Pretty, Pretty Porcelain

Demonstration of the translucent quality of porcelainJoanna here, talking about porcelain,
as in what you make dishes of,
(also electrical insulators, scientific crucibles, and toilets, though these predate our historical characters by a good bit and are thus of less immediate interest than they might otherwise be.)

Porcelain is arguably the luxury product of the Georgian and Regency eras. All those fancy dinner parties …? Porcelain is what they were eating off of.

Maria_Martinez_pot 1945

Ildefonso pot. Maria Martinez c 1945. Hand built, fired in the earth.

Now, pottery has been with us since the first cavewoman patted out a crude bowl from river clay and set it to dry in the sun, or buried that bowl in a pit and built a fire on top of it.
As one does.

These pit-fired ceramics are not mere stepping stones in the history of pottery. People all over the world still make and use exactly this technique.

Kiln-fired ceramics  (We will get to porcelain. Be patient. I want to talk about beer first.)  have been around for 8000 years. That earliest-so-far kiln was found at Yarim Tepe in Iraq.
The earliest chemically confirmed barley beer dates to between 5400 and 5000 years ago. Fragments of a jug containing a by-product of the brewing process were discovered at Godin Tepe in the Zagros Mountains of Iran.

So high quality pots to drink beer out of are considerably older than beer. This tells us much about the human condition.

Chinese_vessel_Han _earthenware

The Chinese made lovely pottery before porcelain. Here's earthenware from the Han dynasty, 206 BCE–220 CE

So. What exactly is porcelain?

Porcelain is made from kaolin clay, which is not found just everywhere, and a varying bunch of add-ins. It's fired at very high temperatures — 1200° to 1400°C (2200° to 2600°F.)
This sort of clay is capable of detailed modeling and thin form. It becomes a hard, white, glossy and uniquely translucent pottery. See that picture way up top with the sun shining through a plate? That's porcelain doing its thing.
It's surprisingly durable. It takes color well.
It's really lovely.

The word "kaolin" derives from "Gaoling", literally "High Ridge", a village in Jiangxi Province in China.
(Do you need to know kaolin clay is the main ingredient of kaopectate? No? I didn't think so.)

The European word "porcelain" is even more fun. It comes from the Italian word "porcella," the name of a sort of smooth white cowrie shell. Porcella-the-shell, in turn, means "little pig" or "female pig genitalia," the Italians having a robust, earthy turn of humor when it comes to naming their cowrie shells.
The first mention of the word porcelain is in Marco Polo.
Etymologists have all the fun. 

The Fonthill vase is the earliest Chinese porcelain object to have reached Europe. It was a Chinese gift for Louis the Great of Hungary in 1338.

Earliest Chinese porcelain to reach Europe. A Chinese gift to Louis of Hungary 1338.jpg

The Chinese made splendid ceramics all along. See that pot above and to the left. That's old, old earthenware, influenced by contemporary cast bronze forms. It has quite a presence. Just wonderful, isn't it?

The Chinese invented porcelain (and spaghetti and many other wonderful things including fireworks.) They kinda revolutionized the whole pottery business.

True, they putzed about for centuries, making close-to-porcelain and this-is-almost-as-good-as-porcelain products which had their own charm.
Then in the ninth century CE, they broke the code on true porcelain and nothing would ever be the same.

The Ming dynasty (1368–1644) controlled a wide-flung porcelain trade that expanded across the Islamic kingdoms to Africa via the Silk Road. Finished pieces, (but not the secret of how to make them,) traveled great distances. And both the art work and the technology of making porcelain spread to Korea and, in 1600, to Japan.

In the fullness of time, by which I mean late Fourteenth Century, Europe saw and Europe wanted. They were late getting into the export-porcelain-from-the-Far-East game, but enthusiastic.
Portuguese merchants began direct trade by sea In 1517, followed by the Dutch in 1598.
Japan became an exporter to the West after 1600.
Porcelain became one of the great luxuries of the European rich.

I look at the best of what might have been acquired by traders and brought to Georgian or Regency England for rich patrons. The balanced, sophisticated beauty of these pieces must have had a stunning impact. 

Ming_whitelueflask brit mus 1426-1432

Ming flask, British Museum 1426-1432.jpg

 

Wine ewer and basin c11

Wine jug and basin C11

 

 

Jiangxi Province; Ming period (1368–1644)  early 15th century (probably Yongle era  1403–1424) Porcelain with incised design under glaze (Jingdezhen ware).

Jiangxi Province; Ming, early C15

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Before 1700, the Chinese porcelain sent to Europe was mostly white or blue-and-white ware like this.

That early blue-and-white export ware was the inspiration for Delft Ware. The popular modern blue onion pattern from Meissen derives from this too.

Blue_onion_pattern- meissen abt 1900

Meissen Onion Pattern c. 1900

Then, after about 1700, color arrived.
Bang.
And what color! The clear white gloss of porcelain takes to overglaze enamel like cake to icing.

 

These below are Japanese examples because pretty. 

Edo 1670 to 1690 Porcelain with overglaze polychrome enamels export ware

Japanese porcelain. Geisha. Edo Period.1670 to 1690. Export ware

 

Incense box in shape of dog Japan 1840

incense box in shape of dog Japan 1840

 

Kakiemon-style bowl with pomegranate and peony design  Arita  Japan  1690-1720. Museum no. C.293-1910  © Victoria and Albert Museum  London.

Kakiemon-style bowl pomegranate and peony, Arita, Japan, 1690-1720 V&A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A writer of Georgian and Regency works can use this. The rich male protagonist, (perhaps a Duke,) can very reasonably own or trade in or steal and hold for ransom these beautiful objects and wouldn't they be lovely to describe?

Okay. Europe, having been teased with these exquisite objects, longed to make their own. Cheaper.
The merchants of the Far East sold plates and flagons and vases but not the secrets of how they were made.
Europeans gamely experimented, with limited success.

Then, in 1712, a French Jesuit in China blew the gaff. He witnessed the technical secrets of porcelain making and published to the world. Doubtless an early exponent of the "Information Wants to be Free" philosophy.

Europe embarked upon porcelain.

 

Bowl  Meissen porcelain factory  1729-1731. Museum no. 7327-1860  © Victoria and Albert Museum  London. Given by Queen Victoria.

Meissen, 1729-1731. V&A. If this looks familiar, glance above.jpg
Candelabrum meissen 1736 dallas museum of art

Candelabrum Meissen 1736 Dallas MOA. I find this disturbing
Sevres-bowl-1773

Sevres 1773.

 

 

 

 

 

Lioness Meissen 1732 porcelain

Lioness Meissen 1732. Rather a worried-looking lioness

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And below … I've seen examples of these fruits and vegetables in museums. Some are true trompe l'oeil. Some are just for fun. (I mention these in one of my books.)

