Petticoats and Plantagenets

Petticoat american 1955 met

All-American petticoat 1955

Doubtless you’ve occasionally stopped in your daily round and wondered, “Why do we call a kind of frilly slip a petticoat? Doesn’t that mean ‘Little Coat’ or something like that? You know, French petite meaning small and coat meaning . . . well . . . coat.”

Gambeson 2

A he-man's petty coat

When I think petticoat I think of the Fifties and something frilly and stiff, maybe worn under a poodle skirt.

1950s_poodle_skirts

Poodle skirts. Those were the days.

But petticoats were not always so.

I blame the Plantagenets. Also the Tudors. 

Originally the ‘little coat’ was indeed a little coat. Worn by men. In fact, worn by men in battle under their armor.

The petty coat or gambeson was a short padded jacket worn to keep all that warlike fitted metal from chafing those manly muscles. This is not the sort of thing I ponder upon every day, but it occurs to me the simple act of wearing metal was probably fairly uncomfortable all by itself, without any battles going on, not to mention chilly in winter.

Thus the original petty coat. It also likely helped stop edged weaponry that had gotten past the metal layer. Your men-at-arms and peasantry on the march wore a slightly longer, multilayered and quilted version of this as their only protection.

Lucas de Heere c. 1570 with red petticoat

Bright red petticoat underneath her dress. 1570. Also a bird in  hand.
400px-Don_Carlos_Spanien wearing a doublet

You cannot actually see the petty coat here. It's under the doublet.

By the end of the Fifteenth Century the petty coat was also a men’s undergarment of the same general form as the military wear. In the  Boke of Curtasye, the chainberlain is told to get ready for his lord a clene shirt and breeches, a pettycote, a doublette, a long cote, and a stomacher. The petty coat was worn between the shirt and the doublet

Perhaps it was these civilian versions of the under-armor petty coat that created confusion. By the last half of the Sixteenth Century, a petty coat was also a garment worn by women. It might be a skirt or a skirt with an attached bodice and even sleeves. It could be worn as underclothes or be an outer garment. They were often a startlingly bright red. 

The petticoat had jumped the gender barrier and become woman’s clothing. It never looked back.

1740 to 60 petticoat silk cotton met

Here we see just the petticoat itself
image from https://s3.amazonaws.com/feather-client-files-aviary-prod-us-east-1/2016-01-20/497671df31844249924afdb9cebe9126.png

And here the petticoat and gown. This is a robe à la française

A hundred years or so later genteel woman’s dress evolved into a combination of gown and petticoat. The skirt of the gown was drawn back to show the petticoat below. The petticoat itself was a gathered skirt, often with a bodice. It had become a highly decorated garment, made of beautiful fabric.

Chemis third quarter 18 c Met

Regency shift or chemise. Well hidden underwear.

This makes sense of the lines in the song Mary Hamilton,

“Cast off, cast off my gown, she cried,
but let my petticoat be
and tie a napkin round my face,
the gallows I would not see.

Anyway, from all this you will see there is an old and venerable tradition of underwear/outer wear confusion and no real grounds for objection if folks choose to run about in camisoles, I suppose.

As we approach the Regency the rules change. A new style with slim lines, diaphanous  fabrics, and a high waist comes in. Exit the petticoat. For a few decades the undergarment of choice is the plain linen or cotton shift.

 

Petticoatearly1805 to 1815
Knitpetticoat1812ETA:
A clothing expert points out that petticoats never really disappeared in the Regency era. The garments worn under a dress might be reduced to a single layer, but it was not always a simple shift or chemise. Sometimes the elaborate design tells us these were meant to be seen.

 

 

I am rather wedded to trousers, myself, and out of touch with dresses,
but it might be fun to swish about in petticoats.

Does anyone miss petticoats?

270 thoughts on “Petticoats and Plantagenets”

  1. I do not miss them one little bit. By the time I was old enough to make my own decisions, the petticoat was being made from nylon, and had a tendency to cling to the legs, and the synthetic fabric of the dress/skirt. It was horrible to wear, but if you left the petticoat off, horrors, you could see through the over fabric. Fancy. You could see all the legs. I did have lots and lots of petticoats, all to match the relevant dresses. Some were full length, I.e. With a top with very thin straps that slipped down the arms, grrrrr. Or some were skirt length only with elastic. And that was another problem. If the elastic went, then the petticoats went as well. I could go on and on so I will stop. I equate petticoats with suspenders. Bad inventions.

    Reply
  2. I do not miss them one little bit. By the time I was old enough to make my own decisions, the petticoat was being made from nylon, and had a tendency to cling to the legs, and the synthetic fabric of the dress/skirt. It was horrible to wear, but if you left the petticoat off, horrors, you could see through the over fabric. Fancy. You could see all the legs. I did have lots and lots of petticoats, all to match the relevant dresses. Some were full length, I.e. With a top with very thin straps that slipped down the arms, grrrrr. Or some were skirt length only with elastic. And that was another problem. If the elastic went, then the petticoats went as well. I could go on and on so I will stop. I equate petticoats with suspenders. Bad inventions.

    Reply
  3. I do not miss them one little bit. By the time I was old enough to make my own decisions, the petticoat was being made from nylon, and had a tendency to cling to the legs, and the synthetic fabric of the dress/skirt. It was horrible to wear, but if you left the petticoat off, horrors, you could see through the over fabric. Fancy. You could see all the legs. I did have lots and lots of petticoats, all to match the relevant dresses. Some were full length, I.e. With a top with very thin straps that slipped down the arms, grrrrr. Or some were skirt length only with elastic. And that was another problem. If the elastic went, then the petticoats went as well. I could go on and on so I will stop. I equate petticoats with suspenders. Bad inventions.

    Reply
  4. I do not miss them one little bit. By the time I was old enough to make my own decisions, the petticoat was being made from nylon, and had a tendency to cling to the legs, and the synthetic fabric of the dress/skirt. It was horrible to wear, but if you left the petticoat off, horrors, you could see through the over fabric. Fancy. You could see all the legs. I did have lots and lots of petticoats, all to match the relevant dresses. Some were full length, I.e. With a top with very thin straps that slipped down the arms, grrrrr. Or some were skirt length only with elastic. And that was another problem. If the elastic went, then the petticoats went as well. I could go on and on so I will stop. I equate petticoats with suspenders. Bad inventions.

    Reply
  5. I do not miss them one little bit. By the time I was old enough to make my own decisions, the petticoat was being made from nylon, and had a tendency to cling to the legs, and the synthetic fabric of the dress/skirt. It was horrible to wear, but if you left the petticoat off, horrors, you could see through the over fabric. Fancy. You could see all the legs. I did have lots and lots of petticoats, all to match the relevant dresses. Some were full length, I.e. With a top with very thin straps that slipped down the arms, grrrrr. Or some were skirt length only with elastic. And that was another problem. If the elastic went, then the petticoats went as well. I could go on and on so I will stop. I equate petticoats with suspenders. Bad inventions.

    Reply
  6. I do kind of miss those ’50s petticoats. They’d be a bit impractical these days, since I’d be hard put to find a full skirt to wear over them, but they were pretty. And there’s a distinct pleasure in knowing you’re wearing something pretty that no one can see.

    Reply
  7. I do kind of miss those ’50s petticoats. They’d be a bit impractical these days, since I’d be hard put to find a full skirt to wear over them, but they were pretty. And there’s a distinct pleasure in knowing you’re wearing something pretty that no one can see.

    Reply
  8. I do kind of miss those ’50s petticoats. They’d be a bit impractical these days, since I’d be hard put to find a full skirt to wear over them, but they were pretty. And there’s a distinct pleasure in knowing you’re wearing something pretty that no one can see.

    Reply
  9. I do kind of miss those ’50s petticoats. They’d be a bit impractical these days, since I’d be hard put to find a full skirt to wear over them, but they were pretty. And there’s a distinct pleasure in knowing you’re wearing something pretty that no one can see.

    Reply
  10. I do kind of miss those ’50s petticoats. They’d be a bit impractical these days, since I’d be hard put to find a full skirt to wear over them, but they were pretty. And there’s a distinct pleasure in knowing you’re wearing something pretty that no one can see.

    Reply
  11. I remember wearing petticoats, but just on the edge of memory. I think they were stiff and unpleasant.
    I don’t understand women’s clothing.
    This is where I say something like, “If we can send a man to the moon, why can’t we make comfortable clothing?” But I imagine space suits are uncomfortable in the extreme.
    I want blue jeans and a tee shirt to become high fashion.

    Reply
  12. I remember wearing petticoats, but just on the edge of memory. I think they were stiff and unpleasant.
    I don’t understand women’s clothing.
    This is where I say something like, “If we can send a man to the moon, why can’t we make comfortable clothing?” But I imagine space suits are uncomfortable in the extreme.
    I want blue jeans and a tee shirt to become high fashion.

    Reply
  13. I remember wearing petticoats, but just on the edge of memory. I think they were stiff and unpleasant.
    I don’t understand women’s clothing.
    This is where I say something like, “If we can send a man to the moon, why can’t we make comfortable clothing?” But I imagine space suits are uncomfortable in the extreme.
    I want blue jeans and a tee shirt to become high fashion.

