Procrastination: The Thief of Time

Cat 243 Dover by Mary Jo

I’ve been thinking about writing a piece on procrastination for a while, but hadn’t gotten around to it….

Okay, I couldn’t resist saying that. <G>  In fact, while I have been a serious practitioner of procrastination for as long as I can remember, I never thought much about it, other than experiencing the usual guilt.

Then I read an article from a recent New Yorker called “Later.”  Author James New Yorker Surowiecki reviewed a book of essays called The Thief of Time, including broader information on the subject as well as applying it to himself. 

The Quintessential Problem?

Procrastination has always been with us, but corrosive guilt about it is more of a modern phenomenon.  Another vestige of our Puritan heritage, probably.  We’re supposed to be working, and avoiding work feels like a sign of weak moral fiber.  As the article says, “it’s possible to see procrastination as the quintessential modern problem.”

The interesting essence of procrastination is that it’s “doing something against one’s own better judgment.”  We know we have to finish that term paper, calculate and file those taxes, finish that book.  We want those good things to happen.

Man in Hammock And yet—we avoid working on things even though we know we’ll pay for the procrastination.  So we don’t do something we should, even though we know such behavior will make us unhappy.

And we don’t even always procrastinate to do something that’s fun!  When you start organizing your sock drawer, you’re probably avoiding something bigSocks  time. 

 

The Dangers of Self-Employment

Those who must structure their own time may be particularly prone to procrastination.  Take academics.  Finishing a PhD dissertation is a monstrously difficult undertaking, so much so that there is a term for people who have taken all the courses, done all the research, but not done the dissertation: ABD = All But Dissertation.  Even my brother-in-law, a professor and one of the most cerebral and intelligent people I know, said that his dissertation was heavy gong. 

Suroweicki’s article discusses several reasons why we procrastinate.  Goals, for example.  I really do want to read War and Peace, but right now, I am going to read the new JAK Arcane novel.  I’ll read War and Peace over vacation when I have lots of time to sink into it.  But vacation comes, and the new Sharon Shinn is out, and I want to read that instead. 

Multiple Selves

A big reason we procrastinate is that there are multiple selves within us, and they often have conflicting goals.  There are different terminologies for this, such as Freud’s classic Id, Ego, and Superego, but suffice it to say that the self that wants to finish the dissertation and read War and Peace is more interested in long term goals, while the self who goes for the fun book is more into short term gratification. 

What you want now is probably what you’ll also want in the future.  In other words, Chocolate cake you want to lose weight, but you’ll start the diet tomorrow, right now there’s a chocolate cake in the office break room.  Come tomorrow, and there are donuts, the diet can be started on Monday, always better to start a project on Monday.

Obviously, this can go on indefinitely.  <G> 

We Need More Time!

Procrastination is related to a concept that I recognized when Ellen Goodman, one of my favorite columnists, articulated it: the unconscious belief that in the future, we’ll have more time.  I’m rushed and harried and behind on deadline and may not get my Christmas cards out this year, but NEXT YEAR WILL BE DIFFERENT

Next year I’ll get into the current book sooner, schedule my time better, have my Christmas cards posted and my holiday shopping done by December 1st. Or at least by December 15th.   (I procrastinate even in my daydreams.  <G>)  Yes, next year I’ll be better organized and everything will be different. 

Of course, next year is probably not different. <g>  One reason is, yes, procrastination.  Another is that we tend to think of the ideal when we schedule projects.  We’re going to sit down and get this book done in six months because we’ve written other books in six months. 

Cat What we tend to overlook is the normal hassles of everyday life:  the cold caught in Croatia, the car that breaks down, the cat needs to be taken to the vet, the furnace fails at the first cold snap.  These things aren’t specifically predictable, but some kinds of delay will invariably happen and we’ll get behind on the project.

Solutions, or at least, Coping Mechanisms

So how can we deal with procrastination? 

One solution is bargaining.  You may want to read a fun book now, and you will want to just as much in the future. So you tell yourself that after you read War and Peace, you’ll read fun books only for the next six months.  This may work for some people, but the fun loving self often has the upper hand here.

Another solution is to raise the stakes.  If you go to Weight Watchers or make a bet with a friend, you are setting yourself up to succeed or fail in the eyes of others.  At Weight Watchers, I understand there are public weighings, plus a sympathetic peer group to help keep you on track.  If you make a bet with a friend and lose, it may cost you money. 

  
If you continuously put something off, eventually you may want to consider whether it actually needs doing.  Most of us have zillions of things we feel we “ought” to do, but some of them probably deserve to be dropped altogether.  Why waste guilt on an undeserving subject??  Maybe you don't really want to read War and Peace–you wWar and Peaceant to have read it, which is not at all the same thing.

A good solution is to set up artificial deadlines or constraints.  Surowiecki’s article cites a study done by MIT psychologist David Ariely, who assigned a class three papers that had to be done during the semester.  The students had the choice of delivering all three at the end of the term, or setting separate deadlines for each, spaced out through the semester.  They didn’t get extra credit for delivering early, but if they set an earlier deadline and missed it, their grades would be docked.

Yet even though setting earlier deadlines risked a penalty, the majority of students choose to do that.  They knew that they were unlikely to start early on all three and deliver them at semester’s end, so they chose external constraints to force them to do what they knew needed to be done. 

Setting such constraints is called self-binding, and it can be done in numerous ways.  One that I LOVE I learned about from Surowiecki.  A PhD student in North Carolina (see “dissertation,” above <g>) wrote a piece of software that cuts off your internet access for anywhere from 15 minutes to 8 hours. 

The software is called Freedom and can be downloaded in either a trial version or bought outright for ten bucks.  (Despite the site name, it works fine for PCs as well as Macs.)  You set the time you want to be offline, and the program dutifully blocks access.  (If you really, suddenly do need to get online, you can clear the program by rebooting.)

Given that the internet is an invention of the devil and the all-time biggest timewaster there is, this is a fabulous invention.  If you read the testimonials, you’ll see names you recognize.  LOTS of writers.  <g> 

So that’s a quick riff about procrastination.  If the subject interests you, be sure to Thief of Time read James Surowiecki’s article—there’s lots of fascinating stuff in there.

Or you can buy The Thief of Time itself, for it's surely full of marvelous insights.  It costs $65, though.  Maybe I’ll get it later…  <G>

So—are you a procrastinator?  Sometimes, not always?  What tasks cause you to use a toothbrush to clean grout as an avoidance technique?  And do you have any good coping strategies that you would be willing to share?

Mary Jo, who is amazed that she has ever managed to finish a book, much less dozens.

PS: Thanks to Anne Gracie for pointing out that I'd mispelled James Surowiecki's name wrong when I originally posted.  That is now corrected.

 

 

150 thoughts on “Procrastination: The Thief of Time”

  1. Hi Mary Jo. I reckon procrastination is my second name. I know all about having to sit up all night just to do the bibliography at the end of the thesis. Have you ever lost a reference? I seem to do it every time and I haven’t left myself enough time to search for it. Then it becomes a case of admitting to the problem or hoping my supervisor doesn’t notice it. Fat chance. At present I am procrastinating coming up to Christmas. Do I do my Christmas cards, or do I give the house a good clean for the holidays? Decisions decisions! Of course here in Australia we are coming up to summer and already it is hotting up and I just know it will be hot and dusty and is it worth all the effort? I’m very good at procrastination.