 

Meissen porcelaindish three attached lemon boxrs c 1760

Meissen dish w three attached lemon boxes c 1760.jpg
MEISSEN PORCELAIN LETTUCE TUREEN

Meissen Lettuce Tureen
Meissen_vegetable_porcelain_(18-19_c. _Gatchina)_04_by_shakko

Meissen C18-C19 photocred shakko.jpg
Worcester Porcelain Cauliflower Tureen c1760

Worcester Cauliflower Tureen c1760.JPG

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I make pottery … somewhat badly. (She says, defiant.)
Never tried porcelain. It's an exacting technique.
I'm very fond of what I make, even though I see all the defects.
That's my own pottery story.

 

What about you … do you have a piece of pottery or porcelain that means something to you? A box you keep on your dresser to hold rings? A vase where the fish swallows the flowers and it is so hokey and it belonged to your grandmother?

165 thoughts on “Pretty, Pretty Porcelain”

  1. Lovely, Jo, especially the bit about how porcelain got its name. *G* I love ceramics, but go more for stoneware than porcelain, being more peasant than aristocrat. Coffee mugs. Tableware. Vases. A collection of little animal figures. I love them all!

    Reply
  2. Lovely, Jo, especially the bit about how porcelain got its name. *G* I love ceramics, but go more for stoneware than porcelain, being more peasant than aristocrat. Coffee mugs. Tableware. Vases. A collection of little animal figures. I love them all!

    Reply
  3. Lovely, Jo, especially the bit about how porcelain got its name. *G* I love ceramics, but go more for stoneware than porcelain, being more peasant than aristocrat. Coffee mugs. Tableware. Vases. A collection of little animal figures. I love them all!

    Reply
  4. Lovely, Jo, especially the bit about how porcelain got its name. *G* I love ceramics, but go more for stoneware than porcelain, being more peasant than aristocrat. Coffee mugs. Tableware. Vases. A collection of little animal figures. I love them all!

    Reply
  5. Lovely, Jo, especially the bit about how porcelain got its name. *G* I love ceramics, but go more for stoneware than porcelain, being more peasant than aristocrat. Coffee mugs. Tableware. Vases. A collection of little animal figures. I love them all!

    Reply
  6. I’m trying to think if I possess much porcelain.
    I have a dinner service my mother used. Royal Doulton with flowers on it. I haven’t managed to pawn it off on anyone so it sits in a box and maybe some idiot thief will make off with it someday.
    But I have two or three pieces of BUNNYKINS and they are dear to my heart.

    Reply
  7. I’m trying to think if I possess much porcelain.
    I have a dinner service my mother used. Royal Doulton with flowers on it. I haven’t managed to pawn it off on anyone so it sits in a box and maybe some idiot thief will make off with it someday.
    But I have two or three pieces of BUNNYKINS and they are dear to my heart.

    Reply
  8. I’m trying to think if I possess much porcelain.
    I have a dinner service my mother used. Royal Doulton with flowers on it. I haven’t managed to pawn it off on anyone so it sits in a box and maybe some idiot thief will make off with it someday.
    But I have two or three pieces of BUNNYKINS and they are dear to my heart.

    Reply
  9. I’m trying to think if I possess much porcelain.
    I have a dinner service my mother used. Royal Doulton with flowers on it. I haven’t managed to pawn it off on anyone so it sits in a box and maybe some idiot thief will make off with it someday.
    But I have two or three pieces of BUNNYKINS and they are dear to my heart.

    Reply
  10. I’m trying to think if I possess much porcelain.
    I have a dinner service my mother used. Royal Doulton with flowers on it. I haven’t managed to pawn it off on anyone so it sits in a box and maybe some idiot thief will make off with it someday.
    But I have two or three pieces of BUNNYKINS and they are dear to my heart.

    Reply
  11. Evelyn, not only spaghetti, but (more to the point for Wench World) paper around 100 BC, woodblock printing, and even moveable type.
    Although porcelain is beautiful, my own collecting interest is crystal and glass paperweights. I’d like to see a column on glasswork here, but don’t put a glass paperweight in a Regency—the first ones appeared in the mid-1840s. (No, the Chinese didn’t invent them, it was the French.)

    Reply
  12. Evelyn, not only spaghetti, but (more to the point for Wench World) paper around 100 BC, woodblock printing, and even moveable type.
    Although porcelain is beautiful, my own collecting interest is crystal and glass paperweights. I’d like to see a column on glasswork here, but don’t put a glass paperweight in a Regency—the first ones appeared in the mid-1840s. (No, the Chinese didn’t invent them, it was the French.)

    Reply
  13. Evelyn, not only spaghetti, but (more to the point for Wench World) paper around 100 BC, woodblock printing, and even moveable type.
    Although porcelain is beautiful, my own collecting interest is crystal and glass paperweights. I’d like to see a column on glasswork here, but don’t put a glass paperweight in a Regency—the first ones appeared in the mid-1840s. (No, the Chinese didn’t invent them, it was the French.)

    Reply
  14. Evelyn, not only spaghetti, but (more to the point for Wench World) paper around 100 BC, woodblock printing, and even moveable type.
    Although porcelain is beautiful, my own collecting interest is crystal and glass paperweights. I’d like to see a column on glasswork here, but don’t put a glass paperweight in a Regency—the first ones appeared in the mid-1840s. (No, the Chinese didn’t invent them, it was the French.)

    Reply
  15. Evelyn, not only spaghetti, but (more to the point for Wench World) paper around 100 BC, woodblock printing, and even moveable type.
    Although porcelain is beautiful, my own collecting interest is crystal and glass paperweights. I’d like to see a column on glasswork here, but don’t put a glass paperweight in a Regency—the first ones appeared in the mid-1840s. (No, the Chinese didn’t invent them, it was the French.)

    Reply
  16. Joanna- What a delightful post! I love tchotchkes, especially boxes. Quite a few of my boxes are porcelain. I love the feel of them in my hands, the “snick” sound that lid makes when it goes back on the box. I also have several porcelain trinket boxes with “surprises” inside. And speaking of glass paperweights, as Mary M. did, above- not so long ago, I saw a program on PBS where the craftsperson was explaining – and showing – the host – the process of making millefiori objects. Beautiful and fascinating.

    Reply
  17. Joanna- What a delightful post! I love tchotchkes, especially boxes. Quite a few of my boxes are porcelain. I love the feel of them in my hands, the “snick” sound that lid makes when it goes back on the box. I also have several porcelain trinket boxes with “surprises” inside. And speaking of glass paperweights, as Mary M. did, above- not so long ago, I saw a program on PBS where the craftsperson was explaining – and showing – the host – the process of making millefiori objects. Beautiful and fascinating.

    Reply
  18. Joanna- What a delightful post! I love tchotchkes, especially boxes. Quite a few of my boxes are porcelain. I love the feel of them in my hands, the “snick” sound that lid makes when it goes back on the box. I also have several porcelain trinket boxes with “surprises” inside. And speaking of glass paperweights, as Mary M. did, above- not so long ago, I saw a program on PBS where the craftsperson was explaining – and showing – the host – the process of making millefiori objects. Beautiful and fascinating.

