Perfection

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Pat here:

There has been some recent on-line discussion about writers who write too fast or too slow and the lack of quality or lack of name recognition as a result. I believe the discussion developed from an article in the San Diego Union Tribune about literary and mainstream writers, so I’ve pretty much ignored the discussion. If mainstream writers make enough money not to starve by producing less, more power to them.

My interest is genre fiction, and since I know Nora Roberts can turn out quality books at a rate far faster than anything I can achieve, and if Laura Kinsale wrote only one book every five years, people would still know her name, the point is moot as far as I’m concerned.

But as I sit here plodding through my revisions, I can see how my writing process works and how it affects my speed (or lack thereof), and my thoughts do raise a few questions.

First, my process is to write with the speed of light once I have all my research and plotting and outlineSpeed
in place.  Snort. I just dismissed six months of work right there.  But not everyone does as much research and plotting as I do, and since I tend to do research in hours when I’m not writing, let’s just throw away those six months and get back to the physical act of putting story on paper.  I am capable of an average of 2500 words a day before my head explodes or I don’t know what comes next.  At that rate, theoretically, I could write a 100,000 word book in forty days, or two months since I take weekends off. 

Man, if I could churn out six books a year, I’d be living good.  Or maybe not, since chances are pretty high that no one in their right mind would pay much money for the drafts I write in two months. They’re strong stories with nice characters, so I might be able to sell them to a publisher Books
who is willing to buy my name and isn’t interested in quality, but that kind of publisher would pay peanuts on the dollar compared to what I’m currently paid. I’d have to hope that readers would faithfully go out and track down those titles so I’d make money on royalties, which means I’d have to do tons of promotion. Ugh.  Promotion would take time from my writing schedule. Besides, after reading one of those rough drafts, would my readers ever read me again?

Since I seriously don’t like promotion and would rather have a supportive publisher who pays me good money up front, I don’t send out that first draft.  Which, by the way, is never really a first draft.  Even though I can write 2500 words a day doesn’t mean I actually write new ones.  The process is far more complicated than sitting at a keyboard typing words on a page.  I spend a great deal of time going back over words already written, editing, revising, picking up dropped story threads, remembering characterEdit
nuances, throwing out chapters and writing new ones to tighten the story before I can move ahead.  On days when I’m particularly mired down, I’m lucky to write 500 new words.  And when I’m done, that original draft has probably taken six months and has already been heavily edited and revised. 

And then I start the real editing and revising, which takes another three months or more. And then I send it to my editor who turns my priceless manuscript into bleeding red ink, and I spend another half a century (or so it seems) refining characters and story and playing up strengths and Mysticrider
deleting the lovely byways and side paths I meander down, before I have a real book.

I suspect it’s somewhere along the revising and editing line that wheat begins to separate from the chaff.  Some writers are far better than I at laying out the story in perfect condition without all the extra work.  These are the people who can write several books a year and keep their quality high. I am in awe of them, and there ain’t no way on this green earth that I’ll say high production reduces their quality.

Other writers fall in different places along this production line.  Some are new and haven’t learned as much as I have about tightening and revising. They innocently send out their books with all the errors I spend six months erasing.  If their stories are strong and their characters are unique, their publisher—and their readers—may not care about the errors in logic or history, or that the book could be improved by heightening the sexual awareness and deleting some extraneous characters and so forth.  I’ve read bestsellers that I wouldn’t have sent out the way they’re written, but only the most critical readers seem to care. A writer who can pull this off and write three or four books a year can build name recognition rapidly and start earning nice money as their readership increases. Does this make them bad writers? Are they diluting the quality of the genre market? A lot of readers don’t think so. And if these fast writers develop a name for themselves, they can start making enough money to slow down and learn the rest of the process, or so the theory goes.

So can we blame authors or publishers who send out less-than-perfect books written in three, six, or nine months for “reducing the quality” of books when publishers and readers eagerly await them?  How many authors who spend one to five years polishing books to perfection will you remember when their next book finally appears?  And let me throw this one at you—since authors are paid basically on numberLexus
of books sold times a percentage of cover price—would you pay more for a book based on quality?  Or buy more cheap books, regardless of quality?  (rather like having four Kias opposed to one Lexus–the picture is of a Lexus concept car, which seemed appropriately fitting for writers!) 

155 thoughts on “Perfection”

  1. You must have written this post post about “time” just for me. I have about 10-15,000 words to go on the current WIP. I should finish in a week or two, right? Ha. Tooth-pulling. I wrote the first scene last October but have only been at it seriously since March. I’ll be happy if it’s done by next month.
    I don’t think I’ll ever be a speed-writer if I keep my day job (which I must if I want to eat, LOL). But as a reader, I want my favorite authors to write as fast as possible. Since my list of autobuy authors is getting shorter by the year, the pressure’s on, Wenches! Go forth and write!
    I would pay more for quality and have cut way back on buying books by authors that were just ‘okay.’ Life’s too short and money’s too tight to fritter away on books that don’t resonate with me.

    Reply
  2. You must have written this post post about “time” just for me. I have about 10-15,000 words to go on the current WIP. I should finish in a week or two, right? Ha. Tooth-pulling. I wrote the first scene last October but have only been at it seriously since March. I’ll be happy if it’s done by next month.
    I don’t think I’ll ever be a speed-writer if I keep my day job (which I must if I want to eat, LOL). But as a reader, I want my favorite authors to write as fast as possible. Since my list of autobuy authors is getting shorter by the year, the pressure’s on, Wenches! Go forth and write!
    I would pay more for quality and have cut way back on buying books by authors that were just ‘okay.’ Life’s too short and money’s too tight to fritter away on books that don’t resonate with me.

    Reply
  3. You must have written this post post about “time” just for me. I have about 10-15,000 words to go on the current WIP. I should finish in a week or two, right? Ha. Tooth-pulling. I wrote the first scene last October but have only been at it seriously since March. I’ll be happy if it’s done by next month.
    I don’t think I’ll ever be a speed-writer if I keep my day job (which I must if I want to eat, LOL). But as a reader, I want my favorite authors to write as fast as possible. Since my list of autobuy authors is getting shorter by the year, the pressure’s on, Wenches! Go forth and write!
    I would pay more for quality and have cut way back on buying books by authors that were just ‘okay.’ Life’s too short and money’s too tight to fritter away on books that don’t resonate with me.

    Reply
  4. You must have written this post post about “time” just for me. I have about 10-15,000 words to go on the current WIP. I should finish in a week or two, right? Ha. Tooth-pulling. I wrote the first scene last October but have only been at it seriously since March. I’ll be happy if it’s done by next month.
    I don’t think I’ll ever be a speed-writer if I keep my day job (which I must if I want to eat, LOL). But as a reader, I want my favorite authors to write as fast as possible. Since my list of autobuy authors is getting shorter by the year, the pressure’s on, Wenches! Go forth and write!
    I would pay more for quality and have cut way back on buying books by authors that were just ‘okay.’ Life’s too short and money’s too tight to fritter away on books that don’t resonate with me.

    Reply
  5. You must have written this post post about “time” just for me. I have about 10-15,000 words to go on the current WIP. I should finish in a week or two, right? Ha. Tooth-pulling. I wrote the first scene last October but have only been at it seriously since March. I’ll be happy if it’s done by next month.
    I don’t think I’ll ever be a speed-writer if I keep my day job (which I must if I want to eat, LOL). But as a reader, I want my favorite authors to write as fast as possible. Since my list of autobuy authors is getting shorter by the year, the pressure’s on, Wenches! Go forth and write!
    I would pay more for quality and have cut way back on buying books by authors that were just ‘okay.’ Life’s too short and money’s too tight to fritter away on books that don’t resonate with me.

    Reply
  6. Personally, as a reader, I much prefer the year in between if it means I’m going to get a fabulous story, well written with compelling characters and a great plotline, than to get a new novel every 4-6 months that I feel shortchanged by after I’ve read it.
    I agree with Maggie. I realize a MM might cost $4.99 to $7.99 and in the grand scheme of things, that doesn’t seem like much to a lot of people but when one buys ten to 15 books a month, it adds up. I’d much rather it was well spent on books I love that are well written and have touched something in me, than to spend it on books I can’t get more than halfway through before they’re put in the used bookstore box.

    Reply
  7. Personally, as a reader, I much prefer the year in between if it means I’m going to get a fabulous story, well written with compelling characters and a great plotline, than to get a new novel every 4-6 months that I feel shortchanged by after I’ve read it.
    I agree with Maggie. I realize a MM might cost $4.99 to $7.99 and in the grand scheme of things, that doesn’t seem like much to a lot of people but when one buys ten to 15 books a month, it adds up. I’d much rather it was well spent on books I love that are well written and have touched something in me, than to spend it on books I can’t get more than halfway through before they’re put in the used bookstore box.

    Reply
  8. Personally, as a reader, I much prefer the year in between if it means I’m going to get a fabulous story, well written with compelling characters and a great plotline, than to get a new novel every 4-6 months that I feel shortchanged by after I’ve read it.
    I agree with Maggie. I realize a MM might cost $4.99 to $7.99 and in the grand scheme of things, that doesn’t seem like much to a lot of people but when one buys ten to 15 books a month, it adds up. I’d much rather it was well spent on books I love that are well written and have touched something in me, than to spend it on books I can’t get more than halfway through before they’re put in the used bookstore box.

    Reply
  9. Personally, as a reader, I much prefer the year in between if it means I’m going to get a fabulous story, well written with compelling characters and a great plotline, than to get a new novel every 4-6 months that I feel shortchanged by after I’ve read it.
    I agree with Maggie. I realize a MM might cost $4.99 to $7.99 and in the grand scheme of things, that doesn’t seem like much to a lot of people but when one buys ten to 15 books a month, it adds up. I’d much rather it was well spent on books I love that are well written and have touched something in me, than to spend it on books I can’t get more than halfway through before they’re put in the used bookstore box.

    Reply
  10. Personally, as a reader, I much prefer the year in between if it means I’m going to get a fabulous story, well written with compelling characters and a great plotline, than to get a new novel every 4-6 months that I feel shortchanged by after I’ve read it.
    I agree with Maggie. I realize a MM might cost $4.99 to $7.99 and in the grand scheme of things, that doesn’t seem like much to a lot of people but when one buys ten to 15 books a month, it adds up. I’d much rather it was well spent on books I love that are well written and have touched something in me, than to spend it on books I can’t get more than halfway through before they’re put in the used bookstore box.

    Reply
  11. Put me in the Lexus crowed, Prof Pat, only make mine a Mustang Cobra. Red, if you please.
    I shy away from the “mass producing authors” on purpose. I know (or at least I’m learning) what it takes to write a gripping piece worth the reading.
    On a side note, thank you, Prof. Pat, for sharing details about your writing process. I’m one of those “end the day with less words than you began with” types of writers. But, slashing away at those precious words is teaching me what not to do when I’m off and writing at the speed of Heinz ketchup.
    Nina, whose current ms just won “Put Your Best Hook Forward”

    Reply
  12. Put me in the Lexus crowed, Prof Pat, only make mine a Mustang Cobra. Red, if you please.
    I shy away from the “mass producing authors” on purpose. I know (or at least I’m learning) what it takes to write a gripping piece worth the reading.
    On a side note, thank you, Prof. Pat, for sharing details about your writing process. I’m one of those “end the day with less words than you began with” types of writers. But, slashing away at those precious words is teaching me what not to do when I’m off and writing at the speed of Heinz ketchup.
    Nina, whose current ms just won “Put Your Best Hook Forward”

    Reply
  13. Put me in the Lexus crowed, Prof Pat, only make mine a Mustang Cobra. Red, if you please.
    I shy away from the “mass producing authors” on purpose. I know (or at least I’m learning) what it takes to write a gripping piece worth the reading.
    On a side note, thank you, Prof. Pat, for sharing details about your writing process. I’m one of those “end the day with less words than you began with” types of writers. But, slashing away at those precious words is teaching me what not to do when I’m off and writing at the speed of Heinz ketchup.
    Nina, whose current ms just won “Put Your Best Hook Forward”

    Reply
  14. Put me in the Lexus crowed, Prof Pat, only make mine a Mustang Cobra. Red, if you please.
    I shy away from the “mass producing authors” on purpose. I know (or at least I’m learning) what it takes to write a gripping piece worth the reading.
    On a side note, thank you, Prof. Pat, for sharing details about your writing process. I’m one of those “end the day with less words than you began with” types of writers. But, slashing away at those precious words is teaching me what not to do when I’m off and writing at the speed of Heinz ketchup.
    Nina, whose current ms just won “Put Your Best Hook Forward”

    Reply
  15. Put me in the Lexus crowed, Prof Pat, only make mine a Mustang Cobra. Red, if you please.
    I shy away from the “mass producing authors” on purpose. I know (or at least I’m learning) what it takes to write a gripping piece worth the reading.
    On a side note, thank you, Prof. Pat, for sharing details about your writing process. I’m one of those “end the day with less words than you began with” types of writers. But, slashing away at those precious words is teaching me what not to do when I’m off and writing at the speed of Heinz ketchup.
    Nina, whose current ms just won “Put Your Best Hook Forward”

    Reply
  16. I think I’m one of those critical readers. I do pay more for quality, and I do buy my absolute favorite romance authors in hardcover. I do appreciate the authors who can write several novels a year and maintain that quality, but I’ll also wait for the “slower” authors.
    Congrats, Nina!