    Reply
  14. I remember wearing petticoats, but just on the edge of memory. I think they were stiff and unpleasant.
    I don’t understand women’s clothing.
    This is where I say something like, “If we can send a man to the moon, why can’t we make comfortable clothing?” But I imagine space suits are uncomfortable in the extreme.
    I want blue jeans and a tee shirt to become high fashion.

    Reply
  15. I remember wearing petticoats, but just on the edge of memory. I think they were stiff and unpleasant.
    I don’t understand women’s clothing.
    This is where I say something like, “If we can send a man to the moon, why can’t we make comfortable clothing?” But I imagine space suits are uncomfortable in the extreme.
    I want blue jeans and a tee shirt to become high fashion.

    Reply
  16. I have a sister who wears petticoats and 50s skirts to do dance and thereby has quite unlimited fun with others of her ilk.
    I think — I don’t know — that you buy the poodle skirts and petticoats from dance costume suppliers who will also sell you belly-dancing rig and leotards if you are that way inclined.
    I am so delighted by variety of mankind.

    Reply
  17. I have a sister who wears petticoats and 50s skirts to do dance and thereby has quite unlimited fun with others of her ilk.
    I think — I don’t know — that you buy the poodle skirts and petticoats from dance costume suppliers who will also sell you belly-dancing rig and leotards if you are that way inclined.
    I am so delighted by variety of mankind.

    Reply
  18. I have a sister who wears petticoats and 50s skirts to do dance and thereby has quite unlimited fun with others of her ilk.
    I think — I don’t know — that you buy the poodle skirts and petticoats from dance costume suppliers who will also sell you belly-dancing rig and leotards if you are that way inclined.
    I am so delighted by variety of mankind.

    Reply
  19. I have a sister who wears petticoats and 50s skirts to do dance and thereby has quite unlimited fun with others of her ilk.
    I think — I don’t know — that you buy the poodle skirts and petticoats from dance costume suppliers who will also sell you belly-dancing rig and leotards if you are that way inclined.
    I am so delighted by variety of mankind.

    Reply
  20. I have a sister who wears petticoats and 50s skirts to do dance and thereby has quite unlimited fun with others of her ilk.
    I think — I don’t know — that you buy the poodle skirts and petticoats from dance costume suppliers who will also sell you belly-dancing rig and leotards if you are that way inclined.
    I am so delighted by variety of mankind.

    Reply
  21. Growing up, it was considered uncouth to go without a slip (American for petticoat), but that all got left behind after women’s lib. When I told one of my daughters she needed a slip to wear under a formal dress that was a little thin, she had no idea what that was. I still have a lacy petticoat in my closet, a leftover from the 80s when western style clothing was in and I wore it with a wide denim skirt.

    Reply
  22. Growing up, it was considered uncouth to go without a slip (American for petticoat), but that all got left behind after women’s lib. When I told one of my daughters she needed a slip to wear under a formal dress that was a little thin, she had no idea what that was. I still have a lacy petticoat in my closet, a leftover from the 80s when western style clothing was in and I wore it with a wide denim skirt.

    Reply
  23. Growing up, it was considered uncouth to go without a slip (American for petticoat), but that all got left behind after women’s lib. When I told one of my daughters she needed a slip to wear under a formal dress that was a little thin, she had no idea what that was. I still have a lacy petticoat in my closet, a leftover from the 80s when western style clothing was in and I wore it with a wide denim skirt.

    Reply
  24. Growing up, it was considered uncouth to go without a slip (American for petticoat), but that all got left behind after women’s lib. When I told one of my daughters she needed a slip to wear under a formal dress that was a little thin, she had no idea what that was. I still have a lacy petticoat in my closet, a leftover from the 80s when western style clothing was in and I wore it with a wide denim skirt.

    Reply
  25. Growing up, it was considered uncouth to go without a slip (American for petticoat), but that all got left behind after women’s lib. When I told one of my daughters she needed a slip to wear under a formal dress that was a little thin, she had no idea what that was. I still have a lacy petticoat in my closet, a leftover from the 80s when western style clothing was in and I wore it with a wide denim skirt.

    Reply
  26. I am practically antideluvian, so I remember a variety of petticoats. I suspect miniskirts had much to do with their disappearance. I rather liked the frilly, swishy petticoats of my early childhood, but I was less fond of the crinolines that came a bit later. I can still see myself and a group of friends at church camp, trudging up a grassy hill to our cabin, our single allotted suitcase in one hand and crinolines and a curler bag (with brush rollers–horrors!) in the other because not even our mothers could get them in the suitcase.

    Reply
  27. I am practically antideluvian, so I remember a variety of petticoats. I suspect miniskirts had much to do with their disappearance. I rather liked the frilly, swishy petticoats of my early childhood, but I was less fond of the crinolines that came a bit later. I can still see myself and a group of friends at church camp, trudging up a grassy hill to our cabin, our single allotted suitcase in one hand and crinolines and a curler bag (with brush rollers–horrors!) in the other because not even our mothers could get them in the suitcase.

    Reply
  28. I am practically antideluvian, so I remember a variety of petticoats. I suspect miniskirts had much to do with their disappearance. I rather liked the frilly, swishy petticoats of my early childhood, but I was less fond of the crinolines that came a bit later. I can still see myself and a group of friends at church camp, trudging up a grassy hill to our cabin, our single allotted suitcase in one hand and crinolines and a curler bag (with brush rollers–horrors!) in the other because not even our mothers could get them in the suitcase.

    Reply
  29. I am practically antideluvian, so I remember a variety of petticoats. I suspect miniskirts had much to do with their disappearance. I rather liked the frilly, swishy petticoats of my early childhood, but I was less fond of the crinolines that came a bit later. I can still see myself and a group of friends at church camp, trudging up a grassy hill to our cabin, our single allotted suitcase in one hand and crinolines and a curler bag (with brush rollers–horrors!) in the other because not even our mothers could get them in the suitcase.

    Reply
  30. I am practically antideluvian, so I remember a variety of petticoats. I suspect miniskirts had much to do with their disappearance. I rather liked the frilly, swishy petticoats of my early childhood, but I was less fond of the crinolines that came a bit later. I can still see myself and a group of friends at church camp, trudging up a grassy hill to our cabin, our single allotted suitcase in one hand and crinolines and a curler bag (with brush rollers–horrors!) in the other because not even our mothers could get them in the suitcase.

    Reply
  31. So I am from India and the petticoat is the skirt that we wear under the sari. It is usually made of cotton for everyday wear and fancy silk when luxury saris are worn. Also on the topic of petticoats.. could someone explain the banyan. This is what the undershirt worn by men is called in India. Earlier this was a garment that was made of cotton and worn over the torso crossed over as a home apparel. Recently in Madeline Hunters latest the hero sport a midnight blue banyan for a midnight rendezvous with the heroine 🙂

    Reply
  32. So I am from India and the petticoat is the skirt that we wear under the sari. It is usually made of cotton for everyday wear and fancy silk when luxury saris are worn. Also on the topic of petticoats.. could someone explain the banyan. This is what the undershirt worn by men is called in India. Earlier this was a garment that was made of cotton and worn over the torso crossed over as a home apparel. Recently in Madeline Hunters latest the hero sport a midnight blue banyan for a midnight rendezvous with the heroine 🙂

    Reply
  33. So I am from India and the petticoat is the skirt that we wear under the sari. It is usually made of cotton for everyday wear and fancy silk when luxury saris are worn. Also on the topic of petticoats.. could someone explain the banyan. This is what the undershirt worn by men is called in India. Earlier this was a garment that was made of cotton and worn over the torso crossed over as a home apparel. Recently in Madeline Hunters latest the hero sport a midnight blue banyan for a midnight rendezvous with the heroine 🙂

    Reply
  34. So I am from India and the petticoat is the skirt that we wear under the sari. It is usually made of cotton for everyday wear and fancy silk when luxury saris are worn. Also on the topic of petticoats.. could someone explain the banyan. This is what the undershirt worn by men is called in India. Earlier this was a garment that was made of cotton and worn over the torso crossed over as a home apparel. Recently in Madeline Hunters latest the hero sport a midnight blue banyan for a midnight rendezvous with the heroine 🙂

    Reply
  35. So I am from India and the petticoat is the skirt that we wear under the sari. It is usually made of cotton for everyday wear and fancy silk when luxury saris are worn. Also on the topic of petticoats.. could someone explain the banyan. This is what the undershirt worn by men is called in India. Earlier this was a garment that was made of cotton and worn over the torso crossed over as a home apparel. Recently in Madeline Hunters latest the hero sport a midnight blue banyan for a midnight rendezvous with the heroine 🙂

    Reply
  36. Yes, I think they are beautiful and the sound of the swish, swish of the skirts always makes me feel so feminine. I have worked as a bridal consultant and I loved helping the bride’s find a beautiful dress. Some days I felt like I stepped back in time. It made me miss our past. I can’t imagine what they would think if the could see what is worn today! I would think it would be more than SHOCKING! 😱

