Marching in Protest

Peterloo_womanOn August 16, 1819 in St. Peter’s Field, Manchester England, 60,000 peaceful protestors marched with banners declaring UNIVERSAL SUFFRAGE (at that date even men couldn’t vote, unless they owned land) REPRESENTATION, and LOVE. Other than the cart the speakers stood on, it wasn’t so different from the women’s marches last week.

The Manchester protesters were peaceful, but at the time, the Riot Act was in force. This abominable act had been passed during another turbulent time in the early 18th century. It allowed a mayor, bailiff, sheriff, or any other “head officer” to declare a riot anytime more than twelve people were assembled “Unlawfully, riotously, and tumultuously.”  If the group didn’t disperse within an hour after the act was read, they were guilty of felony—and punishable by death.

You can guess how that went. Fearful landowners and the local magistrates panicked, thinking the French Revolution had reached their shores. Which, in a way, it had. The old order was being questioned, and the establishment was resisting change. This push and pull between rich and poor, people with power and people without, is a constant throughout history. Unfortunately, it often takes violence to effect change.

In the case of Peterloo, the magistrates gathered 600 Hussars—the king’s finest soldiers—along with canon, 400 cavalry, and 400 special constables. And then they sent the local Yeomanry to arrest the speakers. Some of the Yeomanry were reportedly drunk. Many of them held grudges against the free-speaking Peterloo_Massacrepeople in the crowd. It was akin to setting Skinheads and the Ku Klux Klan loose on a crowd of women, blacks, and gay rights activists. Emotion ruled the day.

Given what we’ve seen in places like Ferguson, MO, we still haven’t learned the result of unleashing armed military on a large crowd. Predictably, the crowd panicked, ran, and when trapped, undoubtedly fought back. Seeing the turmoil, the military charged to protect the Yeoman, not the crowd. By early afternoon, 700 people, including women and children were injured and 18 were dead. And that was just using sabers, not guns. Journalists, speakers, and organizers were arrested, most for High Treason. In an attempt to muzzle the news, anyone reporting on the event was jailed—if not already dead.

Rice_TheoryofMagic200But out of that calamitous riot rose today’s Manchester Guardian newspaper, plus the Chartist Movement that led to trade unions. It was the final influence that forced Parliament to pass the right to vote—although it still took years. In my Unexpected Magic series, set in 1830, they’re still fighting the battle in the Lords. The fight for suffrage brought down several prime ministers, including Wellington and Grey, of opposing parties. The establishment refused to accept that the common man, the public for whom they passed laws, had the ability to think for themselves—rather like the aristocratic South thinking black people were too simple-minded to be educated.

History has proven that people without power or wealth do have the ability to effect change, if they’re willing to take the risk. Blessedly, the power of the vote can bring about peaceful change—provided people are willing to step out of their comfort zones and push for it.

I was fascinated reading the history of the Lords for THEORY OF MAGIC. That houseful of aristocrats routinely read petitions from every small village and organization all across the country, and all the petitions demanded suffrage and the end of slavery—forcing that elite group to recognize the tide was turning against them. Today, we use web petitions and phone calls. How many of you have fought for change, whether by marching or other means? Do you think petitions matter?

160 thoughts on “Marching in Protest”

  1. When I worked in a shop many years ago I was part of the Union and Chairperson for a time. Back then we had to fight for everything. We had no sick leave and no leave for a death in the family either. We didn’t even have heating and the cold was brutal in the winter.
    We slowly but surely got the things we ‘needed’. Mostly we did it by talking but once or twice we had to strike. Unions are necessary but at times they get carried away.
    This story is nothing like what happened in Peterloo but it shows that down through the centuries some things never change, just the way we go about them.
    People went through some really hard grueling times to get us where we are today. Thank God for those wonderful martyrs!

    Reply
  2. When I worked in a shop many years ago I was part of the Union and Chairperson for a time. Back then we had to fight for everything. We had no sick leave and no leave for a death in the family either. We didn’t even have heating and the cold was brutal in the winter.
    We slowly but surely got the things we ‘needed’. Mostly we did it by talking but once or twice we had to strike. Unions are necessary but at times they get carried away.
    This story is nothing like what happened in Peterloo but it shows that down through the centuries some things never change, just the way we go about them.
    People went through some really hard grueling times to get us where we are today. Thank God for those wonderful martyrs!

    Reply
  3. When I worked in a shop many years ago I was part of the Union and Chairperson for a time. Back then we had to fight for everything. We had no sick leave and no leave for a death in the family either. We didn’t even have heating and the cold was brutal in the winter.
    We slowly but surely got the things we ‘needed’. Mostly we did it by talking but once or twice we had to strike. Unions are necessary but at times they get carried away.
    This story is nothing like what happened in Peterloo but it shows that down through the centuries some things never change, just the way we go about them.
    People went through some really hard grueling times to get us where we are today. Thank God for those wonderful martyrs!

    Reply
  4. When I worked in a shop many years ago I was part of the Union and Chairperson for a time. Back then we had to fight for everything. We had no sick leave and no leave for a death in the family either. We didn’t even have heating and the cold was brutal in the winter.
    We slowly but surely got the things we ‘needed’. Mostly we did it by talking but once or twice we had to strike. Unions are necessary but at times they get carried away.
    This story is nothing like what happened in Peterloo but it shows that down through the centuries some things never change, just the way we go about them.
    People went through some really hard grueling times to get us where we are today. Thank God for those wonderful martyrs!