    Reply
  17. I think I’m one of those critical readers. I do pay more for quality, and I do buy my absolute favorite romance authors in hardcover. I do appreciate the authors who can write several novels a year and maintain that quality, but I’ll also wait for the “slower” authors.
    Congrats, Nina!

    Reply
  18. I think I’m one of those critical readers. I do pay more for quality, and I do buy my absolute favorite romance authors in hardcover. I do appreciate the authors who can write several novels a year and maintain that quality, but I’ll also wait for the “slower” authors.
    Congrats, Nina!

    Reply
  19. I think I’m one of those critical readers. I do pay more for quality, and I do buy my absolute favorite romance authors in hardcover. I do appreciate the authors who can write several novels a year and maintain that quality, but I’ll also wait for the “slower” authors.
    Congrats, Nina!

    Reply
  20. I think I’m one of those critical readers. I do pay more for quality, and I do buy my absolute favorite romance authors in hardcover. I do appreciate the authors who can write several novels a year and maintain that quality, but I’ll also wait for the “slower” authors.
    Congrats, Nina!

    Reply
  21. I can see the Lexus crowd are early risers! Maggie, glad that we can share our suffering “G,” and Nina, congratulations!
    But I don’t want to scare away the Kia buyers because I once was one. It takes a lot of reading to reach our critical level. And reading these days can be hideously expensive. Most of the wenchly books end up in libraries where they can be borrowed, but not all books do. Will Kia buyers scarf up everything they can afford to feed their need for reading, or do they turn elsewhere rather than buy books that don’t meet their standards? And where do they turn?

    Reply
  22. I can see the Lexus crowd are early risers! Maggie, glad that we can share our suffering “G,” and Nina, congratulations!
    But I don’t want to scare away the Kia buyers because I once was one. It takes a lot of reading to reach our critical level. And reading these days can be hideously expensive. Most of the wenchly books end up in libraries where they can be borrowed, but not all books do. Will Kia buyers scarf up everything they can afford to feed their need for reading, or do they turn elsewhere rather than buy books that don’t meet their standards? And where do they turn?

    Reply
  23. I can see the Lexus crowd are early risers! Maggie, glad that we can share our suffering “G,” and Nina, congratulations!
    But I don’t want to scare away the Kia buyers because I once was one. It takes a lot of reading to reach our critical level. And reading these days can be hideously expensive. Most of the wenchly books end up in libraries where they can be borrowed, but not all books do. Will Kia buyers scarf up everything they can afford to feed their need for reading, or do they turn elsewhere rather than buy books that don’t meet their standards? And where do they turn?

    Reply
  24. I can see the Lexus crowd are early risers! Maggie, glad that we can share our suffering “G,” and Nina, congratulations!
    But I don’t want to scare away the Kia buyers because I once was one. It takes a lot of reading to reach our critical level. And reading these days can be hideously expensive. Most of the wenchly books end up in libraries where they can be borrowed, but not all books do. Will Kia buyers scarf up everything they can afford to feed their need for reading, or do they turn elsewhere rather than buy books that don’t meet their standards? And where do they turn?

    Reply
  25. I can see the Lexus crowd are early risers! Maggie, glad that we can share our suffering “G,” and Nina, congratulations!
    But I don’t want to scare away the Kia buyers because I once was one. It takes a lot of reading to reach our critical level. And reading these days can be hideously expensive. Most of the wenchly books end up in libraries where they can be borrowed, but not all books do. Will Kia buyers scarf up everything they can afford to feed their need for reading, or do they turn elsewhere rather than buy books that don’t meet their standards? And where do they turn?

    Reply
  26. Hi Pat!
    I’m a slow writer. Very slow. It’s my darn internal editor, and I edit as I go. Then I go back the following day and edit some more. No wonder I inch along!
    As for the Kia vs Lexus analogy, I can’t apply either one to me as a writer. I’m more of a Buick. Comfortable luxury but not very speedy *LOL*
    Cheryl

    Reply
  27. Hi Pat!
    I’m a slow writer. Very slow. It’s my darn internal editor, and I edit as I go. Then I go back the following day and edit some more. No wonder I inch along!
    As for the Kia vs Lexus analogy, I can’t apply either one to me as a writer. I’m more of a Buick. Comfortable luxury but not very speedy *LOL*
    Cheryl

    Reply
  28. Hi Pat!
    I’m a slow writer. Very slow. It’s my darn internal editor, and I edit as I go. Then I go back the following day and edit some more. No wonder I inch along!
    As for the Kia vs Lexus analogy, I can’t apply either one to me as a writer. I’m more of a Buick. Comfortable luxury but not very speedy *LOL*
    Cheryl

    Reply
  29. Hi Pat!
    I’m a slow writer. Very slow. It’s my darn internal editor, and I edit as I go. Then I go back the following day and edit some more. No wonder I inch along!
    As for the Kia vs Lexus analogy, I can’t apply either one to me as a writer. I’m more of a Buick. Comfortable luxury but not very speedy *LOL*
    Cheryl

    Reply
  30. Hi Pat!
    I’m a slow writer. Very slow. It’s my darn internal editor, and I edit as I go. Then I go back the following day and edit some more. No wonder I inch along!
    As for the Kia vs Lexus analogy, I can’t apply either one to me as a writer. I’m more of a Buick. Comfortable luxury but not very speedy *LOL*
    Cheryl

    Reply
  31. Well, I’ll add to the consensus. I, too, want quality over quantity, and I will wait until my favorite authors have something new.
    There was a time in my life when, if I started reading a book, I forced myself to finish it. No longer. I’m reading for pleasure, and if it’s not pleasure, I stop.
    But, in a way, I’m torn. Writers need to eat, too, and Kia as well as Lexus readers need to read. But while both a Kia and a Lexus will get you where you need to go, a poorly written book will not necessarily give you the same amount of pleasure a well-written one will. Without the pleasure, the Kia readers have wasted the little money they have.
    Pat, we appreciate the effort you go through with your books. It shows. Please keep it up.

    Reply
  32. Well, I’ll add to the consensus. I, too, want quality over quantity, and I will wait until my favorite authors have something new.
    There was a time in my life when, if I started reading a book, I forced myself to finish it. No longer. I’m reading for pleasure, and if it’s not pleasure, I stop.
    But, in a way, I’m torn. Writers need to eat, too, and Kia as well as Lexus readers need to read. But while both a Kia and a Lexus will get you where you need to go, a poorly written book will not necessarily give you the same amount of pleasure a well-written one will. Without the pleasure, the Kia readers have wasted the little money they have.
    Pat, we appreciate the effort you go through with your books. It shows. Please keep it up.

    Reply
  33. Well, I’ll add to the consensus. I, too, want quality over quantity, and I will wait until my favorite authors have something new.
    There was a time in my life when, if I started reading a book, I forced myself to finish it. No longer. I’m reading for pleasure, and if it’s not pleasure, I stop.
    But, in a way, I’m torn. Writers need to eat, too, and Kia as well as Lexus readers need to read. But while both a Kia and a Lexus will get you where you need to go, a poorly written book will not necessarily give you the same amount of pleasure a well-written one will. Without the pleasure, the Kia readers have wasted the little money they have.
    Pat, we appreciate the effort you go through with your books. It shows. Please keep it up.

    Reply
  34. Well, I’ll add to the consensus. I, too, want quality over quantity, and I will wait until my favorite authors have something new.
    There was a time in my life when, if I started reading a book, I forced myself to finish it. No longer. I’m reading for pleasure, and if it’s not pleasure, I stop.
    But, in a way, I’m torn. Writers need to eat, too, and Kia as well as Lexus readers need to read. But while both a Kia and a Lexus will get you where you need to go, a poorly written book will not necessarily give you the same amount of pleasure a well-written one will. Without the pleasure, the Kia readers have wasted the little money they have.
    Pat, we appreciate the effort you go through with your books. It shows. Please keep it up.

    Reply
  35. Well, I’ll add to the consensus. I, too, want quality over quantity, and I will wait until my favorite authors have something new.
    There was a time in my life when, if I started reading a book, I forced myself to finish it. No longer. I’m reading for pleasure, and if it’s not pleasure, I stop.
    But, in a way, I’m torn. Writers need to eat, too, and Kia as well as Lexus readers need to read. But while both a Kia and a Lexus will get you where you need to go, a poorly written book will not necessarily give you the same amount of pleasure a well-written one will. Without the pleasure, the Kia readers have wasted the little money they have.
    Pat, we appreciate the effort you go through with your books. It shows. Please keep it up.

    Reply
  36. One more vote for quality, even more so now that I’m doing so much of my reading in my Kindle, which means no used-bookstore recouping of the investment if I find I’ve bought unwisely.
    Rather than wish (uselessly) for the good writers to write faster, I’m wishing there were more good writers… writers who care what the difference is between “to lie” and “to lay,” for starters, but also writers who don’t spend far too long going over and over the same ground, writers who don’t think flippancy is cute, writers who don’t think a “feisty” heroine is a Good Thing… I could go on and on.
    Heaven knows it’s not easy. The more I see, the more impressed I am with you guys, no matter how much struggle you sometimes seem to be having, you do get it done, and done well.

    Reply
  37. One more vote for quality, even more so now that I’m doing so much of my reading in my Kindle, which means no used-bookstore recouping of the investment if I find I’ve bought unwisely.
    Rather than wish (uselessly) for the good writers to write faster, I’m wishing there were more good writers… writers who care what the difference is between “to lie” and “to lay,” for starters, but also writers who don’t spend far too long going over and over the same ground, writers who don’t think flippancy is cute, writers who don’t think a “feisty” heroine is a Good Thing… I could go on and on.
    Heaven knows it’s not easy. The more I see, the more impressed I am with you guys, no matter how much struggle you sometimes seem to be having, you do get it done, and done well.

    Reply
  38. One more vote for quality, even more so now that I’m doing so much of my reading in my Kindle, which means no used-bookstore recouping of the investment if I find I’ve bought unwisely.
    Rather than wish (uselessly) for the good writers to write faster, I’m wishing there were more good writers… writers who care what the difference is between “to lie” and “to lay,” for starters, but also writers who don’t spend far too long going over and over the same ground, writers who don’t think flippancy is cute, writers who don’t think a “feisty” heroine is a Good Thing… I could go on and on.
    Heaven knows it’s not easy. The more I see, the more impressed I am with you guys, no matter how much struggle you sometimes seem to be having, you do get it done, and done well.

    Reply
  39. One more vote for quality, even more so now that I’m doing so much of my reading in my Kindle, which means no used-bookstore recouping of the investment if I find I’ve bought unwisely.
    Rather than wish (uselessly) for the good writers to write faster, I’m wishing there were more good writers… writers who care what the difference is between “to lie” and “to lay,” for starters, but also writers who don’t spend far too long going over and over the same ground, writers who don’t think flippancy is cute, writers who don’t think a “feisty” heroine is a Good Thing… I could go on and on.
    Heaven knows it’s not easy. The more I see, the more impressed I am with you guys, no matter how much struggle you sometimes seem to be having, you do get it done, and done well.

    Reply
  40. One more vote for quality, even more so now that I’m doing so much of my reading in my Kindle, which means no used-bookstore recouping of the investment if I find I’ve bought unwisely.
    Rather than wish (uselessly) for the good writers to write faster, I’m wishing there were more good writers… writers who care what the difference is between “to lie” and “to lay,” for starters, but also writers who don’t spend far too long going over and over the same ground, writers who don’t think flippancy is cute, writers who don’t think a “feisty” heroine is a Good Thing… I could go on and on.
    Heaven knows it’s not easy. The more I see, the more impressed I am with you guys, no matter how much struggle you sometimes seem to be having, you do get it done, and done well.

