The Day of the Pine Marten

 

Wench karen Bullock:Flickr  CC BY-NC 2

photocredit karen Bullock

Joanna here, to say a few words about pine martens and wish them well in their endeavors.

I’m not talking about the American pine marten, fine fellow though he may be, but about the European pine marten. Specifically, the European pine marten in the British isles.

They belong to the same family as otters, weasels, stoats, and polecats. They have the same long sinuous body, the same taste for small animals, and the same tendency to be held in disliked by chicken farmers. It is no accident that “weasel” and “polecat” are not terms of affection.

Martens are native to the British Isles. Original inhabitants, if you would.

 

Wench weasels of the uk

Weasels of the UK: The Book

They were running around the woods and fields of England up till the 1700s, active, cheeky little fellows with silky brown fur and a white “bib” at the throat. But though they’re agile and intelligent, though they know how to decorate a landscape to the max, nobody loved them.

By the Regency period, they were well on the way to disappearing. I suspect everybody but hunting-mad sportsmen said, “Good riddance.” Pine martens had a bad rep.

But some folks want them back. More on that below.

The pine marten is described as “cat-sized”, though I’d find 3½ pounds small for a cat, meself. They’re very slightly larger than your average wandering polecat and, except for that white bib, pretty much visually indistinguishable from a polecat.

One naturalist describes his attempts to distinguish the two “briefly and in poor light, as is generally the case” which tells us much about the life of naturalists. Stoats and weasels are of the same general appearance, but much smaller.

Interesting marten factoids –

Cigarette card 1881

Pine Marten being comfy in a tree.
From a cigarette card, 1881. I fear it may be an American pine marten

The pine marten is the only one of its family that’s really comfortable in trees and the only one that has semi-retractable claws with which to be so. You’ll find them hanging out in trees, pretty much dusk to dawn. They nest there and raise their young up there.

They hunt on the ground, though.

Martens eat a healthy paleo diet of mice, voles, rabbits, birds—including the farmer’s favorite poultry—insects, frogs, carrion, berries, birds' eggs, nuts, and honey. They’re apparently strong swimmers and if I were a cat-sized animal and a strong swimmer, I would eat fish.

The Marten is said to be the natural Enemy of the common Cat and that when these Greeks meet, the tug never fails to be mortal, and the Marten is generally the survivor. They are dreadful enemies to Pheasants, pulling them down at roost, and if suffered to encrease near a Preserve, would soon thin the most abundant
     John Lawrence The Sportsman’s Progress

Brehm's Life of animals 1895 Fertilization occurs in the female pine marten in July, but the egg doesn’t implant till seven months later. (Wonderful are the ways of nature.)

Copulation usually occurs on the ground and can last more than an hour.

Pine martens may be thought of as the champions of red squirrels.
Where pine marten numbers expand, invasive grey squirrel populations quickly retreat. The native squirrel recovers. 
I am fond of red squirrels.

I feel this is more than enough to put us firmly on the side of pine martens.

As I said above, by the Regency, the pine marten was becoming rare. Regency references talk about their disappearance from  England.

The Marten Cat, it is observed by the Rev. Mr. Chafin, has become scarce in his Vicinity, on account of the breed having been made too free with, for the advantage of their skins; there were however, not many years since, a considerable Number of them in Essex and Suffolk. The Pine-Marten, the most valuable, is said to be found at this time, in the Pine Woods of Scotland and Wales.
     John Lawrence The Sportsman’s Progress

So that's what was going on under the noses of our Regency characters.
Why was this happening?

— That soft fur coat was one reason.

V&A pine martin 1897

Pine marten fur hat, 1897, V&A
The Victorians. What can I say?

The fur of the Pine Marten is the most valuable of European furs, and in quality resembles that of the Sable more than anyother found on this continent.
     Brehm's Life of Animals 1895

— Habitat destruction was another cause. There was loss of wild, uncultivated places in the 1700s.
— The martens' perceived taste for the pheasants in those hunting preserves was unpopular with the Powers That Be. Small furry animals should not annoy the Powers That Be.
— And there’s the delight the gentry found in hunting pine martens (or anything else much) with hounds and horses and a gang of like-minded citizens.

The Victorians finished wiping out the pine martens of England. Thorough folks, the Victorians,

By the Twentieth Century pine martens hung on only in the Scottish Highlands and central Wales. There were isolated populations in Ireland and the Kidland Forest in Northumberland. Cumbria seemed to retain a small population; pine marten scat was identified there in 2011. (Naturalists are so earthy.) And in 2015 a photographer got a shot of one in Shropshire, the first confirmed sighting of a pine marten in England in over a century.

These smaller populations may be survivors of the original UK pine martens, or they may be later introductions from Europe. DNA will eventually reveal all.

We come to a happier turn to this story. Late in the Twentieth Century Environmental Groups swung into action. Pine martens became a priority species in the UK Biodiversity Action Plan. They were offered full protection under the Wildlife and Countryside Act of 1981 and the Environmental Protection Act of 1990.

And groups are attempting to reintroduce pine martens to some of their former range.

The Vincent Wildlife Trust released 20 Scottish pine martens in mid-Wales in 2015 and more in 2016 and 2017, bringing the number to 51. They’re tracking them around the woods with radio collars, taking scat samples, and generally practicing all due diligence in monitoring populations.

In 2019 the Gloucestershire Wildlife Trust’s Project Pine Marten introduced 18 into the Forest of Dean. It’s hoped this group, once established, would spread toward stable populations already in Wales.

Wench pine martin 2

Pine marten interacting with the garden

I’m looking for hopeful signs in the world these days. The reestablishment of this cool species into the forests where it was once happily munching upon voles and berries is certainly that.

What would you like to see happen, wildlife-wise, if you had your choice?

Me – I’d like to see flamingos come back to the wild in Florida. No reason it can’t happen.  

175 thoughts on “The Day of the Pine Marten”

  1. If I had a say there would be no more hunting of wild animals with the possible exception of those hunted for food

    Reply
  2. If I had a say there would be no more hunting of wild animals with the possible exception of those hunted for food

    Reply
  3. If I had a say there would be no more hunting of wild animals with the possible exception of those hunted for food

    Reply
  4. If I had a say there would be no more hunting of wild animals with the possible exception of those hunted for food

    Reply
  5. If I had a say there would be no more hunting of wild animals with the possible exception of those hunted for food

    Reply
  6. I’d heard of pine martens but knew next to nothing about them. I’ve learned some things today due to you, Jo, so thank you!

    Reply
  7. I’d heard of pine martens but knew next to nothing about them. I’ve learned some things today due to you, Jo, so thank you!