    Reply
  5. When I worked in a shop many years ago I was part of the Union and Chairperson for a time. Back then we had to fight for everything. We had no sick leave and no leave for a death in the family either. We didn’t even have heating and the cold was brutal in the winter.
    We slowly but surely got the things we ‘needed’. Mostly we did it by talking but once or twice we had to strike. Unions are necessary but at times they get carried away.
    This story is nothing like what happened in Peterloo but it shows that down through the centuries some things never change, just the way we go about them.
    People went through some really hard grueling times to get us where we are today. Thank God for those wonderful martyrs!

    Reply
  6. Back in the day I went to many an anti-war rally during the Vietnam war. None of them ever turned violent – thank God. I’m a pacifist at heart but I know that there are times when war is necessary. But so many of the current conflicts could have and should have been avoided. It is hard not to be cynical.
    I’ve signed many a petition over the years also. I think they are very important, especially for local government issues. I’m not big on on-line petitions. I’ve had someone try to steal my social security by setting up a bogus on-line account, so I’m very cautious about what I put out on the world wide web.
    Lastly, I think it is so sad that so many people who have the right to vote don’t do it. I don’t think we make it easy for people to vote here in the US. There were many times during my work life when it was difficult to find the time to get to the polls. But I have always felt that if you are fortunate enough to live in a democracy – YOU SHOULD VOTE!
    Despite all the rallies, petitions, and votes that have not gone the way that I wanted them to go, I still believe it is so important to be true to your beliefs. Don’t give in to cynicism.

    Reply
  7. Back in the day I went to many an anti-war rally during the Vietnam war. None of them ever turned violent – thank God. I’m a pacifist at heart but I know that there are times when war is necessary. But so many of the current conflicts could have and should have been avoided. It is hard not to be cynical.
    I’ve signed many a petition over the years also. I think they are very important, especially for local government issues. I’m not big on on-line petitions. I’ve had someone try to steal my social security by setting up a bogus on-line account, so I’m very cautious about what I put out on the world wide web.
    Lastly, I think it is so sad that so many people who have the right to vote don’t do it. I don’t think we make it easy for people to vote here in the US. There were many times during my work life when it was difficult to find the time to get to the polls. But I have always felt that if you are fortunate enough to live in a democracy – YOU SHOULD VOTE!
    Despite all the rallies, petitions, and votes that have not gone the way that I wanted them to go, I still believe it is so important to be true to your beliefs. Don’t give in to cynicism.

    Reply
  8. Back in the day I went to many an anti-war rally during the Vietnam war. None of them ever turned violent – thank God. I’m a pacifist at heart but I know that there are times when war is necessary. But so many of the current conflicts could have and should have been avoided. It is hard not to be cynical.
    I’ve signed many a petition over the years also. I think they are very important, especially for local government issues. I’m not big on on-line petitions. I’ve had someone try to steal my social security by setting up a bogus on-line account, so I’m very cautious about what I put out on the world wide web.
    Lastly, I think it is so sad that so many people who have the right to vote don’t do it. I don’t think we make it easy for people to vote here in the US. There were many times during my work life when it was difficult to find the time to get to the polls. But I have always felt that if you are fortunate enough to live in a democracy – YOU SHOULD VOTE!
    Despite all the rallies, petitions, and votes that have not gone the way that I wanted them to go, I still believe it is so important to be true to your beliefs. Don’t give in to cynicism.

    Reply
  9. Back in the day I went to many an anti-war rally during the Vietnam war. None of them ever turned violent – thank God. I’m a pacifist at heart but I know that there are times when war is necessary. But so many of the current conflicts could have and should have been avoided. It is hard not to be cynical.
    I’ve signed many a petition over the years also. I think they are very important, especially for local government issues. I’m not big on on-line petitions. I’ve had someone try to steal my social security by setting up a bogus on-line account, so I’m very cautious about what I put out on the world wide web.
    Lastly, I think it is so sad that so many people who have the right to vote don’t do it. I don’t think we make it easy for people to vote here in the US. There were many times during my work life when it was difficult to find the time to get to the polls. But I have always felt that if you are fortunate enough to live in a democracy – YOU SHOULD VOTE!
    Despite all the rallies, petitions, and votes that have not gone the way that I wanted them to go, I still believe it is so important to be true to your beliefs. Don’t give in to cynicism.

    Reply
  10. Back in the day I went to many an anti-war rally during the Vietnam war. None of them ever turned violent – thank God. I’m a pacifist at heart but I know that there are times when war is necessary. But so many of the current conflicts could have and should have been avoided. It is hard not to be cynical.
    I’ve signed many a petition over the years also. I think they are very important, especially for local government issues. I’m not big on on-line petitions. I’ve had someone try to steal my social security by setting up a bogus on-line account, so I’m very cautious about what I put out on the world wide web.
    Lastly, I think it is so sad that so many people who have the right to vote don’t do it. I don’t think we make it easy for people to vote here in the US. There were many times during my work life when it was difficult to find the time to get to the polls. But I have always felt that if you are fortunate enough to live in a democracy – YOU SHOULD VOTE!
    Despite all the rallies, petitions, and votes that have not gone the way that I wanted them to go, I still believe it is so important to be true to your beliefs. Don’t give in to cynicism.

    Reply
  11. Teresa, you are so right about unions. In all my work life I never had to belong to one, but I’ve opened a history book or two, so I knew that every benefit I had was because men and women in the past, had fought for and even died for.

    Reply
  12. Teresa, you are so right about unions. In all my work life I never had to belong to one, but I’ve opened a history book or two, so I knew that every benefit I had was because men and women in the past, had fought for and even died for.

    Reply
  13. Teresa, you are so right about unions. In all my work life I never had to belong to one, but I’ve opened a history book or two, so I knew that every benefit I had was because men and women in the past, had fought for and even died for.