    Reply
  41. It certainly looks like we’re getting a consensus on the quality issue, if anyone in San Diego or elsewhere cares! Cheryl, you’re too much of a grammarian to be a Buick. But that editor on your shoulder will slow you down. Kick her off, go into the other half of your brain, and let it rip. THEN edit.
    I agree, it would be lovely to have more writers who get it right. I no longer read books that don’t give me pleasure, but I can take my book purchases off on my taxes, so it’s not as expensive for me to fling out bad ones.
    And the complaints you’re making, Elaine, aren’t just the fault of a writer. Editors and copyeditors are supposed to fix those kind of errors, or at least buy authors who don’t make them! My editor is so tough that I caused an uproar in one of my writer’s groups when I threw “Escaping France was literally a breeze” at them. My editor said it wasn’t a sentence and I couldn’t figure out why. That simple sentence has so many strange English pathways in it that even an experienced editor and author couldn’t break it down properly. Just imagine what inexperienced ones can do!
    which reminds me, I don’t think we have this blog address up yet. It’s brand new, but you might enjoy it. It’s from the authors of Novelists Inc, and we have quite an assortment of knowledgeable folks on board:
    http://www.ninc.com/blog (I think. Or some combination thereof)

    Reply
  42. It certainly looks like we’re getting a consensus on the quality issue, if anyone in San Diego or elsewhere cares! Cheryl, you’re too much of a grammarian to be a Buick. But that editor on your shoulder will slow you down. Kick her off, go into the other half of your brain, and let it rip. THEN edit.
    I agree, it would be lovely to have more writers who get it right. I no longer read books that don’t give me pleasure, but I can take my book purchases off on my taxes, so it’s not as expensive for me to fling out bad ones.
    And the complaints you’re making, Elaine, aren’t just the fault of a writer. Editors and copyeditors are supposed to fix those kind of errors, or at least buy authors who don’t make them! My editor is so tough that I caused an uproar in one of my writer’s groups when I threw “Escaping France was literally a breeze” at them. My editor said it wasn’t a sentence and I couldn’t figure out why. That simple sentence has so many strange English pathways in it that even an experienced editor and author couldn’t break it down properly. Just imagine what inexperienced ones can do!
    which reminds me, I don’t think we have this blog address up yet. It’s brand new, but you might enjoy it. It’s from the authors of Novelists Inc, and we have quite an assortment of knowledgeable folks on board:
    http://www.ninc.com/blog (I think. Or some combination thereof)

    Reply
  43. It certainly looks like we’re getting a consensus on the quality issue, if anyone in San Diego or elsewhere cares! Cheryl, you’re too much of a grammarian to be a Buick. But that editor on your shoulder will slow you down. Kick her off, go into the other half of your brain, and let it rip. THEN edit.
    I agree, it would be lovely to have more writers who get it right. I no longer read books that don’t give me pleasure, but I can take my book purchases off on my taxes, so it’s not as expensive for me to fling out bad ones.
    And the complaints you’re making, Elaine, aren’t just the fault of a writer. Editors and copyeditors are supposed to fix those kind of errors, or at least buy authors who don’t make them! My editor is so tough that I caused an uproar in one of my writer’s groups when I threw “Escaping France was literally a breeze” at them. My editor said it wasn’t a sentence and I couldn’t figure out why. That simple sentence has so many strange English pathways in it that even an experienced editor and author couldn’t break it down properly. Just imagine what inexperienced ones can do!
    which reminds me, I don’t think we have this blog address up yet. It’s brand new, but you might enjoy it. It’s from the authors of Novelists Inc, and we have quite an assortment of knowledgeable folks on board:
    http://www.ninc.com/blog (I think. Or some combination thereof)

    Reply
  44. It certainly looks like we’re getting a consensus on the quality issue, if anyone in San Diego or elsewhere cares! Cheryl, you’re too much of a grammarian to be a Buick. But that editor on your shoulder will slow you down. Kick her off, go into the other half of your brain, and let it rip. THEN edit.
    I agree, it would be lovely to have more writers who get it right. I no longer read books that don’t give me pleasure, but I can take my book purchases off on my taxes, so it’s not as expensive for me to fling out bad ones.
    And the complaints you’re making, Elaine, aren’t just the fault of a writer. Editors and copyeditors are supposed to fix those kind of errors, or at least buy authors who don’t make them! My editor is so tough that I caused an uproar in one of my writer’s groups when I threw “Escaping France was literally a breeze” at them. My editor said it wasn’t a sentence and I couldn’t figure out why. That simple sentence has so many strange English pathways in it that even an experienced editor and author couldn’t break it down properly. Just imagine what inexperienced ones can do!
    which reminds me, I don’t think we have this blog address up yet. It’s brand new, but you might enjoy it. It’s from the authors of Novelists Inc, and we have quite an assortment of knowledgeable folks on board:
    http://www.ninc.com/blog (I think. Or some combination thereof)

    Reply
  45. It certainly looks like we’re getting a consensus on the quality issue, if anyone in San Diego or elsewhere cares! Cheryl, you’re too much of a grammarian to be a Buick. But that editor on your shoulder will slow you down. Kick her off, go into the other half of your brain, and let it rip. THEN edit.
    I agree, it would be lovely to have more writers who get it right. I no longer read books that don’t give me pleasure, but I can take my book purchases off on my taxes, so it’s not as expensive for me to fling out bad ones.
    And the complaints you’re making, Elaine, aren’t just the fault of a writer. Editors and copyeditors are supposed to fix those kind of errors, or at least buy authors who don’t make them! My editor is so tough that I caused an uproar in one of my writer’s groups when I threw “Escaping France was literally a breeze” at them. My editor said it wasn’t a sentence and I couldn’t figure out why. That simple sentence has so many strange English pathways in it that even an experienced editor and author couldn’t break it down properly. Just imagine what inexperienced ones can do!
    which reminds me, I don’t think we have this blog address up yet. It’s brand new, but you might enjoy it. It’s from the authors of Novelists Inc, and we have quite an assortment of knowledgeable folks on board:
    http://www.ninc.com/blog (I think. Or some combination thereof)

    Reply
  46. I’m going to go along with others who have posted and vote for quality over quantity. I’ve been hesitant about picking up a novel by Nora Roberts, whom it seems has a new novel out just about every month. I know she’s immensely popular, and maybe I’d like one of her novels. I just find it hard to fathom how she can turn out so many books so quickly, and yet all of them receive raves from various reviewers!
    On the other hand, I remember how patiently I waited for the fifth novel in the Outlander series by Diana Gabaldon. (I think there was about a two-year gap between the fourth and fifth novels.) And I remember how disappointed I was with the novel (“The Fiery Cross”) because it just seemed to D-R-A-G. I’m certainly not privy to communications between authors and editors, but having thoroughly enjoyed the first four novels in the series, I’m still wondering what went wrong there. And I’m not alone in my opinion–when I read customer reviews at Amazon.com and the Barnes & Noble web site, I saw that quite a few readers shared my opinion. Even so, I would still rather wait for a book that was completed to the author’s satisfaction, than to read something that was obviously rushed to completion!

    Reply
  47. I’m going to go along with others who have posted and vote for quality over quantity. I’ve been hesitant about picking up a novel by Nora Roberts, whom it seems has a new novel out just about every month. I know she’s immensely popular, and maybe I’d like one of her novels. I just find it hard to fathom how she can turn out so many books so quickly, and yet all of them receive raves from various reviewers!
    On the other hand, I remember how patiently I waited for the fifth novel in the Outlander series by Diana Gabaldon. (I think there was about a two-year gap between the fourth and fifth novels.) And I remember how disappointed I was with the novel (“The Fiery Cross”) because it just seemed to D-R-A-G. I’m certainly not privy to communications between authors and editors, but having thoroughly enjoyed the first four novels in the series, I’m still wondering what went wrong there. And I’m not alone in my opinion–when I read customer reviews at Amazon.com and the Barnes & Noble web site, I saw that quite a few readers shared my opinion. Even so, I would still rather wait for a book that was completed to the author’s satisfaction, than to read something that was obviously rushed to completion!

    Reply
  48. I’m going to go along with others who have posted and vote for quality over quantity. I’ve been hesitant about picking up a novel by Nora Roberts, whom it seems has a new novel out just about every month. I know she’s immensely popular, and maybe I’d like one of her novels. I just find it hard to fathom how she can turn out so many books so quickly, and yet all of them receive raves from various reviewers!
    On the other hand, I remember how patiently I waited for the fifth novel in the Outlander series by Diana Gabaldon. (I think there was about a two-year gap between the fourth and fifth novels.) And I remember how disappointed I was with the novel (“The Fiery Cross”) because it just seemed to D-R-A-G. I’m certainly not privy to communications between authors and editors, but having thoroughly enjoyed the first four novels in the series, I’m still wondering what went wrong there. And I’m not alone in my opinion–when I read customer reviews at Amazon.com and the Barnes & Noble web site, I saw that quite a few readers shared my opinion. Even so, I would still rather wait for a book that was completed to the author’s satisfaction, than to read something that was obviously rushed to completion!

    Reply
  49. I’m going to go along with others who have posted and vote for quality over quantity. I’ve been hesitant about picking up a novel by Nora Roberts, whom it seems has a new novel out just about every month. I know she’s immensely popular, and maybe I’d like one of her novels. I just find it hard to fathom how she can turn out so many books so quickly, and yet all of them receive raves from various reviewers!
    On the other hand, I remember how patiently I waited for the fifth novel in the Outlander series by Diana Gabaldon. (I think there was about a two-year gap between the fourth and fifth novels.) And I remember how disappointed I was with the novel (“The Fiery Cross”) because it just seemed to D-R-A-G. I’m certainly not privy to communications between authors and editors, but having thoroughly enjoyed the first four novels in the series, I’m still wondering what went wrong there. And I’m not alone in my opinion–when I read customer reviews at Amazon.com and the Barnes & Noble web site, I saw that quite a few readers shared my opinion. Even so, I would still rather wait for a book that was completed to the author’s satisfaction, than to read something that was obviously rushed to completion!

    Reply
  50. I’m going to go along with others who have posted and vote for quality over quantity. I’ve been hesitant about picking up a novel by Nora Roberts, whom it seems has a new novel out just about every month. I know she’s immensely popular, and maybe I’d like one of her novels. I just find it hard to fathom how she can turn out so many books so quickly, and yet all of them receive raves from various reviewers!
    On the other hand, I remember how patiently I waited for the fifth novel in the Outlander series by Diana Gabaldon. (I think there was about a two-year gap between the fourth and fifth novels.) And I remember how disappointed I was with the novel (“The Fiery Cross”) because it just seemed to D-R-A-G. I’m certainly not privy to communications between authors and editors, but having thoroughly enjoyed the first four novels in the series, I’m still wondering what went wrong there. And I’m not alone in my opinion–when I read customer reviews at Amazon.com and the Barnes & Noble web site, I saw that quite a few readers shared my opinion. Even so, I would still rather wait for a book that was completed to the author’s satisfaction, than to read something that was obviously rushed to completion!

    Reply
  51. Here’s another vote for quality. If I read a book and, when I finish, just shrug and go, “Well, that was okay,” then I’m not going to pick up another by that author. I’d rather an author take the time for characters and texturing and a meaty plot, especially if I’m looking at $7.99 for the book.
    I also read fantasy and SF, and there are a couple of authors I gave up because their production times were so long (2 years or more) and their tomes such weighty series installments that I couldn’t retain the story status in my head and didn’t have time to go re-read all the mega-volumes before the new one, but they’re exceptions.

    Reply
  52. Here’s another vote for quality. If I read a book and, when I finish, just shrug and go, “Well, that was okay,” then I’m not going to pick up another by that author. I’d rather an author take the time for characters and texturing and a meaty plot, especially if I’m looking at $7.99 for the book.
    I also read fantasy and SF, and there are a couple of authors I gave up because their production times were so long (2 years or more) and their tomes such weighty series installments that I couldn’t retain the story status in my head and didn’t have time to go re-read all the mega-volumes before the new one, but they’re exceptions.

    Reply
  53. Here’s another vote for quality. If I read a book and, when I finish, just shrug and go, “Well, that was okay,” then I’m not going to pick up another by that author. I’d rather an author take the time for characters and texturing and a meaty plot, especially if I’m looking at $7.99 for the book.
    I also read fantasy and SF, and there are a couple of authors I gave up because their production times were so long (2 years or more) and their tomes such weighty series installments that I couldn’t retain the story status in my head and didn’t have time to go re-read all the mega-volumes before the new one, but they’re exceptions.

    Reply
  54. Here’s another vote for quality. If I read a book and, when I finish, just shrug and go, “Well, that was okay,” then I’m not going to pick up another by that author. I’d rather an author take the time for characters and texturing and a meaty plot, especially if I’m looking at $7.99 for the book.
    I also read fantasy and SF, and there are a couple of authors I gave up because their production times were so long (2 years or more) and their tomes such weighty series installments that I couldn’t retain the story status in my head and didn’t have time to go re-read all the mega-volumes before the new one, but they’re exceptions.

    Reply
  55. Here’s another vote for quality. If I read a book and, when I finish, just shrug and go, “Well, that was okay,” then I’m not going to pick up another by that author. I’d rather an author take the time for characters and texturing and a meaty plot, especially if I’m looking at $7.99 for the book.
    I also read fantasy and SF, and there are a couple of authors I gave up because their production times were so long (2 years or more) and their tomes such weighty series installments that I couldn’t retain the story status in my head and didn’t have time to go re-read all the mega-volumes before the new one, but they’re exceptions.

    Reply
  56. Robin – I do really think Nora Roberts is just a phenomenum because her books do not seem to suffer for her fast writing pace. Naturally, there are stories of hers that I don’t enjoy as much as others – but you never feel like she “rushed” with it. That story just doesn’t happen to resonate as much.
    I do tend to like her big single titles (the ones that come out in hardcover first) the most.
    She’s really a great story teller. If you like contemporary, you may want to give her a try.

    Reply
  57. Robin – I do really think Nora Roberts is just a phenomenum because her books do not seem to suffer for her fast writing pace. Naturally, there are stories of hers that I don’t enjoy as much as others – but you never feel like she “rushed” with it. That story just doesn’t happen to resonate as much.
    I do tend to like her big single titles (the ones that come out in hardcover first) the most.
    She’s really a great story teller. If you like contemporary, you may want to give her a try.

    Reply
  58. Robin – I do really think Nora Roberts is just a phenomenum because her books do not seem to suffer for her fast writing pace. Naturally, there are stories of hers that I don’t enjoy as much as others – but you never feel like she “rushed” with it. That story just doesn’t happen to resonate as much.
    I do tend to like her big single titles (the ones that come out in hardcover first) the most.
    She’s really a great story teller. If you like contemporary, you may want to give her a try.