    Reply
  8. I’d heard of pine martens but knew next to nothing about them. I’ve learned some things today due to you, Jo, so thank you!

    Reply
  9. I’d heard of pine martens but knew next to nothing about them. I’ve learned some things today due to you, Jo, so thank you!

    Reply
  10. I’d heard of pine martens but knew next to nothing about them. I’ve learned some things today due to you, Jo, so thank you!

    Reply
  11. I’m pretty sure they don’t become urbanized or suburbanized like coyotes. They only seem to survive in pretty wild places.
    So it’s not that they wouldn’t like to scarf down the family cat as that they wouldn’t have an opportunity to do so.
    I think farmers really dislike them.

    Reply
  12. I’m pretty sure they don’t become urbanized or suburbanized like coyotes. They only seem to survive in pretty wild places.
    So it’s not that they wouldn’t like to scarf down the family cat as that they wouldn’t have an opportunity to do so.
    I think farmers really dislike them.

    Reply
  13. I’m pretty sure they don’t become urbanized or suburbanized like coyotes. They only seem to survive in pretty wild places.
    So it’s not that they wouldn’t like to scarf down the family cat as that they wouldn’t have an opportunity to do so.
    I think farmers really dislike them.

    Reply
  14. I’m pretty sure they don’t become urbanized or suburbanized like coyotes. They only seem to survive in pretty wild places.
    So it’s not that they wouldn’t like to scarf down the family cat as that they wouldn’t have an opportunity to do so.
    I think farmers really dislike them.

    Reply
  15. I’m pretty sure they don’t become urbanized or suburbanized like coyotes. They only seem to survive in pretty wild places.
    So it’s not that they wouldn’t like to scarf down the family cat as that they wouldn’t have an opportunity to do so.
    I think farmers really dislike them.

    Reply
  16. I agree with you. Restore the wild places to a natural ecology.
    And if somebody really wants to go hunting, let them strip down to mukluks and carry a flint knife. Even the odds.

    Reply
  17. I agree with you. Restore the wild places to a natural ecology.
    And if somebody really wants to go hunting, let them strip down to mukluks and carry a flint knife. Even the odds.

    Reply
  18. I agree with you. Restore the wild places to a natural ecology.
    And if somebody really wants to go hunting, let them strip down to mukluks and carry a flint knife. Even the odds.

    Reply
  19. I agree with you. Restore the wild places to a natural ecology.
    And if somebody really wants to go hunting, let them strip down to mukluks and carry a flint knife. Even the odds.

    Reply
  20. I agree with you. Restore the wild places to a natural ecology.
    And if somebody really wants to go hunting, let them strip down to mukluks and carry a flint knife. Even the odds.

    Reply
  21. What I find interesting here is the skill, work, and training that’s going into this effort to reintroduce them to their former habitat.
    We’re really getting a good look at how this can and should be done.

    Reply
  22. What I find interesting here is the skill, work, and training that’s going into this effort to reintroduce them to their former habitat.
    We’re really getting a good look at how this can and should be done.

    Reply
  23. What I find interesting here is the skill, work, and training that’s going into this effort to reintroduce them to their former habitat.
    We’re really getting a good look at how this can and should be done.

    Reply
  24. What I find interesting here is the skill, work, and training that’s going into this effort to reintroduce them to their former habitat.
    We’re really getting a good look at how this can and should be done.

    Reply
  25. What I find interesting here is the skill, work, and training that’s going into this effort to reintroduce them to their former habitat.
    We’re really getting a good look at how this can and should be done.

    Reply
  26. Lovely post, Joanna! On a trip to the Highlands several years ago, we met someone spending his retirement years working to restore/increase the pine marten population. He said that they do eat fish, and he had seen them in fast-running water diving and coming up with fish. Wouldn’t that be something to see?
    But as someone who lives in a fairly densely populated suburban town in a major urban area, where we now regularly see (in descending body size) deer, coyotes, foxes, woodchucks, raccoons, fisher cats, skunks, squirrels, and chipmunks, I was happy to hear from you that pine martens prefer a wilder environment. My cat still sits in the window, looking longingly at the great outdoors where we no longer dare let her go!
    Also, on a naughtier side, I think your parenthetical remark about the ways of nature should have a come a sentence later!

    Reply
  27. Lovely post, Joanna! On a trip to the Highlands several years ago, we met someone spending his retirement years working to restore/increase the pine marten population. He said that they do eat fish, and he had seen them in fast-running water diving and coming up with fish. Wouldn’t that be something to see?
    But as someone who lives in a fairly densely populated suburban town in a major urban area, where we now regularly see (in descending body size) deer, coyotes, foxes, woodchucks, raccoons, fisher cats, skunks, squirrels, and chipmunks, I was happy to hear from you that pine martens prefer a wilder environment. My cat still sits in the window, looking longingly at the great outdoors where we no longer dare let her go!
    Also, on a naughtier side, I think your parenthetical remark about the ways of nature should have a come a sentence later!

    Reply
  28. Lovely post, Joanna! On a trip to the Highlands several years ago, we met someone spending his retirement years working to restore/increase the pine marten population. He said that they do eat fish, and he had seen them in fast-running water diving and coming up with fish. Wouldn’t that be something to see?
    But as someone who lives in a fairly densely populated suburban town in a major urban area, where we now regularly see (in descending body size) deer, coyotes, foxes, woodchucks, raccoons, fisher cats, skunks, squirrels, and chipmunks, I was happy to hear from you that pine martens prefer a wilder environment. My cat still sits in the window, looking longingly at the great outdoors where we no longer dare let her go!
    Also, on a naughtier side, I think your parenthetical remark about the ways of nature should have a come a sentence later!

    Reply
  29. Lovely post, Joanna! On a trip to the Highlands several years ago, we met someone spending his retirement years working to restore/increase the pine marten population. He said that they do eat fish, and he had seen them in fast-running water diving and coming up with fish. Wouldn’t that be something to see?
    But as someone who lives in a fairly densely populated suburban town in a major urban area, where we now regularly see (in descending body size) deer, coyotes, foxes, woodchucks, raccoons, fisher cats, skunks, squirrels, and chipmunks, I was happy to hear from you that pine martens prefer a wilder environment. My cat still sits in the window, looking longingly at the great outdoors where we no longer dare let her go!
    Also, on a naughtier side, I think your parenthetical remark about the ways of nature should have a come a sentence later!