    Reply
  14. Teresa, you are so right about unions. In all my work life I never had to belong to one, but I’ve opened a history book or two, so I knew that every benefit I had was because men and women in the past, had fought for and even died for.

    Reply
  15. Teresa, you are so right about unions. In all my work life I never had to belong to one, but I’ve opened a history book or two, so I knew that every benefit I had was because men and women in the past, had fought for and even died for.

    Reply
  16. I totally know what you mean. I grew up in Kentucky, where coal miners would have continued to die for the sake of rich corporations if it hadn’t been for the unions. I’m terrified watching the pendulum swing back to big money.

    Reply
  17. I totally know what you mean. I grew up in Kentucky, where coal miners would have continued to die for the sake of rich corporations if it hadn’t been for the unions. I’m terrified watching the pendulum swing back to big money.

    Reply
  18. I totally know what you mean. I grew up in Kentucky, where coal miners would have continued to die for the sake of rich corporations if it hadn’t been for the unions. I’m terrified watching the pendulum swing back to big money.

    Reply
  19. I totally know what you mean. I grew up in Kentucky, where coal miners would have continued to die for the sake of rich corporations if it hadn’t been for the unions. I’m terrified watching the pendulum swing back to big money.

    Reply
  20. I totally know what you mean. I grew up in Kentucky, where coal miners would have continued to die for the sake of rich corporations if it hadn’t been for the unions. I’m terrified watching the pendulum swing back to big money.

    Reply
  21. Absolutely. I’m a pacifist also. And wary of on-line petitions. I really want action. So I guess next time around, I’ll have to find an organization that helps get out the vote. Where we live, there’s really no reason not to vote since mail-in ballots are available, but they’re horrendous documents pages long. So people are intimidated.

    Reply
  22. Absolutely. I’m a pacifist also. And wary of on-line petitions. I really want action. So I guess next time around, I’ll have to find an organization that helps get out the vote. Where we live, there’s really no reason not to vote since mail-in ballots are available, but they’re horrendous documents pages long. So people are intimidated.

    Reply
  23. Absolutely. I’m a pacifist also. And wary of on-line petitions. I really want action. So I guess next time around, I’ll have to find an organization that helps get out the vote. Where we live, there’s really no reason not to vote since mail-in ballots are available, but they’re horrendous documents pages long. So people are intimidated.

    Reply
  24. Absolutely. I’m a pacifist also. And wary of on-line petitions. I really want action. So I guess next time around, I’ll have to find an organization that helps get out the vote. Where we live, there’s really no reason not to vote since mail-in ballots are available, but they’re horrendous documents pages long. So people are intimidated.

    Reply
  25. Absolutely. I’m a pacifist also. And wary of on-line petitions. I really want action. So I guess next time around, I’ll have to find an organization that helps get out the vote. Where we live, there’s really no reason not to vote since mail-in ballots are available, but they’re horrendous documents pages long. So people are intimidated.

    Reply
  26. I remember in the 80’s when people said “We don’t need unions anymore”. How wrong they were. We’re reaping the harvest now, as pay gets lower and lower and people have no way to fight back.

    Reply
  27. I remember in the 80’s when people said “We don’t need unions anymore”. How wrong they were. We’re reaping the harvest now, as pay gets lower and lower and people have no way to fight back.

    Reply
  28. I remember in the 80’s when people said “We don’t need unions anymore”. How wrong they were. We’re reaping the harvest now, as pay gets lower and lower and people have no way to fight back.

    Reply
  29. I remember in the 80’s when people said “We don’t need unions anymore”. How wrong they were. We’re reaping the harvest now, as pay gets lower and lower and people have no way to fight back.

    Reply
  30. I remember in the 80’s when people said “We don’t need unions anymore”. How wrong they were. We’re reaping the harvest now, as pay gets lower and lower and people have no way to fight back.

    Reply
  31. I call my congressman, my senators and even the White House to express my views and I will be doing that more often now. I sign on-line petitions, though I do not know how effective they are. I would sign anything to support the unions. I marched this past Saturday in DC and it was amazing!!

    Reply
  32. I call my congressman, my senators and even the White House to express my views and I will be doing that more often now. I sign on-line petitions, though I do not know how effective they are. I would sign anything to support the unions. I marched this past Saturday in DC and it was amazing!!

    Reply
  33. I call my congressman, my senators and even the White House to express my views and I will be doing that more often now. I sign on-line petitions, though I do not know how effective they are. I would sign anything to support the unions. I marched this past Saturday in DC and it was amazing!!

    Reply
  34. I call my congressman, my senators and even the White House to express my views and I will be doing that more often now. I sign on-line petitions, though I do not know how effective they are. I would sign anything to support the unions. I marched this past Saturday in DC and it was amazing!!

    Reply
  35. I call my congressman, my senators and even the White House to express my views and I will be doing that more often now. I sign on-line petitions, though I do not know how effective they are. I would sign anything to support the unions. I marched this past Saturday in DC and it was amazing!!

    Reply
  36. From what I understand (and I wish I could locate the source — it was someone who worked in a representative’s office), phone calls are more effective than online petitions. Calls have to be answered by someone one in the office. Phone calls tie up resources (phone lines and personnel time) so they get noticed. Phone calls get logged.

    Reply
  37. From what I understand (and I wish I could locate the source — it was someone who worked in a representative’s office), phone calls are more effective than online petitions. Calls have to be answered by someone one in the office. Phone calls tie up resources (phone lines and personnel time) so they get noticed. Phone calls get logged.