    Reply
  19. Joanna- What a delightful post! I love tchotchkes, especially boxes. Quite a few of my boxes are porcelain. I love the feel of them in my hands, the “snick” sound that lid makes when it goes back on the box. I also have several porcelain trinket boxes with “surprises” inside. And speaking of glass paperweights, as Mary M. did, above- not so long ago, I saw a program on PBS where the craftsperson was explaining – and showing – the host – the process of making millefiori objects. Beautiful and fascinating.

    Reply
  20. Joanna- What a delightful post! I love tchotchkes, especially boxes. Quite a few of my boxes are porcelain. I love the feel of them in my hands, the “snick” sound that lid makes when it goes back on the box. I also have several porcelain trinket boxes with “surprises” inside. And speaking of glass paperweights, as Mary M. did, above- not so long ago, I saw a program on PBS where the craftsperson was explaining – and showing – the host – the process of making millefiori objects. Beautiful and fascinating.

    Reply
  21. Fascinating post. I’m a sucker for all kinds of ceramics.
    It matters, I think, that things be beautiful. Many years ago, our plates were the ones you got for free from the supermarket with a purchase of a certain amount. They weren’t ugly, just kind of blah. I was so happy when we could afford to buy a set of dishes. I will swear that food tastes better when served on an attractive and appropriate dish. Tea in a delicate china cup, spaghetti in a brightly-painted pottery bowl, and milk in a glass that has survived since childhood.

    Reply
  22. Fascinating post. I’m a sucker for all kinds of ceramics.
    It matters, I think, that things be beautiful. Many years ago, our plates were the ones you got for free from the supermarket with a purchase of a certain amount. They weren’t ugly, just kind of blah. I was so happy when we could afford to buy a set of dishes. I will swear that food tastes better when served on an attractive and appropriate dish. Tea in a delicate china cup, spaghetti in a brightly-painted pottery bowl, and milk in a glass that has survived since childhood.

    Reply
  23. Fascinating post. I’m a sucker for all kinds of ceramics.
    It matters, I think, that things be beautiful. Many years ago, our plates were the ones you got for free from the supermarket with a purchase of a certain amount. They weren’t ugly, just kind of blah. I was so happy when we could afford to buy a set of dishes. I will swear that food tastes better when served on an attractive and appropriate dish. Tea in a delicate china cup, spaghetti in a brightly-painted pottery bowl, and milk in a glass that has survived since childhood.

    Reply
  24. Fascinating post. I’m a sucker for all kinds of ceramics.
    It matters, I think, that things be beautiful. Many years ago, our plates were the ones you got for free from the supermarket with a purchase of a certain amount. They weren’t ugly, just kind of blah. I was so happy when we could afford to buy a set of dishes. I will swear that food tastes better when served on an attractive and appropriate dish. Tea in a delicate china cup, spaghetti in a brightly-painted pottery bowl, and milk in a glass that has survived since childhood.

    Reply
  25. Fascinating post. I’m a sucker for all kinds of ceramics.
    It matters, I think, that things be beautiful. Many years ago, our plates were the ones you got for free from the supermarket with a purchase of a certain amount. They weren’t ugly, just kind of blah. I was so happy when we could afford to buy a set of dishes. I will swear that food tastes better when served on an attractive and appropriate dish. Tea in a delicate china cup, spaghetti in a brightly-painted pottery bowl, and milk in a glass that has survived since childhood.

    Reply
  26. I think everybody who can make fine white bread eventually makes some kinda noodle as well. So we all invented long skinny noodles at some point or another.
    But popular history credits Marco Polo for bringing the idea back to Italy. Who shall argue with popular history?

    Reply
  27. I think everybody who can make fine white bread eventually makes some kinda noodle as well. So we all invented long skinny noodles at some point or another.
    But popular history credits Marco Polo for bringing the idea back to Italy. Who shall argue with popular history?

    Reply
  28. I think everybody who can make fine white bread eventually makes some kinda noodle as well. So we all invented long skinny noodles at some point or another.
    But popular history credits Marco Polo for bringing the idea back to Italy. Who shall argue with popular history?

    Reply
  29. I think everybody who can make fine white bread eventually makes some kinda noodle as well. So we all invented long skinny noodles at some point or another.
    But popular history credits Marco Polo for bringing the idea back to Italy. Who shall argue with popular history?

    Reply
  30. I think everybody who can make fine white bread eventually makes some kinda noodle as well. So we all invented long skinny noodles at some point or another.
    But popular history credits Marco Polo for bringing the idea back to Italy. Who shall argue with popular history?

    Reply
  31. I learn so many new things reading this blog. I did already know about the Chinese spaghetti though (smile). I guess my most prized possession was a wash basin and water pitcher I inherited years ago. The wash basin had a crack in it, but it is no less valuable to me. BTW I love the pics you included.

    Reply
  32. I learn so many new things reading this blog. I did already know about the Chinese spaghetti though (smile). I guess my most prized possession was a wash basin and water pitcher I inherited years ago. The wash basin had a crack in it, but it is no less valuable to me. BTW I love the pics you included.

    Reply
  33. I learn so many new things reading this blog. I did already know about the Chinese spaghetti though (smile). I guess my most prized possession was a wash basin and water pitcher I inherited years ago. The wash basin had a crack in it, but it is no less valuable to me. BTW I love the pics you included.

    Reply
  34. I learn so many new things reading this blog. I did already know about the Chinese spaghetti though (smile). I guess my most prized possession was a wash basin and water pitcher I inherited years ago. The wash basin had a crack in it, but it is no less valuable to me. BTW I love the pics you included.

    Reply
  35. I learn so many new things reading this blog. I did already know about the Chinese spaghetti though (smile). I guess my most prized possession was a wash basin and water pitcher I inherited years ago. The wash basin had a crack in it, but it is no less valuable to me. BTW I love the pics you included.

    Reply
  36. There’s some good china patterns that strike me as “blah”. I see them sometimes on BBC. When they’re serving tea at the Vicarage there just isn’t any Splash to the pattern.
    My guess is BBC pulls in the same props over and over again and they don’t want something that would be remembered.

    Reply
  37. There’s some good china patterns that strike me as “blah”. I see them sometimes on BBC. When they’re serving tea at the Vicarage there just isn’t any Splash to the pattern.
    My guess is BBC pulls in the same props over and over again and they don’t want something that would be remembered.

    Reply
  38. There’s some good china patterns that strike me as “blah”. I see them sometimes on BBC. When they’re serving tea at the Vicarage there just isn’t any Splash to the pattern.
    My guess is BBC pulls in the same props over and over again and they don’t want something that would be remembered.