    Reply
  30. Lovely post, Joanna! On a trip to the Highlands several years ago, we met someone spending his retirement years working to restore/increase the pine marten population. He said that they do eat fish, and he had seen them in fast-running water diving and coming up with fish. Wouldn’t that be something to see?
    But as someone who lives in a fairly densely populated suburban town in a major urban area, where we now regularly see (in descending body size) deer, coyotes, foxes, woodchucks, raccoons, fisher cats, skunks, squirrels, and chipmunks, I was happy to hear from you that pine martens prefer a wilder environment. My cat still sits in the window, looking longingly at the great outdoors where we no longer dare let her go!
    Also, on a naughtier side, I think your parenthetical remark about the ways of nature should have a come a sentence later!

    Reply
  31. I’m delighted to see various wild creatures flourishing in the wild. I am less delighted when they decide to take up residence in my house. Over the years we have played unwilling hosts to various squirrels, mice, chipmunks, rats (particularly unpleasant) and raccoons. It is nerve-racking to lie in bed listening to the noisy squabbles of a family of raccoons who have taken up residence in the eaves.
    They are more than welcome to their space so long as they leave me mine.

    Reply
  32. I’m delighted to see various wild creatures flourishing in the wild. I am less delighted when they decide to take up residence in my house. Over the years we have played unwilling hosts to various squirrels, mice, chipmunks, rats (particularly unpleasant) and raccoons. It is nerve-racking to lie in bed listening to the noisy squabbles of a family of raccoons who have taken up residence in the eaves.
    They are more than welcome to their space so long as they leave me mine.

    Reply
  33. I’m delighted to see various wild creatures flourishing in the wild. I am less delighted when they decide to take up residence in my house. Over the years we have played unwilling hosts to various squirrels, mice, chipmunks, rats (particularly unpleasant) and raccoons. It is nerve-racking to lie in bed listening to the noisy squabbles of a family of raccoons who have taken up residence in the eaves.
    They are more than welcome to their space so long as they leave me mine.

    Reply
  34. I’m delighted to see various wild creatures flourishing in the wild. I am less delighted when they decide to take up residence in my house. Over the years we have played unwilling hosts to various squirrels, mice, chipmunks, rats (particularly unpleasant) and raccoons. It is nerve-racking to lie in bed listening to the noisy squabbles of a family of raccoons who have taken up residence in the eaves.
    They are more than welcome to their space so long as they leave me mine.

    Reply
  35. I’m delighted to see various wild creatures flourishing in the wild. I am less delighted when they decide to take up residence in my house. Over the years we have played unwilling hosts to various squirrels, mice, chipmunks, rats (particularly unpleasant) and raccoons. It is nerve-racking to lie in bed listening to the noisy squabbles of a family of raccoons who have taken up residence in the eaves.
    They are more than welcome to their space so long as they leave me mine.

    Reply
  36. There was the terrorist squirrel. Not only did she tease my Boxer girls, but she once jumped on my flag pole and shredded the flag hanging there. I figured she was a spy in disguise from an unnamed terrorist group.
    There was the possum who used to stand under a near by street light in his trench coat, fedora with a cigarette dangling from his skinny little lips. He was unafraid. Those same Boxer girls were never something he feared.
    Or the small herd of deer who lived within the fence of a large corporation’s campus near my apartment. Cars driving through never bothered them in their rest. And the buck made sure no one ever bothered his harem.
    Austin has a lot of wildlife right here…up close and personal.
    Seriously, I would like to see the world eliminate the plastic from the oceans, seas, rivers and streams. I would like to see the humans who live here learn to survive with substitutes for all the plastic things we seem unable to stop using.
    I am working on adjusting the way I shop and use things.
    S

    Reply
  37. There was the terrorist squirrel. Not only did she tease my Boxer girls, but she once jumped on my flag pole and shredded the flag hanging there. I figured she was a spy in disguise from an unnamed terrorist group.
    There was the possum who used to stand under a near by street light in his trench coat, fedora with a cigarette dangling from his skinny little lips. He was unafraid. Those same Boxer girls were never something he feared.
    Or the small herd of deer who lived within the fence of a large corporation’s campus near my apartment. Cars driving through never bothered them in their rest. And the buck made sure no one ever bothered his harem.
    Austin has a lot of wildlife right here…up close and personal.
    Seriously, I would like to see the world eliminate the plastic from the oceans, seas, rivers and streams. I would like to see the humans who live here learn to survive with substitutes for all the plastic things we seem unable to stop using.
    I am working on adjusting the way I shop and use things.
    S

    Reply
  38. There was the terrorist squirrel. Not only did she tease my Boxer girls, but she once jumped on my flag pole and shredded the flag hanging there. I figured she was a spy in disguise from an unnamed terrorist group.
    There was the possum who used to stand under a near by street light in his trench coat, fedora with a cigarette dangling from his skinny little lips. He was unafraid. Those same Boxer girls were never something he feared.
    Or the small herd of deer who lived within the fence of a large corporation’s campus near my apartment. Cars driving through never bothered them in their rest. And the buck made sure no one ever bothered his harem.
    Austin has a lot of wildlife right here…up close and personal.
    Seriously, I would like to see the world eliminate the plastic from the oceans, seas, rivers and streams. I would like to see the humans who live here learn to survive with substitutes for all the plastic things we seem unable to stop using.
    I am working on adjusting the way I shop and use things.
    S

    Reply
  39. There was the terrorist squirrel. Not only did she tease my Boxer girls, but she once jumped on my flag pole and shredded the flag hanging there. I figured she was a spy in disguise from an unnamed terrorist group.
    There was the possum who used to stand under a near by street light in his trench coat, fedora with a cigarette dangling from his skinny little lips. He was unafraid. Those same Boxer girls were never something he feared.
    Or the small herd of deer who lived within the fence of a large corporation’s campus near my apartment. Cars driving through never bothered them in their rest. And the buck made sure no one ever bothered his harem.
    Austin has a lot of wildlife right here…up close and personal.
    Seriously, I would like to see the world eliminate the plastic from the oceans, seas, rivers and streams. I would like to see the humans who live here learn to survive with substitutes for all the plastic things we seem unable to stop using.
    I am working on adjusting the way I shop and use things.
    S

    Reply
  40. There was the terrorist squirrel. Not only did she tease my Boxer girls, but she once jumped on my flag pole and shredded the flag hanging there. I figured she was a spy in disguise from an unnamed terrorist group.
    There was the possum who used to stand under a near by street light in his trench coat, fedora with a cigarette dangling from his skinny little lips. He was unafraid. Those same Boxer girls were never something he feared.
    Or the small herd of deer who lived within the fence of a large corporation’s campus near my apartment. Cars driving through never bothered them in their rest. And the buck made sure no one ever bothered his harem.
    Austin has a lot of wildlife right here…up close and personal.
    Seriously, I would like to see the world eliminate the plastic from the oceans, seas, rivers and streams. I would like to see the humans who live here learn to survive with substitutes for all the plastic things we seem unable to stop using.
    I am working on adjusting the way I shop and use things.
    S

    Reply
  41. I’d love to time travel to the days some person thought it was a good idea to bring European Starlings and House sparrows to the United States. and tell them “No, Don’t do that! You have no idea what those to species alone will do to native birds.”

