to those kind of family records. Can you imagine being in a family that has that kind of history?

    Reply
  6. Not helpful probably, but I’ve found a mention of a Black Swan Inn not in Doncaster itself but in York, from a transcript of the Leeds Intelligencer published by Thomas Wright. It was dated May 19th, 1798 and regards some coaches itinerary. So it could be possible that the inn could have been existing since 1764 though situated in a different place.
    By Doncaster, will your new book be set in the north, especially in Yorkshire? It would be interesting to see how Rothgar is managing in Diana’s sphere this time as we got to see Diana in the South in previous books. Didn’t Rothgar even say to Bryght that they will be christmasing in the North the next time? That would really be interesting. That is, if they will be in the new book. Say yes please. And I do miss Brand so much. He’s one of my favourite Malloren heroes.

    Reply
  7. Not helpful probably, but I’ve found a mention of a Black Swan Inn not in Doncaster itself but in York, from a transcript of the Leeds Intelligencer published by Thomas Wright. It was dated May 19th, 1798 and regards some coaches itinerary. So it could be possible that the inn could have been existing since 1764 though situated in a different place.
    By Doncaster, will your new book be set in the north, especially in Yorkshire? It would be interesting to see how Rothgar is managing in Diana’s sphere this time as we got to see Diana in the South in previous books. Didn’t Rothgar even say to Bryght that they will be christmasing in the North the next time? That would really be interesting. That is, if they will be in the new book. Say yes please. And I do miss Brand so much. He’s one of my favourite Malloren heroes.

    Reply
  8. Not helpful probably, but I’ve found a mention of a Black Swan Inn not in Doncaster itself but in York, from a transcript of the Leeds Intelligencer published by Thomas Wright. It was dated May 19th, 1798 and regards some coaches itinerary. So it could be possible that the inn could have been existing since 1764 though situated in a different place.
    By Doncaster, will your new book be set in the north, especially in Yorkshire? It would be interesting to see how Rothgar is managing in Diana’s sphere this time as we got to see Diana in the South in previous books. Didn’t Rothgar even say to Bryght that they will be christmasing in the North the next time? That would really be interesting. That is, if they will be in the new book. Say yes please. And I do miss Brand so much. He’s one of my favourite Malloren heroes.

    Reply
  9. Not helpful probably, but I’ve found a mention of a Black Swan Inn not in Doncaster itself but in York, from a transcript of the Leeds Intelligencer published by Thomas Wright. It was dated May 19th, 1798 and regards some coaches itinerary. So it could be possible that the inn could have been existing since 1764 though situated in a different place.
    By Doncaster, will your new book be set in the north, especially in Yorkshire? It would be interesting to see how Rothgar is managing in Diana’s sphere this time as we got to see Diana in the South in previous books. Didn’t Rothgar even say to Bryght that they will be christmasing in the North the next time? That would really be interesting. That is, if they will be in the new book. Say yes please. And I do miss Brand so much. He’s one of my favourite Malloren heroes.

    Reply
  10. Not helpful probably, but I’ve found a mention of a Black Swan Inn not in Doncaster itself but in York, from a transcript of the Leeds Intelligencer published by Thomas Wright. It was dated May 19th, 1798 and regards some coaches itinerary. So it could be possible that the inn could have been existing since 1764 though situated in a different place.
    By Doncaster, will your new book be set in the north, especially in Yorkshire? It would be interesting to see how Rothgar is managing in Diana’s sphere this time as we got to see Diana in the South in previous books. Didn’t Rothgar even say to Bryght that they will be christmasing in the North the next time? That would really be interesting. That is, if they will be in the new book. Say yes please. And I do miss Brand so much. He’s one of my favourite Malloren heroes.