    Reply
  59. Robin – I do really think Nora Roberts is just a phenomenum because her books do not seem to suffer for her fast writing pace. Naturally, there are stories of hers that I don’t enjoy as much as others – but you never feel like she “rushed” with it. That story just doesn’t happen to resonate as much.
    I do tend to like her big single titles (the ones that come out in hardcover first) the most.
    She’s really a great story teller. If you like contemporary, you may want to give her a try.

    Reply
  60. Robin – I do really think Nora Roberts is just a phenomenum because her books do not seem to suffer for her fast writing pace. Naturally, there are stories of hers that I don’t enjoy as much as others – but you never feel like she “rushed” with it. That story just doesn’t happen to resonate as much.
    I do tend to like her big single titles (the ones that come out in hardcover first) the most.
    She’s really a great story teller. If you like contemporary, you may want to give her a try.

    Reply
  61. Patricia, you have the blog address correct. I took the RSS feed for now to get a feel for it. Thanks! 😀
    As far as some of the literal tomes we wait for sometimes for two or more years, I agree in that I hate to wait that long, expecting a terrific tale, only to find myself slogging through something and wondering why I waited or why I paid the money to buy it.
    There’s a fine line between quantity and quality, and sometimes, the quantity really can give you better quality than the lengthy wait in-between. But they are not common.
    And Michelle, I agree with you that Nora Roberts is really a true exception to the rule. I’m not a big contemporary reader though I have read two or three of hers. Talent like that is so rare, but it makes me wonder if she is so prolific so her head doesn’t explode from all her ideas 😆 And I’m teasing with that because she does write really well…(even though after reading that last sentence, I can certainly see that I don’t!) 😉

    Reply
  62. Patricia, you have the blog address correct. I took the RSS feed for now to get a feel for it. Thanks! 😀
    As far as some of the literal tomes we wait for sometimes for two or more years, I agree in that I hate to wait that long, expecting a terrific tale, only to find myself slogging through something and wondering why I waited or why I paid the money to buy it.
    There’s a fine line between quantity and quality, and sometimes, the quantity really can give you better quality than the lengthy wait in-between. But they are not common.
    And Michelle, I agree with you that Nora Roberts is really a true exception to the rule. I’m not a big contemporary reader though I have read two or three of hers. Talent like that is so rare, but it makes me wonder if she is so prolific so her head doesn’t explode from all her ideas 😆 And I’m teasing with that because she does write really well…(even though after reading that last sentence, I can certainly see that I don’t!) 😉

    Reply
  63. Patricia, you have the blog address correct. I took the RSS feed for now to get a feel for it. Thanks! 😀
    As far as some of the literal tomes we wait for sometimes for two or more years, I agree in that I hate to wait that long, expecting a terrific tale, only to find myself slogging through something and wondering why I waited or why I paid the money to buy it.
    There’s a fine line between quantity and quality, and sometimes, the quantity really can give you better quality than the lengthy wait in-between. But they are not common.
    And Michelle, I agree with you that Nora Roberts is really a true exception to the rule. I’m not a big contemporary reader though I have read two or three of hers. Talent like that is so rare, but it makes me wonder if she is so prolific so her head doesn’t explode from all her ideas 😆 And I’m teasing with that because she does write really well…(even though after reading that last sentence, I can certainly see that I don’t!) 😉

    Reply
  64. Patricia, you have the blog address correct. I took the RSS feed for now to get a feel for it. Thanks! 😀
    As far as some of the literal tomes we wait for sometimes for two or more years, I agree in that I hate to wait that long, expecting a terrific tale, only to find myself slogging through something and wondering why I waited or why I paid the money to buy it.
    There’s a fine line between quantity and quality, and sometimes, the quantity really can give you better quality than the lengthy wait in-between. But they are not common.
    And Michelle, I agree with you that Nora Roberts is really a true exception to the rule. I’m not a big contemporary reader though I have read two or three of hers. Talent like that is so rare, but it makes me wonder if she is so prolific so her head doesn’t explode from all her ideas 😆 And I’m teasing with that because she does write really well…(even though after reading that last sentence, I can certainly see that I don’t!) 😉

    Reply
  65. Patricia, you have the blog address correct. I took the RSS feed for now to get a feel for it. Thanks! 😀
    As far as some of the literal tomes we wait for sometimes for two or more years, I agree in that I hate to wait that long, expecting a terrific tale, only to find myself slogging through something and wondering why I waited or why I paid the money to buy it.
    There’s a fine line between quantity and quality, and sometimes, the quantity really can give you better quality than the lengthy wait in-between. But they are not common.
    And Michelle, I agree with you that Nora Roberts is really a true exception to the rule. I’m not a big contemporary reader though I have read two or three of hers. Talent like that is so rare, but it makes me wonder if she is so prolific so her head doesn’t explode from all her ideas 😆 And I’m teasing with that because she does write really well…(even though after reading that last sentence, I can certainly see that I don’t!) 😉

    Reply
  66. Gee, Pat, can you really deduct novels you read for pleasure from your taxes? I know you can deduct research materials. I have an e-book coming out soon, and I’d love to deduct the romances I read.
    Linda Banche

    Reply
  67. Gee, Pat, can you really deduct novels you read for pleasure from your taxes? I know you can deduct research materials. I have an e-book coming out soon, and I’d love to deduct the romances I read.
    Linda Banche

    Reply
  68. Gee, Pat, can you really deduct novels you read for pleasure from your taxes? I know you can deduct research materials. I have an e-book coming out soon, and I’d love to deduct the romances I read.
    Linda Banche

    Reply
  69. Gee, Pat, can you really deduct novels you read for pleasure from your taxes? I know you can deduct research materials. I have an e-book coming out soon, and I’d love to deduct the romances I read.
    Linda Banche

    Reply
  70. Gee, Pat, can you really deduct novels you read for pleasure from your taxes? I know you can deduct research materials. I have an e-book coming out soon, and I’d love to deduct the romances I read.
    Linda Banche

    Reply
  71. Nora truly is a phenomenon, but I can’t think of anyone else who can accomplish what she does. Macomber may come close. Nora has a little bit of something for everyone, so you have to read across the board to find the ones that suit you. Really, you need to try her.
    I agree that it’s tough to write a series and not produce regularly. That has to be a headache for everyone. I don’t read Gabaldon so can’t comment there, but it does sound as if she’s so popular that the editors decided not to fix what ain’t broke, as the saying goes.
    And Linda, I consider the books I read as market research, which is definitely deductible! One of the few perks of being a writer. I can’t possibly compete in this market without knowing what’s out there, what’s selling, and where the next market might be. See, maybe you’ve just made a little profit from reading this blog!
    Theo, let me know how the ninc blog goes. I’m supposed to sign up over there but I’ve been waiting until after RWA and revisions are done.

    Reply
  72. Nora truly is a phenomenon, but I can’t think of anyone else who can accomplish what she does. Macomber may come close. Nora has a little bit of something for everyone, so you have to read across the board to find the ones that suit you. Really, you need to try her.
    I agree that it’s tough to write a series and not produce regularly. That has to be a headache for everyone. I don’t read Gabaldon so can’t comment there, but it does sound as if she’s so popular that the editors decided not to fix what ain’t broke, as the saying goes.
    And Linda, I consider the books I read as market research, which is definitely deductible! One of the few perks of being a writer. I can’t possibly compete in this market without knowing what’s out there, what’s selling, and where the next market might be. See, maybe you’ve just made a little profit from reading this blog!
    Theo, let me know how the ninc blog goes. I’m supposed to sign up over there but I’ve been waiting until after RWA and revisions are done.

    Reply
  73. Nora truly is a phenomenon, but I can’t think of anyone else who can accomplish what she does. Macomber may come close. Nora has a little bit of something for everyone, so you have to read across the board to find the ones that suit you. Really, you need to try her.
    I agree that it’s tough to write a series and not produce regularly. That has to be a headache for everyone. I don’t read Gabaldon so can’t comment there, but it does sound as if she’s so popular that the editors decided not to fix what ain’t broke, as the saying goes.
    And Linda, I consider the books I read as market research, which is definitely deductible! One of the few perks of being a writer. I can’t possibly compete in this market without knowing what’s out there, what’s selling, and where the next market might be. See, maybe you’ve just made a little profit from reading this blog!
    Theo, let me know how the ninc blog goes. I’m supposed to sign up over there but I’ve been waiting until after RWA and revisions are done.

    Reply
  74. Nora truly is a phenomenon, but I can’t think of anyone else who can accomplish what she does. Macomber may come close. Nora has a little bit of something for everyone, so you have to read across the board to find the ones that suit you. Really, you need to try her.
    I agree that it’s tough to write a series and not produce regularly. That has to be a headache for everyone. I don’t read Gabaldon so can’t comment there, but it does sound as if she’s so popular that the editors decided not to fix what ain’t broke, as the saying goes.
    And Linda, I consider the books I read as market research, which is definitely deductible! One of the few perks of being a writer. I can’t possibly compete in this market without knowing what’s out there, what’s selling, and where the next market might be. See, maybe you’ve just made a little profit from reading this blog!
    Theo, let me know how the ninc blog goes. I’m supposed to sign up over there but I’ve been waiting until after RWA and revisions are done.

    Reply
  75. Nora truly is a phenomenon, but I can’t think of anyone else who can accomplish what she does. Macomber may come close. Nora has a little bit of something for everyone, so you have to read across the board to find the ones that suit you. Really, you need to try her.
    I agree that it’s tough to write a series and not produce regularly. That has to be a headache for everyone. I don’t read Gabaldon so can’t comment there, but it does sound as if she’s so popular that the editors decided not to fix what ain’t broke, as the saying goes.
    And Linda, I consider the books I read as market research, which is definitely deductible! One of the few perks of being a writer. I can’t possibly compete in this market without knowing what’s out there, what’s selling, and where the next market might be. See, maybe you’ve just made a little profit from reading this blog!
    Theo, let me know how the ninc blog goes. I’m supposed to sign up over there but I’ve been waiting until after RWA and revisions are done.

    Reply
  76. Oh, hmm. Kia or Lexus… I’m a Toyota or VW girl myself but….
    I have some authors that I love to read. They take a year or more between books, but I’m willing to wait. I have some authors that I love to read that can produce 2 books a year. I’m loving that.
    There are some authors who produce a book a year, that I can’t be bothered to read past the first chapter. Likewise with some that write faster. I guess what I’m saying is that I like quality no matter what the time frame, but if the writing itself doesn’t resonate with me, then I’m not reading.
    I have found that with the library, I am willing to read or attempt to read different authors, because I don’t have anything but time at risk, and I toss books onto the “don’t bother” pile readily.
    I have to admit though, that I tend to live the Kia lifestyle. I’m not much into fine dining, fine wine and designer clothes. I’m pretty no frills. Maybe that’s why “literature” doesn’t appeal to me.

    Reply
  77. Oh, hmm. Kia or Lexus… I’m a Toyota or VW girl myself but….
    I have some authors that I love to read. They take a year or more between books, but I’m willing to wait. I have some authors that I love to read that can produce 2 books a year. I’m loving that.
    There are some authors who produce a book a year, that I can’t be bothered to read past the first chapter. Likewise with some that write faster. I guess what I’m saying is that I like quality no matter what the time frame, but if the writing itself doesn’t resonate with me, then I’m not reading.
    I have found that with the library, I am willing to read or attempt to read different authors, because I don’t have anything but time at risk, and I toss books onto the “don’t bother” pile readily.
    I have to admit though, that I tend to live the Kia lifestyle. I’m not much into fine dining, fine wine and designer clothes. I’m pretty no frills. Maybe that’s why “literature” doesn’t appeal to me.

    Reply
  78. Oh, hmm. Kia or Lexus… I’m a Toyota or VW girl myself but….
    I have some authors that I love to read. They take a year or more between books, but I’m willing to wait. I have some authors that I love to read that can produce 2 books a year. I’m loving that.
    There are some authors who produce a book a year, that I can’t be bothered to read past the first chapter. Likewise with some that write faster. I guess what I’m saying is that I like quality no matter what the time frame, but if the writing itself doesn’t resonate with me, then I’m not reading.
    I have found that with the library, I am willing to read or attempt to read different authors, because I don’t have anything but time at risk, and I toss books onto the “don’t bother” pile readily.
    I have to admit though, that I tend to live the Kia lifestyle. I’m not much into fine dining, fine wine and designer clothes. I’m pretty no frills. Maybe that’s why “literature” doesn’t appeal to me.

    Reply
  79. Oh, hmm. Kia or Lexus… I’m a Toyota or VW girl myself but….
    I have some authors that I love to read. They take a year or more between books, but I’m willing to wait. I have some authors that I love to read that can produce 2 books a year. I’m loving that.
    There are some authors who produce a book a year, that I can’t be bothered to read past the first chapter. Likewise with some that write faster. I guess what I’m saying is that I like quality no matter what the time frame, but if the writing itself doesn’t resonate with me, then I’m not reading.
    I have found that with the library, I am willing to read or attempt to read different authors, because I don’t have anything but time at risk, and I toss books onto the “don’t bother” pile readily.
    I have to admit though, that I tend to live the Kia lifestyle. I’m not much into fine dining, fine wine and designer clothes. I’m pretty no frills. Maybe that’s why “literature” doesn’t appeal to me.