    Reply
  42. I’d love to time travel to the days some person thought it was a good idea to bring European Starlings and House sparrows to the United States. and tell them “No, Don’t do that! You have no idea what those to species alone will do to native birds.”

    Reply
  43. I’d love to time travel to the days some person thought it was a good idea to bring European Starlings and House sparrows to the United States. and tell them “No, Don’t do that! You have no idea what those to species alone will do to native birds.”

    Reply
  44. I’d love to time travel to the days some person thought it was a good idea to bring European Starlings and House sparrows to the United States. and tell them “No, Don’t do that! You have no idea what those to species alone will do to native birds.”

    Reply
  45. I’d love to time travel to the days some person thought it was a good idea to bring European Starlings and House sparrows to the United States. and tell them “No, Don’t do that! You have no idea what those to species alone will do to native birds.”

    Reply
  46. Great topic and I was not aware of the pine marten. I do know about similar creatures. I also like the comments so far – esp. the topics on plastic use and disuse, non native species being introduced and helping to save species.
    I was lucky – when I was young – to be able to work one summer with the Peregrine Falcon Fund to help re-establish their numbers. I worked at a hack site and cared for the young until they were independent. So good to see that it worked and there are now many nesting pairs and they have been removed from the Endangered list.

    Reply
  47. Great topic and I was not aware of the pine marten. I do know about similar creatures. I also like the comments so far – esp. the topics on plastic use and disuse, non native species being introduced and helping to save species.
    I was lucky – when I was young – to be able to work one summer with the Peregrine Falcon Fund to help re-establish their numbers. I worked at a hack site and cared for the young until they were independent. So good to see that it worked and there are now many nesting pairs and they have been removed from the Endangered list.

    Reply
  48. Great topic and I was not aware of the pine marten. I do know about similar creatures. I also like the comments so far – esp. the topics on plastic use and disuse, non native species being introduced and helping to save species.
    I was lucky – when I was young – to be able to work one summer with the Peregrine Falcon Fund to help re-establish their numbers. I worked at a hack site and cared for the young until they were independent. So good to see that it worked and there are now many nesting pairs and they have been removed from the Endangered list.

    Reply
  49. Great topic and I was not aware of the pine marten. I do know about similar creatures. I also like the comments so far – esp. the topics on plastic use and disuse, non native species being introduced and helping to save species.
    I was lucky – when I was young – to be able to work one summer with the Peregrine Falcon Fund to help re-establish their numbers. I worked at a hack site and cared for the young until they were independent. So good to see that it worked and there are now many nesting pairs and they have been removed from the Endangered list.

    Reply
  50. Great topic and I was not aware of the pine marten. I do know about similar creatures. I also like the comments so far – esp. the topics on plastic use and disuse, non native species being introduced and helping to save species.
    I was lucky – when I was young – to be able to work one summer with the Peregrine Falcon Fund to help re-establish their numbers. I worked at a hack site and cared for the young until they were independent. So good to see that it worked and there are now many nesting pairs and they have been removed from the Endangered list.

    Reply
  51. Oh, me too, Pamela. The introduction of various species has caused so much extinction of native animals in Australia — rabbits, foxes (purely so people could hunt them) and domestic cats and dogs who have been dumped and go feral and breed. And many more. Devastation, as most Australian native animals are herbivores and not set up to deal with carnivore predators.

    Reply
  52. Oh, me too, Pamela. The introduction of various species has caused so much extinction of native animals in Australia — rabbits, foxes (purely so people could hunt them) and domestic cats and dogs who have been dumped and go feral and breed. And many more. Devastation, as most Australian native animals are herbivores and not set up to deal with carnivore predators.

    Reply
  53. Oh, me too, Pamela. The introduction of various species has caused so much extinction of native animals in Australia — rabbits, foxes (purely so people could hunt them) and domestic cats and dogs who have been dumped and go feral and breed. And many more. Devastation, as most Australian native animals are herbivores and not set up to deal with carnivore predators.

    Reply
  54. Oh, me too, Pamela. The introduction of various species has caused so much extinction of native animals in Australia — rabbits, foxes (purely so people could hunt them) and domestic cats and dogs who have been dumped and go feral and breed. And many more. Devastation, as most Australian native animals are herbivores and not set up to deal with carnivore predators.

    Reply
  55. Oh, me too, Pamela. The introduction of various species has caused so much extinction of native animals in Australia — rabbits, foxes (purely so people could hunt them) and domestic cats and dogs who have been dumped and go feral and breed. And many more. Devastation, as most Australian native animals are herbivores and not set up to deal with carnivore predators.

    Reply
  56. I agree with that too – someone let loose their green parakeets in London’s Hyde Park and now there are thousands of them! Also look what foreign predators like cats did to the kakapos in New Zealand … I love that there are amazing people trying to save various threatened species and really hope they succeed! Also agree with Annette about the plastic.

    Reply
  57. I agree with that too – someone let loose their green parakeets in London’s Hyde Park and now there are thousands of them! Also look what foreign predators like cats did to the kakapos in New Zealand … I love that there are amazing people trying to save various threatened species and really hope they succeed! Also agree with Annette about the plastic.

    Reply
  58. I agree with that too – someone let loose their green parakeets in London’s Hyde Park and now there are thousands of them! Also look what foreign predators like cats did to the kakapos in New Zealand … I love that there are amazing people trying to save various threatened species and really hope they succeed! Also agree with Annette about the plastic.

    Reply
  59. I agree with that too – someone let loose their green parakeets in London’s Hyde Park and now there are thousands of them! Also look what foreign predators like cats did to the kakapos in New Zealand … I love that there are amazing people trying to save various threatened species and really hope they succeed! Also agree with Annette about the plastic.

    Reply
  60. I agree with that too – someone let loose their green parakeets in London’s Hyde Park and now there are thousands of them! Also look what foreign predators like cats did to the kakapos in New Zealand … I love that there are amazing people trying to save various threatened species and really hope they succeed! Also agree with Annette about the plastic.

    Reply
  61. I was not aware of European pine martens, but they seem to be lovely creatures. I also did not know polecat was an actual name of an animal. I thought it was just slang for a weasel or a weasely person.
    I live in NJ, which is one of the most densely populated states, yet many mammals have made a comeback in the past few decades. We’ve got red fox, black bear, coyotes, fishers, bobcats, and even mink in the more rural areas.
    I would like to see more native plants and trees, and get rid of those invasive imported plants and trees like Japanese barberry and knotweed, bamboo, burning bush, etc. They spread everywhere and don’t belong in our ecosystem!