    Reply
  2. Hi Mary Jo. I reckon procrastination is my second name. I know all about having to sit up all night just to do the bibliography at the end of the thesis. Have you ever lost a reference? I seem to do it every time and I haven’t left myself enough time to search for it. Then it becomes a case of admitting to the problem or hoping my supervisor doesn’t notice it. Fat chance. At present I am procrastinating coming up to Christmas. Do I do my Christmas cards, or do I give the house a good clean for the holidays? Decisions decisions! Of course here in Australia we are coming up to summer and already it is hotting up and I just know it will be hot and dusty and is it worth all the effort? I’m very good at procrastination.

    Reply
  3. Hi Mary Jo. I reckon procrastination is my second name. I know all about having to sit up all night just to do the bibliography at the end of the thesis. Have you ever lost a reference? I seem to do it every time and I haven’t left myself enough time to search for it. Then it becomes a case of admitting to the problem or hoping my supervisor doesn’t notice it. Fat chance. At present I am procrastinating coming up to Christmas. Do I do my Christmas cards, or do I give the house a good clean for the holidays? Decisions decisions! Of course here in Australia we are coming up to summer and already it is hotting up and I just know it will be hot and dusty and is it worth all the effort? I’m very good at procrastination.

    Reply
  4. Hi Mary Jo. I reckon procrastination is my second name. I know all about having to sit up all night just to do the bibliography at the end of the thesis. Have you ever lost a reference? I seem to do it every time and I haven’t left myself enough time to search for it. Then it becomes a case of admitting to the problem or hoping my supervisor doesn’t notice it. Fat chance. At present I am procrastinating coming up to Christmas. Do I do my Christmas cards, or do I give the house a good clean for the holidays? Decisions decisions! Of course here in Australia we are coming up to summer and already it is hotting up and I just know it will be hot and dusty and is it worth all the effort? I’m very good at procrastination.

    Reply
  5. Hi Mary Jo. I reckon procrastination is my second name. I know all about having to sit up all night just to do the bibliography at the end of the thesis. Have you ever lost a reference? I seem to do it every time and I haven’t left myself enough time to search for it. Then it becomes a case of admitting to the problem or hoping my supervisor doesn’t notice it. Fat chance. At present I am procrastinating coming up to Christmas. Do I do my Christmas cards, or do I give the house a good clean for the holidays? Decisions decisions! Of course here in Australia we are coming up to summer and already it is hotting up and I just know it will be hot and dusty and is it worth all the effort? I’m very good at procrastination.

    Reply
  6. I read this with great interest, as I’ve realized now that I’m writing to fulfill contracts, it’s like having homework 24/7. There is ALWAYS something hanging over my head. And darn it, that Puritanical streak has been distilled perfectly in my brain so that I’m driven to always do what I’m “supposed to.” Which is why I’m up writing at 4 AM…well, not technically, as I’m here, but as soon as I go offline…
    I can’t tell you how many boxes of Christmas cards I have. I keep buying them at end of the year sales. And I never send any except to a handful of friends because I just don’t have time. Soon I’ll qualify for one of those hoarder shows.

    Reply
  7. I read this with great interest, as I’ve realized now that I’m writing to fulfill contracts, it’s like having homework 24/7. There is ALWAYS something hanging over my head. And darn it, that Puritanical streak has been distilled perfectly in my brain so that I’m driven to always do what I’m “supposed to.” Which is why I’m up writing at 4 AM…well, not technically, as I’m here, but as soon as I go offline…
    I can’t tell you how many boxes of Christmas cards I have. I keep buying them at end of the year sales. And I never send any except to a handful of friends because I just don’t have time. Soon I’ll qualify for one of those hoarder shows.

    Reply
  8. I read this with great interest, as I’ve realized now that I’m writing to fulfill contracts, it’s like having homework 24/7. There is ALWAYS something hanging over my head. And darn it, that Puritanical streak has been distilled perfectly in my brain so that I’m driven to always do what I’m “supposed to.” Which is why I’m up writing at 4 AM…well, not technically, as I’m here, but as soon as I go offline…
    I can’t tell you how many boxes of Christmas cards I have. I keep buying them at end of the year sales. And I never send any except to a handful of friends because I just don’t have time. Soon I’ll qualify for one of those hoarder shows.

    Reply
  9. I read this with great interest, as I’ve realized now that I’m writing to fulfill contracts, it’s like having homework 24/7. There is ALWAYS something hanging over my head. And darn it, that Puritanical streak has been distilled perfectly in my brain so that I’m driven to always do what I’m “supposed to.” Which is why I’m up writing at 4 AM…well, not technically, as I’m here, but as soon as I go offline…
    I can’t tell you how many boxes of Christmas cards I have. I keep buying them at end of the year sales. And I never send any except to a handful of friends because I just don’t have time. Soon I’ll qualify for one of those hoarder shows.

    Reply
  10. I read this with great interest, as I’ve realized now that I’m writing to fulfill contracts, it’s like having homework 24/7. There is ALWAYS something hanging over my head. And darn it, that Puritanical streak has been distilled perfectly in my brain so that I’m driven to always do what I’m “supposed to.” Which is why I’m up writing at 4 AM…well, not technically, as I’m here, but as soon as I go offline…
    I can’t tell you how many boxes of Christmas cards I have. I keep buying them at end of the year sales. And I never send any except to a handful of friends because I just don’t have time. Soon I’ll qualify for one of those hoarder shows.

    Reply
  11. I’m a spider solitaire procrastinator. When I sit down to write, I always, always play the stupid spider solitaire on my computer before I begin. I’ve tried to avoid it, but I hear it calling my name. I could disable it, but I would have to play hearts first.

    Reply
  12. I’m a spider solitaire procrastinator. When I sit down to write, I always, always play the stupid spider solitaire on my computer before I begin. I’ve tried to avoid it, but I hear it calling my name. I could disable it, but I would have to play hearts first.

    Reply
  13. I’m a spider solitaire procrastinator. When I sit down to write, I always, always play the stupid spider solitaire on my computer before I begin. I’ve tried to avoid it, but I hear it calling my name. I could disable it, but I would have to play hearts first.

    Reply
  14. I’m a spider solitaire procrastinator. When I sit down to write, I always, always play the stupid spider solitaire on my computer before I begin. I’ve tried to avoid it, but I hear it calling my name. I could disable it, but I would have to play hearts first.

    Reply
  15. I’m a spider solitaire procrastinator. When I sit down to write, I always, always play the stupid spider solitaire on my computer before I begin. I’ve tried to avoid it, but I hear it calling my name. I could disable it, but I would have to play hearts first.

    Reply
  16. I’ve never been a procrastinator. Although, as I get older, I find I’m turning into one in some ways.
    Although you describe the self-employed’s problems with procrastination, the employed have the opposite. The employer wants more, much more, than can be done in a reasonable amount of time. Pity the poor worker who works hard and gets her (I’m talking me here) work done a little early. The employer then adds more tasks to the employee’s list, until she can’t do any more. And then they ding her for not doing enough. I’ve now decided a little procrastination is A Good Thing.
    I’ve heard the phrase “start out as you mean to go on”. If you work too hard at the beginning, you’ll get caught. If you work too little at the beginning, you’ll still get caught. The happy medium is a place we’d all like to be, but we never get there.