    Reply
  38. From what I understand (and I wish I could locate the source — it was someone who worked in a representative’s office), phone calls are more effective than online petitions. Calls have to be answered by someone one in the office. Phone calls tie up resources (phone lines and personnel time) so they get noticed. Phone calls get logged.

    Reply
  39. From what I understand (and I wish I could locate the source — it was someone who worked in a representative’s office), phone calls are more effective than online petitions. Calls have to be answered by someone one in the office. Phone calls tie up resources (phone lines and personnel time) so they get noticed. Phone calls get logged.

    Reply
  40. From what I understand (and I wish I could locate the source — it was someone who worked in a representative’s office), phone calls are more effective than online petitions. Calls have to be answered by someone one in the office. Phone calls tie up resources (phone lines and personnel time) so they get noticed. Phone calls get logged.

    Reply
  41. In addition to the marches and petitions, I’ve also written letters to congressmen and senators. Gotta say, it’s really annoying to have taken the time to actually write a letter and get a reply that completely misses the point of what I was saying. I tend to think I write reasonably clear prose.

    Reply
  42. In addition to the marches and petitions, I’ve also written letters to congressmen and senators. Gotta say, it’s really annoying to have taken the time to actually write a letter and get a reply that completely misses the point of what I was saying. I tend to think I write reasonably clear prose.

    Reply
  43. In addition to the marches and petitions, I’ve also written letters to congressmen and senators. Gotta say, it’s really annoying to have taken the time to actually write a letter and get a reply that completely misses the point of what I was saying. I tend to think I write reasonably clear prose.

    Reply
  44. In addition to the marches and petitions, I’ve also written letters to congressmen and senators. Gotta say, it’s really annoying to have taken the time to actually write a letter and get a reply that completely misses the point of what I was saying. I tend to think I write reasonably clear prose.

    Reply
  45. In addition to the marches and petitions, I’ve also written letters to congressmen and senators. Gotta say, it’s really annoying to have taken the time to actually write a letter and get a reply that completely misses the point of what I was saying. I tend to think I write reasonably clear prose.

    Reply
  46. Yes, I’ve been told the same, but the congress critters tend to let the voice mail fill up so we can’t get through. It takes a lot of patience and determination. Marches are more fun. 😉

    Reply
  47. Yes, I’ve been told the same, but the congress critters tend to let the voice mail fill up so we can’t get through. It takes a lot of patience and determination. Marches are more fun. 😉

    Reply
  48. Yes, I’ve been told the same, but the congress critters tend to let the voice mail fill up so we can’t get through. It takes a lot of patience and determination. Marches are more fun. 😉

    Reply
  49. Yes, I’ve been told the same, but the congress critters tend to let the voice mail fill up so we can’t get through. It takes a lot of patience and determination. Marches are more fun. 😉

    Reply
  50. Yes, I’ve been told the same, but the congress critters tend to let the voice mail fill up so we can’t get through. It takes a lot of patience and determination. Marches are more fun. 😉

    Reply
  51. Because voting is compulsory in Australia, they have to make it easy to do – they can’t fine you for not voting if they can’t help you get to the polls!
    It does help that we have elections on a weekend.

    Reply
  52. Because voting is compulsory in Australia, they have to make it easy to do – they can’t fine you for not voting if they can’t help you get to the polls!
    It does help that we have elections on a weekend.

    Reply
  53. Because voting is compulsory in Australia, they have to make it easy to do – they can’t fine you for not voting if they can’t help you get to the polls!
    It does help that we have elections on a weekend.

    Reply
  54. Because voting is compulsory in Australia, they have to make it easy to do – they can’t fine you for not voting if they can’t help you get to the polls!
    It does help that we have elections on a weekend.

    Reply
  55. Because voting is compulsory in Australia, they have to make it easy to do – they can’t fine you for not voting if they can’t help you get to the polls!
    It does help that we have elections on a weekend.

    Reply
  56. Being Ukrainian, I’ve spent a lot of time standing with hundreds of others outside the gates of the Russian embassy in the past few years!
    After the 2013-14 revolution in Kyiv (Kiev), I think the police expect some drama (Molotov cocktails and snipers!). So they send so many officers, and then all we do is hold signs and sing the national anthem.

    Reply
  57. Being Ukrainian, I’ve spent a lot of time standing with hundreds of others outside the gates of the Russian embassy in the past few years!
    After the 2013-14 revolution in Kyiv (Kiev), I think the police expect some drama (Molotov cocktails and snipers!). So they send so many officers, and then all we do is hold signs and sing the national anthem.

    Reply
  58. Being Ukrainian, I’ve spent a lot of time standing with hundreds of others outside the gates of the Russian embassy in the past few years!
    After the 2013-14 revolution in Kyiv (Kiev), I think the police expect some drama (Molotov cocktails and snipers!). So they send so many officers, and then all we do is hold signs and sing the national anthem.

    Reply
  59. Being Ukrainian, I’ve spent a lot of time standing with hundreds of others outside the gates of the Russian embassy in the past few years!
    After the 2013-14 revolution in Kyiv (Kiev), I think the police expect some drama (Molotov cocktails and snipers!). So they send so many officers, and then all we do is hold signs and sing the national anthem.

    Reply
  60. Being Ukrainian, I’ve spent a lot of time standing with hundreds of others outside the gates of the Russian embassy in the past few years!
    After the 2013-14 revolution in Kyiv (Kiev), I think the police expect some drama (Molotov cocktails and snipers!). So they send so many officers, and then all we do is hold signs and sing the national anthem.