    Reply
  62. I was not aware of European pine martens, but they seem to be lovely creatures. I also did not know polecat was an actual name of an animal. I thought it was just slang for a weasel or a weasely person.
    I live in NJ, which is one of the most densely populated states, yet many mammals have made a comeback in the past few decades. We’ve got red fox, black bear, coyotes, fishers, bobcats, and even mink in the more rural areas.
    I would like to see more native plants and trees, and get rid of those invasive imported plants and trees like Japanese barberry and knotweed, bamboo, burning bush, etc. They spread everywhere and don’t belong in our ecosystem!

    Reply
  63. I was not aware of European pine martens, but they seem to be lovely creatures. I also did not know polecat was an actual name of an animal. I thought it was just slang for a weasel or a weasely person.
    I live in NJ, which is one of the most densely populated states, yet many mammals have made a comeback in the past few decades. We’ve got red fox, black bear, coyotes, fishers, bobcats, and even mink in the more rural areas.
    I would like to see more native plants and trees, and get rid of those invasive imported plants and trees like Japanese barberry and knotweed, bamboo, burning bush, etc. They spread everywhere and don’t belong in our ecosystem!

    Reply
  64. I was not aware of European pine martens, but they seem to be lovely creatures. I also did not know polecat was an actual name of an animal. I thought it was just slang for a weasel or a weasely person.
    I live in NJ, which is one of the most densely populated states, yet many mammals have made a comeback in the past few decades. We’ve got red fox, black bear, coyotes, fishers, bobcats, and even mink in the more rural areas.
    I would like to see more native plants and trees, and get rid of those invasive imported plants and trees like Japanese barberry and knotweed, bamboo, burning bush, etc. They spread everywhere and don’t belong in our ecosystem!

    Reply
  65. I was not aware of European pine martens, but they seem to be lovely creatures. I also did not know polecat was an actual name of an animal. I thought it was just slang for a weasel or a weasely person.
    I live in NJ, which is one of the most densely populated states, yet many mammals have made a comeback in the past few decades. We’ve got red fox, black bear, coyotes, fishers, bobcats, and even mink in the more rural areas.
    I would like to see more native plants and trees, and get rid of those invasive imported plants and trees like Japanese barberry and knotweed, bamboo, burning bush, etc. They spread everywhere and don’t belong in our ecosystem!

    Reply
  66. I’d like to see polar bears come back more strongly in the Arctic.
    I also would like to know that enough of the unique kangeroo species and other species of animals lost in the terrible fires in Australia will regenerate and come back to flourish again.
    Whatever animal species were lost in the Brazilian rain forest fires come back as well.

    Reply
  67. I’d like to see polar bears come back more strongly in the Arctic.
    I also would like to know that enough of the unique kangeroo species and other species of animals lost in the terrible fires in Australia will regenerate and come back to flourish again.
    Whatever animal species were lost in the Brazilian rain forest fires come back as well.

    Reply
  68. I’d like to see polar bears come back more strongly in the Arctic.
    I also would like to know that enough of the unique kangeroo species and other species of animals lost in the terrible fires in Australia will regenerate and come back to flourish again.
    Whatever animal species were lost in the Brazilian rain forest fires come back as well.

    Reply
  69. I’d like to see polar bears come back more strongly in the Arctic.
    I also would like to know that enough of the unique kangeroo species and other species of animals lost in the terrible fires in Australia will regenerate and come back to flourish again.
    Whatever animal species were lost in the Brazilian rain forest fires come back as well.

    Reply
  70. I’d like to see polar bears come back more strongly in the Arctic.
    I also would like to know that enough of the unique kangeroo species and other species of animals lost in the terrible fires in Australia will regenerate and come back to flourish again.
    Whatever animal species were lost in the Brazilian rain forest fires come back as well.

    Reply
  71. I hadn’t found any refs to pine martens catching fish … but they’re so closel related to otters that I had to believe they do.
    Good on the man in the Highlands who’s helping the species out. Yeh Scotland!
    (Itry not to be too naughty on a family blog … *g*)

    Reply
  72. I hadn’t found any refs to pine martens catching fish … but they’re so closel related to otters that I had to believe they do.
    Good on the man in the Highlands who’s helping the species out. Yeh Scotland!
    (Itry not to be too naughty on a family blog … *g*)

    Reply
  73. I hadn’t found any refs to pine martens catching fish … but they’re so closel related to otters that I had to believe they do.
    Good on the man in the Highlands who’s helping the species out. Yeh Scotland!
    (Itry not to be too naughty on a family blog … *g*)

    Reply
  74. I hadn’t found any refs to pine martens catching fish … but they’re so closel related to otters that I had to believe they do.
    Good on the man in the Highlands who’s helping the species out. Yeh Scotland!
    (Itry not to be too naughty on a family blog … *g*)

    Reply
  75. I hadn’t found any refs to pine martens catching fish … but they’re so closel related to otters that I had to believe they do.
    Good on the man in the Highlands who’s helping the species out. Yeh Scotland!
    (Itry not to be too naughty on a family blog … *g*)

    Reply
  76. Ouch. I feel for you. With me, it’s been squirrels.
    There is a wide and ingenious web discussion of how to keep wildlife out of one’s house.
    I imagine the first cave dwellers were deeply troubled by their mice and vole problems. (“… nested in my GOOD deer cloak”)
    At least the average suburban dweller is no longer challenged by cave bear and sabre tooths.

    Reply
  77. Ouch. I feel for you. With me, it’s been squirrels.
    There is a wide and ingenious web discussion of how to keep wildlife out of one’s house.
    I imagine the first cave dwellers were deeply troubled by their mice and vole problems. (“… nested in my GOOD deer cloak”)
    At least the average suburban dweller is no longer challenged by cave bear and sabre tooths.

    Reply
  78. Ouch. I feel for you. With me, it’s been squirrels.
    There is a wide and ingenious web discussion of how to keep wildlife out of one’s house.
    I imagine the first cave dwellers were deeply troubled by their mice and vole problems. (“… nested in my GOOD deer cloak”)
    At least the average suburban dweller is no longer challenged by cave bear and sabre tooths.

    Reply
  79. Ouch. I feel for you. With me, it’s been squirrels.
    There is a wide and ingenious web discussion of how to keep wildlife out of one’s house.
    I imagine the first cave dwellers were deeply troubled by their mice and vole problems. (“… nested in my GOOD deer cloak”)
    At least the average suburban dweller is no longer challenged by cave bear and sabre tooths.