    Reply
  17. I’ve never been a procrastinator. Although, as I get older, I find I’m turning into one in some ways.
    Although you describe the self-employed’s problems with procrastination, the employed have the opposite. The employer wants more, much more, than can be done in a reasonable amount of time. Pity the poor worker who works hard and gets her (I’m talking me here) work done a little early. The employer then adds more tasks to the employee’s list, until she can’t do any more. And then they ding her for not doing enough. I’ve now decided a little procrastination is A Good Thing.
    I’ve heard the phrase “start out as you mean to go on”. If you work too hard at the beginning, you’ll get caught. If you work too little at the beginning, you’ll still get caught. The happy medium is a place we’d all like to be, but we never get there.

    Reply
  18. I’ve never been a procrastinator. Although, as I get older, I find I’m turning into one in some ways.
    Although you describe the self-employed’s problems with procrastination, the employed have the opposite. The employer wants more, much more, than can be done in a reasonable amount of time. Pity the poor worker who works hard and gets her (I’m talking me here) work done a little early. The employer then adds more tasks to the employee’s list, until she can’t do any more. And then they ding her for not doing enough. I’ve now decided a little procrastination is A Good Thing.
    I’ve heard the phrase “start out as you mean to go on”. If you work too hard at the beginning, you’ll get caught. If you work too little at the beginning, you’ll still get caught. The happy medium is a place we’d all like to be, but we never get there.

    Reply
  19. I’ve never been a procrastinator. Although, as I get older, I find I’m turning into one in some ways.
    Although you describe the self-employed’s problems with procrastination, the employed have the opposite. The employer wants more, much more, than can be done in a reasonable amount of time. Pity the poor worker who works hard and gets her (I’m talking me here) work done a little early. The employer then adds more tasks to the employee’s list, until she can’t do any more. And then they ding her for not doing enough. I’ve now decided a little procrastination is A Good Thing.
    I’ve heard the phrase “start out as you mean to go on”. If you work too hard at the beginning, you’ll get caught. If you work too little at the beginning, you’ll still get caught. The happy medium is a place we’d all like to be, but we never get there.

    Reply
  20. I’ve never been a procrastinator. Although, as I get older, I find I’m turning into one in some ways.
    Although you describe the self-employed’s problems with procrastination, the employed have the opposite. The employer wants more, much more, than can be done in a reasonable amount of time. Pity the poor worker who works hard and gets her (I’m talking me here) work done a little early. The employer then adds more tasks to the employee’s list, until she can’t do any more. And then they ding her for not doing enough. I’ve now decided a little procrastination is A Good Thing.
    I’ve heard the phrase “start out as you mean to go on”. If you work too hard at the beginning, you’ll get caught. If you work too little at the beginning, you’ll still get caught. The happy medium is a place we’d all like to be, but we never get there.

    Reply
  21. Jenny, I’ve never done a thesis, but I definitely misplace references when I’m writing. I’ll know I read some delicious fact I can incorporate, but WHERE??? I’m moderately good at keeping track of my research. Just not good enough.
    As for whether to do Christmas cards or clean the house with Australian dust seeking to creep inside–I suggest doing some baking and lighting some candles so the doesn’t does show and have some good friends over. Looking back, it’s the good times with good people we remember, not whether we got the cleaning done!

    Reply
  22. Jenny, I’ve never done a thesis, but I definitely misplace references when I’m writing. I’ll know I read some delicious fact I can incorporate, but WHERE??? I’m moderately good at keeping track of my research. Just not good enough.
    As for whether to do Christmas cards or clean the house with Australian dust seeking to creep inside–I suggest doing some baking and lighting some candles so the doesn’t does show and have some good friends over. Looking back, it’s the good times with good people we remember, not whether we got the cleaning done!

    Reply
  23. Jenny, I’ve never done a thesis, but I definitely misplace references when I’m writing. I’ll know I read some delicious fact I can incorporate, but WHERE??? I’m moderately good at keeping track of my research. Just not good enough.
    As for whether to do Christmas cards or clean the house with Australian dust seeking to creep inside–I suggest doing some baking and lighting some candles so the doesn’t does show and have some good friends over. Looking back, it’s the good times with good people we remember, not whether we got the cleaning done!

    Reply
  24. Jenny, I’ve never done a thesis, but I definitely misplace references when I’m writing. I’ll know I read some delicious fact I can incorporate, but WHERE??? I’m moderately good at keeping track of my research. Just not good enough.
    As for whether to do Christmas cards or clean the house with Australian dust seeking to creep inside–I suggest doing some baking and lighting some candles so the doesn’t does show and have some good friends over. Looking back, it’s the good times with good people we remember, not whether we got the cleaning done!

    Reply
  25. Jenny, I’ve never done a thesis, but I definitely misplace references when I’m writing. I’ll know I read some delicious fact I can incorporate, but WHERE??? I’m moderately good at keeping track of my research. Just not good enough.
    As for whether to do Christmas cards or clean the house with Australian dust seeking to creep inside–I suggest doing some baking and lighting some candles so the doesn’t does show and have some good friends over. Looking back, it’s the good times with good people we remember, not whether we got the cleaning done!

    Reply
  26. Maggie, you are suffering the curse of success! And being a Down Easterner, of course you’ll have a Puritan conscience. *g* Find some time to enjoy the holiday, and give the accummulating Christmas cards to a church rummage sale. *g* (I’m very good at telling people not to be compulsive. Just not so good at practicing that myself!)

    Reply
  27. Maggie, you are suffering the curse of success! And being a Down Easterner, of course you’ll have a Puritan conscience. *g* Find some time to enjoy the holiday, and give the accummulating Christmas cards to a church rummage sale. *g* (I’m very good at telling people not to be compulsive. Just not so good at practicing that myself!)

    Reply
  28. Maggie, you are suffering the curse of success! And being a Down Easterner, of course you’ll have a Puritan conscience. *g* Find some time to enjoy the holiday, and give the accummulating Christmas cards to a church rummage sale. *g* (I’m very good at telling people not to be compulsive. Just not so good at practicing that myself!)

    Reply
  29. Maggie, you are suffering the curse of success! And being a Down Easterner, of course you’ll have a Puritan conscience. *g* Find some time to enjoy the holiday, and give the accummulating Christmas cards to a church rummage sale. *g* (I’m very good at telling people not to be compulsive. Just not so good at practicing that myself!)

    Reply
  30. Maggie, you are suffering the curse of success! And being a Down Easterner, of course you’ll have a Puritan conscience. *g* Find some time to enjoy the holiday, and give the accummulating Christmas cards to a church rummage sale. *g* (I’m very good at telling people not to be compulsive. Just not so good at practicing that myself!)

    Reply
  31. Kay–
    A discussion on the Novelist, Inc. loop has positively established that playing spider solitaire or hearts or whatever before starting is part of the routine of moving your brain into creative space, so it’s not procrastination AT ALL! I trust that relieves your conscience. *g*

    Reply
  32. Kay–
    A discussion on the Novelist, Inc. loop has positively established that playing spider solitaire or hearts or whatever before starting is part of the routine of moving your brain into creative space, so it’s not procrastination AT ALL! I trust that relieves your conscience. *g*

    Reply
  33. Kay–
    A discussion on the Novelist, Inc. loop has positively established that playing spider solitaire or hearts or whatever before starting is part of the routine of moving your brain into creative space, so it’s not procrastination AT ALL! I trust that relieves your conscience. *g*

    Reply
  34. Kay–
    A discussion on the Novelist, Inc. loop has positively established that playing spider solitaire or hearts or whatever before starting is part of the routine of moving your brain into creative space, so it’s not procrastination AT ALL! I trust that relieves your conscience. *g*

    Reply
  35. Kay–
    A discussion on the Novelist, Inc. loop has positively established that playing spider solitaire or hearts or whatever before starting is part of the routine of moving your brain into creative space, so it’s not procrastination AT ALL! I trust that relieves your conscience. *g*

    Reply
  36. Linda, you’re right–the problems of the emplotyed are a whole different ballgame. With so many companies and organizations cutting staff to the bare bones minimum and sometimes beyond, too much efficiency can lead a conscientious person to work herself to collapse. I’ve seen it. So finding the golden mean of production without self desctrution is the ideal. Not easy to establish, though.