    Reply
  39. There’s some good china patterns that strike me as “blah”. I see them sometimes on BBC. When they’re serving tea at the Vicarage there just isn’t any Splash to the pattern.
    My guess is BBC pulls in the same props over and over again and they don’t want something that would be remembered.

    Reply
  40. There’s some good china patterns that strike me as “blah”. I see them sometimes on BBC. When they’re serving tea at the Vicarage there just isn’t any Splash to the pattern.
    My guess is BBC pulls in the same props over and over again and they don’t want something that would be remembered.

    Reply
  41. I seem to have done porcelain and glassware much more than I’d realized.
    I even put my beloved Betty Brown teapot in a scene, though it’s anachronistic, since I doubt they go bck before Victorian.
    I just say something like “ordinary brown teapot” because there were sure to be ordinary brown teapots and nobody knows it’s my own teapot.

    Reply
  42. I seem to have done porcelain and glassware much more than I’d realized.
    I even put my beloved Betty Brown teapot in a scene, though it’s anachronistic, since I doubt they go bck before Victorian.
    I just say something like “ordinary brown teapot” because there were sure to be ordinary brown teapots and nobody knows it’s my own teapot.

    Reply
  43. I seem to have done porcelain and glassware much more than I’d realized.
    I even put my beloved Betty Brown teapot in a scene, though it’s anachronistic, since I doubt they go bck before Victorian.
    I just say something like “ordinary brown teapot” because there were sure to be ordinary brown teapots and nobody knows it’s my own teapot.

    Reply
  44. I seem to have done porcelain and glassware much more than I’d realized.
    I even put my beloved Betty Brown teapot in a scene, though it’s anachronistic, since I doubt they go bck before Victorian.
    I just say something like “ordinary brown teapot” because there were sure to be ordinary brown teapots and nobody knows it’s my own teapot.

    Reply
  45. I seem to have done porcelain and glassware much more than I’d realized.
    I even put my beloved Betty Brown teapot in a scene, though it’s anachronistic, since I doubt they go bck before Victorian.
    I just say something like “ordinary brown teapot” because there were sure to be ordinary brown teapots and nobody knows it’s my own teapot.

    Reply
  46. That’s why we don’t have more old china hanging about. It does get battered up.
    That’s art of the beauty of it, I guess. We know it’s fragile.
    When I wash my pottery teapot you should see me holding the spout and the handle protectively so I don’t chip them against the sides of the sink.

    Reply
  47. That’s why we don’t have more old china hanging about. It does get battered up.
    That’s art of the beauty of it, I guess. We know it’s fragile.
    When I wash my pottery teapot you should see me holding the spout and the handle protectively so I don’t chip them against the sides of the sink.

    Reply
  48. That’s why we don’t have more old china hanging about. It does get battered up.
    That’s art of the beauty of it, I guess. We know it’s fragile.
    When I wash my pottery teapot you should see me holding the spout and the handle protectively so I don’t chip them against the sides of the sink.

    Reply
  49. That’s why we don’t have more old china hanging about. It does get battered up.
    That’s art of the beauty of it, I guess. We know it’s fragile.
    When I wash my pottery teapot you should see me holding the spout and the handle protectively so I don’t chip them against the sides of the sink.

    Reply
  50. That’s why we don’t have more old china hanging about. It does get battered up.
    That’s art of the beauty of it, I guess. We know it’s fragile.
    When I wash my pottery teapot you should see me holding the spout and the handle protectively so I don’t chip them against the sides of the sink.

    Reply
  51. My porcelain story:
    Mr Wonderful purchased a fine china set – service for 12 – platinum trim – the whole bit. But, it never truly appealed to me – pretty and delicate but not for me. It was too something. Not sure what. After he was gone, I could get rid of the china. HOORAY!
    I tried to give it away – no one wants it. My son and his wife took it to Phoenix because they thought they knew someone who would take it. Nope – changed their mind. I have now found that life has changed and there are many things which were once treasures which are not anymore. So, Tim and Becca have big ugly boxes of china no one wants.
    I also have plates displayed on my kitchen wall. They are patterns which have appealed to me and a couple which were patterns of my mother and her mother.
    OK – I am supposed to be getting rid of things. And I have been.
    But, on a neighborhood site, I saw a china set – service for 8. Delicate flowers, Tiffany blue, and so pretty. So of course I bought it.
    I live alone with a Pekinese. He seldom eats off delicate plates. I no longer give dinner parties. But, every time I look at a piece of this china, I smile. I am a weak person who is a sucker for pretty china.
    Thank you so much for this informative and entertaining post. And the pictures are lovely.

    Reply
  52. My porcelain story:
    Mr Wonderful purchased a fine china set – service for 12 – platinum trim – the whole bit. But, it never truly appealed to me – pretty and delicate but not for me. It was too something. Not sure what. After he was gone, I could get rid of the china. HOORAY!
    I tried to give it away – no one wants it. My son and his wife took it to Phoenix because they thought they knew someone who would take it. Nope – changed their mind. I have now found that life has changed and there are many things which were once treasures which are not anymore. So, Tim and Becca have big ugly boxes of china no one wants.
    I also have plates displayed on my kitchen wall. They are patterns which have appealed to me and a couple which were patterns of my mother and her mother.
    OK – I am supposed to be getting rid of things. And I have been.
    But, on a neighborhood site, I saw a china set – service for 8. Delicate flowers, Tiffany blue, and so pretty. So of course I bought it.
    I live alone with a Pekinese. He seldom eats off delicate plates. I no longer give dinner parties. But, every time I look at a piece of this china, I smile. I am a weak person who is a sucker for pretty china.
    Thank you so much for this informative and entertaining post. And the pictures are lovely.

    Reply
  53. My porcelain story:
    Mr Wonderful purchased a fine china set – service for 12 – platinum trim – the whole bit. But, it never truly appealed to me – pretty and delicate but not for me. It was too something. Not sure what. After he was gone, I could get rid of the china. HOORAY!
    I tried to give it away – no one wants it. My son and his wife took it to Phoenix because they thought they knew someone who would take it. Nope – changed their mind. I have now found that life has changed and there are many things which were once treasures which are not anymore. So, Tim and Becca have big ugly boxes of china no one wants.
    I also have plates displayed on my kitchen wall. They are patterns which have appealed to me and a couple which were patterns of my mother and her mother.
    OK – I am supposed to be getting rid of things. And I have been.
    But, on a neighborhood site, I saw a china set – service for 8. Delicate flowers, Tiffany blue, and so pretty. So of course I bought it.
    I live alone with a Pekinese. He seldom eats off delicate plates. I no longer give dinner parties. But, every time I look at a piece of this china, I smile. I am a weak person who is a sucker for pretty china.
    Thank you so much for this informative and entertaining post. And the pictures are lovely.