    Reply
  11. Aah! I titled a tavern/gaming hell in 1812 Southwark, The Black Bull, in a ms. I finished last year. I placed it on Black Bull Alley. Ah well, probably not likely to see the light of day!
    I like the name Black Swan. I just read an article about Nassim Taleb, who coined the term Black Swan for a surprise event, like finding black swans in Australia when they were all white in the Old World. He applies it to the stock market and risk.

    Reply
  12. Aah! I titled a tavern/gaming hell in 1812 Southwark, The Black Bull, in a ms. I finished last year. I placed it on Black Bull Alley. Ah well, probably not likely to see the light of day!
    I like the name Black Swan. I just read an article about Nassim Taleb, who coined the term Black Swan for a surprise event, like finding black swans in Australia when they were all white in the Old World. He applies it to the stock market and risk.

    Reply
  13. Aah! I titled a tavern/gaming hell in 1812 Southwark, The Black Bull, in a ms. I finished last year. I placed it on Black Bull Alley. Ah well, probably not likely to see the light of day!
    I like the name Black Swan. I just read an article about Nassim Taleb, who coined the term Black Swan for a surprise event, like finding black swans in Australia when they were all white in the Old World. He applies it to the stock market and risk.

    Reply
  14. Aah! I titled a tavern/gaming hell in 1812 Southwark, The Black Bull, in a ms. I finished last year. I placed it on Black Bull Alley. Ah well, probably not likely to see the light of day!
    I like the name Black Swan. I just read an article about Nassim Taleb, who coined the term Black Swan for a surprise event, like finding black swans in Australia when they were all white in the Old World. He applies it to the stock market and risk.

    Reply
  15. Aah! I titled a tavern/gaming hell in 1812 Southwark, The Black Bull, in a ms. I finished last year. I placed it on Black Bull Alley. Ah well, probably not likely to see the light of day!
    I like the name Black Swan. I just read an article about Nassim Taleb, who coined the term Black Swan for a surprise event, like finding black swans in Australia when they were all white in the Old World. He applies it to the stock market and risk.

    Reply
  16. I like the Black Swan also…it has that Dapne du Maurier feel about it.
    And my face is red…it wasn’t Maura St. Leger, but Moya St. Leger. That’s what happens when one depends on ones memory.

    Reply
  17. I like the Black Swan also…it has that Dapne du Maurier feel about it.
    And my face is red…it wasn’t Maura St. Leger, but Moya St. Leger. That’s what happens when one depends on ones memory.

    Reply
  18. I like the Black Swan also…it has that Dapne du Maurier feel about it.
    And my face is red…it wasn’t Maura St. Leger, but Moya St. Leger. That’s what happens when one depends on ones memory.

    Reply
  19. I like the Black Swan also…it has that Dapne du Maurier feel about it.
    And my face is red…it wasn’t Maura St. Leger, but Moya St. Leger. That’s what happens when one depends on ones memory.

    Reply
  20. I like the Black Swan also…it has that Dapne du Maurier feel about it.
    And my face is red…it wasn’t Maura St. Leger, but Moya St. Leger. That’s what happens when one depends on ones memory.