    Reply
  37. Linda, you’re right–the problems of the emplotyed are a whole different ballgame. With so many companies and organizations cutting staff to the bare bones minimum and sometimes beyond, too much efficiency can lead a conscientious person to work herself to collapse. I’ve seen it. So finding the golden mean of production without self desctrution is the ideal. Not easy to establish, though.

    Reply
  38. Linda, you’re right–the problems of the emplotyed are a whole different ballgame. With so many companies and organizations cutting staff to the bare bones minimum and sometimes beyond, too much efficiency can lead a conscientious person to work herself to collapse. I’ve seen it. So finding the golden mean of production without self desctrution is the ideal. Not easy to establish, though.

    Reply
  39. Linda, you’re right–the problems of the emplotyed are a whole different ballgame. With so many companies and organizations cutting staff to the bare bones minimum and sometimes beyond, too much efficiency can lead a conscientious person to work herself to collapse. I’ve seen it. So finding the golden mean of production without self desctrution is the ideal. Not easy to establish, though.

    Reply
  40. Linda, you’re right–the problems of the emplotyed are a whole different ballgame. With so many companies and organizations cutting staff to the bare bones minimum and sometimes beyond, too much efficiency can lead a conscientious person to work herself to collapse. I’ve seen it. So finding the golden mean of production without self desctrution is the ideal. Not easy to establish, though.

    Reply
  41. I can relate to the problems of those not self-employed. The more I do and do well, the more they expect. The sad thing is, other than a paycheck my job doesn’t do a thing for me. As a result I feel as if I am working myself to death for – Nothing!
    I just wish I could make myself work as hard at my writing. I always feel as if I don’t spend enough time on it. On the days it is going well, the pages are coming and I am loving the research and everything about it I have such a feeling of fulfillment and satisfaction. Then on the days I sit and stare at the screen or allow myself to procrastinate surfing the net, cleaning up my kitchen, working in my yard I feel so guilty!
    I think that is the hardest part of being a writer (at least an uunpubbed one)I haven’t been able to establish a set routine of writing, a daily word count or something to keep me coming back to my desk. At work I keep going because I know it is how I pay for little luxuries like food, toilet paper and living indoors!
    Writing feeds my soul. Now if I could just convince my soul to grumble like my tummy does when I’m hungry!

    Reply
  42. I can relate to the problems of those not self-employed. The more I do and do well, the more they expect. The sad thing is, other than a paycheck my job doesn’t do a thing for me. As a result I feel as if I am working myself to death for – Nothing!
    I just wish I could make myself work as hard at my writing. I always feel as if I don’t spend enough time on it. On the days it is going well, the pages are coming and I am loving the research and everything about it I have such a feeling of fulfillment and satisfaction. Then on the days I sit and stare at the screen or allow myself to procrastinate surfing the net, cleaning up my kitchen, working in my yard I feel so guilty!
    I think that is the hardest part of being a writer (at least an uunpubbed one)I haven’t been able to establish a set routine of writing, a daily word count or something to keep me coming back to my desk. At work I keep going because I know it is how I pay for little luxuries like food, toilet paper and living indoors!
    Writing feeds my soul. Now if I could just convince my soul to grumble like my tummy does when I’m hungry!

    Reply
  43. I can relate to the problems of those not self-employed. The more I do and do well, the more they expect. The sad thing is, other than a paycheck my job doesn’t do a thing for me. As a result I feel as if I am working myself to death for – Nothing!
    I just wish I could make myself work as hard at my writing. I always feel as if I don’t spend enough time on it. On the days it is going well, the pages are coming and I am loving the research and everything about it I have such a feeling of fulfillment and satisfaction. Then on the days I sit and stare at the screen or allow myself to procrastinate surfing the net, cleaning up my kitchen, working in my yard I feel so guilty!
    I think that is the hardest part of being a writer (at least an uunpubbed one)I haven’t been able to establish a set routine of writing, a daily word count or something to keep me coming back to my desk. At work I keep going because I know it is how I pay for little luxuries like food, toilet paper and living indoors!
    Writing feeds my soul. Now if I could just convince my soul to grumble like my tummy does when I’m hungry!

    Reply
  44. I can relate to the problems of those not self-employed. The more I do and do well, the more they expect. The sad thing is, other than a paycheck my job doesn’t do a thing for me. As a result I feel as if I am working myself to death for – Nothing!
    I just wish I could make myself work as hard at my writing. I always feel as if I don’t spend enough time on it. On the days it is going well, the pages are coming and I am loving the research and everything about it I have such a feeling of fulfillment and satisfaction. Then on the days I sit and stare at the screen or allow myself to procrastinate surfing the net, cleaning up my kitchen, working in my yard I feel so guilty!
    I think that is the hardest part of being a writer (at least an uunpubbed one)I haven’t been able to establish a set routine of writing, a daily word count or something to keep me coming back to my desk. At work I keep going because I know it is how I pay for little luxuries like food, toilet paper and living indoors!
    Writing feeds my soul. Now if I could just convince my soul to grumble like my tummy does when I’m hungry!

    Reply
  45. I can relate to the problems of those not self-employed. The more I do and do well, the more they expect. The sad thing is, other than a paycheck my job doesn’t do a thing for me. As a result I feel as if I am working myself to death for – Nothing!
    I just wish I could make myself work as hard at my writing. I always feel as if I don’t spend enough time on it. On the days it is going well, the pages are coming and I am loving the research and everything about it I have such a feeling of fulfillment and satisfaction. Then on the days I sit and stare at the screen or allow myself to procrastinate surfing the net, cleaning up my kitchen, working in my yard I feel so guilty!
    I think that is the hardest part of being a writer (at least an uunpubbed one)I haven’t been able to establish a set routine of writing, a daily word count or something to keep me coming back to my desk. At work I keep going because I know it is how I pay for little luxuries like food, toilet paper and living indoors!
    Writing feeds my soul. Now if I could just convince my soul to grumble like my tummy does when I’m hungry!