    Reply
  37. Yes, I think they are beautiful and the sound of the swish, swish of the skirts always makes me feel so feminine. I have worked as a bridal consultant and I loved helping the bride’s find a beautiful dress. Some days I felt like I stepped back in time. It made me miss our past. I can’t imagine what they would think if the could see what is worn today! I would think it would be more than SHOCKING! 😱

    Reply
  38. Yes, I think they are beautiful and the sound of the swish, swish of the skirts always makes me feel so feminine. I have worked as a bridal consultant and I loved helping the bride’s find a beautiful dress. Some days I felt like I stepped back in time. It made me miss our past. I can’t imagine what they would think if the could see what is worn today! I would think it would be more than SHOCKING! 😱

    Reply
  39. Yes, I think they are beautiful and the sound of the swish, swish of the skirts always makes me feel so feminine. I have worked as a bridal consultant and I loved helping the bride’s find a beautiful dress. Some days I felt like I stepped back in time. It made me miss our past. I can’t imagine what they would think if the could see what is worn today! I would think it would be more than SHOCKING! 😱

    Reply
  40. Yes, I think they are beautiful and the sound of the swish, swish of the skirts always makes me feel so feminine. I have worked as a bridal consultant and I loved helping the bride’s find a beautiful dress. Some days I felt like I stepped back in time. It made me miss our past. I can’t imagine what they would think if the could see what is worn today! I would think it would be more than SHOCKING! 😱

    Reply
  41. We study Peru in our grade 3 social studies. The Quechua women wear layers of petticoats under their traditional embroidered skirts. I always need to explain what a petticoat is. It’s nice to have the background information on it. Personally, I’d love to wear dresses and skirts that swish when I walk, but alas, I was born in the 70’s and would look like I was playing dress up!

    Reply
  42. We study Peru in our grade 3 social studies. The Quechua women wear layers of petticoats under their traditional embroidered skirts. I always need to explain what a petticoat is. It’s nice to have the background information on it. Personally, I’d love to wear dresses and skirts that swish when I walk, but alas, I was born in the 70’s and would look like I was playing dress up!

    Reply
  43. We study Peru in our grade 3 social studies. The Quechua women wear layers of petticoats under their traditional embroidered skirts. I always need to explain what a petticoat is. It’s nice to have the background information on it. Personally, I’d love to wear dresses and skirts that swish when I walk, but alas, I was born in the 70’s and would look like I was playing dress up!

    Reply
  44. We study Peru in our grade 3 social studies. The Quechua women wear layers of petticoats under their traditional embroidered skirts. I always need to explain what a petticoat is. It’s nice to have the background information on it. Personally, I’d love to wear dresses and skirts that swish when I walk, but alas, I was born in the 70’s and would look like I was playing dress up!

    Reply
  45. We study Peru in our grade 3 social studies. The Quechua women wear layers of petticoats under their traditional embroidered skirts. I always need to explain what a petticoat is. It’s nice to have the background information on it. Personally, I’d love to wear dresses and skirts that swish when I walk, but alas, I was born in the 70’s and would look like I was playing dress up!

    Reply
  46. Hope ye don’t mind me telling this little story. My Great-Grandmother was a tough lady. In the Civil War here in Ireland in 1922 her son, my Grand-Uncle, was fighting for the old IRA. When the English soldiers were hunting them they used to come to my Great-Grans house and she would hide them in the hills behind her home. She had two long petticoats. One in white and one in red. If the soldiers were hanging around she would go out in her back yard, lift her long black skirt and show her red one. She would show the white one if it was safe. Then they would come down from the hills, she’d feed them and they would head off again. A special use for the petticoat!!

    Reply
  47. Hope ye don’t mind me telling this little story. My Great-Grandmother was a tough lady. In the Civil War here in Ireland in 1922 her son, my Grand-Uncle, was fighting for the old IRA. When the English soldiers were hunting them they used to come to my Great-Grans house and she would hide them in the hills behind her home. She had two long petticoats. One in white and one in red. If the soldiers were hanging around she would go out in her back yard, lift her long black skirt and show her red one. She would show the white one if it was safe. Then they would come down from the hills, she’d feed them and they would head off again. A special use for the petticoat!!

    Reply
  48. Hope ye don’t mind me telling this little story. My Great-Grandmother was a tough lady. In the Civil War here in Ireland in 1922 her son, my Grand-Uncle, was fighting for the old IRA. When the English soldiers were hunting them they used to come to my Great-Grans house and she would hide them in the hills behind her home. She had two long petticoats. One in white and one in red. If the soldiers were hanging around she would go out in her back yard, lift her long black skirt and show her red one. She would show the white one if it was safe. Then they would come down from the hills, she’d feed them and they would head off again. A special use for the petticoat!!

    Reply
  49. Hope ye don’t mind me telling this little story. My Great-Grandmother was a tough lady. In the Civil War here in Ireland in 1922 her son, my Grand-Uncle, was fighting for the old IRA. When the English soldiers were hunting them they used to come to my Great-Grans house and she would hide them in the hills behind her home. She had two long petticoats. One in white and one in red. If the soldiers were hanging around she would go out in her back yard, lift her long black skirt and show her red one. She would show the white one if it was safe. Then they would come down from the hills, she’d feed them and they would head off again. A special use for the petticoat!!

    Reply
  50. Hope ye don’t mind me telling this little story. My Great-Grandmother was a tough lady. In the Civil War here in Ireland in 1922 her son, my Grand-Uncle, was fighting for the old IRA. When the English soldiers were hunting them they used to come to my Great-Grans house and she would hide them in the hills behind her home. She had two long petticoats. One in white and one in red. If the soldiers were hanging around she would go out in her back yard, lift her long black skirt and show her red one. She would show the white one if it was safe. Then they would come down from the hills, she’d feed them and they would head off again. A special use for the petticoat!!

    Reply
  51. I remember those well Annette. The edge of the petticoat was frilly and was on show under the skirt. I thought I was the bee’s knees in mine.

    Reply
  52. I remember those well Annette. The edge of the petticoat was frilly and was on show under the skirt. I thought I was the bee’s knees in mine.

    Reply
  53. I remember those well Annette. The edge of the petticoat was frilly and was on show under the skirt. I thought I was the bee’s knees in mine.

    Reply
  54. I remember those well Annette. The edge of the petticoat was frilly and was on show under the skirt. I thought I was the bee’s knees in mine.

    Reply
  55. I remember those well Annette. The edge of the petticoat was frilly and was on show under the skirt. I thought I was the bee’s knees in mine.

    Reply
  56. I had a dear seamstress friend make me a petticoat out of cotton years ago with a drawstring so it doesn’t matter if I change size. It also has a long eyelet ruffle so it doesn’t matter if it shows or not. I love it. I like to wear long summer skirts and sometimes the material is too thin to go without one.
    It’s cooler than going without one in the summer as the sun doesn’t touch my skin.

    Reply
  57. I had a dear seamstress friend make me a petticoat out of cotton years ago with a drawstring so it doesn’t matter if I change size. It also has a long eyelet ruffle so it doesn’t matter if it shows or not. I love it. I like to wear long summer skirts and sometimes the material is too thin to go without one.
    It’s cooler than going without one in the summer as the sun doesn’t touch my skin.

    Reply
  58. I had a dear seamstress friend make me a petticoat out of cotton years ago with a drawstring so it doesn’t matter if I change size. It also has a long eyelet ruffle so it doesn’t matter if it shows or not. I love it. I like to wear long summer skirts and sometimes the material is too thin to go without one.
    It’s cooler than going without one in the summer as the sun doesn’t touch my skin.

    Reply
  59. I had a dear seamstress friend make me a petticoat out of cotton years ago with a drawstring so it doesn’t matter if I change size. It also has a long eyelet ruffle so it doesn’t matter if it shows or not. I love it. I like to wear long summer skirts and sometimes the material is too thin to go without one.
    It’s cooler than going without one in the summer as the sun doesn’t touch my skin.

    Reply
  60. I had a dear seamstress friend make me a petticoat out of cotton years ago with a drawstring so it doesn’t matter if I change size. It also has a long eyelet ruffle so it doesn’t matter if it shows or not. I love it. I like to wear long summer skirts and sometimes the material is too thin to go without one.
    It’s cooler than going without one in the summer as the sun doesn’t touch my skin.

    Reply
  61. This is great. In bright hot sunlight weather our clothing is protection against the sun. A layer of cotton would pay back by blocking the sun. And a long skirt probably catches lots of wind as it blows by. A skirt is cooler than jeans, actually.

    Reply
  62. This is great. In bright hot sunlight weather our clothing is protection against the sun. A layer of cotton would pay back by blocking the sun. And a long skirt probably catches lots of wind as it blows by. A skirt is cooler than jeans, actually.

    Reply
  63. This is great. In bright hot sunlight weather our clothing is protection against the sun. A layer of cotton would pay back by blocking the sun. And a long skirt probably catches lots of wind as it blows by. A skirt is cooler than jeans, actually.