    Reply
  80. Ouch. I feel for you. With me, it’s been squirrels.
    There is a wide and ingenious web discussion of how to keep wildlife out of one’s house.
    I imagine the first cave dwellers were deeply troubled by their mice and vole problems. (“… nested in my GOOD deer cloak”)
    At least the average suburban dweller is no longer challenged by cave bear and sabre tooths.

    Reply
  81. You are doing the right thing. And it’s important.
    We have the knowledge to make 98% of our plastic uses biodegradable. We could start today. We just need the will to do this.
    I like opposum myself. The are not, perhaps, personally appealing, but they are such useful scavengers.

    Reply
  82. You are doing the right thing. And it’s important.
    We have the knowledge to make 98% of our plastic uses biodegradable. We could start today. We just need the will to do this.
    I like opposum myself. The are not, perhaps, personally appealing, but they are such useful scavengers.

    Reply
  83. You are doing the right thing. And it’s important.
    We have the knowledge to make 98% of our plastic uses biodegradable. We could start today. We just need the will to do this.
    I like opposum myself. The are not, perhaps, personally appealing, but they are such useful scavengers.

    Reply
  84. You are doing the right thing. And it’s important.
    We have the knowledge to make 98% of our plastic uses biodegradable. We could start today. We just need the will to do this.
    I like opposum myself. The are not, perhaps, personally appealing, but they are such useful scavengers.

    Reply
  85. You are doing the right thing. And it’s important.
    We have the knowledge to make 98% of our plastic uses biodegradable. We could start today. We just need the will to do this.
    I like opposum myself. The are not, perhaps, personally appealing, but they are such useful scavengers.

    Reply
  86. I have seen it blamed on some fellow in New York who purposefully imported and planted all the birds in Shakespeare.
    Don’t know if that’s true, but it sounds like typical human arrogance and therefore may be accurate.

    Reply
  87. I have seen it blamed on some fellow in New York who purposefully imported and planted all the birds in Shakespeare.
    Don’t know if that’s true, but it sounds like typical human arrogance and therefore may be accurate.

    Reply
  88. I have seen it blamed on some fellow in New York who purposefully imported and planted all the birds in Shakespeare.
    Don’t know if that’s true, but it sounds like typical human arrogance and therefore may be accurate.

    Reply
  89. I have seen it blamed on some fellow in New York who purposefully imported and planted all the birds in Shakespeare.
    Don’t know if that’s true, but it sounds like typical human arrogance and therefore may be accurate.

    Reply
  90. I have seen it blamed on some fellow in New York who purposefully imported and planted all the birds in Shakespeare.
    Don’t know if that’s true, but it sounds like typical human arrogance and therefore may be accurate.

    Reply
  91. British amateur naturalists apparently join in groups to walk through wild areas uprooting intrusive species.
    I’m wildly in favor of this … I’m not sure if it would work in our vast US though.
    Wish it did.

    Reply
  92. British amateur naturalists apparently join in groups to walk through wild areas uprooting intrusive species.
    I’m wildly in favor of this … I’m not sure if it would work in our vast US though.
    Wish it did.

    Reply
  93. British amateur naturalists apparently join in groups to walk through wild areas uprooting intrusive species.
    I’m wildly in favor of this … I’m not sure if it would work in our vast US though.
    Wish it did.

    Reply
  94. British amateur naturalists apparently join in groups to walk through wild areas uprooting intrusive species.
    I’m wildly in favor of this … I’m not sure if it would work in our vast US though.
    Wish it did.

    Reply
  95. British amateur naturalists apparently join in groups to walk through wild areas uprooting intrusive species.
    I’m wildly in favor of this … I’m not sure if it would work in our vast US though.
    Wish it did.

    Reply
  96. You’ve picked some of the saddest stories for naturalists in these last years.
    Ultimately, these species are falling to human greed.
    Makes me ashamed to be a people sometimes.

    Reply
  97. You’ve picked some of the saddest stories for naturalists in these last years.
    Ultimately, these species are falling to human greed.
    Makes me ashamed to be a people sometimes.

    Reply
  98. You’ve picked some of the saddest stories for naturalists in these last years.
    Ultimately, these species are falling to human greed.
    Makes me ashamed to be a people sometimes.

    Reply
  99. You’ve picked some of the saddest stories for naturalists in these last years.
    Ultimately, these species are falling to human greed.
    Makes me ashamed to be a people sometimes.

    Reply
  100. You’ve picked some of the saddest stories for naturalists in these last years.
    Ultimately, these species are falling to human greed.
    Makes me ashamed to be a people sometimes.

    Reply
  101. I’ve had the pleasure of seeing pine martens in the wild in the Scottish Highlands. I can’t imagine them being big enough to take on a domestic cat, though. I’d like to see them return in great quantities to England along with the red squirrel. We have a beautiful selection of wildlife where we live, including European otters which again are very elusive. There is currently something living up in our loft that purrs – we haven’t been up to check it out yet…

    Reply
  102. I’ve had the pleasure of seeing pine martens in the wild in the Scottish Highlands. I can’t imagine them being big enough to take on a domestic cat, though. I’d like to see them return in great quantities to England along with the red squirrel. We have a beautiful selection of wildlife where we live, including European otters which again are very elusive. There is currently something living up in our loft that purrs – we haven’t been up to check it out yet…

    Reply
  103. I’ve had the pleasure of seeing pine martens in the wild in the Scottish Highlands. I can’t imagine them being big enough to take on a domestic cat, though. I’d like to see them return in great quantities to England along with the red squirrel. We have a beautiful selection of wildlife where we live, including European otters which again are very elusive. There is currently something living up in our loft that purrs – we haven’t been up to check it out yet…

    Reply
  104. I’ve had the pleasure of seeing pine martens in the wild in the Scottish Highlands. I can’t imagine them being big enough to take on a domestic cat, though. I’d like to see them return in great quantities to England along with the red squirrel. We have a beautiful selection of wildlife where we live, including European otters which again are very elusive. There is currently something living up in our loft that purrs – we haven’t been up to check it out yet…

    Reply
  105. I’ve had the pleasure of seeing pine martens in the wild in the Scottish Highlands. I can’t imagine them being big enough to take on a domestic cat, though. I’d like to see them return in great quantities to England along with the red squirrel. We have a beautiful selection of wildlife where we live, including European otters which again are very elusive. There is currently something living up in our loft that purrs – we haven’t been up to check it out yet…

    Reply
  106. Do you know … I would not be at all reassured to know there was something in my loft that purrs. Unless it is a cat.
    I have seen North American sea otters out in Oregon and also otters that live in the Maine woods. They are utterly delightful.
    And if pine martens are the price of getting the red squirrel back, I’m all in favor of it.
    I don’t know whether the naturalist lore is right about pine martens taking down cats. Cats do seem to be tasty snacks to predators.
    I’m actually surprised martens take out chickens. A rooster in charge of a flock is downright scary.