    Reply
  21. Hi, Kay. Not your St Leger, but another fun loving guy, for sure.
    Cory, yes, The Secret Wedding opens in the north and is partially set there. That was for other reasons, but it does allow for some Malloren interaction.
    I hadn’t thought of Brand, as he’s off in the dales and the book thus far in in the Sheffield and Doncaster area, but I’ll see what I can do! I’d like to catch up with them, too.
    Yes, the Black Swan is an interesting term. When it first popped into my head for Thorn’s ship, I wondered if it existed before they discovered the birds, but of course it did.
    The earliest reference in the OED is from the 14th century.
    1398 “The swanne… he is al white in fe{th}eres. for no man finde{th} a blacke swanne”
    I like this one from the late 16th century. “The abuse of such places [sc. theatres] was so great, that for any chaste liver to haunt them was a black swan, and a white crowe.”
    I wonder why the phrase “a white crow” isn’t more popular.
    Then from 1694, from the Ladies Dictionary, which sounds like fun, “Husbands without faults (if such black Swans there be).”
    The section in the OED references Juvenal, who apparently coined the phrase. In a quick look for that, I found this lovely site.
    http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/ancient/asbook.html
    Ah, can’t the internet suck us right in.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  22. Hi, Kay. Not your St Leger, but another fun loving guy, for sure.
    Cory, yes, The Secret Wedding opens in the north and is partially set there. That was for other reasons, but it does allow for some Malloren interaction.
    I hadn’t thought of Brand, as he’s off in the dales and the book thus far in in the Sheffield and Doncaster area, but I’ll see what I can do! I’d like to catch up with them, too.
    Yes, the Black Swan is an interesting term. When it first popped into my head for Thorn’s ship, I wondered if it existed before they discovered the birds, but of course it did.
    The earliest reference in the OED is from the 14th century.
    1398 “The swanne… he is al white in fe{th}eres. for no man finde{th} a blacke swanne”
    I like this one from the late 16th century. “The abuse of such places [sc. theatres] was so great, that for any chaste liver to haunt them was a black swan, and a white crowe.”
    I wonder why the phrase “a white crow” isn’t more popular.
    Then from 1694, from the Ladies Dictionary, which sounds like fun, “Husbands without faults (if such black Swans there be).”
    The section in the OED references Juvenal, who apparently coined the phrase. In a quick look for that, I found this lovely site.
    http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/ancient/asbook.html
    Ah, can’t the internet suck us right in.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  23. Hi, Kay. Not your St Leger, but another fun loving guy, for sure.
    Cory, yes, The Secret Wedding opens in the north and is partially set there. That was for other reasons, but it does allow for some Malloren interaction.
    I hadn’t thought of Brand, as he’s off in the dales and the book thus far in in the Sheffield and Doncaster area, but I’ll see what I can do! I’d like to catch up with them, too.
    Yes, the Black Swan is an interesting term. When it first popped into my head for Thorn’s ship, I wondered if it existed before they discovered the birds, but of course it did.
    The earliest reference in the OED is from the 14th century.
    1398 “The swanne… he is al white in fe{th}eres. for no man finde{th} a blacke swanne”
    I like this one from the late 16th century. “The abuse of such places [sc. theatres] was so great, that for any chaste liver to haunt them was a black swan, and a white crowe.”
    I wonder why the phrase “a white crow” isn’t more popular.
    Then from 1694, from the Ladies Dictionary, which sounds like fun, “Husbands without faults (if such black Swans there be).”
    The section in the OED references Juvenal, who apparently coined the phrase. In a quick look for that, I found this lovely site.
    http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/ancient/asbook.html
    Ah, can’t the internet suck us right in.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  24. Hi, Kay. Not your St Leger, but another fun loving guy, for sure.
    Cory, yes, The Secret Wedding opens in the north and is partially set there. That was for other reasons, but it does allow for some Malloren interaction.
    I hadn’t thought of Brand, as he’s off in the dales and the book thus far in in the Sheffield and Doncaster area, but I’ll see what I can do! I’d like to catch up with them, too.
    Yes, the Black Swan is an interesting term. When it first popped into my head for Thorn’s ship, I wondered if it existed before they discovered the birds, but of course it did.
    The earliest reference in the OED is from the 14th century.
    1398 “The swanne… he is al white in fe{th}eres. for no man finde{th} a blacke swanne”
    I like this one from the late 16th century. “The abuse of such places [sc. theatres] was so great, that for any chaste liver to haunt them was a black swan, and a white crowe.”
    I wonder why the phrase “a white crow” isn’t more popular.
    Then from 1694, from the Ladies Dictionary, which sounds like fun, “Husbands without faults (if such black Swans there be).”
    The section in the OED references Juvenal, who apparently coined the phrase. In a quick look for that, I found this lovely site.
    http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/ancient/asbook.html
    Ah, can’t the internet suck us right in.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  25. Hi, Kay. Not your St Leger, but another fun loving guy, for sure.
    Cory, yes, The Secret Wedding opens in the north and is partially set there. That was for other reasons, but it does allow for some Malloren interaction.
    I hadn’t thought of Brand, as he’s off in the dales and the book thus far in in the Sheffield and Doncaster area, but I’ll see what I can do! I’d like to catch up with them, too.
    Yes, the Black Swan is an interesting term. When it first popped into my head for Thorn’s ship, I wondered if it existed before they discovered the birds, but of course it did.
    The earliest reference in the OED is from the 14th century.
    1398 “The swanne… he is al white in fe{th}eres. for no man finde{th} a blacke swanne”
    I like this one from the late 16th century. “The abuse of such places [sc. theatres] was so great, that for any chaste liver to haunt them was a black swan, and a white crowe.”
    I wonder why the phrase “a white crow” isn’t more popular.
    Then from 1694, from the Ladies Dictionary, which sounds like fun, “Husbands without faults (if such black Swans there be).”
    The section in the OED references Juvenal, who apparently coined the phrase. In a quick look for that, I found this lovely site.
    http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/ancient/asbook.html
    Ah, can’t the internet suck us right in.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  26. Oooh! I love the term White Crow even better! Quite evocative. That would be a good name for a ship. Unfortunately, any ship with the word black in it’s name is going to have competition from the Black Pearl.
    Thanks for the site.