    Reply
  64. This is great. In bright hot sunlight weather our clothing is protection against the sun. A layer of cotton would pay back by blocking the sun. And a long skirt probably catches lots of wind as it blows by. A skirt is cooler than jeans, actually.

    Reply
  65. This is great. In bright hot sunlight weather our clothing is protection against the sun. A layer of cotton would pay back by blocking the sun. And a long skirt probably catches lots of wind as it blows by. A skirt is cooler than jeans, actually.

    Reply
  66. I remember wearing slips. It was “But somebody will SEE THROUGH”, which I suppose was true. But they could have guessed I had legs if they really tried.
    Lots of the history of undergarments of the slip, smock, petticoat type is that it protected the expensive outer clothing from the sweating body beneath. A smock could be washed more easily than velvet or wool.
    Wool, IMO, is an excellent reason for wearing a petticoat.

    Reply
  67. I remember wearing slips. It was “But somebody will SEE THROUGH”, which I suppose was true. But they could have guessed I had legs if they really tried.
    Lots of the history of undergarments of the slip, smock, petticoat type is that it protected the expensive outer clothing from the sweating body beneath. A smock could be washed more easily than velvet or wool.
    Wool, IMO, is an excellent reason for wearing a petticoat.

    Reply
  68. I remember wearing slips. It was “But somebody will SEE THROUGH”, which I suppose was true. But they could have guessed I had legs if they really tried.
    Lots of the history of undergarments of the slip, smock, petticoat type is that it protected the expensive outer clothing from the sweating body beneath. A smock could be washed more easily than velvet or wool.
    Wool, IMO, is an excellent reason for wearing a petticoat.

    Reply
  69. I remember wearing slips. It was “But somebody will SEE THROUGH”, which I suppose was true. But they could have guessed I had legs if they really tried.
    Lots of the history of undergarments of the slip, smock, petticoat type is that it protected the expensive outer clothing from the sweating body beneath. A smock could be washed more easily than velvet or wool.
    Wool, IMO, is an excellent reason for wearing a petticoat.

    Reply
  70. I remember wearing slips. It was “But somebody will SEE THROUGH”, which I suppose was true. But they could have guessed I had legs if they really tried.
    Lots of the history of undergarments of the slip, smock, petticoat type is that it protected the expensive outer clothing from the sweating body beneath. A smock could be washed more easily than velvet or wool.
    Wool, IMO, is an excellent reason for wearing a petticoat.

    Reply
  71. What Anne said. The West imported the fabric and the name and the idea of a long garment for leisure at home.
    I like the idea of the hero wearing a banyan. He’d likely have something on underneath, though. English houses of the Regency period were coooold. Brr.

    Reply
  72. What Anne said. The West imported the fabric and the name and the idea of a long garment for leisure at home.
    I like the idea of the hero wearing a banyan. He’d likely have something on underneath, though. English houses of the Regency period were coooold. Brr.

    Reply
  73. What Anne said. The West imported the fabric and the name and the idea of a long garment for leisure at home.
    I like the idea of the hero wearing a banyan. He’d likely have something on underneath, though. English houses of the Regency period were coooold. Brr.

    Reply
  74. What Anne said. The West imported the fabric and the name and the idea of a long garment for leisure at home.
    I like the idea of the hero wearing a banyan. He’d likely have something on underneath, though. English houses of the Regency period were coooold. Brr.

    Reply
  75. What Anne said. The West imported the fabric and the name and the idea of a long garment for leisure at home.
    I like the idea of the hero wearing a banyan. He’d likely have something on underneath, though. English houses of the Regency period were coooold. Brr.

    Reply
  76. Those layers of underclothing are necessary for formal costume. One doesn’t just wear the dress and some skin. There’s structure underneath.
    And yes, the sound is part of the experience. Writer heroines in the Georgian period, for instance, one would have to imagine the complication of that underclothing. And the sound of it.

    Reply
  77. Those layers of underclothing are necessary for formal costume. One doesn’t just wear the dress and some skin. There’s structure underneath.
    And yes, the sound is part of the experience. Writer heroines in the Georgian period, for instance, one would have to imagine the complication of that underclothing. And the sound of it.

    Reply
  78. Those layers of underclothing are necessary for formal costume. One doesn’t just wear the dress and some skin. There’s structure underneath.
    And yes, the sound is part of the experience. Writer heroines in the Georgian period, for instance, one would have to imagine the complication of that underclothing. And the sound of it.

    Reply
  79. Those layers of underclothing are necessary for formal costume. One doesn’t just wear the dress and some skin. There’s structure underneath.
    And yes, the sound is part of the experience. Writer heroines in the Georgian period, for instance, one would have to imagine the complication of that underclothing. And the sound of it.

    Reply
  80. Those layers of underclothing are necessary for formal costume. One doesn’t just wear the dress and some skin. There’s structure underneath.
    And yes, the sound is part of the experience. Writer heroines in the Georgian period, for instance, one would have to imagine the complication of that underclothing. And the sound of it.

    Reply
  81. It’s nice to have different mode of dress. Something ‘for special’. We’ve lost some of that in our quest for comfort and utility.
    Who knows … maybe a limited formality will make a comeback. Might be interesting to see what we’d do with all the materials we have now.

    Reply
  82. It’s nice to have different mode of dress. Something ‘for special’. We’ve lost some of that in our quest for comfort and utility.
    Who knows … maybe a limited formality will make a comeback. Might be interesting to see what we’d do with all the materials we have now.

    Reply
  83. It’s nice to have different mode of dress. Something ‘for special’. We’ve lost some of that in our quest for comfort and utility.
    Who knows … maybe a limited formality will make a comeback. Might be interesting to see what we’d do with all the materials we have now.

    Reply
  84. It’s nice to have different mode of dress. Something ‘for special’. We’ve lost some of that in our quest for comfort and utility.
    Who knows … maybe a limited formality will make a comeback. Might be interesting to see what we’d do with all the materials we have now.

    Reply
  85. It’s nice to have different mode of dress. Something ‘for special’. We’ve lost some of that in our quest for comfort and utility.
    Who knows … maybe a limited formality will make a comeback. Might be interesting to see what we’d do with all the materials we have now.

    Reply
  86. Nobody is tougher than a tough old granny.
    And I have to say that red petticoats are madly traditional. Red cloaks too. Country women wore long, hooded red wool cloaks all through the Regency and beyond.
    I love that. I love the modest woman, dressed in practical dark clothing, with that red petticoat underneath.

    Reply
  87. Nobody is tougher than a tough old granny.
    And I have to say that red petticoats are madly traditional. Red cloaks too. Country women wore long, hooded red wool cloaks all through the Regency and beyond.
    I love that. I love the modest woman, dressed in practical dark clothing, with that red petticoat underneath.

    Reply
  88. Nobody is tougher than a tough old granny.
    And I have to say that red petticoats are madly traditional. Red cloaks too. Country women wore long, hooded red wool cloaks all through the Regency and beyond.
    I love that. I love the modest woman, dressed in practical dark clothing, with that red petticoat underneath.

    Reply
  89. Nobody is tougher than a tough old granny.
    And I have to say that red petticoats are madly traditional. Red cloaks too. Country women wore long, hooded red wool cloaks all through the Regency and beyond.
    I love that. I love the modest woman, dressed in practical dark clothing, with that red petticoat underneath.

    Reply
  90. Nobody is tougher than a tough old granny.
    And I have to say that red petticoats are madly traditional. Red cloaks too. Country women wore long, hooded red wool cloaks all through the Regency and beyond.
    I love that. I love the modest woman, dressed in practical dark clothing, with that red petticoat underneath.

    Reply
  91. Exactly, Joanne. I’m a huge believer in cover up in the sun. I’m a prime candidate for skin cancers so I just stay covered up most of the time. I also found in the cold when I have to wear a dress out for whatever reason, it also helps keep heat in. Much better than nylon would. And as most of my skirts are of the Bohemian styles, I like to pirroette in them too. As I’m in the second half of my first century this amuses my family and friends hugely. 🙂

    Reply
  92. Exactly, Joanne. I’m a huge believer in cover up in the sun. I’m a prime candidate for skin cancers so I just stay covered up most of the time. I also found in the cold when I have to wear a dress out for whatever reason, it also helps keep heat in. Much better than nylon would. And as most of my skirts are of the Bohemian styles, I like to pirroette in them too. As I’m in the second half of my first century this amuses my family and friends hugely. 🙂

    Reply
  93. Exactly, Joanne. I’m a huge believer in cover up in the sun. I’m a prime candidate for skin cancers so I just stay covered up most of the time. I also found in the cold when I have to wear a dress out for whatever reason, it also helps keep heat in. Much better than nylon would. And as most of my skirts are of the Bohemian styles, I like to pirroette in them too. As I’m in the second half of my first century this amuses my family and friends hugely. 🙂

    Reply
  94. Exactly, Joanne. I’m a huge believer in cover up in the sun. I’m a prime candidate for skin cancers so I just stay covered up most of the time. I also found in the cold when I have to wear a dress out for whatever reason, it also helps keep heat in. Much better than nylon would. And as most of my skirts are of the Bohemian styles, I like to pirroette in them too. As I’m in the second half of my first century this amuses my family and friends hugely. 🙂

    Reply
  95. Exactly, Joanne. I’m a huge believer in cover up in the sun. I’m a prime candidate for skin cancers so I just stay covered up most of the time. I also found in the cold when I have to wear a dress out for whatever reason, it also helps keep heat in. Much better than nylon would. And as most of my skirts are of the Bohemian styles, I like to pirroette in them too. As I’m in the second half of my first century this amuses my family and friends hugely. 🙂

    Reply
  96. What a fascinating article! I rarely wear a petticoat these days, being largely a trousers and shorts sort of girl, but I still own two jalf slips and a full peitticoat which I’ve had for years. All beautifyully decorated with lace. I had a grgeous multi-layered petticoat in the eghties. I used to wear it under my dresses to give the skirts some body.