    Reply
  46. Louisa–
    writing takes a high level of mental operation, and Real Jobs just suck out the creative energy. If you’re a morning person, you might be able to get up an hour early and get some writing done when you’re fresh. Since I am NOT a morning person, I have no idea is this works, but some writers swear by it. *g*

    Reply
  47. Louisa–
    writing takes a high level of mental operation, and Real Jobs just suck out the creative energy. If you’re a morning person, you might be able to get up an hour early and get some writing done when you’re fresh. Since I am NOT a morning person, I have no idea is this works, but some writers swear by it. *g*

    Reply
  48. Louisa–
    writing takes a high level of mental operation, and Real Jobs just suck out the creative energy. If you’re a morning person, you might be able to get up an hour early and get some writing done when you’re fresh. Since I am NOT a morning person, I have no idea is this works, but some writers swear by it. *g*

    Reply
  49. Louisa–
    writing takes a high level of mental operation, and Real Jobs just suck out the creative energy. If you’re a morning person, you might be able to get up an hour early and get some writing done when you’re fresh. Since I am NOT a morning person, I have no idea is this works, but some writers swear by it. *g*

    Reply
  50. Louisa–
    writing takes a high level of mental operation, and Real Jobs just suck out the creative energy. If you’re a morning person, you might be able to get up an hour early and get some writing done when you’re fresh. Since I am NOT a morning person, I have no idea is this works, but some writers swear by it. *g*

    Reply
  51. I am NOT a morning person either. Which is not good when one considers I have to be at work at 7:00 AM !!
    When I was singing my routine was sheer perfection. Get up around 10 or 11, have brunch, go to the opera house for a bit of rehearsal, a walk through. Go back to the hotel, eat a little something no later than five. Get to the opera house around 6. Hair, makeup and costume. (Nap in the makeup chair.) Perform 8 to Midnight or later. Go out to a late supper. Go back to the hotel and go to bed around 3 AM and start all over again. Sigh. Those were the days.

    Reply
  52. I am NOT a morning person either. Which is not good when one considers I have to be at work at 7:00 AM !!
    When I was singing my routine was sheer perfection. Get up around 10 or 11, have brunch, go to the opera house for a bit of rehearsal, a walk through. Go back to the hotel, eat a little something no later than five. Get to the opera house around 6. Hair, makeup and costume. (Nap in the makeup chair.) Perform 8 to Midnight or later. Go out to a late supper. Go back to the hotel and go to bed around 3 AM and start all over again. Sigh. Those were the days.

    Reply
  53. I am NOT a morning person either. Which is not good when one considers I have to be at work at 7:00 AM !!
    When I was singing my routine was sheer perfection. Get up around 10 or 11, have brunch, go to the opera house for a bit of rehearsal, a walk through. Go back to the hotel, eat a little something no later than five. Get to the opera house around 6. Hair, makeup and costume. (Nap in the makeup chair.) Perform 8 to Midnight or later. Go out to a late supper. Go back to the hotel and go to bed around 3 AM and start all over again. Sigh. Those were the days.

    Reply
  54. I am NOT a morning person either. Which is not good when one considers I have to be at work at 7:00 AM !!
    When I was singing my routine was sheer perfection. Get up around 10 or 11, have brunch, go to the opera house for a bit of rehearsal, a walk through. Go back to the hotel, eat a little something no later than five. Get to the opera house around 6. Hair, makeup and costume. (Nap in the makeup chair.) Perform 8 to Midnight or later. Go out to a late supper. Go back to the hotel and go to bed around 3 AM and start all over again. Sigh. Those were the days.

    Reply
  55. I am NOT a morning person either. Which is not good when one considers I have to be at work at 7:00 AM !!
    When I was singing my routine was sheer perfection. Get up around 10 or 11, have brunch, go to the opera house for a bit of rehearsal, a walk through. Go back to the hotel, eat a little something no later than five. Get to the opera house around 6. Hair, makeup and costume. (Nap in the makeup chair.) Perform 8 to Midnight or later. Go out to a late supper. Go back to the hotel and go to bed around 3 AM and start all over again. Sigh. Those were the days.

    Reply
  56. Fabulous post, Mary Jo. I battle with procrastination too, especially since I became a writer. I catch myself thinking, So I didn’t do my pages today — I’ll do twice as many tomorrow. Fatal!
    The trouble is, sometimes my procrastination is creative — I’m putting off writing a scene because there’s something wrong, and I haven’t worked it out yet. But sometimes it’s just time-wasting.
    I’ve never been good at keeping a routine – I think having a routine is a really good prevention tool for the dangers of procrastination.
    When I was in full time (and more) paid work, I used to do my writing at the end of the day. But all day in the back of my mind, I had the scene in mind that I was going to work on, so when it came to 10 pm or whenever I could get to my writing, the words would just fly.
    Then again, in those days my writing only mattered to me, and I was just having fun. Nowadays the stakes are higher.

    Reply
  57. Fabulous post, Mary Jo. I battle with procrastination too, especially since I became a writer. I catch myself thinking, So I didn’t do my pages today — I’ll do twice as many tomorrow. Fatal!
    The trouble is, sometimes my procrastination is creative — I’m putting off writing a scene because there’s something wrong, and I haven’t worked it out yet. But sometimes it’s just time-wasting.
    I’ve never been good at keeping a routine – I think having a routine is a really good prevention tool for the dangers of procrastination.
    When I was in full time (and more) paid work, I used to do my writing at the end of the day. But all day in the back of my mind, I had the scene in mind that I was going to work on, so when it came to 10 pm or whenever I could get to my writing, the words would just fly.
    Then again, in those days my writing only mattered to me, and I was just having fun. Nowadays the stakes are higher.

    Reply
  58. Fabulous post, Mary Jo. I battle with procrastination too, especially since I became a writer. I catch myself thinking, So I didn’t do my pages today — I’ll do twice as many tomorrow. Fatal!
    The trouble is, sometimes my procrastination is creative — I’m putting off writing a scene because there’s something wrong, and I haven’t worked it out yet. But sometimes it’s just time-wasting.
    I’ve never been good at keeping a routine – I think having a routine is a really good prevention tool for the dangers of procrastination.
    When I was in full time (and more) paid work, I used to do my writing at the end of the day. But all day in the back of my mind, I had the scene in mind that I was going to work on, so when it came to 10 pm or whenever I could get to my writing, the words would just fly.
    Then again, in those days my writing only mattered to me, and I was just having fun. Nowadays the stakes are higher.

    Reply
  59. Fabulous post, Mary Jo. I battle with procrastination too, especially since I became a writer. I catch myself thinking, So I didn’t do my pages today — I’ll do twice as many tomorrow. Fatal!
    The trouble is, sometimes my procrastination is creative — I’m putting off writing a scene because there’s something wrong, and I haven’t worked it out yet. But sometimes it’s just time-wasting.
    I’ve never been good at keeping a routine – I think having a routine is a really good prevention tool for the dangers of procrastination.
    When I was in full time (and more) paid work, I used to do my writing at the end of the day. But all day in the back of my mind, I had the scene in mind that I was going to work on, so when it came to 10 pm or whenever I could get to my writing, the words would just fly.
    Then again, in those days my writing only mattered to me, and I was just having fun. Nowadays the stakes are higher.

    Reply
  60. Fabulous post, Mary Jo. I battle with procrastination too, especially since I became a writer. I catch myself thinking, So I didn’t do my pages today — I’ll do twice as many tomorrow. Fatal!
    The trouble is, sometimes my procrastination is creative — I’m putting off writing a scene because there’s something wrong, and I haven’t worked it out yet. But sometimes it’s just time-wasting.
    I’ve never been good at keeping a routine – I think having a routine is a really good prevention tool for the dangers of procrastination.
    When I was in full time (and more) paid work, I used to do my writing at the end of the day. But all day in the back of my mind, I had the scene in mind that I was going to work on, so when it came to 10 pm or whenever I could get to my writing, the words would just fly.
    Then again, in those days my writing only mattered to me, and I was just having fun. Nowadays the stakes are higher.