    Reply
  107. Do you know … I would not be at all reassured to know there was something in my loft that purrs. Unless it is a cat.
    I have seen North American sea otters out in Oregon and also otters that live in the Maine woods. They are utterly delightful.
    And if pine martens are the price of getting the red squirrel back, I’m all in favor of it.
    I don’t know whether the naturalist lore is right about pine martens taking down cats. Cats do seem to be tasty snacks to predators.
    I’m actually surprised martens take out chickens. A rooster in charge of a flock is downright scary.

    Reply
  108. Do you know … I would not be at all reassured to know there was something in my loft that purrs. Unless it is a cat.
    I have seen North American sea otters out in Oregon and also otters that live in the Maine woods. They are utterly delightful.
    And if pine martens are the price of getting the red squirrel back, I’m all in favor of it.
    I don’t know whether the naturalist lore is right about pine martens taking down cats. Cats do seem to be tasty snacks to predators.
    I’m actually surprised martens take out chickens. A rooster in charge of a flock is downright scary.

    Reply
  109. Do you know … I would not be at all reassured to know there was something in my loft that purrs. Unless it is a cat.
    I have seen North American sea otters out in Oregon and also otters that live in the Maine woods. They are utterly delightful.
    And if pine martens are the price of getting the red squirrel back, I’m all in favor of it.
    I don’t know whether the naturalist lore is right about pine martens taking down cats. Cats do seem to be tasty snacks to predators.
    I’m actually surprised martens take out chickens. A rooster in charge of a flock is downright scary.

    Reply
  110. Do you know … I would not be at all reassured to know there was something in my loft that purrs. Unless it is a cat.
    I have seen North American sea otters out in Oregon and also otters that live in the Maine woods. They are utterly delightful.
    And if pine martens are the price of getting the red squirrel back, I’m all in favor of it.
    I don’t know whether the naturalist lore is right about pine martens taking down cats. Cats do seem to be tasty snacks to predators.
    I’m actually surprised martens take out chickens. A rooster in charge of a flock is downright scary.

    Reply
  111. So agree with Karin re invasive plants. Here in New England some states have banned nurseries from selling burning bush, bamboo, and loosestrife – all beautiful, but all have not only pushed out native species but also caused specific harm. Loosestrife clogged many ponds and small lakes, changing the natural watershed. Even though banned, all still thrive in gardens and on private land.

    Reply
  112. So agree with Karin re invasive plants. Here in New England some states have banned nurseries from selling burning bush, bamboo, and loosestrife – all beautiful, but all have not only pushed out native species but also caused specific harm. Loosestrife clogged many ponds and small lakes, changing the natural watershed. Even though banned, all still thrive in gardens and on private land.

    Reply
  113. So agree with Karin re invasive plants. Here in New England some states have banned nurseries from selling burning bush, bamboo, and loosestrife – all beautiful, but all have not only pushed out native species but also caused specific harm. Loosestrife clogged many ponds and small lakes, changing the natural watershed. Even though banned, all still thrive in gardens and on private land.

    Reply
  114. So agree with Karin re invasive plants. Here in New England some states have banned nurseries from selling burning bush, bamboo, and loosestrife – all beautiful, but all have not only pushed out native species but also caused specific harm. Loosestrife clogged many ponds and small lakes, changing the natural watershed. Even though banned, all still thrive in gardens and on private land.

    Reply
  115. So agree with Karin re invasive plants. Here in New England some states have banned nurseries from selling burning bush, bamboo, and loosestrife – all beautiful, but all have not only pushed out native species but also caused specific harm. Loosestrife clogged many ponds and small lakes, changing the natural watershed. Even though banned, all still thrive in gardens and on private land.

    Reply
  116. Honeysuckle — the imported variety, not the native plant — chokes the woods in the MidAtlantic. Imported as a garden plant.
    And don’t get me started on kudzu. It was deliberately introduced to be cattle feed. Nobody checked to see if they’d actually eat it.

    Reply
  117. Honeysuckle — the imported variety, not the native plant — chokes the woods in the MidAtlantic. Imported as a garden plant.
    And don’t get me started on kudzu. It was deliberately introduced to be cattle feed. Nobody checked to see if they’d actually eat it.

    Reply
  118. Honeysuckle — the imported variety, not the native plant — chokes the woods in the MidAtlantic. Imported as a garden plant.
    And don’t get me started on kudzu. It was deliberately introduced to be cattle feed. Nobody checked to see if they’d actually eat it.

    Reply
  119. Honeysuckle — the imported variety, not the native plant — chokes the woods in the MidAtlantic. Imported as a garden plant.
    And don’t get me started on kudzu. It was deliberately introduced to be cattle feed. Nobody checked to see if they’d actually eat it.

    Reply
  120. Honeysuckle — the imported variety, not the native plant — chokes the woods in the MidAtlantic. Imported as a garden plant.
    And don’t get me started on kudzu. It was deliberately introduced to be cattle feed. Nobody checked to see if they’d actually eat it.

    Reply
  121. Growing up in North Carolina, my sister and I would scare each other silly with stories about kudzu growing over our house — in rural areas, it did seem to swallow everything in its path its a rapid rate! Never knew honeysuckle could be invasive, but certainly can imagine it. Now, despite the heat, I am going out to clear my perennial garden of lily of the valley, which we never planted, but which seems determined to replace everything we did! I imagine one of those English sparrow invaders brought it! ;))

    Reply
  122. Growing up in North Carolina, my sister and I would scare each other silly with stories about kudzu growing over our house — in rural areas, it did seem to swallow everything in its path its a rapid rate! Never knew honeysuckle could be invasive, but certainly can imagine it. Now, despite the heat, I am going out to clear my perennial garden of lily of the valley, which we never planted, but which seems determined to replace everything we did! I imagine one of those English sparrow invaders brought it! ;))

    Reply
  123. Growing up in North Carolina, my sister and I would scare each other silly with stories about kudzu growing over our house — in rural areas, it did seem to swallow everything in its path its a rapid rate! Never knew honeysuckle could be invasive, but certainly can imagine it. Now, despite the heat, I am going out to clear my perennial garden of lily of the valley, which we never planted, but which seems determined to replace everything we did! I imagine one of those English sparrow invaders brought it! ;))

    Reply
  124. Growing up in North Carolina, my sister and I would scare each other silly with stories about kudzu growing over our house — in rural areas, it did seem to swallow everything in its path its a rapid rate! Never knew honeysuckle could be invasive, but certainly can imagine it. Now, despite the heat, I am going out to clear my perennial garden of lily of the valley, which we never planted, but which seems determined to replace everything we did! I imagine one of those English sparrow invaders brought it! ;))

    Reply
  125. Growing up in North Carolina, my sister and I would scare each other silly with stories about kudzu growing over our house — in rural areas, it did seem to swallow everything in its path its a rapid rate! Never knew honeysuckle could be invasive, but certainly can imagine it. Now, despite the heat, I am going out to clear my perennial garden of lily of the valley, which we never planted, but which seems determined to replace everything we did! I imagine one of those English sparrow invaders brought it! ;))

    Reply
  126. I wish I lived close enough to come take your lily of the valley out of the garden. I do love it.
    I had a whole bunch in the last place I lived, up in the hills, but Inleft it for those who follow me there.
    I haven’t planted it in my yard down here yet.