    Reply
  61. Patricia, your piece was very interesting, but one thing I find terribly sad is that what so many of the women marching on Saturday were rallying for were rights we thought were already ours, which had already been won! It is one thing to demand something new, even when it seems completely logical, like universal suffrage, but to have to demand again and again for what should be commonplace by now is truly discouraging. I remember wearing ERA buttons when I was young, and then the movement died down, in part, I think, because women no longer thought the actual amendment was necessary. Yet my grown children and I felt compelled to join the march on Saturday just to demand that women be treated with respect (and immigrants, and our planet, and our reproductive organs) – come on!!! Why, oh why, have we devolved so far? I suppose we should be happy they didn’t shoot us, this time, but I fear what the future holds.

    Reply
  62. Patricia, your piece was very interesting, but one thing I find terribly sad is that what so many of the women marching on Saturday were rallying for were rights we thought were already ours, which had already been won! It is one thing to demand something new, even when it seems completely logical, like universal suffrage, but to have to demand again and again for what should be commonplace by now is truly discouraging. I remember wearing ERA buttons when I was young, and then the movement died down, in part, I think, because women no longer thought the actual amendment was necessary. Yet my grown children and I felt compelled to join the march on Saturday just to demand that women be treated with respect (and immigrants, and our planet, and our reproductive organs) – come on!!! Why, oh why, have we devolved so far? I suppose we should be happy they didn’t shoot us, this time, but I fear what the future holds.

    Reply
  63. Patricia, your piece was very interesting, but one thing I find terribly sad is that what so many of the women marching on Saturday were rallying for were rights we thought were already ours, which had already been won! It is one thing to demand something new, even when it seems completely logical, like universal suffrage, but to have to demand again and again for what should be commonplace by now is truly discouraging. I remember wearing ERA buttons when I was young, and then the movement died down, in part, I think, because women no longer thought the actual amendment was necessary. Yet my grown children and I felt compelled to join the march on Saturday just to demand that women be treated with respect (and immigrants, and our planet, and our reproductive organs) – come on!!! Why, oh why, have we devolved so far? I suppose we should be happy they didn’t shoot us, this time, but I fear what the future holds.

    Reply
  64. Patricia, your piece was very interesting, but one thing I find terribly sad is that what so many of the women marching on Saturday were rallying for were rights we thought were already ours, which had already been won! It is one thing to demand something new, even when it seems completely logical, like universal suffrage, but to have to demand again and again for what should be commonplace by now is truly discouraging. I remember wearing ERA buttons when I was young, and then the movement died down, in part, I think, because women no longer thought the actual amendment was necessary. Yet my grown children and I felt compelled to join the march on Saturday just to demand that women be treated with respect (and immigrants, and our planet, and our reproductive organs) – come on!!! Why, oh why, have we devolved so far? I suppose we should be happy they didn’t shoot us, this time, but I fear what the future holds.

    Reply
  65. Patricia, your piece was very interesting, but one thing I find terribly sad is that what so many of the women marching on Saturday were rallying for were rights we thought were already ours, which had already been won! It is one thing to demand something new, even when it seems completely logical, like universal suffrage, but to have to demand again and again for what should be commonplace by now is truly discouraging. I remember wearing ERA buttons when I was young, and then the movement died down, in part, I think, because women no longer thought the actual amendment was necessary. Yet my grown children and I felt compelled to join the march on Saturday just to demand that women be treated with respect (and immigrants, and our planet, and our reproductive organs) – come on!!! Why, oh why, have we devolved so far? I suppose we should be happy they didn’t shoot us, this time, but I fear what the future holds.

    Reply
  66. Thank you so much, Wenches, for this post, and the Bitter East End one. I have renewed energy, conviction and heart after being reminded that this isn’t the first time, and that we’ve survived this kind of insanity before and, most of the time, managed to turn the great, unwieldy ships of our nations in a better direction.
    Onward and upward, women rock!
    Cheers, Faith

    Reply
  67. Thank you so much, Wenches, for this post, and the Bitter East End one. I have renewed energy, conviction and heart after being reminded that this isn’t the first time, and that we’ve survived this kind of insanity before and, most of the time, managed to turn the great, unwieldy ships of our nations in a better direction.
    Onward and upward, women rock!
    Cheers, Faith

    Reply
  68. Thank you so much, Wenches, for this post, and the Bitter East End one. I have renewed energy, conviction and heart after being reminded that this isn’t the first time, and that we’ve survived this kind of insanity before and, most of the time, managed to turn the great, unwieldy ships of our nations in a better direction.
    Onward and upward, women rock!
    Cheers, Faith

    Reply
  69. Thank you so much, Wenches, for this post, and the Bitter East End one. I have renewed energy, conviction and heart after being reminded that this isn’t the first time, and that we’ve survived this kind of insanity before and, most of the time, managed to turn the great, unwieldy ships of our nations in a better direction.
    Onward and upward, women rock!
    Cheers, Faith

    Reply
  70. Thank you so much, Wenches, for this post, and the Bitter East End one. I have renewed energy, conviction and heart after being reminded that this isn’t the first time, and that we’ve survived this kind of insanity before and, most of the time, managed to turn the great, unwieldy ships of our nations in a better direction.
    Onward and upward, women rock!
    Cheers, Faith

    Reply
  71. On the positive side, it is forcing a generation who never fought the good fight to understand how quickly they can be deprived of rights if they’re not paying attention. Maybe we need that constant reminder. We have been in danger of complacency but freedom must always be defended.

    Reply
  72. On the positive side, it is forcing a generation who never fought the good fight to understand how quickly they can be deprived of rights if they’re not paying attention. Maybe we need that constant reminder. We have been in danger of complacency but freedom must always be defended.

    Reply
  73. On the positive side, it is forcing a generation who never fought the good fight to understand how quickly they can be deprived of rights if they’re not paying attention. Maybe we need that constant reminder. We have been in danger of complacency but freedom must always be defended.