    Reply
  61. So interesting, Mary Jo.
    I mostly solved the internet thing by writing on a computer that’s not connected to it. I kept the internet out of my writing room entirely for a long time.
    Now I do keep my laptop beside me for research. (Really and truly, but we do know how a research wander can suck away a few hours.)It’s a Mac, and I don’t like Macmail, so I’m never tempted to check e-mail on it. It also doesn’t have Spider solitaire!
    If anyone here has e-mail set to ping and/or do the “You’ve got mail” thing, kill that feature now.
    Jo, who procrastinates in all kinds of other ways. 🙂

    Reply
  62. So interesting, Mary Jo.
    I mostly solved the internet thing by writing on a computer that’s not connected to it. I kept the internet out of my writing room entirely for a long time.
    Now I do keep my laptop beside me for research. (Really and truly, but we do know how a research wander can suck away a few hours.)It’s a Mac, and I don’t like Macmail, so I’m never tempted to check e-mail on it. It also doesn’t have Spider solitaire!
    If anyone here has e-mail set to ping and/or do the “You’ve got mail” thing, kill that feature now.
    Jo, who procrastinates in all kinds of other ways. 🙂

    Reply
  63. So interesting, Mary Jo.
    I mostly solved the internet thing by writing on a computer that’s not connected to it. I kept the internet out of my writing room entirely for a long time.
    Now I do keep my laptop beside me for research. (Really and truly, but we do know how a research wander can suck away a few hours.)It’s a Mac, and I don’t like Macmail, so I’m never tempted to check e-mail on it. It also doesn’t have Spider solitaire!
    If anyone here has e-mail set to ping and/or do the “You’ve got mail” thing, kill that feature now.
    Jo, who procrastinates in all kinds of other ways. 🙂

    Reply
  64. So interesting, Mary Jo.
    I mostly solved the internet thing by writing on a computer that’s not connected to it. I kept the internet out of my writing room entirely for a long time.
    Now I do keep my laptop beside me for research. (Really and truly, but we do know how a research wander can suck away a few hours.)It’s a Mac, and I don’t like Macmail, so I’m never tempted to check e-mail on it. It also doesn’t have Spider solitaire!
    If anyone here has e-mail set to ping and/or do the “You’ve got mail” thing, kill that feature now.
    Jo, who procrastinates in all kinds of other ways. 🙂

    Reply
  65. So interesting, Mary Jo.
    I mostly solved the internet thing by writing on a computer that’s not connected to it. I kept the internet out of my writing room entirely for a long time.
    Now I do keep my laptop beside me for research. (Really and truly, but we do know how a research wander can suck away a few hours.)It’s a Mac, and I don’t like Macmail, so I’m never tempted to check e-mail on it. It also doesn’t have Spider solitaire!
    If anyone here has e-mail set to ping and/or do the “You’ve got mail” thing, kill that feature now.
    Jo, who procrastinates in all kinds of other ways. 🙂

    Reply
  66. Great post, Mary Jo.
    I’ve been touting the wonderfulness of MacFreedom, now simply Freedom, for over a year. I’m the kind that jumps on the internet to research a single point and falls down the rabbit hole, only to wake up in Wonderland two hours later.
    With Freedom on, I can’t do that, so I’m forced to use a placeholder to mark missing facts. I’ve started using TK, for To Come. Then I simple move on and do my research later and replace all those TKs with correct data (Here’s an article on how them make it stand out even more so you don’t miss any instances: http://bit.ly/cfTy6w )
    It’s done wonders for my production.

    Reply
  67. Great post, Mary Jo.
    I’ve been touting the wonderfulness of MacFreedom, now simply Freedom, for over a year. I’m the kind that jumps on the internet to research a single point and falls down the rabbit hole, only to wake up in Wonderland two hours later.
    With Freedom on, I can’t do that, so I’m forced to use a placeholder to mark missing facts. I’ve started using TK, for To Come. Then I simple move on and do my research later and replace all those TKs with correct data (Here’s an article on how them make it stand out even more so you don’t miss any instances: http://bit.ly/cfTy6w )
    It’s done wonders for my production.

    Reply
  68. Great post, Mary Jo.
    I’ve been touting the wonderfulness of MacFreedom, now simply Freedom, for over a year. I’m the kind that jumps on the internet to research a single point and falls down the rabbit hole, only to wake up in Wonderland two hours later.
    With Freedom on, I can’t do that, so I’m forced to use a placeholder to mark missing facts. I’ve started using TK, for To Come. Then I simple move on and do my research later and replace all those TKs with correct data (Here’s an article on how them make it stand out even more so you don’t miss any instances: http://bit.ly/cfTy6w )
    It’s done wonders for my production.

    Reply
  69. Great post, Mary Jo.
    I’ve been touting the wonderfulness of MacFreedom, now simply Freedom, for over a year. I’m the kind that jumps on the internet to research a single point and falls down the rabbit hole, only to wake up in Wonderland two hours later.
    With Freedom on, I can’t do that, so I’m forced to use a placeholder to mark missing facts. I’ve started using TK, for To Come. Then I simple move on and do my research later and replace all those TKs with correct data (Here’s an article on how them make it stand out even more so you don’t miss any instances: http://bit.ly/cfTy6w )
    It’s done wonders for my production.

    Reply
  70. Great post, Mary Jo.
    I’ve been touting the wonderfulness of MacFreedom, now simply Freedom, for over a year. I’m the kind that jumps on the internet to research a single point and falls down the rabbit hole, only to wake up in Wonderland two hours later.
    With Freedom on, I can’t do that, so I’m forced to use a placeholder to mark missing facts. I’ve started using TK, for To Come. Then I simple move on and do my research later and replace all those TKs with correct data (Here’s an article on how them make it stand out even more so you don’t miss any instances: http://bit.ly/cfTy6w )
    It’s done wonders for my production.

    Reply
  71. LOL! The problem for is not so much that procrastination is stealing my time, but that I hand the stuff over in whacking great wads!
    I deal with the internet distraction by disconnecting the laptop from the docking station and modem to work on the dining table. If my sock drawer starts to look inviting I actually leave the house for the local library and work there.
    The problem is that there are various legitimate activities that I have to slot into the day, such as training our new puppy and hanging out the occasional load of washing. A break from staring at a computer screen is probably good for my eyes …

    Reply
  72. LOL! The problem for is not so much that procrastination is stealing my time, but that I hand the stuff over in whacking great wads!
    I deal with the internet distraction by disconnecting the laptop from the docking station and modem to work on the dining table. If my sock drawer starts to look inviting I actually leave the house for the local library and work there.
    The problem is that there are various legitimate activities that I have to slot into the day, such as training our new puppy and hanging out the occasional load of washing. A break from staring at a computer screen is probably good for my eyes …

    Reply
  73. LOL! The problem for is not so much that procrastination is stealing my time, but that I hand the stuff over in whacking great wads!
    I deal with the internet distraction by disconnecting the laptop from the docking station and modem to work on the dining table. If my sock drawer starts to look inviting I actually leave the house for the local library and work there.
    The problem is that there are various legitimate activities that I have to slot into the day, such as training our new puppy and hanging out the occasional load of washing. A break from staring at a computer screen is probably good for my eyes …

    Reply
  74. LOL! The problem for is not so much that procrastination is stealing my time, but that I hand the stuff over in whacking great wads!
    I deal with the internet distraction by disconnecting the laptop from the docking station and modem to work on the dining table. If my sock drawer starts to look inviting I actually leave the house for the local library and work there.
    The problem is that there are various legitimate activities that I have to slot into the day, such as training our new puppy and hanging out the occasional load of washing. A break from staring at a computer screen is probably good for my eyes …