    Reply
  97. What a fascinating article! I rarely wear a petticoat these days, being largely a trousers and shorts sort of girl, but I still own two jalf slips and a full peitticoat which I’ve had for years. All beautifyully decorated with lace. I had a grgeous multi-layered petticoat in the eghties. I used to wear it under my dresses to give the skirts some body.

    Reply
  98. What a fascinating article! I rarely wear a petticoat these days, being largely a trousers and shorts sort of girl, but I still own two jalf slips and a full peitticoat which I’ve had for years. All beautifyully decorated with lace. I had a grgeous multi-layered petticoat in the eghties. I used to wear it under my dresses to give the skirts some body.

    Reply
  99. What a fascinating article! I rarely wear a petticoat these days, being largely a trousers and shorts sort of girl, but I still own two jalf slips and a full peitticoat which I’ve had for years. All beautifyully decorated with lace. I had a grgeous multi-layered petticoat in the eghties. I used to wear it under my dresses to give the skirts some body.

    Reply
  100. What a fascinating article! I rarely wear a petticoat these days, being largely a trousers and shorts sort of girl, but I still own two jalf slips and a full peitticoat which I’ve had for years. All beautifyully decorated with lace. I had a grgeous multi-layered petticoat in the eghties. I used to wear it under my dresses to give the skirts some body.

    Reply
  101. I wore petticoats under my dresses in grade school. then wore slips under skirts. still wear them when I wear a skirt but that is rare.

    Reply
  102. I wore petticoats under my dresses in grade school. then wore slips under skirts. still wear them when I wear a skirt but that is rare.

    Reply
  103. I wore petticoats under my dresses in grade school. then wore slips under skirts. still wear them when I wear a skirt but that is rare.

    Reply
  104. I wore petticoats under my dresses in grade school. then wore slips under skirts. still wear them when I wear a skirt but that is rare.

    Reply
  105. I wore petticoats under my dresses in grade school. then wore slips under skirts. still wear them when I wear a skirt but that is rare.

    Reply
  106. This reminds me of when my mother made my wedding dress (1971). When it was finished she took one look at it on me and said, “It needs a petticoat.” So she bought a length of cotton and made me a long slip. It wasn’t needed because you could see through the skirt but it was needed to add that tiny bit of fullness to the skirt. It wasn’t glamorous but it did the job and I did use with other long dresses over the next few years.
    Speaking of “seeing through it”, anybody else remember the sensation when the British press printed the picture of Lady Diana (as she was then) with the sun shining behind her skirt and showing her legs?

    Reply
  107. This reminds me of when my mother made my wedding dress (1971). When it was finished she took one look at it on me and said, “It needs a petticoat.” So she bought a length of cotton and made me a long slip. It wasn’t needed because you could see through the skirt but it was needed to add that tiny bit of fullness to the skirt. It wasn’t glamorous but it did the job and I did use with other long dresses over the next few years.
    Speaking of “seeing through it”, anybody else remember the sensation when the British press printed the picture of Lady Diana (as she was then) with the sun shining behind her skirt and showing her legs?

    Reply
  108. This reminds me of when my mother made my wedding dress (1971). When it was finished she took one look at it on me and said, “It needs a petticoat.” So she bought a length of cotton and made me a long slip. It wasn’t needed because you could see through the skirt but it was needed to add that tiny bit of fullness to the skirt. It wasn’t glamorous but it did the job and I did use with other long dresses over the next few years.
    Speaking of “seeing through it”, anybody else remember the sensation when the British press printed the picture of Lady Diana (as she was then) with the sun shining behind her skirt and showing her legs?

    Reply
  109. This reminds me of when my mother made my wedding dress (1971). When it was finished she took one look at it on me and said, “It needs a petticoat.” So she bought a length of cotton and made me a long slip. It wasn’t needed because you could see through the skirt but it was needed to add that tiny bit of fullness to the skirt. It wasn’t glamorous but it did the job and I did use with other long dresses over the next few years.
    Speaking of “seeing through it”, anybody else remember the sensation when the British press printed the picture of Lady Diana (as she was then) with the sun shining behind her skirt and showing her legs?

    Reply
  110. This reminds me of when my mother made my wedding dress (1971). When it was finished she took one look at it on me and said, “It needs a petticoat.” So she bought a length of cotton and made me a long slip. It wasn’t needed because you could see through the skirt but it was needed to add that tiny bit of fullness to the skirt. It wasn’t glamorous but it did the job and I did use with other long dresses over the next few years.
    Speaking of “seeing through it”, anybody else remember the sensation when the British press printed the picture of Lady Diana (as she was then) with the sun shining behind her skirt and showing her legs?

    Reply
  111. All the talk of petticoat reminds me of my high school graduation. It was a very ladylike girls school, and we didn’t wear black robes for graduation. We wore white organdy. The dress chosen for my year had a full skirt that was worn with hoops. We spent an afternoon learning how to sit down while wearing hoops without having the front of our skirt go flying up.

    Reply
  112. All the talk of petticoat reminds me of my high school graduation. It was a very ladylike girls school, and we didn’t wear black robes for graduation. We wore white organdy. The dress chosen for my year had a full skirt that was worn with hoops. We spent an afternoon learning how to sit down while wearing hoops without having the front of our skirt go flying up.

    Reply
  113. All the talk of petticoat reminds me of my high school graduation. It was a very ladylike girls school, and we didn’t wear black robes for graduation. We wore white organdy. The dress chosen for my year had a full skirt that was worn with hoops. We spent an afternoon learning how to sit down while wearing hoops without having the front of our skirt go flying up.

    Reply
  114. All the talk of petticoat reminds me of my high school graduation. It was a very ladylike girls school, and we didn’t wear black robes for graduation. We wore white organdy. The dress chosen for my year had a full skirt that was worn with hoops. We spent an afternoon learning how to sit down while wearing hoops without having the front of our skirt go flying up.

    Reply
  115. All the talk of petticoat reminds me of my high school graduation. It was a very ladylike girls school, and we didn’t wear black robes for graduation. We wore white organdy. The dress chosen for my year had a full skirt that was worn with hoops. We spent an afternoon learning how to sit down while wearing hoops without having the front of our skirt go flying up.

    Reply
  116. I can remember searching for a cotton half-slip when I was wearing tights with a synthetic fabric skirt (for work), and the static electricity made the skirt cling to the tights. Similarly, having to wear a nylon overall for a Saturday job was only bearable wearing a full-length cotton petticoat underneath it (it was too hot for a layer of other clothes). But these days I never wear petticoats because, like Joanna, I prefer to wear trousers.

    Reply
  117. I can remember searching for a cotton half-slip when I was wearing tights with a synthetic fabric skirt (for work), and the static electricity made the skirt cling to the tights. Similarly, having to wear a nylon overall for a Saturday job was only bearable wearing a full-length cotton petticoat underneath it (it was too hot for a layer of other clothes). But these days I never wear petticoats because, like Joanna, I prefer to wear trousers.

    Reply
  118. I can remember searching for a cotton half-slip when I was wearing tights with a synthetic fabric skirt (for work), and the static electricity made the skirt cling to the tights. Similarly, having to wear a nylon overall for a Saturday job was only bearable wearing a full-length cotton petticoat underneath it (it was too hot for a layer of other clothes). But these days I never wear petticoats because, like Joanna, I prefer to wear trousers.

    Reply
  119. I can remember searching for a cotton half-slip when I was wearing tights with a synthetic fabric skirt (for work), and the static electricity made the skirt cling to the tights. Similarly, having to wear a nylon overall for a Saturday job was only bearable wearing a full-length cotton petticoat underneath it (it was too hot for a layer of other clothes). But these days I never wear petticoats because, like Joanna, I prefer to wear trousers.

    Reply
  120. I can remember searching for a cotton half-slip when I was wearing tights with a synthetic fabric skirt (for work), and the static electricity made the skirt cling to the tights. Similarly, having to wear a nylon overall for a Saturday job was only bearable wearing a full-length cotton petticoat underneath it (it was too hot for a layer of other clothes). But these days I never wear petticoats because, like Joanna, I prefer to wear trousers.