    Reply
  27. Oooh! I love the term White Crow even better! Quite evocative. That would be a good name for a ship. Unfortunately, any ship with the word black in it’s name is going to have competition from the Black Pearl.
    Thanks for the site.

    Reply
  28. Oooh! I love the term White Crow even better! Quite evocative. That would be a good name for a ship. Unfortunately, any ship with the word black in it’s name is going to have competition from the Black Pearl.
    Thanks for the site.

    Reply
  29. Oooh! I love the term White Crow even better! Quite evocative. That would be a good name for a ship. Unfortunately, any ship with the word black in it’s name is going to have competition from the Black Pearl.
    Thanks for the site.

    Reply
  30. Oooh! I love the term White Crow even better! Quite evocative. That would be a good name for a ship. Unfortunately, any ship with the word black in it’s name is going to have competition from the Black Pearl.
    Thanks for the site.

    Reply
  31. I can’t comments about inns, but I’d like to say that I second that request about Brand. Please see what you can do *g*. What a wonderful hero and Rothgar’s favorite brother. And I’m glad to know that your next novel is still set in the Georgian period. Plus the next one, hopefully. I’m currently rereading the first 5 Malloren books (in Devilish now) as a preparation for my copy of A Lady’s Secret to arrive anytime soon. I know the spoiler in A Lady’s Secret (that was really a surprise Jo) in advance so I’m really looking forward to come across that scene where Diana was looking at Bey’s picture, particularly the one that was taken in his grand tour in Italy.

    Reply
  32. I can’t comments about inns, but I’d like to say that I second that request about Brand. Please see what you can do *g*. What a wonderful hero and Rothgar’s favorite brother. And I’m glad to know that your next novel is still set in the Georgian period. Plus the next one, hopefully. I’m currently rereading the first 5 Malloren books (in Devilish now) as a preparation for my copy of A Lady’s Secret to arrive anytime soon. I know the spoiler in A Lady’s Secret (that was really a surprise Jo) in advance so I’m really looking forward to come across that scene where Diana was looking at Bey’s picture, particularly the one that was taken in his grand tour in Italy.