    Reply
  74. On the positive side, it is forcing a generation who never fought the good fight to understand how quickly they can be deprived of rights if they’re not paying attention. Maybe we need that constant reminder. We have been in danger of complacency but freedom must always be defended.

    Reply
  75. On the positive side, it is forcing a generation who never fought the good fight to understand how quickly they can be deprived of rights if they’re not paying attention. Maybe we need that constant reminder. We have been in danger of complacency but freedom must always be defended.

    Reply
  76. Australia has done some very smart things when it comes to voting. Unfortunately, here, we have a tendency to try to keep people out of the polls. It’s historical, from the very founding of the country, and there are certainly times when I can see the point! But equality demands all people have equal rights and responsibilities.

    Reply
  77. Australia has done some very smart things when it comes to voting. Unfortunately, here, we have a tendency to try to keep people out of the polls. It’s historical, from the very founding of the country, and there are certainly times when I can see the point! But equality demands all people have equal rights and responsibilities.

    Reply
  78. Australia has done some very smart things when it comes to voting. Unfortunately, here, we have a tendency to try to keep people out of the polls. It’s historical, from the very founding of the country, and there are certainly times when I can see the point! But equality demands all people have equal rights and responsibilities.

    Reply
  79. Australia has done some very smart things when it comes to voting. Unfortunately, here, we have a tendency to try to keep people out of the polls. It’s historical, from the very founding of the country, and there are certainly times when I can see the point! But equality demands all people have equal rights and responsibilities.

    Reply
  80. Australia has done some very smart things when it comes to voting. Unfortunately, here, we have a tendency to try to keep people out of the polls. It’s historical, from the very founding of the country, and there are certainly times when I can see the point! But equality demands all people have equal rights and responsibilities.

    Reply
  81. Thank you for the very timely reminder. Thankfully we don’t have a Riot Act but I see other tactics being used to discourage people from exercising their right to assemble. Things like denying permits, or penning people into certain areas ironically called “Free Speech Zones”.
    Funny, I thought the whole country was supposed to be a free speech zone!

    Reply
  82. Thank you for the very timely reminder. Thankfully we don’t have a Riot Act but I see other tactics being used to discourage people from exercising their right to assemble. Things like denying permits, or penning people into certain areas ironically called “Free Speech Zones”.
    Funny, I thought the whole country was supposed to be a free speech zone!

    Reply
  83. Thank you for the very timely reminder. Thankfully we don’t have a Riot Act but I see other tactics being used to discourage people from exercising their right to assemble. Things like denying permits, or penning people into certain areas ironically called “Free Speech Zones”.
    Funny, I thought the whole country was supposed to be a free speech zone!

    Reply
  84. Thank you for the very timely reminder. Thankfully we don’t have a Riot Act but I see other tactics being used to discourage people from exercising their right to assemble. Things like denying permits, or penning people into certain areas ironically called “Free Speech Zones”.
    Funny, I thought the whole country was supposed to be a free speech zone!

    Reply
  85. Thank you for the very timely reminder. Thankfully we don’t have a Riot Act but I see other tactics being used to discourage people from exercising their right to assemble. Things like denying permits, or penning people into certain areas ironically called “Free Speech Zones”.
    Funny, I thought the whole country was supposed to be a free speech zone!

    Reply
  86. Years ago, we moved to a small town. The City Council was going to raise taxes as well as water rates. I attended the meeting and after many people had asked that the council rethink their decision, it was obvious, the taxes and water were going up.
    I stood up, and pointed out that there was no choice for people about the water rate, but the taxes could be rolled back because they were going over the amount allowed by state law.
    The council did not believe me, but the city attorney admitted I was right.
    That was Tuesday, on Saturday 500 people were standing in my front yard. We got the rollback, with a petition. We got new people elected to City Council.
    It was a very lawful process, as people went house to house all over town explaining what could be done.
    A little knowledge is a powerful thing.

    Reply
  87. Years ago, we moved to a small town. The City Council was going to raise taxes as well as water rates. I attended the meeting and after many people had asked that the council rethink their decision, it was obvious, the taxes and water were going up.
    I stood up, and pointed out that there was no choice for people about the water rate, but the taxes could be rolled back because they were going over the amount allowed by state law.
    The council did not believe me, but the city attorney admitted I was right.
    That was Tuesday, on Saturday 500 people were standing in my front yard. We got the rollback, with a petition. We got new people elected to City Council.
    It was a very lawful process, as people went house to house all over town explaining what could be done.
    A little knowledge is a powerful thing.

    Reply
  88. Years ago, we moved to a small town. The City Council was going to raise taxes as well as water rates. I attended the meeting and after many people had asked that the council rethink their decision, it was obvious, the taxes and water were going up.
    I stood up, and pointed out that there was no choice for people about the water rate, but the taxes could be rolled back because they were going over the amount allowed by state law.
    The council did not believe me, but the city attorney admitted I was right.
    That was Tuesday, on Saturday 500 people were standing in my front yard. We got the rollback, with a petition. We got new people elected to City Council.
    It was a very lawful process, as people went house to house all over town explaining what could be done.
    A little knowledge is a powerful thing.

    Reply
  89. Years ago, we moved to a small town. The City Council was going to raise taxes as well as water rates. I attended the meeting and after many people had asked that the council rethink their decision, it was obvious, the taxes and water were going up.
    I stood up, and pointed out that there was no choice for people about the water rate, but the taxes could be rolled back because they were going over the amount allowed by state law.
    The council did not believe me, but the city attorney admitted I was right.
    That was Tuesday, on Saturday 500 people were standing in my front yard. We got the rollback, with a petition. We got new people elected to City Council.
    It was a very lawful process, as people went house to house all over town explaining what could be done.
    A little knowledge is a powerful thing.