    Reply
  54. My porcelain story:
    Mr Wonderful purchased a fine china set – service for 12 – platinum trim – the whole bit. But, it never truly appealed to me – pretty and delicate but not for me. It was too something. Not sure what. After he was gone, I could get rid of the china. HOORAY!
    I tried to give it away – no one wants it. My son and his wife took it to Phoenix because they thought they knew someone who would take it. Nope – changed their mind. I have now found that life has changed and there are many things which were once treasures which are not anymore. So, Tim and Becca have big ugly boxes of china no one wants.
    I also have plates displayed on my kitchen wall. They are patterns which have appealed to me and a couple which were patterns of my mother and her mother.
    OK – I am supposed to be getting rid of things. And I have been.
    But, on a neighborhood site, I saw a china set – service for 8. Delicate flowers, Tiffany blue, and so pretty. So of course I bought it.
    I live alone with a Pekinese. He seldom eats off delicate plates. I no longer give dinner parties. But, every time I look at a piece of this china, I smile. I am a weak person who is a sucker for pretty china.
    Thank you so much for this informative and entertaining post. And the pictures are lovely.

    Reply
  55. My porcelain story:
    Mr Wonderful purchased a fine china set – service for 12 – platinum trim – the whole bit. But, it never truly appealed to me – pretty and delicate but not for me. It was too something. Not sure what. After he was gone, I could get rid of the china. HOORAY!
    I tried to give it away – no one wants it. My son and his wife took it to Phoenix because they thought they knew someone who would take it. Nope – changed their mind. I have now found that life has changed and there are many things which were once treasures which are not anymore. So, Tim and Becca have big ugly boxes of china no one wants.
    I also have plates displayed on my kitchen wall. They are patterns which have appealed to me and a couple which were patterns of my mother and her mother.
    OK – I am supposed to be getting rid of things. And I have been.
    But, on a neighborhood site, I saw a china set – service for 8. Delicate flowers, Tiffany blue, and so pretty. So of course I bought it.
    I live alone with a Pekinese. He seldom eats off delicate plates. I no longer give dinner parties. But, every time I look at a piece of this china, I smile. I am a weak person who is a sucker for pretty china.
    Thank you so much for this informative and entertaining post. And the pictures are lovely.

    Reply
  56. I like to look at porcelain, but I want sturdier plates to deal with. We use Corning’s Corelle. Looks good to me, but requires much less care.
    As to patterns: Spode has a pattern I thing would make a nice breakfast set, but nothing I would want on the dinner table.
    Obviously, I prefer my porcelain in museums.

    Reply
  57. I like to look at porcelain, but I want sturdier plates to deal with. We use Corning’s Corelle. Looks good to me, but requires much less care.
    As to patterns: Spode has a pattern I thing would make a nice breakfast set, but nothing I would want on the dinner table.
    Obviously, I prefer my porcelain in museums.

    Reply
  58. I like to look at porcelain, but I want sturdier plates to deal with. We use Corning’s Corelle. Looks good to me, but requires much less care.
    As to patterns: Spode has a pattern I thing would make a nice breakfast set, but nothing I would want on the dinner table.
    Obviously, I prefer my porcelain in museums.

    Reply
  59. I like to look at porcelain, but I want sturdier plates to deal with. We use Corning’s Corelle. Looks good to me, but requires much less care.
    As to patterns: Spode has a pattern I thing would make a nice breakfast set, but nothing I would want on the dinner table.
    Obviously, I prefer my porcelain in museums.

    Reply
  60. I like to look at porcelain, but I want sturdier plates to deal with. We use Corning’s Corelle. Looks good to me, but requires much less care.
    As to patterns: Spode has a pattern I thing would make a nice breakfast set, but nothing I would want on the dinner table.
    Obviously, I prefer my porcelain in museums.

    Reply
  61. Fascinating. I especially love the etymology…
    But I confess, if given a chose between the porcelain, which my mother would undoubtedly have chosen, and stoneware, I’ll choose stoneware.
    I used to throw pots on a wheel, myself, until I blew out my wrists. I have made pinch pots, slab and coil vessels and had a good time with pit firing. And when the world (or maybe just my mind) was still young, I taught kids how to do that out in the wilds. Digging and refining the clay, then building a vessel and firing it yourself is an amazing experience.

    Reply
  62. Fascinating. I especially love the etymology…
    But I confess, if given a chose between the porcelain, which my mother would undoubtedly have chosen, and stoneware, I’ll choose stoneware.
    I used to throw pots on a wheel, myself, until I blew out my wrists. I have made pinch pots, slab and coil vessels and had a good time with pit firing. And when the world (or maybe just my mind) was still young, I taught kids how to do that out in the wilds. Digging and refining the clay, then building a vessel and firing it yourself is an amazing experience.

    Reply
  63. Fascinating. I especially love the etymology…
    But I confess, if given a chose between the porcelain, which my mother would undoubtedly have chosen, and stoneware, I’ll choose stoneware.
    I used to throw pots on a wheel, myself, until I blew out my wrists. I have made pinch pots, slab and coil vessels and had a good time with pit firing. And when the world (or maybe just my mind) was still young, I taught kids how to do that out in the wilds. Digging and refining the clay, then building a vessel and firing it yourself is an amazing experience.

    Reply
  64. Fascinating. I especially love the etymology…
    But I confess, if given a chose between the porcelain, which my mother would undoubtedly have chosen, and stoneware, I’ll choose stoneware.
    I used to throw pots on a wheel, myself, until I blew out my wrists. I have made pinch pots, slab and coil vessels and had a good time with pit firing. And when the world (or maybe just my mind) was still young, I taught kids how to do that out in the wilds. Digging and refining the clay, then building a vessel and firing it yourself is an amazing experience.

    Reply
  65. Fascinating. I especially love the etymology…
    But I confess, if given a chose between the porcelain, which my mother would undoubtedly have chosen, and stoneware, I’ll choose stoneware.
    I used to throw pots on a wheel, myself, until I blew out my wrists. I have made pinch pots, slab and coil vessels and had a good time with pit firing. And when the world (or maybe just my mind) was still young, I taught kids how to do that out in the wilds. Digging and refining the clay, then building a vessel and firing it yourself is an amazing experience.

    Reply
  66. No porcelain, no china. But I do have some fun pottery pieces that I’ve picked up here and there.
    As for plates, I’m with Sue – Corning’s Corelle since I’m ahem, hell on wheels with breakables. Just the other day I opened the freezer door on the refrigerator and something fell off the top, hit inside the freezer before falling on the floor. Oopss…I put a big gash in the freezer.
    The floor in the kitchen has quite a few dents from me dropping things. Corelle survives dropping on the floor, in the sink and on the counter (grin)
    When I was in Sacramento a few years ago, I went to the RR Museum and oh they had some of the prettiest china that they used in the RR dining cars. Absolutely gorgeous patterns.