    Reply
  75. LOL! The problem for is not so much that procrastination is stealing my time, but that I hand the stuff over in whacking great wads!
    I deal with the internet distraction by disconnecting the laptop from the docking station and modem to work on the dining table. If my sock drawer starts to look inviting I actually leave the house for the local library and work there.
    The problem is that there are various legitimate activities that I have to slot into the day, such as training our new puppy and hanging out the occasional load of washing. A break from staring at a computer screen is probably good for my eyes …

    Reply
  76. Keziah–I’m not really into that delayed gratification thing, either. *g*
    Jo–I’ve known all along how wise you are to separate your writing computer from your internet computer, but I lack sufficient will to do it. Plus, it would make it harder to move research to the writing computer. Or so I tell myself. *g* The Freedom software sure is handy for those of us with weak will!
    Lisa, thanks for the extra tip to use with the Freedom software!
    Elizabeth–it sounds like you’ve come up with some good coping mechanisms. I do find the writing breaks are good for household tasks that need doing.
    I must admit that my sock drawer has never benefited from my distraction. There are so many other ways to waste time…

    Reply
  77. Keziah–I’m not really into that delayed gratification thing, either. *g*
    Jo–I’ve known all along how wise you are to separate your writing computer from your internet computer, but I lack sufficient will to do it. Plus, it would make it harder to move research to the writing computer. Or so I tell myself. *g* The Freedom software sure is handy for those of us with weak will!
    Lisa, thanks for the extra tip to use with the Freedom software!
    Elizabeth–it sounds like you’ve come up with some good coping mechanisms. I do find the writing breaks are good for household tasks that need doing.
    I must admit that my sock drawer has never benefited from my distraction. There are so many other ways to waste time…

    Reply
  78. Keziah–I’m not really into that delayed gratification thing, either. *g*
    Jo–I’ve known all along how wise you are to separate your writing computer from your internet computer, but I lack sufficient will to do it. Plus, it would make it harder to move research to the writing computer. Or so I tell myself. *g* The Freedom software sure is handy for those of us with weak will!
    Lisa, thanks for the extra tip to use with the Freedom software!
    Elizabeth–it sounds like you’ve come up with some good coping mechanisms. I do find the writing breaks are good for household tasks that need doing.
    I must admit that my sock drawer has never benefited from my distraction. There are so many other ways to waste time…

    Reply
  79. Keziah–I’m not really into that delayed gratification thing, either. *g*
    Jo–I’ve known all along how wise you are to separate your writing computer from your internet computer, but I lack sufficient will to do it. Plus, it would make it harder to move research to the writing computer. Or so I tell myself. *g* The Freedom software sure is handy for those of us with weak will!
    Lisa, thanks for the extra tip to use with the Freedom software!
    Elizabeth–it sounds like you’ve come up with some good coping mechanisms. I do find the writing breaks are good for household tasks that need doing.
    I must admit that my sock drawer has never benefited from my distraction. There are so many other ways to waste time…

    Reply
  80. Keziah–I’m not really into that delayed gratification thing, either. *g*
    Jo–I’ve known all along how wise you are to separate your writing computer from your internet computer, but I lack sufficient will to do it. Plus, it would make it harder to move research to the writing computer. Or so I tell myself. *g* The Freedom software sure is handy for those of us with weak will!
    Lisa, thanks for the extra tip to use with the Freedom software!
    Elizabeth–it sounds like you’ve come up with some good coping mechanisms. I do find the writing breaks are good for household tasks that need doing.
    I must admit that my sock drawer has never benefited from my distraction. There are so many other ways to waste time…

    Reply
  81. Another thing that I find helps is that I tend to draft long hand quite a bit. For some reason the words flow better that way and when I come to the computer to type it up I’m more fully focused and less easily distracted. Messes up the word count thing, but I edit as I type the rough draft and it is now part of my process.
    Right now I’m on a research week between books and reading on the back porch. Bliss.
    The worst time of year for distraction is the summer fire danger season when I have to keep the radio on loudly in case of bush fire warnings.

    Reply
  82. Another thing that I find helps is that I tend to draft long hand quite a bit. For some reason the words flow better that way and when I come to the computer to type it up I’m more fully focused and less easily distracted. Messes up the word count thing, but I edit as I type the rough draft and it is now part of my process.
    Right now I’m on a research week between books and reading on the back porch. Bliss.
    The worst time of year for distraction is the summer fire danger season when I have to keep the radio on loudly in case of bush fire warnings.

    Reply
  83. Another thing that I find helps is that I tend to draft long hand quite a bit. For some reason the words flow better that way and when I come to the computer to type it up I’m more fully focused and less easily distracted. Messes up the word count thing, but I edit as I type the rough draft and it is now part of my process.
    Right now I’m on a research week between books and reading on the back porch. Bliss.
    The worst time of year for distraction is the summer fire danger season when I have to keep the radio on loudly in case of bush fire warnings.

    Reply
  84. Another thing that I find helps is that I tend to draft long hand quite a bit. For some reason the words flow better that way and when I come to the computer to type it up I’m more fully focused and less easily distracted. Messes up the word count thing, but I edit as I type the rough draft and it is now part of my process.
    Right now I’m on a research week between books and reading on the back porch. Bliss.
    The worst time of year for distraction is the summer fire danger season when I have to keep the radio on loudly in case of bush fire warnings.

    Reply
  85. Another thing that I find helps is that I tend to draft long hand quite a bit. For some reason the words flow better that way and when I come to the computer to type it up I’m more fully focused and less easily distracted. Messes up the word count thing, but I edit as I type the rough draft and it is now part of my process.
    Right now I’m on a research week between books and reading on the back porch. Bliss.
    The worst time of year for distraction is the summer fire danger season when I have to keep the radio on loudly in case of bush fire warnings.

    Reply
  86. Theo–It really is to resist making procrastination jokes with this topic. *g*
    Elizabeth, you’re far from the only writer I know who drafts in long hand. Whatever makes the Muse happy!
    I also like working on the screened porch when the weather cooperates, but it’s the wrong season for that in my section of the Northern Hemisphere. *g*

    Reply
  87. Theo–It really is to resist making procrastination jokes with this topic. *g*
    Elizabeth, you’re far from the only writer I know who drafts in long hand. Whatever makes the Muse happy!
    I also like working on the screened porch when the weather cooperates, but it’s the wrong season for that in my section of the Northern Hemisphere. *g*

    Reply
  88. Theo–It really is to resist making procrastination jokes with this topic. *g*
    Elizabeth, you’re far from the only writer I know who drafts in long hand. Whatever makes the Muse happy!
    I also like working on the screened porch when the weather cooperates, but it’s the wrong season for that in my section of the Northern Hemisphere. *g*

    Reply
  89. Theo–It really is to resist making procrastination jokes with this topic. *g*
    Elizabeth, you’re far from the only writer I know who drafts in long hand. Whatever makes the Muse happy!
    I also like working on the screened porch when the weather cooperates, but it’s the wrong season for that in my section of the Northern Hemisphere. *g*

    Reply
  90. Theo–It really is to resist making procrastination jokes with this topic. *g*
    Elizabeth, you’re far from the only writer I know who drafts in long hand. Whatever makes the Muse happy!
    I also like working on the screened porch when the weather cooperates, but it’s the wrong season for that in my section of the Northern Hemisphere. *g*