    Reply
  80. Oh, hmm. Kia or Lexus… I’m a Toyota or VW girl myself but….
    I have some authors that I love to read. They take a year or more between books, but I’m willing to wait. I have some authors that I love to read that can produce 2 books a year. I’m loving that.
    There are some authors who produce a book a year, that I can’t be bothered to read past the first chapter. Likewise with some that write faster. I guess what I’m saying is that I like quality no matter what the time frame, but if the writing itself doesn’t resonate with me, then I’m not reading.
    I have found that with the library, I am willing to read or attempt to read different authors, because I don’t have anything but time at risk, and I toss books onto the “don’t bother” pile readily.
    I have to admit though, that I tend to live the Kia lifestyle. I’m not much into fine dining, fine wine and designer clothes. I’m pretty no frills. Maybe that’s why “literature” doesn’t appeal to me.

    Reply
  81. Gosh, I beat myself up because I write so slow. Heck, it only took 10 years to finish My Lord Raven. Seriously, I started it and put it down for many years. Then I finally wrote it and re-wrote it. Thanks to a tough critique partner and a good editor, it’s a quality book I can be proud of.
    So, yes, I vote for quality over quantity. I’d rather have a book I can be proud of than one that misses the mark.

    Reply
  82. Gosh, I beat myself up because I write so slow. Heck, it only took 10 years to finish My Lord Raven. Seriously, I started it and put it down for many years. Then I finally wrote it and re-wrote it. Thanks to a tough critique partner and a good editor, it’s a quality book I can be proud of.
    So, yes, I vote for quality over quantity. I’d rather have a book I can be proud of than one that misses the mark.

    Reply
  83. Gosh, I beat myself up because I write so slow. Heck, it only took 10 years to finish My Lord Raven. Seriously, I started it and put it down for many years. Then I finally wrote it and re-wrote it. Thanks to a tough critique partner and a good editor, it’s a quality book I can be proud of.
    So, yes, I vote for quality over quantity. I’d rather have a book I can be proud of than one that misses the mark.

    Reply
  84. Gosh, I beat myself up because I write so slow. Heck, it only took 10 years to finish My Lord Raven. Seriously, I started it and put it down for many years. Then I finally wrote it and re-wrote it. Thanks to a tough critique partner and a good editor, it’s a quality book I can be proud of.
    So, yes, I vote for quality over quantity. I’d rather have a book I can be proud of than one that misses the mark.

    Reply
  85. Gosh, I beat myself up because I write so slow. Heck, it only took 10 years to finish My Lord Raven. Seriously, I started it and put it down for many years. Then I finally wrote it and re-wrote it. Thanks to a tough critique partner and a good editor, it’s a quality book I can be proud of.
    So, yes, I vote for quality over quantity. I’d rather have a book I can be proud of than one that misses the mark.

    Reply
  86. Hey! I have a KIA!
    I think some of the responsibility belongs to the editors, who should see that books aren’t birthed into the world with gross errors, whether in grammar or storytelling. I’ve noticed in Nora’s books (and I do love them, except the early romances and (mostly) when she tries the supernatural) errors that I myself caught as a casual reader; so why did the copy editor miss them?
    I think most writers who produce multiple books with great frequency write to a formula, and their offspring are like eight-banded armadillos, which produce identical quadruplets in each birth. Nora’s secret is that she has dozens and dozens of formulas, some for characters, some for plots, some for relationships, and she can mix and match for an eon or so without repeating herself.

    Reply
  87. Hey! I have a KIA!
    I think some of the responsibility belongs to the editors, who should see that books aren’t birthed into the world with gross errors, whether in grammar or storytelling. I’ve noticed in Nora’s books (and I do love them, except the early romances and (mostly) when she tries the supernatural) errors that I myself caught as a casual reader; so why did the copy editor miss them?
    I think most writers who produce multiple books with great frequency write to a formula, and their offspring are like eight-banded armadillos, which produce identical quadruplets in each birth. Nora’s secret is that she has dozens and dozens of formulas, some for characters, some for plots, some for relationships, and she can mix and match for an eon or so without repeating herself.

    Reply
  88. Hey! I have a KIA!
    I think some of the responsibility belongs to the editors, who should see that books aren’t birthed into the world with gross errors, whether in grammar or storytelling. I’ve noticed in Nora’s books (and I do love them, except the early romances and (mostly) when she tries the supernatural) errors that I myself caught as a casual reader; so why did the copy editor miss them?
    I think most writers who produce multiple books with great frequency write to a formula, and their offspring are like eight-banded armadillos, which produce identical quadruplets in each birth. Nora’s secret is that she has dozens and dozens of formulas, some for characters, some for plots, some for relationships, and she can mix and match for an eon or so without repeating herself.

    Reply
  89. Hey! I have a KIA!
    I think some of the responsibility belongs to the editors, who should see that books aren’t birthed into the world with gross errors, whether in grammar or storytelling. I’ve noticed in Nora’s books (and I do love them, except the early romances and (mostly) when she tries the supernatural) errors that I myself caught as a casual reader; so why did the copy editor miss them?
    I think most writers who produce multiple books with great frequency write to a formula, and their offspring are like eight-banded armadillos, which produce identical quadruplets in each birth. Nora’s secret is that she has dozens and dozens of formulas, some for characters, some for plots, some for relationships, and she can mix and match for an eon or so without repeating herself.

    Reply
  90. Hey! I have a KIA!
    I think some of the responsibility belongs to the editors, who should see that books aren’t birthed into the world with gross errors, whether in grammar or storytelling. I’ve noticed in Nora’s books (and I do love them, except the early romances and (mostly) when she tries the supernatural) errors that I myself caught as a casual reader; so why did the copy editor miss them?
    I think most writers who produce multiple books with great frequency write to a formula, and their offspring are like eight-banded armadillos, which produce identical quadruplets in each birth. Nora’s secret is that she has dozens and dozens of formulas, some for characters, some for plots, some for relationships, and she can mix and match for an eon or so without repeating herself.

    Reply
  91. Patricia…so far, the ninc blog reminds me of what the RWA blog would be if they had one, with more genres. I’m not that impressed with it but maybe it needs a month to get going.
    I’m a Mustang GT kind of girl myself…five speed with all the bells and whistles. That said, I can shove the clutch in and idle in neutral if I need to at a stop light, until the light turns green, and then I’m off and speeding again. 😀
    No, I’m not published yet, though I have a couple things being considered which, if I never get any farther than that, for me is a dream come true! I’d much rather deliver something quality, error free, plot hole free (I HATE plot holes with a passion! Nothing irritates me more than a story full of plot holes!) and that might speak to one person, than deliver a Q & D that might satisfy for the moment but doesn’t stick with the reader any longer than it takes to put it back on the shelf.

    Reply
  92. Patricia…so far, the ninc blog reminds me of what the RWA blog would be if they had one, with more genres. I’m not that impressed with it but maybe it needs a month to get going.
    I’m a Mustang GT kind of girl myself…five speed with all the bells and whistles. That said, I can shove the clutch in and idle in neutral if I need to at a stop light, until the light turns green, and then I’m off and speeding again. 😀
    No, I’m not published yet, though I have a couple things being considered which, if I never get any farther than that, for me is a dream come true! I’d much rather deliver something quality, error free, plot hole free (I HATE plot holes with a passion! Nothing irritates me more than a story full of plot holes!) and that might speak to one person, than deliver a Q & D that might satisfy for the moment but doesn’t stick with the reader any longer than it takes to put it back on the shelf.

    Reply
  93. Patricia…so far, the ninc blog reminds me of what the RWA blog would be if they had one, with more genres. I’m not that impressed with it but maybe it needs a month to get going.
    I’m a Mustang GT kind of girl myself…five speed with all the bells and whistles. That said, I can shove the clutch in and idle in neutral if I need to at a stop light, until the light turns green, and then I’m off and speeding again. 😀
    No, I’m not published yet, though I have a couple things being considered which, if I never get any farther than that, for me is a dream come true! I’d much rather deliver something quality, error free, plot hole free (I HATE plot holes with a passion! Nothing irritates me more than a story full of plot holes!) and that might speak to one person, than deliver a Q & D that might satisfy for the moment but doesn’t stick with the reader any longer than it takes to put it back on the shelf.

    Reply
  94. Patricia…so far, the ninc blog reminds me of what the RWA blog would be if they had one, with more genres. I’m not that impressed with it but maybe it needs a month to get going.
    I’m a Mustang GT kind of girl myself…five speed with all the bells and whistles. That said, I can shove the clutch in and idle in neutral if I need to at a stop light, until the light turns green, and then I’m off and speeding again. 😀
    No, I’m not published yet, though I have a couple things being considered which, if I never get any farther than that, for me is a dream come true! I’d much rather deliver something quality, error free, plot hole free (I HATE plot holes with a passion! Nothing irritates me more than a story full of plot holes!) and that might speak to one person, than deliver a Q & D that might satisfy for the moment but doesn’t stick with the reader any longer than it takes to put it back on the shelf.

    Reply
  95. Patricia…so far, the ninc blog reminds me of what the RWA blog would be if they had one, with more genres. I’m not that impressed with it but maybe it needs a month to get going.
    I’m a Mustang GT kind of girl myself…five speed with all the bells and whistles. That said, I can shove the clutch in and idle in neutral if I need to at a stop light, until the light turns green, and then I’m off and speeding again. 😀
    No, I’m not published yet, though I have a couple things being considered which, if I never get any farther than that, for me is a dream come true! I’d much rather deliver something quality, error free, plot hole free (I HATE plot holes with a passion! Nothing irritates me more than a story full of plot holes!) and that might speak to one person, than deliver a Q & D that might satisfy for the moment but doesn’t stick with the reader any longer than it takes to put it back on the shelf.

    Reply
  96. There’s nothing wrong with Kias, as long as they get you where you’re going. But for books, it does seem our readers want the luxury of a Lexus (and Theo, don’t knock the speed of a Lexus until you try one!). Although at the price of a Lexii, the library may be the best place to try one out.
    Congrats, Theo, on getting the work past the dragons at the gate! Give the ninc blog some time. Because romance is still pretty much 50% of the market, we have a corresponding number of romance authors in the group. And they’re used to getting out there and doing workshops and blogging, so they jumped in first. I’ll monitor for a while to see if the line-up needs juggling in some way.
    As to plot holes–I just watched a DVD of a movie called something like Ten Things I Hate About You, which was an excellent modern Taming of the Shrew, but at the critical scene when everything turns around, there was no scene! I have no idea how it all turned around except that it’s supposed to. I understand how a writer can leave plot holes (and speed and a tight deadline are bad on Kias “G”), but how can a whole scene be dropped from a movie?

    Reply
  97. There’s nothing wrong with Kias, as long as they get you where you’re going. But for books, it does seem our readers want the luxury of a Lexus (and Theo, don’t knock the speed of a Lexus until you try one!). Although at the price of a Lexii, the library may be the best place to try one out.
    Congrats, Theo, on getting the work past the dragons at the gate! Give the ninc blog some time. Because romance is still pretty much 50% of the market, we have a corresponding number of romance authors in the group. And they’re used to getting out there and doing workshops and blogging, so they jumped in first. I’ll monitor for a while to see if the line-up needs juggling in some way.
    As to plot holes–I just watched a DVD of a movie called something like Ten Things I Hate About You, which was an excellent modern Taming of the Shrew, but at the critical scene when everything turns around, there was no scene! I have no idea how it all turned around except that it’s supposed to. I understand how a writer can leave plot holes (and speed and a tight deadline are bad on Kias “G”), but how can a whole scene be dropped from a movie?

    Reply
  98. There’s nothing wrong with Kias, as long as they get you where you’re going. But for books, it does seem our readers want the luxury of a Lexus (and Theo, don’t knock the speed of a Lexus until you try one!). Although at the price of a Lexii, the library may be the best place to try one out.
    Congrats, Theo, on getting the work past the dragons at the gate! Give the ninc blog some time. Because romance is still pretty much 50% of the market, we have a corresponding number of romance authors in the group. And they’re used to getting out there and doing workshops and blogging, so they jumped in first. I’ll monitor for a while to see if the line-up needs juggling in some way.
    As to plot holes–I just watched a DVD of a movie called something like Ten Things I Hate About You, which was an excellent modern Taming of the Shrew, but at the critical scene when everything turns around, there was no scene! I have no idea how it all turned around except that it’s supposed to. I understand how a writer can leave plot holes (and speed and a tight deadline are bad on Kias “G”), but how can a whole scene be dropped from a movie?

    Reply
  99. There’s nothing wrong with Kias, as long as they get you where you’re going. But for books, it does seem our readers want the luxury of a Lexus (and Theo, don’t knock the speed of a Lexus until you try one!). Although at the price of a Lexii, the library may be the best place to try one out.
    Congrats, Theo, on getting the work past the dragons at the gate! Give the ninc blog some time. Because romance is still pretty much 50% of the market, we have a corresponding number of romance authors in the group. And they’re used to getting out there and doing workshops and blogging, so they jumped in first. I’ll monitor for a while to see if the line-up needs juggling in some way.
    As to plot holes–I just watched a DVD of a movie called something like Ten Things I Hate About You, which was an excellent modern Taming of the Shrew, but at the critical scene when everything turns around, there was no scene! I have no idea how it all turned around except that it’s supposed to. I understand how a writer can leave plot holes (and speed and a tight deadline are bad on Kias “G”), but how can a whole scene be dropped from a movie?