    Reply
  67. No porcelain, no china. But I do have some fun pottery pieces that I’ve picked up here and there.
    As for plates, I’m with Sue – Corning’s Corelle since I’m ahem, hell on wheels with breakables. Just the other day I opened the freezer door on the refrigerator and something fell off the top, hit inside the freezer before falling on the floor. Oopss…I put a big gash in the freezer.
    The floor in the kitchen has quite a few dents from me dropping things. Corelle survives dropping on the floor, in the sink and on the counter (grin)
    When I was in Sacramento a few years ago, I went to the RR Museum and oh they had some of the prettiest china that they used in the RR dining cars. Absolutely gorgeous patterns.

    Reply
  68. No porcelain, no china. But I do have some fun pottery pieces that I’ve picked up here and there.
    As for plates, I’m with Sue – Corning’s Corelle since I’m ahem, hell on wheels with breakables. Just the other day I opened the freezer door on the refrigerator and something fell off the top, hit inside the freezer before falling on the floor. Oopss…I put a big gash in the freezer.
    The floor in the kitchen has quite a few dents from me dropping things. Corelle survives dropping on the floor, in the sink and on the counter (grin)
    When I was in Sacramento a few years ago, I went to the RR Museum and oh they had some of the prettiest china that they used in the RR dining cars. Absolutely gorgeous patterns.

    Reply
  69. No porcelain, no china. But I do have some fun pottery pieces that I’ve picked up here and there.
    As for plates, I’m with Sue – Corning’s Corelle since I’m ahem, hell on wheels with breakables. Just the other day I opened the freezer door on the refrigerator and something fell off the top, hit inside the freezer before falling on the floor. Oopss…I put a big gash in the freezer.
    The floor in the kitchen has quite a few dents from me dropping things. Corelle survives dropping on the floor, in the sink and on the counter (grin)
    When I was in Sacramento a few years ago, I went to the RR Museum and oh they had some of the prettiest china that they used in the RR dining cars. Absolutely gorgeous patterns.

    Reply
  70. No porcelain, no china. But I do have some fun pottery pieces that I’ve picked up here and there.
    As for plates, I’m with Sue – Corning’s Corelle since I’m ahem, hell on wheels with breakables. Just the other day I opened the freezer door on the refrigerator and something fell off the top, hit inside the freezer before falling on the floor. Oopss…I put a big gash in the freezer.
    The floor in the kitchen has quite a few dents from me dropping things. Corelle survives dropping on the floor, in the sink and on the counter (grin)
    When I was in Sacramento a few years ago, I went to the RR Museum and oh they had some of the prettiest china that they used in the RR dining cars. Absolutely gorgeous patterns.

    Reply
  71. I cherish my great grandmother’s wedding china – translucent and gold trimmed – a million pieces….and I adore my hand thrown Joanne Bourne pottery coffee mug !

    Reply
  72. I cherish my great grandmother’s wedding china – translucent and gold trimmed – a million pieces….and I adore my hand thrown Joanne Bourne pottery coffee mug !

    Reply
  73. I cherish my great grandmother’s wedding china – translucent and gold trimmed – a million pieces….and I adore my hand thrown Joanne Bourne pottery coffee mug !

    Reply
  74. I cherish my great grandmother’s wedding china – translucent and gold trimmed – a million pieces….and I adore my hand thrown Joanne Bourne pottery coffee mug !

    Reply
  75. I cherish my great grandmother’s wedding china – translucent and gold trimmed – a million pieces….and I adore my hand thrown Joanne Bourne pottery coffee mug !

    Reply
  76. Fascinating! I don’t have any porcelain myself, but it is beautiful to look at. I also remember attempting to make clay coiled pots in art in grade school. Probably not very well, and no idea what happened to them! But I first learned about kaolin clay in the Nancy Drew book “The Clue of the Leaning Chimney”.

    Reply
  77. Fascinating! I don’t have any porcelain myself, but it is beautiful to look at. I also remember attempting to make clay coiled pots in art in grade school. Probably not very well, and no idea what happened to them! But I first learned about kaolin clay in the Nancy Drew book “The Clue of the Leaning Chimney”.

    Reply
  78. Fascinating! I don’t have any porcelain myself, but it is beautiful to look at. I also remember attempting to make clay coiled pots in art in grade school. Probably not very well, and no idea what happened to them! But I first learned about kaolin clay in the Nancy Drew book “The Clue of the Leaning Chimney”.

    Reply
  79. Fascinating! I don’t have any porcelain myself, but it is beautiful to look at. I also remember attempting to make clay coiled pots in art in grade school. Probably not very well, and no idea what happened to them! But I first learned about kaolin clay in the Nancy Drew book “The Clue of the Leaning Chimney”.

    Reply
  80. Fascinating! I don’t have any porcelain myself, but it is beautiful to look at. I also remember attempting to make clay coiled pots in art in grade school. Probably not very well, and no idea what happened to them! But I first learned about kaolin clay in the Nancy Drew book “The Clue of the Leaning Chimney”.

    Reply
  81. What an enjoyable post, Joanna. I have a few Delft pieces (courtesy of Dutch family) that are likely porcelain. Our dishes are a Dansk design, but I don’t think they are porcelain. They are definitely too thick for light to shine through.

    Reply
  82. What an enjoyable post, Joanna. I have a few Delft pieces (courtesy of Dutch family) that are likely porcelain. Our dishes are a Dansk design, but I don’t think they are porcelain. They are definitely too thick for light to shine through.

    Reply
  83. What an enjoyable post, Joanna. I have a few Delft pieces (courtesy of Dutch family) that are likely porcelain. Our dishes are a Dansk design, but I don’t think they are porcelain. They are definitely too thick for light to shine through.

    Reply
  84. What an enjoyable post, Joanna. I have a few Delft pieces (courtesy of Dutch family) that are likely porcelain. Our dishes are a Dansk design, but I don’t think they are porcelain. They are definitely too thick for light to shine through.

    Reply
  85. What an enjoyable post, Joanna. I have a few Delft pieces (courtesy of Dutch family) that are likely porcelain. Our dishes are a Dansk design, but I don’t think they are porcelain. They are definitely too thick for light to shine through.

    Reply
  86. The spaghetti thing isn’t actually correct. Many cultures invented a similar food around about the same time (same with bread). Spaghetti has been in Italy for many, many, many centuries.
    China didn’t teach Italians how to cook.

    Reply
  87. The spaghetti thing isn’t actually correct. Many cultures invented a similar food around about the same time (same with bread). Spaghetti has been in Italy for many, many, many centuries.
    China didn’t teach Italians how to cook.

    Reply
  88. The spaghetti thing isn’t actually correct. Many cultures invented a similar food around about the same time (same with bread). Spaghetti has been in Italy for many, many, many centuries.
    China didn’t teach Italians how to cook.

    Reply
  89. The spaghetti thing isn’t actually correct. Many cultures invented a similar food around about the same time (same with bread). Spaghetti has been in Italy for many, many, many centuries.
    China didn’t teach Italians how to cook.