    Reply
  121. I’ll tell you anyway, Jo. LOL This was CHURCH camp in the 50s. Young ladies didn’t wear shorts to dinner or to evening worship. And if we wore our swing-skirt dresses, we had to have our crinolines, of course. 🙂

    Reply
  122. I’ll tell you anyway, Jo. LOL This was CHURCH camp in the 50s. Young ladies didn’t wear shorts to dinner or to evening worship. And if we wore our swing-skirt dresses, we had to have our crinolines, of course. 🙂

    Reply
  123. I’ll tell you anyway, Jo. LOL This was CHURCH camp in the 50s. Young ladies didn’t wear shorts to dinner or to evening worship. And if we wore our swing-skirt dresses, we had to have our crinolines, of course. 🙂

    Reply
  124. I’ll tell you anyway, Jo. LOL This was CHURCH camp in the 50s. Young ladies didn’t wear shorts to dinner or to evening worship. And if we wore our swing-skirt dresses, we had to have our crinolines, of course. 🙂

    Reply
  125. I’ll tell you anyway, Jo. LOL This was CHURCH camp in the 50s. Young ladies didn’t wear shorts to dinner or to evening worship. And if we wore our swing-skirt dresses, we had to have our crinolines, of course. 🙂

    Reply
  126. In the seventies my mother saw me in the sun and realized I wasn’t wearing a slip. Her shocked remark wasn’t about my legs — she said, “I can see your crotch!” I always thought it was the Victorian era when women were supposed to deny that they had a crotch.

    Reply
  127. In the seventies my mother saw me in the sun and realized I wasn’t wearing a slip. Her shocked remark wasn’t about my legs — she said, “I can see your crotch!” I always thought it was the Victorian era when women were supposed to deny that they had a crotch.

    Reply
  128. In the seventies my mother saw me in the sun and realized I wasn’t wearing a slip. Her shocked remark wasn’t about my legs — she said, “I can see your crotch!” I always thought it was the Victorian era when women were supposed to deny that they had a crotch.

    Reply
  129. In the seventies my mother saw me in the sun and realized I wasn’t wearing a slip. Her shocked remark wasn’t about my legs — she said, “I can see your crotch!” I always thought it was the Victorian era when women were supposed to deny that they had a crotch.

    Reply
  130. In the seventies my mother saw me in the sun and realized I wasn’t wearing a slip. Her shocked remark wasn’t about my legs — she said, “I can see your crotch!” I always thought it was the Victorian era when women were supposed to deny that they had a crotch.

    Reply
  131. I live in skirts and dresses and find trousers very uncomfortable (the last two times I wore them were in 2012 and 2009. I know; I have pictures!).
    However, petticoats were definitely out by my time- I was a teen in the 90s!
    Through my life in the theatre I’ve worn full Victorian costumes, so I have a bit of experience with all those layers. On hot days in Australia I always find myself feeling very sorry for women of the past.

    Reply
  132. I live in skirts and dresses and find trousers very uncomfortable (the last two times I wore them were in 2012 and 2009. I know; I have pictures!).
    However, petticoats were definitely out by my time- I was a teen in the 90s!
    Through my life in the theatre I’ve worn full Victorian costumes, so I have a bit of experience with all those layers. On hot days in Australia I always find myself feeling very sorry for women of the past.

    Reply
  133. I live in skirts and dresses and find trousers very uncomfortable (the last two times I wore them were in 2012 and 2009. I know; I have pictures!).
    However, petticoats were definitely out by my time- I was a teen in the 90s!
    Through my life in the theatre I’ve worn full Victorian costumes, so I have a bit of experience with all those layers. On hot days in Australia I always find myself feeling very sorry for women of the past.

    Reply
  134. I live in skirts and dresses and find trousers very uncomfortable (the last two times I wore them were in 2012 and 2009. I know; I have pictures!).
    However, petticoats were definitely out by my time- I was a teen in the 90s!
    Through my life in the theatre I’ve worn full Victorian costumes, so I have a bit of experience with all those layers. On hot days in Australia I always find myself feeling very sorry for women of the past.

    Reply
  135. I live in skirts and dresses and find trousers very uncomfortable (the last two times I wore them were in 2012 and 2009. I know; I have pictures!).
    However, petticoats were definitely out by my time- I was a teen in the 90s!
    Through my life in the theatre I’ve worn full Victorian costumes, so I have a bit of experience with all those layers. On hot days in Australia I always find myself feeling very sorry for women of the past.

    Reply
  136. I don’t think I own but two dresses and I haven’t the slightest idea of how long it’s been since I wore either of them. During hot weather, which is most of the year in south central Texas, I wear a pair of capri pants or knee length shorts, the rest of the time I wear long pants. I can’t justify wearing a dress or skirt since I can’t stoop or squat down if I drop something because of my arthritis. I still dress fairly modestly because that is the way I was brought up.

    Reply
  137. I don’t think I own but two dresses and I haven’t the slightest idea of how long it’s been since I wore either of them. During hot weather, which is most of the year in south central Texas, I wear a pair of capri pants or knee length shorts, the rest of the time I wear long pants. I can’t justify wearing a dress or skirt since I can’t stoop or squat down if I drop something because of my arthritis. I still dress fairly modestly because that is the way I was brought up.

    Reply
  138. I don’t think I own but two dresses and I haven’t the slightest idea of how long it’s been since I wore either of them. During hot weather, which is most of the year in south central Texas, I wear a pair of capri pants or knee length shorts, the rest of the time I wear long pants. I can’t justify wearing a dress or skirt since I can’t stoop or squat down if I drop something because of my arthritis. I still dress fairly modestly because that is the way I was brought up.

    Reply
  139. I don’t think I own but two dresses and I haven’t the slightest idea of how long it’s been since I wore either of them. During hot weather, which is most of the year in south central Texas, I wear a pair of capri pants or knee length shorts, the rest of the time I wear long pants. I can’t justify wearing a dress or skirt since I can’t stoop or squat down if I drop something because of my arthritis. I still dress fairly modestly because that is the way I was brought up.

    Reply
  140. I don’t think I own but two dresses and I haven’t the slightest idea of how long it’s been since I wore either of them. During hot weather, which is most of the year in south central Texas, I wear a pair of capri pants or knee length shorts, the rest of the time I wear long pants. I can’t justify wearing a dress or skirt since I can’t stoop or squat down if I drop something because of my arthritis. I still dress fairly modestly because that is the way I was brought up.

    Reply
  141. I, too, have made the transition from any sort of skirt to trousers. I will say, though, that a skirt is cool in summer. I keep a few light summery dresses on hand.
    And I have some warm floor-length outfits I wear around the house when it’s cold out and I’m warm next to the fire. Skirts just cuddle around you and feel kind.
    No undergarments for those though. I should try out a cotton slip with the summer dress.

    Reply
  142. I, too, have made the transition from any sort of skirt to trousers. I will say, though, that a skirt is cool in summer. I keep a few light summery dresses on hand.
    And I have some warm floor-length outfits I wear around the house when it’s cold out and I’m warm next to the fire. Skirts just cuddle around you and feel kind.
    No undergarments for those though. I should try out a cotton slip with the summer dress.

    Reply
  143. I, too, have made the transition from any sort of skirt to trousers. I will say, though, that a skirt is cool in summer. I keep a few light summery dresses on hand.
    And I have some warm floor-length outfits I wear around the house when it’s cold out and I’m warm next to the fire. Skirts just cuddle around you and feel kind.
    No undergarments for those though. I should try out a cotton slip with the summer dress.

    Reply
  144. I, too, have made the transition from any sort of skirt to trousers. I will say, though, that a skirt is cool in summer. I keep a few light summery dresses on hand.
    And I have some warm floor-length outfits I wear around the house when it’s cold out and I’m warm next to the fire. Skirts just cuddle around you and feel kind.
    No undergarments for those though. I should try out a cotton slip with the summer dress.

    Reply
  145. I, too, have made the transition from any sort of skirt to trousers. I will say, though, that a skirt is cool in summer. I keep a few light summery dresses on hand.
    And I have some warm floor-length outfits I wear around the house when it’s cold out and I’m warm next to the fire. Skirts just cuddle around you and feel kind.
    No undergarments for those though. I should try out a cotton slip with the summer dress.

    Reply
  146. I associate slips and petticoats with school, being old enough to remember when the idea of wearing trousers or jeans to class just didn’t exist.
    Even in massive horrible cold and snow, you wore a skirt. You put your snow trousers on under the skirt for the long walk to school and wriggled out of it in the cloakroom.

    Reply
  147. I associate slips and petticoats with school, being old enough to remember when the idea of wearing trousers or jeans to class just didn’t exist.
    Even in massive horrible cold and snow, you wore a skirt. You put your snow trousers on under the skirt for the long walk to school and wriggled out of it in the cloakroom.

    Reply
  148. I associate slips and petticoats with school, being old enough to remember when the idea of wearing trousers or jeans to class just didn’t exist.
    Even in massive horrible cold and snow, you wore a skirt. You put your snow trousers on under the skirt for the long walk to school and wriggled out of it in the cloakroom.