    Reply
  33. I can’t comments about inns, but I’d like to say that I second that request about Brand. Please see what you can do *g*. What a wonderful hero and Rothgar’s favorite brother. And I’m glad to know that your next novel is still set in the Georgian period. Plus the next one, hopefully. I’m currently rereading the first 5 Malloren books (in Devilish now) as a preparation for my copy of A Lady’s Secret to arrive anytime soon. I know the spoiler in A Lady’s Secret (that was really a surprise Jo) in advance so I’m really looking forward to come across that scene where Diana was looking at Bey’s picture, particularly the one that was taken in his grand tour in Italy.

    Reply
  34. I can’t comments about inns, but I’d like to say that I second that request about Brand. Please see what you can do *g*. What a wonderful hero and Rothgar’s favorite brother. And I’m glad to know that your next novel is still set in the Georgian period. Plus the next one, hopefully. I’m currently rereading the first 5 Malloren books (in Devilish now) as a preparation for my copy of A Lady’s Secret to arrive anytime soon. I know the spoiler in A Lady’s Secret (that was really a surprise Jo) in advance so I’m really looking forward to come across that scene where Diana was looking at Bey’s picture, particularly the one that was taken in his grand tour in Italy.

    Reply
  35. I can’t comments about inns, but I’d like to say that I second that request about Brand. Please see what you can do *g*. What a wonderful hero and Rothgar’s favorite brother. And I’m glad to know that your next novel is still set in the Georgian period. Plus the next one, hopefully. I’m currently rereading the first 5 Malloren books (in Devilish now) as a preparation for my copy of A Lady’s Secret to arrive anytime soon. I know the spoiler in A Lady’s Secret (that was really a surprise Jo) in advance so I’m really looking forward to come across that scene where Diana was looking at Bey’s picture, particularly the one that was taken in his grand tour in Italy.

    Reply
  36. As I recall, Devilish explains that Rothgar’s pale makeup and metrosexual style at court are camouflage for his powerful, manly Eminence 🙂 Anyway, it’s like a macho guy wearing a flowery pink tie–all that matters is that it suits him.

    Reply
  37. As I recall, Devilish explains that Rothgar’s pale makeup and metrosexual style at court are camouflage for his powerful, manly Eminence 🙂 Anyway, it’s like a macho guy wearing a flowery pink tie–all that matters is that it suits him.

    Reply
  38. As I recall, Devilish explains that Rothgar’s pale makeup and metrosexual style at court are camouflage for his powerful, manly Eminence 🙂 Anyway, it’s like a macho guy wearing a flowery pink tie–all that matters is that it suits him.

    Reply
  39. As I recall, Devilish explains that Rothgar’s pale makeup and metrosexual style at court are camouflage for his powerful, manly Eminence 🙂 Anyway, it’s like a macho guy wearing a flowery pink tie–all that matters is that it suits him.

    Reply
  40. As I recall, Devilish explains that Rothgar’s pale makeup and metrosexual style at court are camouflage for his powerful, manly Eminence 🙂 Anyway, it’s like a macho guy wearing a flowery pink tie–all that matters is that it suits him.

    Reply
  41. On the math front. I see why GB went to metric so easily. At least US $ are multiples of 10. Now if we can get rid of the pesky 12in/foot. Looking forward to more historical tidbits wrapped around delicious characters.

    Reply
  42. On the math front. I see why GB went to metric so easily. At least US $ are multiples of 10. Now if we can get rid of the pesky 12in/foot. Looking forward to more historical tidbits wrapped around delicious characters.

    Reply
  43. On the math front. I see why GB went to metric so easily. At least US $ are multiples of 10. Now if we can get rid of the pesky 12in/foot. Looking forward to more historical tidbits wrapped around delicious characters.

    Reply
  44. On the math front. I see why GB went to metric so easily. At least US $ are multiples of 10. Now if we can get rid of the pesky 12in/foot. Looking forward to more historical tidbits wrapped around delicious characters.

    Reply
  45. On the math front. I see why GB went to metric so easily. At least US $ are multiples of 10. Now if we can get rid of the pesky 12in/foot. Looking forward to more historical tidbits wrapped around delicious characters.

    Reply

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