    Reply
  127. I wish I lived close enough to come take your lily of the valley out of the garden. I do love it.
    I had a whole bunch in the last place I lived, up in the hills, but Inleft it for those who follow me there.
    I haven’t planted it in my yard down here yet.

    Reply
  128. I wish I lived close enough to come take your lily of the valley out of the garden. I do love it.
    I had a whole bunch in the last place I lived, up in the hills, but Inleft it for those who follow me there.
    I haven’t planted it in my yard down here yet.

    Reply
  129. I wish I lived close enough to come take your lily of the valley out of the garden. I do love it.
    I had a whole bunch in the last place I lived, up in the hills, but Inleft it for those who follow me there.
    I haven’t planted it in my yard down here yet.

    Reply
  130. I wish I lived close enough to come take your lily of the valley out of the garden. I do love it.
    I had a whole bunch in the last place I lived, up in the hills, but Inleft it for those who follow me there.
    I haven’t planted it in my yard down here yet.

    Reply
  131. Apparently, you must be careul in the uprooting. I have read that attempting to uproot kudzu makes it spread faster. I am not sure that this is true, but the idea suggests that we must learn to change things safely.

    Reply
  132. Apparently, you must be careul in the uprooting. I have read that attempting to uproot kudzu makes it spread faster. I am not sure that this is true, but the idea suggests that we must learn to change things safely.

    Reply
  133. Apparently, you must be careul in the uprooting. I have read that attempting to uproot kudzu makes it spread faster. I am not sure that this is true, but the idea suggests that we must learn to change things safely.

    Reply
  134. Apparently, you must be careul in the uprooting. I have read that attempting to uproot kudzu makes it spread faster. I am not sure that this is true, but the idea suggests that we must learn to change things safely.

    Reply
  135. Apparently, you must be careul in the uprooting. I have read that attempting to uproot kudzu makes it spread faster. I am not sure that this is true, but the idea suggests that we must learn to change things safely.

    Reply
  136. Loved reading about the pine marten… or is it Pine Marten? I’ll go with the latter. So I’ve been “stalking” a thing that lives along the sandy/muddy beach on the Mattaponi River (Virginia, U.S.A.) and just assumed I was stalking an otter. Well, now there’s a whole new world of possibilities to which you’ve opened my eyes. There’s a massive cypress tree growing at the edge of this beach. I keep looking to the marsh grass for signs of an abode, but maybe I need to look up. (What the heck WAS that that fell on my head last weekend. Ewww.) Thanks for the new possibility. Next time I see you, I’ll share the little footy print pictures. BTW, caught nothing on the critter camera, but maybe she’s grown wise to my ways. (BTW, it is a “she”, I suspect. The big prints were joined by little tiny prints last spring.)

    Reply
  137. Loved reading about the pine marten… or is it Pine Marten? I’ll go with the latter. So I’ve been “stalking” a thing that lives along the sandy/muddy beach on the Mattaponi River (Virginia, U.S.A.) and just assumed I was stalking an otter. Well, now there’s a whole new world of possibilities to which you’ve opened my eyes. There’s a massive cypress tree growing at the edge of this beach. I keep looking to the marsh grass for signs of an abode, but maybe I need to look up. (What the heck WAS that that fell on my head last weekend. Ewww.) Thanks for the new possibility. Next time I see you, I’ll share the little footy print pictures. BTW, caught nothing on the critter camera, but maybe she’s grown wise to my ways. (BTW, it is a “she”, I suspect. The big prints were joined by little tiny prints last spring.)

    Reply
  138. Loved reading about the pine marten… or is it Pine Marten? I’ll go with the latter. So I’ve been “stalking” a thing that lives along the sandy/muddy beach on the Mattaponi River (Virginia, U.S.A.) and just assumed I was stalking an otter. Well, now there’s a whole new world of possibilities to which you’ve opened my eyes. There’s a massive cypress tree growing at the edge of this beach. I keep looking to the marsh grass for signs of an abode, but maybe I need to look up. (What the heck WAS that that fell on my head last weekend. Ewww.) Thanks for the new possibility. Next time I see you, I’ll share the little footy print pictures. BTW, caught nothing on the critter camera, but maybe she’s grown wise to my ways. (BTW, it is a “she”, I suspect. The big prints were joined by little tiny prints last spring.)

    Reply
  139. Loved reading about the pine marten… or is it Pine Marten? I’ll go with the latter. So I’ve been “stalking” a thing that lives along the sandy/muddy beach on the Mattaponi River (Virginia, U.S.A.) and just assumed I was stalking an otter. Well, now there’s a whole new world of possibilities to which you’ve opened my eyes. There’s a massive cypress tree growing at the edge of this beach. I keep looking to the marsh grass for signs of an abode, but maybe I need to look up. (What the heck WAS that that fell on my head last weekend. Ewww.) Thanks for the new possibility. Next time I see you, I’ll share the little footy print pictures. BTW, caught nothing on the critter camera, but maybe she’s grown wise to my ways. (BTW, it is a “she”, I suspect. The big prints were joined by little tiny prints last spring.)

    Reply
  140. Loved reading about the pine marten… or is it Pine Marten? I’ll go with the latter. So I’ve been “stalking” a thing that lives along the sandy/muddy beach on the Mattaponi River (Virginia, U.S.A.) and just assumed I was stalking an otter. Well, now there’s a whole new world of possibilities to which you’ve opened my eyes. There’s a massive cypress tree growing at the edge of this beach. I keep looking to the marsh grass for signs of an abode, but maybe I need to look up. (What the heck WAS that that fell on my head last weekend. Ewww.) Thanks for the new possibility. Next time I see you, I’ll share the little footy print pictures. BTW, caught nothing on the critter camera, but maybe she’s grown wise to my ways. (BTW, it is a “she”, I suspect. The big prints were joined by little tiny prints last spring.)

    Reply

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