    Reply
  149. I associate slips and petticoats with school, being old enough to remember when the idea of wearing trousers or jeans to class just didn’t exist.
    Even in massive horrible cold and snow, you wore a skirt. You put your snow trousers on under the skirt for the long walk to school and wriggled out of it in the cloakroom.

    Reply
  150. I associate slips and petticoats with school, being old enough to remember when the idea of wearing trousers or jeans to class just didn’t exist.
    Even in massive horrible cold and snow, you wore a skirt. You put your snow trousers on under the skirt for the long walk to school and wriggled out of it in the cloakroom.

    Reply
  151. I do remember that famous photo.
    So hard to live a life in the public eye. I feel so sorry for folks who have to do this.
    And a good reminder for folks who have to ‘dress up’ for work in skirts. My mother always told me* to CHECK on how see-through stuff is.
    *classify this as good advice my mother gave me. I guess the equivalent good advice from Mom nowadays involves not posting nekkid selfies or something

    Reply
  152. I do remember that famous photo.
    So hard to live a life in the public eye. I feel so sorry for folks who have to do this.
    And a good reminder for folks who have to ‘dress up’ for work in skirts. My mother always told me* to CHECK on how see-through stuff is.
    *classify this as good advice my mother gave me. I guess the equivalent good advice from Mom nowadays involves not posting nekkid selfies or something

    Reply
  153. I do remember that famous photo.
    So hard to live a life in the public eye. I feel so sorry for folks who have to do this.
    And a good reminder for folks who have to ‘dress up’ for work in skirts. My mother always told me* to CHECK on how see-through stuff is.
    *classify this as good advice my mother gave me. I guess the equivalent good advice from Mom nowadays involves not posting nekkid selfies or something

    Reply
  154. I do remember that famous photo.
    So hard to live a life in the public eye. I feel so sorry for folks who have to do this.
    And a good reminder for folks who have to ‘dress up’ for work in skirts. My mother always told me* to CHECK on how see-through stuff is.
    *classify this as good advice my mother gave me. I guess the equivalent good advice from Mom nowadays involves not posting nekkid selfies or something

    Reply
  155. I do remember that famous photo.
    So hard to live a life in the public eye. I feel so sorry for folks who have to do this.
    And a good reminder for folks who have to ‘dress up’ for work in skirts. My mother always told me* to CHECK on how see-through stuff is.
    *classify this as good advice my mother gave me. I guess the equivalent good advice from Mom nowadays involves not posting nekkid selfies or something

    Reply
  156. I have this love/hate relationship with synthetic fabrics. Yes, they’re beautiful. Yes, they can wear like iron when silk or even cotton won’t. Yes, they let us get away without spending a fortune.
    But they never quite pamper my skin the way silk or high-quality cotton or rayon does.

    Reply
  157. I have this love/hate relationship with synthetic fabrics. Yes, they’re beautiful. Yes, they can wear like iron when silk or even cotton won’t. Yes, they let us get away without spending a fortune.
    But they never quite pamper my skin the way silk or high-quality cotton or rayon does.

    Reply
  158. I have this love/hate relationship with synthetic fabrics. Yes, they’re beautiful. Yes, they can wear like iron when silk or even cotton won’t. Yes, they let us get away without spending a fortune.
    But they never quite pamper my skin the way silk or high-quality cotton or rayon does.

    Reply
  159. I have this love/hate relationship with synthetic fabrics. Yes, they’re beautiful. Yes, they can wear like iron when silk or even cotton won’t. Yes, they let us get away without spending a fortune.
    But they never quite pamper my skin the way silk or high-quality cotton or rayon does.

    Reply
  160. I have this love/hate relationship with synthetic fabrics. Yes, they’re beautiful. Yes, they can wear like iron when silk or even cotton won’t. Yes, they let us get away without spending a fortune.
    But they never quite pamper my skin the way silk or high-quality cotton or rayon does.

    Reply
  161. I remember an old cartoon.
    The woman goes into one of those beach cabanas to change into her bathing suit. The wind blows the door open and her male friend sees her in her slip.
    “Shriek!” goes the young woman, clad only in her slip, and clutches a towel to herself.
    The door blows closed again. A few minutes later she emerges, perfectly comfortable, dressed in a teeny-tiny bikini.
    That expressed something complex about modesty, I suppose. The same … ah … crotch that would be most apparent when wearing jeans becomes mysterious and immodest if seen through a skirt.

    Reply
  162. I remember an old cartoon.
    The woman goes into one of those beach cabanas to change into her bathing suit. The wind blows the door open and her male friend sees her in her slip.
    “Shriek!” goes the young woman, clad only in her slip, and clutches a towel to herself.
    The door blows closed again. A few minutes later she emerges, perfectly comfortable, dressed in a teeny-tiny bikini.
    That expressed something complex about modesty, I suppose. The same … ah … crotch that would be most apparent when wearing jeans becomes mysterious and immodest if seen through a skirt.

    Reply
  163. I remember an old cartoon.
    The woman goes into one of those beach cabanas to change into her bathing suit. The wind blows the door open and her male friend sees her in her slip.
    “Shriek!” goes the young woman, clad only in her slip, and clutches a towel to herself.
    The door blows closed again. A few minutes later she emerges, perfectly comfortable, dressed in a teeny-tiny bikini.
    That expressed something complex about modesty, I suppose. The same … ah … crotch that would be most apparent when wearing jeans becomes mysterious and immodest if seen through a skirt.

    Reply
  164. I remember an old cartoon.
    The woman goes into one of those beach cabanas to change into her bathing suit. The wind blows the door open and her male friend sees her in her slip.
    “Shriek!” goes the young woman, clad only in her slip, and clutches a towel to herself.
    The door blows closed again. A few minutes later she emerges, perfectly comfortable, dressed in a teeny-tiny bikini.
    That expressed something complex about modesty, I suppose. The same … ah … crotch that would be most apparent when wearing jeans becomes mysterious and immodest if seen through a skirt.

    Reply
  165. I remember an old cartoon.
    The woman goes into one of those beach cabanas to change into her bathing suit. The wind blows the door open and her male friend sees her in her slip.
    “Shriek!” goes the young woman, clad only in her slip, and clutches a towel to herself.
    The door blows closed again. A few minutes later she emerges, perfectly comfortable, dressed in a teeny-tiny bikini.
    That expressed something complex about modesty, I suppose. The same … ah … crotch that would be most apparent when wearing jeans becomes mysterious and immodest if seen through a skirt.

    Reply
  166. This is a good time to be a woman. We have such a wide choice of clothing. Nobody’s going to look askance at a woman in trousers in almost any situation, formal or informal.
    And there’s a skirted outfit to match about every place one could go, short of participating in mud wrestling or touch football.
    Yeah for modern times, says I.

    Reply
  167. This is a good time to be a woman. We have such a wide choice of clothing. Nobody’s going to look askance at a woman in trousers in almost any situation, formal or informal.
    And there’s a skirted outfit to match about every place one could go, short of participating in mud wrestling or touch football.
    Yeah for modern times, says I.

    Reply
  168. This is a good time to be a woman. We have such a wide choice of clothing. Nobody’s going to look askance at a woman in trousers in almost any situation, formal or informal.
    And there’s a skirted outfit to match about every place one could go, short of participating in mud wrestling or touch football.
    Yeah for modern times, says I.

    Reply
  169. This is a good time to be a woman. We have such a wide choice of clothing. Nobody’s going to look askance at a woman in trousers in almost any situation, formal or informal.
    And there’s a skirted outfit to match about every place one could go, short of participating in mud wrestling or touch football.
    Yeah for modern times, says I.

    Reply
  170. This is a good time to be a woman. We have such a wide choice of clothing. Nobody’s going to look askance at a woman in trousers in almost any situation, formal or informal.
    And there’s a skirted outfit to match about every place one could go, short of participating in mud wrestling or touch football.
    Yeah for modern times, says I.

    Reply
  171. I own about two skirts. I don’t think I have worn either for about twenty years.
    My generation is the school generation that brought Jeans into women’t clothing (we had to buy them in the mens/ (or more frequently the boys’) department.
    After the dress revolution in the 60’s?, I have never truly gone back to dresses. Separates fit me better, they adjust to the oddities of my body shape. I tend to get cold summer or winter, so I prefer pants to skirts.
    All that having been said, I LOVED the crinolines of the “New Look” of the early 1950s.

    Reply
  172. I own about two skirts. I don’t think I have worn either for about twenty years.
    My generation is the school generation that brought Jeans into women’t clothing (we had to buy them in the mens/ (or more frequently the boys’) department.
    After the dress revolution in the 60’s?, I have never truly gone back to dresses. Separates fit me better, they adjust to the oddities of my body shape. I tend to get cold summer or winter, so I prefer pants to skirts.
    All that having been said, I LOVED the crinolines of the “New Look” of the early 1950s.