    Reply
  90. Years ago, we moved to a small town. The City Council was going to raise taxes as well as water rates. I attended the meeting and after many people had asked that the council rethink their decision, it was obvious, the taxes and water were going up.
    I stood up, and pointed out that there was no choice for people about the water rate, but the taxes could be rolled back because they were going over the amount allowed by state law.
    The council did not believe me, but the city attorney admitted I was right.
    That was Tuesday, on Saturday 500 people were standing in my front yard. We got the rollback, with a petition. We got new people elected to City Council.
    It was a very lawful process, as people went house to house all over town explaining what could be done.
    A little knowledge is a powerful thing.

    Reply
  91. I have signed petitions; we have contributed money, and on rare occasions, send letters. I am sorry to say that otherwise we haven’t been very active (we is me plus my husband.)
    I do believe that we need progress and on issues I had believed were settled.
    Many here have hinted at this, but no one has used the word. Today, in the United States, most of the people being called conservative are actually being reactionary/ It’s time the difference between those terms was made clear and that we apply the proper labe.

    Reply
  92. I have signed petitions; we have contributed money, and on rare occasions, send letters. I am sorry to say that otherwise we haven’t been very active (we is me plus my husband.)
    I do believe that we need progress and on issues I had believed were settled.
    Many here have hinted at this, but no one has used the word. Today, in the United States, most of the people being called conservative are actually being reactionary/ It’s time the difference between those terms was made clear and that we apply the proper labe.

    Reply
  93. I have signed petitions; we have contributed money, and on rare occasions, send letters. I am sorry to say that otherwise we haven’t been very active (we is me plus my husband.)
    I do believe that we need progress and on issues I had believed were settled.
    Many here have hinted at this, but no one has used the word. Today, in the United States, most of the people being called conservative are actually being reactionary/ It’s time the difference between those terms was made clear and that we apply the proper labe.

    Reply
  94. I have signed petitions; we have contributed money, and on rare occasions, send letters. I am sorry to say that otherwise we haven’t been very active (we is me plus my husband.)
    I do believe that we need progress and on issues I had believed were settled.
    Many here have hinted at this, but no one has used the word. Today, in the United States, most of the people being called conservative are actually being reactionary/ It’s time the difference between those terms was made clear and that we apply the proper labe.

    Reply
  95. I have signed petitions; we have contributed money, and on rare occasions, send letters. I am sorry to say that otherwise we haven’t been very active (we is me plus my husband.)
    I do believe that we need progress and on issues I had believed were settled.
    Many here have hinted at this, but no one has used the word. Today, in the United States, most of the people being called conservative are actually being reactionary/ It’s time the difference between those terms was made clear and that we apply the proper labe.

    Reply
  96. I was talking to my mom today and she is feeling somewhat encouraged because several of my nieces (mid-20’s) have now become more politically active in the past month. 1 niece went to the Washington march, 1 niece and 1 sister to the one in Roanoke. 2 sisters and a niece and nephew were going to the Atlanta one but it was storming too much for them to leave home.
    Previously I had thought my nieces were (well nephews too) too complacent and never thought about where their rights were going. Especially their access to contraception. I could tell we were going totally in the wrong direction.
    I admit I have been rather slack about being active. Only the occasional petition or letter or phone call. But…all the email addresses and phone numbers are on my phone/computer now so I can fire off something as needed.
    My husband and I had another little chat about contraception access and what is/wasn’t covered by insurance last night. I said, back in the day, you paid out of your pocket to have your exam and then all birth control came out of your pocket. Oh…he says. Obviously I didn’t keep him informed at the time and just paid.
    I guess we need to encourage all women to have their significant others pay half the cost of any birth control to decrease ignorance. No hanky panky until you pay your monthly share. Grin.

    Reply
  97. I was talking to my mom today and she is feeling somewhat encouraged because several of my nieces (mid-20’s) have now become more politically active in the past month. 1 niece went to the Washington march, 1 niece and 1 sister to the one in Roanoke. 2 sisters and a niece and nephew were going to the Atlanta one but it was storming too much for them to leave home.
    Previously I had thought my nieces were (well nephews too) too complacent and never thought about where their rights were going. Especially their access to contraception. I could tell we were going totally in the wrong direction.
    I admit I have been rather slack about being active. Only the occasional petition or letter or phone call. But…all the email addresses and phone numbers are on my phone/computer now so I can fire off something as needed.
    My husband and I had another little chat about contraception access and what is/wasn’t covered by insurance last night. I said, back in the day, you paid out of your pocket to have your exam and then all birth control came out of your pocket. Oh…he says. Obviously I didn’t keep him informed at the time and just paid.
    I guess we need to encourage all women to have their significant others pay half the cost of any birth control to decrease ignorance. No hanky panky until you pay your monthly share. Grin.

    Reply
  98. I was talking to my mom today and she is feeling somewhat encouraged because several of my nieces (mid-20’s) have now become more politically active in the past month. 1 niece went to the Washington march, 1 niece and 1 sister to the one in Roanoke. 2 sisters and a niece and nephew were going to the Atlanta one but it was storming too much for them to leave home.
    Previously I had thought my nieces were (well nephews too) too complacent and never thought about where their rights were going. Especially their access to contraception. I could tell we were going totally in the wrong direction.
    I admit I have been rather slack about being active. Only the occasional petition or letter or phone call. But…all the email addresses and phone numbers are on my phone/computer now so I can fire off something as needed.
    My husband and I had another little chat about contraception access and what is/wasn’t covered by insurance last night. I said, back in the day, you paid out of your pocket to have your exam and then all birth control came out of your pocket. Oh…he says. Obviously I didn’t keep him informed at the time and just paid.
    I guess we need to encourage all women to have their significant others pay half the cost of any birth control to decrease ignorance. No hanky panky until you pay your monthly share. Grin.