    Reply
  100. There’s nothing wrong with Kias, as long as they get you where you’re going. But for books, it does seem our readers want the luxury of a Lexus (and Theo, don’t knock the speed of a Lexus until you try one!). Although at the price of a Lexii, the library may be the best place to try one out.
    Congrats, Theo, on getting the work past the dragons at the gate! Give the ninc blog some time. Because romance is still pretty much 50% of the market, we have a corresponding number of romance authors in the group. And they’re used to getting out there and doing workshops and blogging, so they jumped in first. I’ll monitor for a while to see if the line-up needs juggling in some way.
    As to plot holes–I just watched a DVD of a movie called something like Ten Things I Hate About You, which was an excellent modern Taming of the Shrew, but at the critical scene when everything turns around, there was no scene! I have no idea how it all turned around except that it’s supposed to. I understand how a writer can leave plot holes (and speed and a tight deadline are bad on Kias “G”), but how can a whole scene be dropped from a movie?

    Reply
  101. I wrote quite a bit of the following for Anne Marble’s question about whether authors were being pushed to write too fast on AAR, so even though I’m adding some explanation, anyone who read it there can skip it.
    I don’t write romances, to start with. I’m also retired, so I’m not trying to make a living by writing.
    My situation is also sort of unusual in that I’ve never submitted a manuscript to a publisher or had an agent or anything. The senior author/creator of the 1632 alternate history series (Eric Flint) asked me to write with him and I agreed, thus starting to produce creative fiction when I was past sixty. (I had written a lot of professional non-fiction.)
    He does all the business-type stuff with the publisher. This is sometimes disconcerting, as when he told me, in the form of a public announcement to the Grantville Gazette editorial board, that he was sending me the contract and advance for the solo collection (mentioned below), when he hadn’t even asked me if I wanted to/had time to produce the 2/3 that would have to be new.
    Thus, the novel-length fiction writing I’ve done is all collaborative, so my schedule depends on that of the senior writer, he has to work out the plotting with me, and the scheduling depends on how many other books in the series the publisher is going to produce in a given year.
    In regard to the full-length novels (about 200,000 words), from idea to publication for the first one (1634: The Bavarian Crisis) took from 2001 to 2007; in regard to the second (1635: The Dreeson Incident), from my first proposal of the idea to the senior author to scheduled publication will be from 2003 to 2008. However, along the way, these also generated a “themed anthology” (1634: The Ram Rebellion) and have generated and all-by-me short story and novella collection (1635: The Tangled Web, of which the publisher has had the manuscript since last December, but I don’t know when it’s going to come out), as well as three Ring of Fire anthology stories and a lot of stories in the Grantville Gazette.
    There’s a third collaborative novel scheduled (working title is 1635: Duke Bernhard’s Sandbox), plus I have to finish a long novella for a second “themed anthology” (working title is 1635: The Torturer of Fulda) and write a story for the third “regular” Ring of Fire anthology in the series (yes, I have to, because I promised the editor that I would do it).
    We’ve been talking about ideas and plot for the Duke Bernhard novel for over two years now. Last October, I went to Europe and did some on-site research in Alsace and the Franche Comte. Given the current rate of progress, I hope to get my part of it done and turned over to Eric early next year.
    Collaborative writing can be frustrating. The general approach is that once we’ve agreed in regard to what is going on (which generates a lot of e-mails in regard to things like “why don’t you use Wrangel?” and “Wrangel isn’t feasible for this book because . . . — Mr. Weber can use him in his naval-theme novel where he’d make a better fit,” I do the “draft.”
    I write my sections, including “Chapters” that he plans to write, along with my research notes for him to use (Eric doesn’t read German, so when it comes to Heinrich Holk, Wolmar von Farensbach, and similar very second-line historical characters, I look stuff up and translate it into English). He writes most of the military and action sequences, though I usually identify the appropriate fortress, Franconian castle, or other location where it should occur.
    In regard to 1635: The Dreeson Incident, the draft I finally sent to Eric was labeled #17 (a copy-read version of #16). Over the years, I would write a short piece, he would tell me to “put it in Dreeson,” and I would. Then the other books would change things, and I would have to take parts of it out again. After draft #15, this had resulted in a rather inchoate manuscript, as I tried to invent a plot which would account for everything but the kitchen sink. Eric finally found time to read through the whole thing and sent me a “this has got to come out” list. For draft #16, I took out what he’d told me to put in and then wanted out again, which made room for the remainder of what I had wanted to write in the first place. With that done, I told him that I had shot my wad and he’d have to finish the thing up, which he did.
    I could write books faster than this, but there isn’t really any point in it, because I have to coordinate with everyone else’s work for the sake of continuity.

    Reply
  102. I wrote quite a bit of the following for Anne Marble’s question about whether authors were being pushed to write too fast on AAR, so even though I’m adding some explanation, anyone who read it there can skip it.
    I don’t write romances, to start with. I’m also retired, so I’m not trying to make a living by writing.
    My situation is also sort of unusual in that I’ve never submitted a manuscript to a publisher or had an agent or anything. The senior author/creator of the 1632 alternate history series (Eric Flint) asked me to write with him and I agreed, thus starting to produce creative fiction when I was past sixty. (I had written a lot of professional non-fiction.)
    He does all the business-type stuff with the publisher. This is sometimes disconcerting, as when he told me, in the form of a public announcement to the Grantville Gazette editorial board, that he was sending me the contract and advance for the solo collection (mentioned below), when he hadn’t even asked me if I wanted to/had time to produce the 2/3 that would have to be new.
    Thus, the novel-length fiction writing I’ve done is all collaborative, so my schedule depends on that of the senior writer, he has to work out the plotting with me, and the scheduling depends on how many other books in the series the publisher is going to produce in a given year.
    In regard to the full-length novels (about 200,000 words), from idea to publication for the first one (1634: The Bavarian Crisis) took from 2001 to 2007; in regard to the second (1635: The Dreeson Incident), from my first proposal of the idea to the senior author to scheduled publication will be from 2003 to 2008. However, along the way, these also generated a “themed anthology” (1634: The Ram Rebellion) and have generated and all-by-me short story and novella collection (1635: The Tangled Web, of which the publisher has had the manuscript since last December, but I don’t know when it’s going to come out), as well as three Ring of Fire anthology stories and a lot of stories in the Grantville Gazette.
    There’s a third collaborative novel scheduled (working title is 1635: Duke Bernhard’s Sandbox), plus I have to finish a long novella for a second “themed anthology” (working title is 1635: The Torturer of Fulda) and write a story for the third “regular” Ring of Fire anthology in the series (yes, I have to, because I promised the editor that I would do it).
    We’ve been talking about ideas and plot for the Duke Bernhard novel for over two years now. Last October, I went to Europe and did some on-site research in Alsace and the Franche Comte. Given the current rate of progress, I hope to get my part of it done and turned over to Eric early next year.
    Collaborative writing can be frustrating. The general approach is that once we’ve agreed in regard to what is going on (which generates a lot of e-mails in regard to things like “why don’t you use Wrangel?” and “Wrangel isn’t feasible for this book because . . . — Mr. Weber can use him in his naval-theme novel where he’d make a better fit,” I do the “draft.”
    I write my sections, including “Chapters” that he plans to write, along with my research notes for him to use (Eric doesn’t read German, so when it comes to Heinrich Holk, Wolmar von Farensbach, and similar very second-line historical characters, I look stuff up and translate it into English). He writes most of the military and action sequences, though I usually identify the appropriate fortress, Franconian castle, or other location where it should occur.
    In regard to 1635: The Dreeson Incident, the draft I finally sent to Eric was labeled #17 (a copy-read version of #16). Over the years, I would write a short piece, he would tell me to “put it in Dreeson,” and I would. Then the other books would change things, and I would have to take parts of it out again. After draft #15, this had resulted in a rather inchoate manuscript, as I tried to invent a plot which would account for everything but the kitchen sink. Eric finally found time to read through the whole thing and sent me a “this has got to come out” list. For draft #16, I took out what he’d told me to put in and then wanted out again, which made room for the remainder of what I had wanted to write in the first place. With that done, I told him that I had shot my wad and he’d have to finish the thing up, which he did.
    I could write books faster than this, but there isn’t really any point in it, because I have to coordinate with everyone else’s work for the sake of continuity.

    Reply
  103. I wrote quite a bit of the following for Anne Marble’s question about whether authors were being pushed to write too fast on AAR, so even though I’m adding some explanation, anyone who read it there can skip it.
    I don’t write romances, to start with. I’m also retired, so I’m not trying to make a living by writing.
    My situation is also sort of unusual in that I’ve never submitted a manuscript to a publisher or had an agent or anything. The senior author/creator of the 1632 alternate history series (Eric Flint) asked me to write with him and I agreed, thus starting to produce creative fiction when I was past sixty. (I had written a lot of professional non-fiction.)
    He does all the business-type stuff with the publisher. This is sometimes disconcerting, as when he told me, in the form of a public announcement to the Grantville Gazette editorial board, that he was sending me the contract and advance for the solo collection (mentioned below), when he hadn’t even asked me if I wanted to/had time to produce the 2/3 that would have to be new.
    Thus, the novel-length fiction writing I’ve done is all collaborative, so my schedule depends on that of the senior writer, he has to work out the plotting with me, and the scheduling depends on how many other books in the series the publisher is going to produce in a given year.
    In regard to the full-length novels (about 200,000 words), from idea to publication for the first one (1634: The Bavarian Crisis) took from 2001 to 2007; in regard to the second (1635: The Dreeson Incident), from my first proposal of the idea to the senior author to scheduled publication will be from 2003 to 2008. However, along the way, these also generated a “themed anthology” (1634: The Ram Rebellion) and have generated and all-by-me short story and novella collection (1635: The Tangled Web, of which the publisher has had the manuscript since last December, but I don’t know when it’s going to come out), as well as three Ring of Fire anthology stories and a lot of stories in the Grantville Gazette.
    There’s a third collaborative novel scheduled (working title is 1635: Duke Bernhard’s Sandbox), plus I have to finish a long novella for a second “themed anthology” (working title is 1635: The Torturer of Fulda) and write a story for the third “regular” Ring of Fire anthology in the series (yes, I have to, because I promised the editor that I would do it).
    We’ve been talking about ideas and plot for the Duke Bernhard novel for over two years now. Last October, I went to Europe and did some on-site research in Alsace and the Franche Comte. Given the current rate of progress, I hope to get my part of it done and turned over to Eric early next year.
    Collaborative writing can be frustrating. The general approach is that once we’ve agreed in regard to what is going on (which generates a lot of e-mails in regard to things like “why don’t you use Wrangel?” and “Wrangel isn’t feasible for this book because . . . — Mr. Weber can use him in his naval-theme novel where he’d make a better fit,” I do the “draft.”
    I write my sections, including “Chapters” that he plans to write, along with my research notes for him to use (Eric doesn’t read German, so when it comes to Heinrich Holk, Wolmar von Farensbach, and similar very second-line historical characters, I look stuff up and translate it into English). He writes most of the military and action sequences, though I usually identify the appropriate fortress, Franconian castle, or other location where it should occur.
    In regard to 1635: The Dreeson Incident, the draft I finally sent to Eric was labeled #17 (a copy-read version of #16). Over the years, I would write a short piece, he would tell me to “put it in Dreeson,” and I would. Then the other books would change things, and I would have to take parts of it out again. After draft #15, this had resulted in a rather inchoate manuscript, as I tried to invent a plot which would account for everything but the kitchen sink. Eric finally found time to read through the whole thing and sent me a “this has got to come out” list. For draft #16, I took out what he’d told me to put in and then wanted out again, which made room for the remainder of what I had wanted to write in the first place. With that done, I told him that I had shot my wad and he’d have to finish the thing up, which he did.
    I could write books faster than this, but there isn’t really any point in it, because I have to coordinate with everyone else’s work for the sake of continuity.