    Reply
  90. The spaghetti thing isn’t actually correct. Many cultures invented a similar food around about the same time (same with bread). Spaghetti has been in Italy for many, many, many centuries.
    China didn’t teach Italians how to cook.

    Reply
  91. I use earthenware for a lot of things.
    Cups, for instance.
    My cups are pretty much divided between lovely thin old porcelain and clunky handmade cups that are a good deal more … hmmm …. robust.
    I enjoy both. I use what suits my mood.

    Reply
  92. I use earthenware for a lot of things.
    Cups, for instance.
    My cups are pretty much divided between lovely thin old porcelain and clunky handmade cups that are a good deal more … hmmm …. robust.
    I enjoy both. I use what suits my mood.

    Reply
  93. I use earthenware for a lot of things.
    Cups, for instance.
    My cups are pretty much divided between lovely thin old porcelain and clunky handmade cups that are a good deal more … hmmm …. robust.
    I enjoy both. I use what suits my mood.

    Reply
  94. I use earthenware for a lot of things.
    Cups, for instance.
    My cups are pretty much divided between lovely thin old porcelain and clunky handmade cups that are a good deal more … hmmm …. robust.
    I enjoy both. I use what suits my mood.

    Reply
  95. I use earthenware for a lot of things.
    Cups, for instance.
    My cups are pretty much divided between lovely thin old porcelain and clunky handmade cups that are a good deal more … hmmm …. robust.
    I enjoy both. I use what suits my mood.

    Reply
  96. My husband is Hungarian, so I have a weakness for Herend (the Hungarian national porcelain). Whenever I go antiquing, I’m always looking for additions to my collection. To buy a dinner set of Herend, I’d need to mortgage my house! I can afford little animals and children. My 2 favorites are a boy (that looks like childhood pictures of my red-headed husband) and girl who looks like a grandchild.
    Peg from DC

    Reply
  97. My husband is Hungarian, so I have a weakness for Herend (the Hungarian national porcelain). Whenever I go antiquing, I’m always looking for additions to my collection. To buy a dinner set of Herend, I’d need to mortgage my house! I can afford little animals and children. My 2 favorites are a boy (that looks like childhood pictures of my red-headed husband) and girl who looks like a grandchild.
    Peg from DC

    Reply
  98. My husband is Hungarian, so I have a weakness for Herend (the Hungarian national porcelain). Whenever I go antiquing, I’m always looking for additions to my collection. To buy a dinner set of Herend, I’d need to mortgage my house! I can afford little animals and children. My 2 favorites are a boy (that looks like childhood pictures of my red-headed husband) and girl who looks like a grandchild.
    Peg from DC

    Reply
  99. My husband is Hungarian, so I have a weakness for Herend (the Hungarian national porcelain). Whenever I go antiquing, I’m always looking for additions to my collection. To buy a dinner set of Herend, I’d need to mortgage my house! I can afford little animals and children. My 2 favorites are a boy (that looks like childhood pictures of my red-headed husband) and girl who looks like a grandchild.
    Peg from DC

    Reply
  100. My husband is Hungarian, so I have a weakness for Herend (the Hungarian national porcelain). Whenever I go antiquing, I’m always looking for additions to my collection. To buy a dinner set of Herend, I’d need to mortgage my house! I can afford little animals and children. My 2 favorites are a boy (that looks like childhood pictures of my red-headed husband) and girl who looks like a grandchild.
    Peg from DC

    Reply
  101. I’m so sorry about the wrists. Pot throwing is physically strenuous and I always end a session just worn out.
    With me, it’s the shoulders that are going to give way eventually. And — yes — the hands and wrists. I’;; be sorry to give it up when the times comes.
    I could never do pinch pots. I just lack the patience and fine motor control.
    I’ve never taught from-scratch pot making, but my older sister taught me, yeah these many years ago.
    Good on you that you passed the skill along.

    Reply
  102. I’m so sorry about the wrists. Pot throwing is physically strenuous and I always end a session just worn out.
    With me, it’s the shoulders that are going to give way eventually. And — yes — the hands and wrists. I’;; be sorry to give it up when the times comes.
    I could never do pinch pots. I just lack the patience and fine motor control.
    I’ve never taught from-scratch pot making, but my older sister taught me, yeah these many years ago.
    Good on you that you passed the skill along.

    Reply
  103. I’m so sorry about the wrists. Pot throwing is physically strenuous and I always end a session just worn out.
    With me, it’s the shoulders that are going to give way eventually. And — yes — the hands and wrists. I’;; be sorry to give it up when the times comes.
    I could never do pinch pots. I just lack the patience and fine motor control.
    I’ve never taught from-scratch pot making, but my older sister taught me, yeah these many years ago.
    Good on you that you passed the skill along.

    Reply
  104. I’m so sorry about the wrists. Pot throwing is physically strenuous and I always end a session just worn out.
    With me, it’s the shoulders that are going to give way eventually. And — yes — the hands and wrists. I’;; be sorry to give it up when the times comes.
    I could never do pinch pots. I just lack the patience and fine motor control.
    I’ve never taught from-scratch pot making, but my older sister taught me, yeah these many years ago.
    Good on you that you passed the skill along.

    Reply
  105. I’m so sorry about the wrists. Pot throwing is physically strenuous and I always end a session just worn out.
    With me, it’s the shoulders that are going to give way eventually. And — yes — the hands and wrists. I’;; be sorry to give it up when the times comes.
    I could never do pinch pots. I just lack the patience and fine motor control.
    I’ve never taught from-scratch pot making, but my older sister taught me, yeah these many years ago.
    Good on you that you passed the skill along.

    Reply
  106. Corelle is so useful and pretty. The world is a better place for it.
    I’m lucky in that I haven’t been involved in the whole china breaking thing so much. I know the time is coming. Even now I am careful to keep a firm hold on what I’m carrying.
    At some point I’ll have to choose between just cleaning up after many dropped and broken plates … or going the corelle route.

    Reply
  107. Corelle is so useful and pretty. The world is a better place for it.
    I’m lucky in that I haven’t been involved in the whole china breaking thing so much. I know the time is coming. Even now I am careful to keep a firm hold on what I’m carrying.
    At some point I’ll have to choose between just cleaning up after many dropped and broken plates … or going the corelle route.

    Reply
  108. Corelle is so useful and pretty. The world is a better place for it.
    I’m lucky in that I haven’t been involved in the whole china breaking thing so much. I know the time is coming. Even now I am careful to keep a firm hold on what I’m carrying.
    At some point I’ll have to choose between just cleaning up after many dropped and broken plates … or going the corelle route.

    Reply
  109. Corelle is so useful and pretty. The world is a better place for it.
    I’m lucky in that I haven’t been involved in the whole china breaking thing so much. I know the time is coming. Even now I am careful to keep a firm hold on what I’m carrying.
    At some point I’ll have to choose between just cleaning up after many dropped and broken plates … or going the corelle route.