    Reply
  99. I was talking to my mom today and she is feeling somewhat encouraged because several of my nieces (mid-20’s) have now become more politically active in the past month. 1 niece went to the Washington march, 1 niece and 1 sister to the one in Roanoke. 2 sisters and a niece and nephew were going to the Atlanta one but it was storming too much for them to leave home.
    Previously I had thought my nieces were (well nephews too) too complacent and never thought about where their rights were going. Especially their access to contraception. I could tell we were going totally in the wrong direction.
    I admit I have been rather slack about being active. Only the occasional petition or letter or phone call. But…all the email addresses and phone numbers are on my phone/computer now so I can fire off something as needed.
    My husband and I had another little chat about contraception access and what is/wasn’t covered by insurance last night. I said, back in the day, you paid out of your pocket to have your exam and then all birth control came out of your pocket. Oh…he says. Obviously I didn’t keep him informed at the time and just paid.
    I guess we need to encourage all women to have their significant others pay half the cost of any birth control to decrease ignorance. No hanky panky until you pay your monthly share. Grin.

    Reply
  100. I was talking to my mom today and she is feeling somewhat encouraged because several of my nieces (mid-20’s) have now become more politically active in the past month. 1 niece went to the Washington march, 1 niece and 1 sister to the one in Roanoke. 2 sisters and a niece and nephew were going to the Atlanta one but it was storming too much for them to leave home.
    Previously I had thought my nieces were (well nephews too) too complacent and never thought about where their rights were going. Especially their access to contraception. I could tell we were going totally in the wrong direction.
    I admit I have been rather slack about being active. Only the occasional petition or letter or phone call. But…all the email addresses and phone numbers are on my phone/computer now so I can fire off something as needed.
    My husband and I had another little chat about contraception access and what is/wasn’t covered by insurance last night. I said, back in the day, you paid out of your pocket to have your exam and then all birth control came out of your pocket. Oh…he says. Obviously I didn’t keep him informed at the time and just paid.
    I guess we need to encourage all women to have their significant others pay half the cost of any birth control to decrease ignorance. No hanky panky until you pay your monthly share. Grin.

    Reply
  101. I have always thought men ought to pay their fair share of hanky panky and the results! And I’m thrilled that a new generation is stepping up where we leave off. Something good is coming out of this mess.

    Reply
  102. I have always thought men ought to pay their fair share of hanky panky and the results! And I’m thrilled that a new generation is stepping up where we leave off. Something good is coming out of this mess.

    Reply
  103. I have always thought men ought to pay their fair share of hanky panky and the results! And I’m thrilled that a new generation is stepping up where we leave off. Something good is coming out of this mess.

    Reply
  104. I have always thought men ought to pay their fair share of hanky panky and the results! And I’m thrilled that a new generation is stepping up where we leave off. Something good is coming out of this mess.

    Reply
  105. I have always thought men ought to pay their fair share of hanky panky and the results! And I’m thrilled that a new generation is stepping up where we leave off. Something good is coming out of this mess.

    Reply
  106. Thank you Patricia for this post. It has sent me on my own search for more details about the things you brought up. That’s honestly one of the highest compliments I can give an author.
    In answer to your question, I absolutely cannot begin. I don’t trust myself with the answer, but agree with all the comments above. It has taken me down memory lane, and brought to the forefront so many of the fears and frustrations I’ve felt in the past couple of years, including governmental actions in our own state. Based on the comments by others, your history lesson has been a great success.

    Reply
  107. Thank you Patricia for this post. It has sent me on my own search for more details about the things you brought up. That’s honestly one of the highest compliments I can give an author.
    In answer to your question, I absolutely cannot begin. I don’t trust myself with the answer, but agree with all the comments above. It has taken me down memory lane, and brought to the forefront so many of the fears and frustrations I’ve felt in the past couple of years, including governmental actions in our own state. Based on the comments by others, your history lesson has been a great success.

    Reply
  108. Thank you Patricia for this post. It has sent me on my own search for more details about the things you brought up. That’s honestly one of the highest compliments I can give an author.
    In answer to your question, I absolutely cannot begin. I don’t trust myself with the answer, but agree with all the comments above. It has taken me down memory lane, and brought to the forefront so many of the fears and frustrations I’ve felt in the past couple of years, including governmental actions in our own state. Based on the comments by others, your history lesson has been a great success.

    Reply
  109. Thank you Patricia for this post. It has sent me on my own search for more details about the things you brought up. That’s honestly one of the highest compliments I can give an author.
    In answer to your question, I absolutely cannot begin. I don’t trust myself with the answer, but agree with all the comments above. It has taken me down memory lane, and brought to the forefront so many of the fears and frustrations I’ve felt in the past couple of years, including governmental actions in our own state. Based on the comments by others, your history lesson has been a great success.

    Reply
  110. Thank you Patricia for this post. It has sent me on my own search for more details about the things you brought up. That’s honestly one of the highest compliments I can give an author.
    In answer to your question, I absolutely cannot begin. I don’t trust myself with the answer, but agree with all the comments above. It has taken me down memory lane, and brought to the forefront so many of the fears and frustrations I’ve felt in the past couple of years, including governmental actions in our own state. Based on the comments by others, your history lesson has been a great success.

    Reply

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