    Reply
  173. I own about two skirts. I don’t think I have worn either for about twenty years.
    My generation is the school generation that brought Jeans into women’t clothing (we had to buy them in the mens/ (or more frequently the boys’) department.
    After the dress revolution in the 60’s?, I have never truly gone back to dresses. Separates fit me better, they adjust to the oddities of my body shape. I tend to get cold summer or winter, so I prefer pants to skirts.
    All that having been said, I LOVED the crinolines of the “New Look” of the early 1950s.

    Reply
  174. I own about two skirts. I don’t think I have worn either for about twenty years.
    My generation is the school generation that brought Jeans into women’t clothing (we had to buy them in the mens/ (or more frequently the boys’) department.
    After the dress revolution in the 60’s?, I have never truly gone back to dresses. Separates fit me better, they adjust to the oddities of my body shape. I tend to get cold summer or winter, so I prefer pants to skirts.
    All that having been said, I LOVED the crinolines of the “New Look” of the early 1950s.

    Reply
  175. I own about two skirts. I don’t think I have worn either for about twenty years.
    My generation is the school generation that brought Jeans into women’t clothing (we had to buy them in the mens/ (or more frequently the boys’) department.
    After the dress revolution in the 60’s?, I have never truly gone back to dresses. Separates fit me better, they adjust to the oddities of my body shape. I tend to get cold summer or winter, so I prefer pants to skirts.
    All that having been said, I LOVED the crinolines of the “New Look” of the early 1950s.

    Reply
  176. There’s something … what’s the word I’m looking for? …something festive about getting dressed up in several layers.
    I don’t think we’ll lose dresses altogether in the foreseeable future, but there is certainly a move to trousers for all occasions.
    “Oh good,” says I.

    Reply
  177. There’s something … what’s the word I’m looking for? …something festive about getting dressed up in several layers.
    I don’t think we’ll lose dresses altogether in the foreseeable future, but there is certainly a move to trousers for all occasions.
    “Oh good,” says I.

    Reply
  178. There’s something … what’s the word I’m looking for? …something festive about getting dressed up in several layers.
    I don’t think we’ll lose dresses altogether in the foreseeable future, but there is certainly a move to trousers for all occasions.
    “Oh good,” says I.

    Reply
  179. There’s something … what’s the word I’m looking for? …something festive about getting dressed up in several layers.
    I don’t think we’ll lose dresses altogether in the foreseeable future, but there is certainly a move to trousers for all occasions.
    “Oh good,” says I.

    Reply
  180. There’s something … what’s the word I’m looking for? …something festive about getting dressed up in several layers.
    I don’t think we’ll lose dresses altogether in the foreseeable future, but there is certainly a move to trousers for all occasions.
    “Oh good,” says I.

    Reply
  181. The crinolines and almost horizontal skirts of the Fifties were what my older sisters wore. I don’t reeealy remember so much doing it myself.
    To the eye of memory it does look so fancy and fun.

    Reply
  182. The crinolines and almost horizontal skirts of the Fifties were what my older sisters wore. I don’t reeealy remember so much doing it myself.
    To the eye of memory it does look so fancy and fun.

    Reply
  183. The crinolines and almost horizontal skirts of the Fifties were what my older sisters wore. I don’t reeealy remember so much doing it myself.
    To the eye of memory it does look so fancy and fun.

    Reply
  184. The crinolines and almost horizontal skirts of the Fifties were what my older sisters wore. I don’t reeealy remember so much doing it myself.
    To the eye of memory it does look so fancy and fun.

    Reply
  185. The crinolines and almost horizontal skirts of the Fifties were what my older sisters wore. I don’t reeealy remember so much doing it myself.
    To the eye of memory it does look so fancy and fun.

    Reply
  186. Petticoat brings to mind the scene from Gone With The Wind, when the hero presents, as a special gift, a red petticoat, to Mami, much to annoyance of the heroine. Does anyone remember that?

    Reply
  187. Petticoat brings to mind the scene from Gone With The Wind, when the hero presents, as a special gift, a red petticoat, to Mami, much to annoyance of the heroine. Does anyone remember that?

    Reply
  188. Petticoat brings to mind the scene from Gone With The Wind, when the hero presents, as a special gift, a red petticoat, to Mami, much to annoyance of the heroine. Does anyone remember that?

    Reply
  189. Petticoat brings to mind the scene from Gone With The Wind, when the hero presents, as a special gift, a red petticoat, to Mami, much to annoyance of the heroine. Does anyone remember that?

    Reply
  190. Petticoat brings to mind the scene from Gone With The Wind, when the hero presents, as a special gift, a red petticoat, to Mami, much to annoyance of the heroine. Does anyone remember that?

    Reply
  191. I hardly ever wear skirts, but my 94 year old mother still wears petticoats under the dresses. I remember with nostalgia, though, the “stiffies” we wore in the fifties. We used to have several of them, sugared to make them stiffer, standing about in the bedroom waiting for us to dress. When we were dressed in three stiffies with a gathered skirted dress over the top, we must have looked something like half balloons with legs! And getting into the car to go to the party was an exercise in itself. Fun, though.
    Great post, by the way. I didn’t know about the petty coat, though my heroines are always in petticoats.

    Reply
  192. I hardly ever wear skirts, but my 94 year old mother still wears petticoats under the dresses. I remember with nostalgia, though, the “stiffies” we wore in the fifties. We used to have several of them, sugared to make them stiffer, standing about in the bedroom waiting for us to dress. When we were dressed in three stiffies with a gathered skirted dress over the top, we must have looked something like half balloons with legs! And getting into the car to go to the party was an exercise in itself. Fun, though.
    Great post, by the way. I didn’t know about the petty coat, though my heroines are always in petticoats.

    Reply
  193. I hardly ever wear skirts, but my 94 year old mother still wears petticoats under the dresses. I remember with nostalgia, though, the “stiffies” we wore in the fifties. We used to have several of them, sugared to make them stiffer, standing about in the bedroom waiting for us to dress. When we were dressed in three stiffies with a gathered skirted dress over the top, we must have looked something like half balloons with legs! And getting into the car to go to the party was an exercise in itself. Fun, though.
    Great post, by the way. I didn’t know about the petty coat, though my heroines are always in petticoats.

    Reply
  194. I hardly ever wear skirts, but my 94 year old mother still wears petticoats under the dresses. I remember with nostalgia, though, the “stiffies” we wore in the fifties. We used to have several of them, sugared to make them stiffer, standing about in the bedroom waiting for us to dress. When we were dressed in three stiffies with a gathered skirted dress over the top, we must have looked something like half balloons with legs! And getting into the car to go to the party was an exercise in itself. Fun, though.
    Great post, by the way. I didn’t know about the petty coat, though my heroines are always in petticoats.

    Reply
  195. I hardly ever wear skirts, but my 94 year old mother still wears petticoats under the dresses. I remember with nostalgia, though, the “stiffies” we wore in the fifties. We used to have several of them, sugared to make them stiffer, standing about in the bedroom waiting for us to dress. When we were dressed in three stiffies with a gathered skirted dress over the top, we must have looked something like half balloons with legs! And getting into the car to go to the party was an exercise in itself. Fun, though.
    Great post, by the way. I didn’t know about the petty coat, though my heroines are always in petticoats.

    Reply
  196. >>>sugared to make them stiffer<<< Oh my. That's one of the things I never knew. How fascinating. I wonder if they did something like that in earlier days .... though I suppose starch would have been much cheaper before the 20th Century.

    Reply
  197. >>>sugared to make them stiffer<<< Oh my. That's one of the things I never knew. How fascinating. I wonder if they did something like that in earlier days .... though I suppose starch would have been much cheaper before the 20th Century.

    Reply
  198. >>>sugared to make them stiffer<<< Oh my. That's one of the things I never knew. How fascinating. I wonder if they did something like that in earlier days .... though I suppose starch would have been much cheaper before the 20th Century.

    Reply
  199. >>>sugared to make them stiffer<<< Oh my. That's one of the things I never knew. How fascinating. I wonder if they did something like that in earlier days .... though I suppose starch would have been much cheaper before the 20th Century.

    Reply
  200. >>>sugared to make them stiffer<<< Oh my. That's one of the things I never knew. How fascinating. I wonder if they did something like that in earlier days .... though I suppose starch would have been much cheaper before the 20th Century.

    Reply
  201. Word Wenches to the rescue! My son had asked me why it’s called a petticoat (the day before this appeared in my inbox) and I’d been saving this to read with him. Thanks!

    Reply
  202. Word Wenches to the rescue! My son had asked me why it’s called a petticoat (the day before this appeared in my inbox) and I’d been saving this to read with him. Thanks!

    Reply
  203. Word Wenches to the rescue! My son had asked me why it’s called a petticoat (the day before this appeared in my inbox) and I’d been saving this to read with him. Thanks!

    Reply
  204. Word Wenches to the rescue! My son had asked me why it’s called a petticoat (the day before this appeared in my inbox) and I’d been saving this to read with him. Thanks!

    Reply
  205. Word Wenches to the rescue! My son had asked me why it’s called a petticoat (the day before this appeared in my inbox) and I’d been saving this to read with him. Thanks!

    Reply

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