    Reply
  110. Corelle is so useful and pretty. The world is a better place for it.
    I’m lucky in that I haven’t been involved in the whole china breaking thing so much. I know the time is coming. Even now I am careful to keep a firm hold on what I’m carrying.
    At some point I’ll have to choose between just cleaning up after many dropped and broken plates … or going the corelle route.

    Reply
  111. Oh lord. That latter is one you’re perfectly free to drop on the tile floor.
    I like to think of my work as bold and rustic.
    My pottery sensei says stuff like, “That’s interesting.”
    Currently, I’m incising beaker-people-like designs (2900-1800 BCE) on the ware.
    I’m going to be giving away a mug when I finally finish revisions of Gideon and the Den of Thieves story and send out my notify mailing again.
    Poor things, but mine own.

    Reply
  112. Oh lord. That latter is one you’re perfectly free to drop on the tile floor.
    I like to think of my work as bold and rustic.
    My pottery sensei says stuff like, “That’s interesting.”
    Currently, I’m incising beaker-people-like designs (2900-1800 BCE) on the ware.
    I’m going to be giving away a mug when I finally finish revisions of Gideon and the Den of Thieves story and send out my notify mailing again.
    Poor things, but mine own.

    Reply
  113. Oh lord. That latter is one you’re perfectly free to drop on the tile floor.
    I like to think of my work as bold and rustic.
    My pottery sensei says stuff like, “That’s interesting.”
    Currently, I’m incising beaker-people-like designs (2900-1800 BCE) on the ware.
    I’m going to be giving away a mug when I finally finish revisions of Gideon and the Den of Thieves story and send out my notify mailing again.
    Poor things, but mine own.

    Reply
  114. Oh lord. That latter is one you’re perfectly free to drop on the tile floor.
    I like to think of my work as bold and rustic.
    My pottery sensei says stuff like, “That’s interesting.”
    Currently, I’m incising beaker-people-like designs (2900-1800 BCE) on the ware.
    I’m going to be giving away a mug when I finally finish revisions of Gideon and the Den of Thieves story and send out my notify mailing again.
    Poor things, but mine own.

    Reply
  115. Oh lord. That latter is one you’re perfectly free to drop on the tile floor.
    I like to think of my work as bold and rustic.
    My pottery sensei says stuff like, “That’s interesting.”
    Currently, I’m incising beaker-people-like designs (2900-1800 BCE) on the ware.
    I’m going to be giving away a mug when I finally finish revisions of Gideon and the Den of Thieves story and send out my notify mailing again.
    Poor things, but mine own.

    Reply
  116. Cool and cool.
    Kaolin clay is not uncommon … but it’s also not just yer ordinary clay that you gaze at in despair when you’re trying to establish a garden. There’s more of it formed in areas that were warm and tropical in earlier geological ages.
    In the ground, kaolin is white. It must have just beckoned to early potters.
    In the US, it’s mostly commercial in Georgia, between Augusta and Macon, in a region of thirteen counties where it’s called “white gold.”
    I have somehow missed reading that particular Nancy Drew book …

    Reply
  117. Cool and cool.
    Kaolin clay is not uncommon … but it’s also not just yer ordinary clay that you gaze at in despair when you’re trying to establish a garden. There’s more of it formed in areas that were warm and tropical in earlier geological ages.
    In the ground, kaolin is white. It must have just beckoned to early potters.
    In the US, it’s mostly commercial in Georgia, between Augusta and Macon, in a region of thirteen counties where it’s called “white gold.”
    I have somehow missed reading that particular Nancy Drew book …

    Reply
  118. Cool and cool.
    Kaolin clay is not uncommon … but it’s also not just yer ordinary clay that you gaze at in despair when you’re trying to establish a garden. There’s more of it formed in areas that were warm and tropical in earlier geological ages.
    In the ground, kaolin is white. It must have just beckoned to early potters.
    In the US, it’s mostly commercial in Georgia, between Augusta and Macon, in a region of thirteen counties where it’s called “white gold.”
    I have somehow missed reading that particular Nancy Drew book …

    Reply
  119. Cool and cool.
    Kaolin clay is not uncommon … but it’s also not just yer ordinary clay that you gaze at in despair when you’re trying to establish a garden. There’s more of it formed in areas that were warm and tropical in earlier geological ages.
    In the ground, kaolin is white. It must have just beckoned to early potters.
    In the US, it’s mostly commercial in Georgia, between Augusta and Macon, in a region of thirteen counties where it’s called “white gold.”
    I have somehow missed reading that particular Nancy Drew book …

    Reply
  120. Cool and cool.
    Kaolin clay is not uncommon … but it’s also not just yer ordinary clay that you gaze at in despair when you’re trying to establish a garden. There’s more of it formed in areas that were warm and tropical in earlier geological ages.
    In the ground, kaolin is white. It must have just beckoned to early potters.
    In the US, it’s mostly commercial in Georgia, between Augusta and Macon, in a region of thirteen counties where it’s called “white gold.”
    I have somehow missed reading that particular Nancy Drew book …

    Reply
  121. The Delft designs are so vigorous and enthusiastic. They’ve had a huge influence.
    Way back in my student days I had a set of earthenware china — I think it might have been Dansk — with a modern interpretation of old Delft patterns.
    I still remember it kindly. Partly for the design. Partly for the nostalgia of student days. Funny how memory of objects takes us back to the past.

    Reply
  122. The Delft designs are so vigorous and enthusiastic. They’ve had a huge influence.
    Way back in my student days I had a set of earthenware china — I think it might have been Dansk — with a modern interpretation of old Delft patterns.
    I still remember it kindly. Partly for the design. Partly for the nostalgia of student days. Funny how memory of objects takes us back to the past.

    Reply
  123. The Delft designs are so vigorous and enthusiastic. They’ve had a huge influence.
    Way back in my student days I had a set of earthenware china — I think it might have been Dansk — with a modern interpretation of old Delft patterns.
    I still remember it kindly. Partly for the design. Partly for the nostalgia of student days. Funny how memory of objects takes us back to the past.

    Reply
  124. The Delft designs are so vigorous and enthusiastic. They’ve had a huge influence.
    Way back in my student days I had a set of earthenware china — I think it might have been Dansk — with a modern interpretation of old Delft patterns.
    I still remember it kindly. Partly for the design. Partly for the nostalgia of student days. Funny how memory of objects takes us back to the past.

    Reply
  125. The Delft designs are so vigorous and enthusiastic. They’ve had a huge influence.
    Way back in my student days I had a set of earthenware china — I think it might have been Dansk — with a modern interpretation of old Delft patterns.
    I still remember it kindly. Partly for the design. Partly for the nostalgia of student days. Funny how memory of objects takes us back to the past.

    Reply

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