    Reply
  104. I wrote quite a bit of the following for Anne Marble’s question about whether authors were being pushed to write too fast on AAR, so even though I’m adding some explanation, anyone who read it there can skip it.
    I don’t write romances, to start with. I’m also retired, so I’m not trying to make a living by writing.
    My situation is also sort of unusual in that I’ve never submitted a manuscript to a publisher or had an agent or anything. The senior author/creator of the 1632 alternate history series (Eric Flint) asked me to write with him and I agreed, thus starting to produce creative fiction when I was past sixty. (I had written a lot of professional non-fiction.)
    He does all the business-type stuff with the publisher. This is sometimes disconcerting, as when he told me, in the form of a public announcement to the Grantville Gazette editorial board, that he was sending me the contract and advance for the solo collection (mentioned below), when he hadn’t even asked me if I wanted to/had time to produce the 2/3 that would have to be new.
    Thus, the novel-length fiction writing I’ve done is all collaborative, so my schedule depends on that of the senior writer, he has to work out the plotting with me, and the scheduling depends on how many other books in the series the publisher is going to produce in a given year.
    In regard to the full-length novels (about 200,000 words), from idea to publication for the first one (1634: The Bavarian Crisis) took from 2001 to 2007; in regard to the second (1635: The Dreeson Incident), from my first proposal of the idea to the senior author to scheduled publication will be from 2003 to 2008. However, along the way, these also generated a “themed anthology” (1634: The Ram Rebellion) and have generated and all-by-me short story and novella collection (1635: The Tangled Web, of which the publisher has had the manuscript since last December, but I don’t know when it’s going to come out), as well as three Ring of Fire anthology stories and a lot of stories in the Grantville Gazette.
    There’s a third collaborative novel scheduled (working title is 1635: Duke Bernhard’s Sandbox), plus I have to finish a long novella for a second “themed anthology” (working title is 1635: The Torturer of Fulda) and write a story for the third “regular” Ring of Fire anthology in the series (yes, I have to, because I promised the editor that I would do it).
    We’ve been talking about ideas and plot for the Duke Bernhard novel for over two years now. Last October, I went to Europe and did some on-site research in Alsace and the Franche Comte. Given the current rate of progress, I hope to get my part of it done and turned over to Eric early next year.
    Collaborative writing can be frustrating. The general approach is that once we’ve agreed in regard to what is going on (which generates a lot of e-mails in regard to things like “why don’t you use Wrangel?” and “Wrangel isn’t feasible for this book because . . . — Mr. Weber can use him in his naval-theme novel where he’d make a better fit,” I do the “draft.”
    I write my sections, including “Chapters” that he plans to write, along with my research notes for him to use (Eric doesn’t read German, so when it comes to Heinrich Holk, Wolmar von Farensbach, and similar very second-line historical characters, I look stuff up and translate it into English). He writes most of the military and action sequences, though I usually identify the appropriate fortress, Franconian castle, or other location where it should occur.
    In regard to 1635: The Dreeson Incident, the draft I finally sent to Eric was labeled #17 (a copy-read version of #16). Over the years, I would write a short piece, he would tell me to “put it in Dreeson,” and I would. Then the other books would change things, and I would have to take parts of it out again. After draft #15, this had resulted in a rather inchoate manuscript, as I tried to invent a plot which would account for everything but the kitchen sink. Eric finally found time to read through the whole thing and sent me a “this has got to come out” list. For draft #16, I took out what he’d told me to put in and then wanted out again, which made room for the remainder of what I had wanted to write in the first place. With that done, I told him that I had shot my wad and he’d have to finish the thing up, which he did.
    I could write books faster than this, but there isn’t really any point in it, because I have to coordinate with everyone else’s work for the sake of continuity.

    Reply
  105. I wrote quite a bit of the following for Anne Marble’s question about whether authors were being pushed to write too fast on AAR, so even though I’m adding some explanation, anyone who read it there can skip it.
    I don’t write romances, to start with. I’m also retired, so I’m not trying to make a living by writing.
    My situation is also sort of unusual in that I’ve never submitted a manuscript to a publisher or had an agent or anything. The senior author/creator of the 1632 alternate history series (Eric Flint) asked me to write with him and I agreed, thus starting to produce creative fiction when I was past sixty. (I had written a lot of professional non-fiction.)
    He does all the business-type stuff with the publisher. This is sometimes disconcerting, as when he told me, in the form of a public announcement to the Grantville Gazette editorial board, that he was sending me the contract and advance for the solo collection (mentioned below), when he hadn’t even asked me if I wanted to/had time to produce the 2/3 that would have to be new.
    Thus, the novel-length fiction writing I’ve done is all collaborative, so my schedule depends on that of the senior writer, he has to work out the plotting with me, and the scheduling depends on how many other books in the series the publisher is going to produce in a given year.
    In regard to the full-length novels (about 200,000 words), from idea to publication for the first one (1634: The Bavarian Crisis) took from 2001 to 2007; in regard to the second (1635: The Dreeson Incident), from my first proposal of the idea to the senior author to scheduled publication will be from 2003 to 2008. However, along the way, these also generated a “themed anthology” (1634: The Ram Rebellion) and have generated and all-by-me short story and novella collection (1635: The Tangled Web, of which the publisher has had the manuscript since last December, but I don’t know when it’s going to come out), as well as three Ring of Fire anthology stories and a lot of stories in the Grantville Gazette.
    There’s a third collaborative novel scheduled (working title is 1635: Duke Bernhard’s Sandbox), plus I have to finish a long novella for a second “themed anthology” (working title is 1635: The Torturer of Fulda) and write a story for the third “regular” Ring of Fire anthology in the series (yes, I have to, because I promised the editor that I would do it).
    We’ve been talking about ideas and plot for the Duke Bernhard novel for over two years now. Last October, I went to Europe and did some on-site research in Alsace and the Franche Comte. Given the current rate of progress, I hope to get my part of it done and turned over to Eric early next year.
    Collaborative writing can be frustrating. The general approach is that once we’ve agreed in regard to what is going on (which generates a lot of e-mails in regard to things like “why don’t you use Wrangel?” and “Wrangel isn’t feasible for this book because . . . — Mr. Weber can use him in his naval-theme novel where he’d make a better fit,” I do the “draft.”
    I write my sections, including “Chapters” that he plans to write, along with my research notes for him to use (Eric doesn’t read German, so when it comes to Heinrich Holk, Wolmar von Farensbach, and similar very second-line historical characters, I look stuff up and translate it into English). He writes most of the military and action sequences, though I usually identify the appropriate fortress, Franconian castle, or other location where it should occur.
    In regard to 1635: The Dreeson Incident, the draft I finally sent to Eric was labeled #17 (a copy-read version of #16). Over the years, I would write a short piece, he would tell me to “put it in Dreeson,” and I would. Then the other books would change things, and I would have to take parts of it out again. After draft #15, this had resulted in a rather inchoate manuscript, as I tried to invent a plot which would account for everything but the kitchen sink. Eric finally found time to read through the whole thing and sent me a “this has got to come out” list. For draft #16, I took out what he’d told me to put in and then wanted out again, which made room for the remainder of what I had wanted to write in the first place. With that done, I told him that I had shot my wad and he’d have to finish the thing up, which he did.
    I could write books faster than this, but there isn’t really any point in it, because I have to coordinate with everyone else’s work for the sake of continuity.

    Reply
  106. Patricia, I hated that movie, Ten Things…I wanted to scream! My daughter watched it with me and I turned to her and must have looked totally confused because she started laughing. When I asked her where the rest of the storyline was she looked at me like I’m nuts. **rollseyes** My girls think I’m nuts anyway so that was nothing new but…
    I definitely will give the NINC blog a chance. I did like some of the bloggers and I do know it’s new and has to get it’s feet under it. 🙂
    Thanks about the dragons at the gate and really, that’s exactly what they remind me of. I always get the feeling the corners of my pages are slightly singed before they even make it to the assistant’s hands. 😛
    Lexus is a nice car! Don’t get me wrong. Too fancy for me though. This is what I have:
    http://www.moddedmustangs.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/02/roush-blackjack-mustang2.jpg
    But for luxury, if that were my style, I’d have to go with this:
    http://www.bmwusa.com/Standard/Content/Vehicles/2008/M/M6Convertible/
    What can I say…I’m just a rebel at heart! 😀
    Virginia, there is no way I could collaborate on a book. I would never have the patience and really suppose I’m just too unwilling to share my characters. I want them to do what the story dictates not what someone else does. But that’s just me and one of my favorite series is done in collaboration.

    Reply
  107. Patricia, I hated that movie, Ten Things…I wanted to scream! My daughter watched it with me and I turned to her and must have looked totally confused because she started laughing. When I asked her where the rest of the storyline was she looked at me like I’m nuts. **rollseyes** My girls think I’m nuts anyway so that was nothing new but…
    I definitely will give the NINC blog a chance. I did like some of the bloggers and I do know it’s new and has to get it’s feet under it. 🙂
    Thanks about the dragons at the gate and really, that’s exactly what they remind me of. I always get the feeling the corners of my pages are slightly singed before they even make it to the assistant’s hands. 😛
    Lexus is a nice car! Don’t get me wrong. Too fancy for me though. This is what I have:
    http://www.moddedmustangs.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/02/roush-blackjack-mustang2.jpg
    But for luxury, if that were my style, I’d have to go with this:
    http://www.bmwusa.com/Standard/Content/Vehicles/2008/M/M6Convertible/
    What can I say…I’m just a rebel at heart! 😀
    Virginia, there is no way I could collaborate on a book. I would never have the patience and really suppose I’m just too unwilling to share my characters. I want them to do what the story dictates not what someone else does. But that’s just me and one of my favorite series is done in collaboration.

    Reply
  108. Patricia, I hated that movie, Ten Things…I wanted to scream! My daughter watched it with me and I turned to her and must have looked totally confused because she started laughing. When I asked her where the rest of the storyline was she looked at me like I’m nuts. **rollseyes** My girls think I’m nuts anyway so that was nothing new but…
    I definitely will give the NINC blog a chance. I did like some of the bloggers and I do know it’s new and has to get it’s feet under it. 🙂
    Thanks about the dragons at the gate and really, that’s exactly what they remind me of. I always get the feeling the corners of my pages are slightly singed before they even make it to the assistant’s hands. 😛
    Lexus is a nice car! Don’t get me wrong. Too fancy for me though. This is what I have:
    http://www.moddedmustangs.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/02/roush-blackjack-mustang2.jpg
    But for luxury, if that were my style, I’d have to go with this:
    http://www.bmwusa.com/Standard/Content/Vehicles/2008/M/M6Convertible/
    What can I say…I’m just a rebel at heart! 😀
    Virginia, there is no way I could collaborate on a book. I would never have the patience and really suppose I’m just too unwilling to share my characters. I want them to do what the story dictates not what someone else does. But that’s just me and one of my favorite series is done in collaboration.

    Reply
  109. Patricia, I hated that movie, Ten Things…I wanted to scream! My daughter watched it with me and I turned to her and must have looked totally confused because she started laughing. When I asked her where the rest of the storyline was she looked at me like I’m nuts. **rollseyes** My girls think I’m nuts anyway so that was nothing new but…
    I definitely will give the NINC blog a chance. I did like some of the bloggers and I do know it’s new and has to get it’s feet under it. 🙂
    Thanks about the dragons at the gate and really, that’s exactly what they remind me of. I always get the feeling the corners of my pages are slightly singed before they even make it to the assistant’s hands. 😛
    Lexus is a nice car! Don’t get me wrong. Too fancy for me though. This is what I have:
    http://www.moddedmustangs.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/02/roush-blackjack-mustang2.jpg
    But for luxury, if that were my style, I’d have to go with this:
    http://www.bmwusa.com/Standard/Content/Vehicles/2008/M/M6Convertible/
    What can I say…I’m just a rebel at heart! 😀
    Virginia, there is no way I could collaborate on a book. I would never have the patience and really suppose I’m just too unwilling to share my characters. I want them to do what the story dictates not what someone else does. But that’s just me and one of my favorite series is done in collaboration.

    Reply
  110. Patricia, I hated that movie, Ten Things…I wanted to scream! My daughter watched it with me and I turned to her and must have looked totally confused because she started laughing. When I asked her where the rest of the storyline was she looked at me like I’m nuts. **rollseyes** My girls think I’m nuts anyway so that was nothing new but…
    I definitely will give the NINC blog a chance. I did like some of the bloggers and I do know it’s new and has to get it’s feet under it. 🙂
    Thanks about the dragons at the gate and really, that’s exactly what they remind me of. I always get the feeling the corners of my pages are slightly singed before they even make it to the assistant’s hands. 😛
    Lexus is a nice car! Don’t get me wrong. Too fancy for me though. This is what I have:
    http://www.moddedmustangs.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/02/roush-blackjack-mustang2.jpg
    But for luxury, if that were my style, I’d have to go with this:
    http://www.bmwusa.com/Standard/Content/Vehicles/2008/M/M6Convertible/
    What can I say…I’m just a rebel at heart! 😀
    Virginia, there is no way I could collaborate on a book. I would never have the patience and really suppose I’m just too unwilling to share my characters. I want them to do what the story dictates not what someone else does. But that’s just me and one of my favorite series is done in collaboration.

    Reply
  111. Thanks for bringing this discussion over here, Pat, and thank you, too, for sharing how you work. I always like learning how other writers write. *g*
    I’d like to weigh in as someone from the “fast-writer” camp. I’ve written at least two, and usually three, books a year since 1992. I’m fortunate that I have a high-speed muse (though I don’t know if she’s a Kia or a Lexus), and fortunate, too, that I’ve had publishers to buy all those books. Yes, I work seven days a week, with only a very few days off here and there, but that’s how my particular muse cracks her whip.
    I’m also a single-draft writer; for me, rewriting is generally a disaster that drains all the life and spark from what I’ve written. In my parade of editors over the years, I’ve never had one who has hacked and slashed, either (more good fortune!), and I’ve generally turned my copy-edits around in a week or less. I agree with the Robert Parker quote at the end of that Boston Globe article: if I take longer than six months to write a book, then I’m not really trying.
    But that’s just me. The magic of writing is that there’s no right or wrong way to do it. Every writer follows a different path, and some take longer to reach “the end” than others. It’s ain’t a race. It’s how our individual heads work.
    Yet it’s a very perverse form of snobbery to think that fast writers make for worse (or better) books, or that someone who takes ten years to finish a manuscript to their satisfaction is either superior, or a laggard. Even Stephen King had to write under another name because his publisher feared he’d dilute his audience by publishing too many books a year. Pressuring writers one way or the other short-changes both the writers, and the readers, too.
    Publishing has never been exactly a logical business. But it’s too bad that the big houses won’t follow the advice of those old wine commercials, and sell no books before their time.