    Reply
  91. **Does reading blogs count as procrastination or work? Hmmmm.**
    It’s both. *g* Though if there is educational value or a topic related to Real Work, it’s easier to pretend it’s not procrastination. *g*

    Reply
  92. **Does reading blogs count as procrastination or work? Hmmmm.**
    It’s both. *g* Though if there is educational value or a topic related to Real Work, it’s easier to pretend it’s not procrastination. *g*

    Reply
  93. **Does reading blogs count as procrastination or work? Hmmmm.**
    It’s both. *g* Though if there is educational value or a topic related to Real Work, it’s easier to pretend it’s not procrastination. *g*

    Reply
  94. **Does reading blogs count as procrastination or work? Hmmmm.**
    It’s both. *g* Though if there is educational value or a topic related to Real Work, it’s easier to pretend it’s not procrastination. *g*

    Reply
  95. **Does reading blogs count as procrastination or work? Hmmmm.**
    It’s both. *g* Though if there is educational value or a topic related to Real Work, it’s easier to pretend it’s not procrastination. *g*

    Reply
  96. -sorry, I’ll be short:I’m Italian and my English is very bad… and tiring!-
    ehm… I’m a procrastination heroine! ^.^
    I’m very untidy, but when I have something unpleasant to do, I start tiding the bedroom, then the bathroom, then I’m tired so I’ll take a bath, then I remenber that I absolutely have to do some shopping… then it’s already time to cook the dinner, and then… and now it’s 2 years that my thesis is almost FROZEN! sigh! 🙁

    Reply
  97. -sorry, I’ll be short:I’m Italian and my English is very bad… and tiring!-
    ehm… I’m a procrastination heroine! ^.^
    I’m very untidy, but when I have something unpleasant to do, I start tiding the bedroom, then the bathroom, then I’m tired so I’ll take a bath, then I remenber that I absolutely have to do some shopping… then it’s already time to cook the dinner, and then… and now it’s 2 years that my thesis is almost FROZEN! sigh! 🙁

    Reply
  98. -sorry, I’ll be short:I’m Italian and my English is very bad… and tiring!-
    ehm… I’m a procrastination heroine! ^.^
    I’m very untidy, but when I have something unpleasant to do, I start tiding the bedroom, then the bathroom, then I’m tired so I’ll take a bath, then I remenber that I absolutely have to do some shopping… then it’s already time to cook the dinner, and then… and now it’s 2 years that my thesis is almost FROZEN! sigh! 🙁

    Reply
  99. -sorry, I’ll be short:I’m Italian and my English is very bad… and tiring!-
    ehm… I’m a procrastination heroine! ^.^
    I’m very untidy, but when I have something unpleasant to do, I start tiding the bedroom, then the bathroom, then I’m tired so I’ll take a bath, then I remenber that I absolutely have to do some shopping… then it’s already time to cook the dinner, and then… and now it’s 2 years that my thesis is almost FROZEN! sigh! 🙁

    Reply
  100. -sorry, I’ll be short:I’m Italian and my English is very bad… and tiring!-
    ehm… I’m a procrastination heroine! ^.^
    I’m very untidy, but when I have something unpleasant to do, I start tiding the bedroom, then the bathroom, then I’m tired so I’ll take a bath, then I remenber that I absolutely have to do some shopping… then it’s already time to cook the dinner, and then… and now it’s 2 years that my thesis is almost FROZEN! sigh! 🙁

    Reply
  101. Gio–
    Your English is very good–I recognized myself immediately! Can you work on your thesis in the morning, for maybe just a few minutes every day? THEN you can clean house.
    There are different ways of dealing with procrastination. Good luck with the thesis!

    Reply
  102. Gio–
    Your English is very good–I recognized myself immediately! Can you work on your thesis in the morning, for maybe just a few minutes every day? THEN you can clean house.
    There are different ways of dealing with procrastination. Good luck with the thesis!

    Reply
  103. Gio–
    Your English is very good–I recognized myself immediately! Can you work on your thesis in the morning, for maybe just a few minutes every day? THEN you can clean house.
    There are different ways of dealing with procrastination. Good luck with the thesis!

    Reply
  104. Gio–
    Your English is very good–I recognized myself immediately! Can you work on your thesis in the morning, for maybe just a few minutes every day? THEN you can clean house.
    There are different ways of dealing with procrastination. Good luck with the thesis!

    Reply
  105. Gio–
    Your English is very good–I recognized myself immediately! Can you work on your thesis in the morning, for maybe just a few minutes every day? THEN you can clean house.
    There are different ways of dealing with procrastination. Good luck with the thesis!

    Reply
  106. Thank you Mary Jo! 😀
    I actually don’t have a lot of free time (I’m working in a museum) so I always think something like “Well, I have two hours: I MUST work at my thesis BUT I can’t leave the house in this terrible state… what if someone come in? What if this someone is the mother of my boyfriend? There’s an emergency! I’ll work at the thesis later… when the emergency will be over!” 😉
    It’s quite a good method to delay almost forever, because there’s always something more urgent than what I don’t want to do! 😀
    But this is my new year good intention: STOP procrastinating and START working again… I’ll let you know! 😉
    thank you again!

    Reply
  107. Thank you Mary Jo! 😀
    I actually don’t have a lot of free time (I’m working in a museum) so I always think something like “Well, I have two hours: I MUST work at my thesis BUT I can’t leave the house in this terrible state… what if someone come in? What if this someone is the mother of my boyfriend? There’s an emergency! I’ll work at the thesis later… when the emergency will be over!” 😉
    It’s quite a good method to delay almost forever, because there’s always something more urgent than what I don’t want to do! 😀
    But this is my new year good intention: STOP procrastinating and START working again… I’ll let you know! 😉
    thank you again!

    Reply
  108. Thank you Mary Jo! 😀
    I actually don’t have a lot of free time (I’m working in a museum) so I always think something like “Well, I have two hours: I MUST work at my thesis BUT I can’t leave the house in this terrible state… what if someone come in? What if this someone is the mother of my boyfriend? There’s an emergency! I’ll work at the thesis later… when the emergency will be over!” 😉
    It’s quite a good method to delay almost forever, because there’s always something more urgent than what I don’t want to do! 😀
    But this is my new year good intention: STOP procrastinating and START working again… I’ll let you know! 😉
    thank you again!

    Reply
  109. Thank you Mary Jo! 😀
    I actually don’t have a lot of free time (I’m working in a museum) so I always think something like “Well, I have two hours: I MUST work at my thesis BUT I can’t leave the house in this terrible state… what if someone come in? What if this someone is the mother of my boyfriend? There’s an emergency! I’ll work at the thesis later… when the emergency will be over!” 😉
    It’s quite a good method to delay almost forever, because there’s always something more urgent than what I don’t want to do! 😀
    But this is my new year good intention: STOP procrastinating and START working again… I’ll let you know! 😉
    thank you again!

    Reply
  110. Thank you Mary Jo! 😀
    I actually don’t have a lot of free time (I’m working in a museum) so I always think something like “Well, I have two hours: I MUST work at my thesis BUT I can’t leave the house in this terrible state… what if someone come in? What if this someone is the mother of my boyfriend? There’s an emergency! I’ll work at the thesis later… when the emergency will be over!” 😉
    It’s quite a good method to delay almost forever, because there’s always something more urgent than what I don’t want to do! 😀
    But this is my new year good intention: STOP procrastinating and START working again… I’ll let you know! 😉
    thank you again!

    Reply

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