    Reply
  112. Thanks for bringing this discussion over here, Pat, and thank you, too, for sharing how you work. I always like learning how other writers write. *g*
    I’d like to weigh in as someone from the “fast-writer” camp. I’ve written at least two, and usually three, books a year since 1992. I’m fortunate that I have a high-speed muse (though I don’t know if she’s a Kia or a Lexus), and fortunate, too, that I’ve had publishers to buy all those books. Yes, I work seven days a week, with only a very few days off here and there, but that’s how my particular muse cracks her whip.
    I’m also a single-draft writer; for me, rewriting is generally a disaster that drains all the life and spark from what I’ve written. In my parade of editors over the years, I’ve never had one who has hacked and slashed, either (more good fortune!), and I’ve generally turned my copy-edits around in a week or less. I agree with the Robert Parker quote at the end of that Boston Globe article: if I take longer than six months to write a book, then I’m not really trying.
    But that’s just me. The magic of writing is that there’s no right or wrong way to do it. Every writer follows a different path, and some take longer to reach “the end” than others. It’s ain’t a race. It’s how our individual heads work.
    Yet it’s a very perverse form of snobbery to think that fast writers make for worse (or better) books, or that someone who takes ten years to finish a manuscript to their satisfaction is either superior, or a laggard. Even Stephen King had to write under another name because his publisher feared he’d dilute his audience by publishing too many books a year. Pressuring writers one way or the other short-changes both the writers, and the readers, too.
    Publishing has never been exactly a logical business. But it’s too bad that the big houses won’t follow the advice of those old wine commercials, and sell no books before their time.

    Reply
  113. Thanks for bringing this discussion over here, Pat, and thank you, too, for sharing how you work. I always like learning how other writers write. *g*
    I’d like to weigh in as someone from the “fast-writer” camp. I’ve written at least two, and usually three, books a year since 1992. I’m fortunate that I have a high-speed muse (though I don’t know if she’s a Kia or a Lexus), and fortunate, too, that I’ve had publishers to buy all those books. Yes, I work seven days a week, with only a very few days off here and there, but that’s how my particular muse cracks her whip.
    I’m also a single-draft writer; for me, rewriting is generally a disaster that drains all the life and spark from what I’ve written. In my parade of editors over the years, I’ve never had one who has hacked and slashed, either (more good fortune!), and I’ve generally turned my copy-edits around in a week or less. I agree with the Robert Parker quote at the end of that Boston Globe article: if I take longer than six months to write a book, then I’m not really trying.
    But that’s just me. The magic of writing is that there’s no right or wrong way to do it. Every writer follows a different path, and some take longer to reach “the end” than others. It’s ain’t a race. It’s how our individual heads work.
    Yet it’s a very perverse form of snobbery to think that fast writers make for worse (or better) books, or that someone who takes ten years to finish a manuscript to their satisfaction is either superior, or a laggard. Even Stephen King had to write under another name because his publisher feared he’d dilute his audience by publishing too many books a year. Pressuring writers one way or the other short-changes both the writers, and the readers, too.
    Publishing has never been exactly a logical business. But it’s too bad that the big houses won’t follow the advice of those old wine commercials, and sell no books before their time.

    Reply
  114. Thanks for bringing this discussion over here, Pat, and thank you, too, for sharing how you work. I always like learning how other writers write. *g*
    I’d like to weigh in as someone from the “fast-writer” camp. I’ve written at least two, and usually three, books a year since 1992. I’m fortunate that I have a high-speed muse (though I don’t know if she’s a Kia or a Lexus), and fortunate, too, that I’ve had publishers to buy all those books. Yes, I work seven days a week, with only a very few days off here and there, but that’s how my particular muse cracks her whip.
    I’m also a single-draft writer; for me, rewriting is generally a disaster that drains all the life and spark from what I’ve written. In my parade of editors over the years, I’ve never had one who has hacked and slashed, either (more good fortune!), and I’ve generally turned my copy-edits around in a week or less. I agree with the Robert Parker quote at the end of that Boston Globe article: if I take longer than six months to write a book, then I’m not really trying.
    But that’s just me. The magic of writing is that there’s no right or wrong way to do it. Every writer follows a different path, and some take longer to reach “the end” than others. It’s ain’t a race. It’s how our individual heads work.
    Yet it’s a very perverse form of snobbery to think that fast writers make for worse (or better) books, or that someone who takes ten years to finish a manuscript to their satisfaction is either superior, or a laggard. Even Stephen King had to write under another name because his publisher feared he’d dilute his audience by publishing too many books a year. Pressuring writers one way or the other short-changes both the writers, and the readers, too.
    Publishing has never been exactly a logical business. But it’s too bad that the big houses won’t follow the advice of those old wine commercials, and sell no books before their time.

    Reply
  115. Thanks for bringing this discussion over here, Pat, and thank you, too, for sharing how you work. I always like learning how other writers write. *g*
    I’d like to weigh in as someone from the “fast-writer” camp. I’ve written at least two, and usually three, books a year since 1992. I’m fortunate that I have a high-speed muse (though I don’t know if she’s a Kia or a Lexus), and fortunate, too, that I’ve had publishers to buy all those books. Yes, I work seven days a week, with only a very few days off here and there, but that’s how my particular muse cracks her whip.
    I’m also a single-draft writer; for me, rewriting is generally a disaster that drains all the life and spark from what I’ve written. In my parade of editors over the years, I’ve never had one who has hacked and slashed, either (more good fortune!), and I’ve generally turned my copy-edits around in a week or less. I agree with the Robert Parker quote at the end of that Boston Globe article: if I take longer than six months to write a book, then I’m not really trying.
    But that’s just me. The magic of writing is that there’s no right or wrong way to do it. Every writer follows a different path, and some take longer to reach “the end” than others. It’s ain’t a race. It’s how our individual heads work.
    Yet it’s a very perverse form of snobbery to think that fast writers make for worse (or better) books, or that someone who takes ten years to finish a manuscript to their satisfaction is either superior, or a laggard. Even Stephen King had to write under another name because his publisher feared he’d dilute his audience by publishing too many books a year. Pressuring writers one way or the other short-changes both the writers, and the readers, too.
    Publishing has never been exactly a logical business. But it’s too bad that the big houses won’t follow the advice of those old wine commercials, and sell no books before their time.

    Reply
  116. Theo wrote:
    “Virginia, there is no way I could collaborate on a book. I would never have the patience and really suppose I’m just too unwilling to share my characters. I want them to do what the story dictates not what someone else does. But that’s just me and one of my favorite series is done in collaboration.”
    Eric says that collaborative novels are right up there with laws and sausages in the category of “things that no one should watch being made.”
    In regard to characters, I’ve traded Marc Cavriani, whom I developed, over to Andrew Dennis, one of Eric’s other co-authors, in return for Gerry Stone, who in turn was developed by Mercedes Lackey in the story she wrote for the first Ring of Fire anthology. I know that if Andrew takes Marc off in some direction I would not have done, it will hurt, but that’s the way these things go. Right now, I needed Gerry Stone more.

    Reply
  117. Theo wrote:
    “Virginia, there is no way I could collaborate on a book. I would never have the patience and really suppose I’m just too unwilling to share my characters. I want them to do what the story dictates not what someone else does. But that’s just me and one of my favorite series is done in collaboration.”
    Eric says that collaborative novels are right up there with laws and sausages in the category of “things that no one should watch being made.”
    In regard to characters, I’ve traded Marc Cavriani, whom I developed, over to Andrew Dennis, one of Eric’s other co-authors, in return for Gerry Stone, who in turn was developed by Mercedes Lackey in the story she wrote for the first Ring of Fire anthology. I know that if Andrew takes Marc off in some direction I would not have done, it will hurt, but that’s the way these things go. Right now, I needed Gerry Stone more.

    Reply
  118. Theo wrote:
    “Virginia, there is no way I could collaborate on a book. I would never have the patience and really suppose I’m just too unwilling to share my characters. I want them to do what the story dictates not what someone else does. But that’s just me and one of my favorite series is done in collaboration.”
    Eric says that collaborative novels are right up there with laws and sausages in the category of “things that no one should watch being made.”
    In regard to characters, I’ve traded Marc Cavriani, whom I developed, over to Andrew Dennis, one of Eric’s other co-authors, in return for Gerry Stone, who in turn was developed by Mercedes Lackey in the story she wrote for the first Ring of Fire anthology. I know that if Andrew takes Marc off in some direction I would not have done, it will hurt, but that’s the way these things go. Right now, I needed Gerry Stone more.

    Reply
  119. Theo wrote:
    “Virginia, there is no way I could collaborate on a book. I would never have the patience and really suppose I’m just too unwilling to share my characters. I want them to do what the story dictates not what someone else does. But that’s just me and one of my favorite series is done in collaboration.”
    Eric says that collaborative novels are right up there with laws and sausages in the category of “things that no one should watch being made.”
    In regard to characters, I’ve traded Marc Cavriani, whom I developed, over to Andrew Dennis, one of Eric’s other co-authors, in return for Gerry Stone, who in turn was developed by Mercedes Lackey in the story she wrote for the first Ring of Fire anthology. I know that if Andrew takes Marc off in some direction I would not have done, it will hurt, but that’s the way these things go. Right now, I needed Gerry Stone more.

    Reply
  120. Theo wrote:
    “Virginia, there is no way I could collaborate on a book. I would never have the patience and really suppose I’m just too unwilling to share my characters. I want them to do what the story dictates not what someone else does. But that’s just me and one of my favorite series is done in collaboration.”
    Eric says that collaborative novels are right up there with laws and sausages in the category of “things that no one should watch being made.”
    In regard to characters, I’ve traded Marc Cavriani, whom I developed, over to Andrew Dennis, one of Eric’s other co-authors, in return for Gerry Stone, who in turn was developed by Mercedes Lackey in the story she wrote for the first Ring of Fire anthology. I know that if Andrew takes Marc off in some direction I would not have done, it will hurt, but that’s the way these things go. Right now, I needed Gerry Stone more.

    Reply
  121. ooookay, I just read everyone’s notes and started to respond and Typepad turned them all upside down on me so I can’t see them while I type. So now I have to rely on my very bad memory. I know I laughed over Virginia’s “novels and sausages” comment. That’s just about right. I am in utter awe of that much research and rewriting, but 200k words makes two books as far as I’m concerned!
    Susan, you are definitely a Lexus and one of those writers I admire. Really, it’s impossible to pass judgment on process. It’s the result that matters. So why on earth people want to argue qty vs quality is beyond me. Because they can’t figure any other way of judging?
    Linda, the blog theo and I are talking about is http://www.ninc.com/blog.
    It’s a blog written by members of the multipubbed genre fiction authors of Novelists Inc. It just started up this week, so the wheels may be a little creaky yet.

    Reply
  122. ooookay, I just read everyone’s notes and started to respond and Typepad turned them all upside down on me so I can’t see them while I type. So now I have to rely on my very bad memory. I know I laughed over Virginia’s “novels and sausages” comment. That’s just about right. I am in utter awe of that much research and rewriting, but 200k words makes two books as far as I’m concerned!
    Susan, you are definitely a Lexus and one of those writers I admire. Really, it’s impossible to pass judgment on process. It’s the result that matters. So why on earth people want to argue qty vs quality is beyond me. Because they can’t figure any other way of judging?
    Linda, the blog theo and I are talking about is http://www.ninc.com/blog.
    It’s a blog written by members of the multipubbed genre fiction authors of Novelists Inc. It just started up this week, so the wheels may be a little creaky yet.

    Reply
  123. ooookay, I just read everyone’s notes and started to respond and Typepad turned them all upside down on me so I can’t see them while I type. So now I have to rely on my very bad memory. I know I laughed over Virginia’s “novels and sausages” comment. That’s just about right. I am in utter awe of that much research and rewriting, but 200k words makes two books as far as I’m concerned!
    Susan, you are definitely a Lexus and one of those writers I admire. Really, it’s impossible to pass judgment on process. It’s the result that matters. So why on earth people want to argue qty vs quality is beyond me. Because they can’t figure any other way of judging?
    Linda, the blog theo and I are talking about is http://www.ninc.com/blog.
    It’s a blog written by members of the multipubbed genre fiction authors of Novelists Inc. It just started up this week, so the wheels may be a little creaky yet.

    Reply
  124. ooookay, I just read everyone’s notes and started to respond and Typepad turned them all upside down on me so I can’t see them while I type. So now I have to rely on my very bad memory. I know I laughed over Virginia’s “novels and sausages” comment. That’s just about right. I am in utter awe of that much research and rewriting, but 200k words makes two books as far as I’m concerned!
    Susan, you are definitely a Lexus and one of those writers I admire. Really, it’s impossible to pass judgment on process. It’s the result that matters. So why on earth people want to argue qty vs quality is beyond me. Because they can’t figure any other way of judging?
    Linda, the blog theo and I are talking about is http://www.ninc.com/blog.
    It’s a blog written by members of the multipubbed genre fiction authors of Novelists Inc. It just started up this week, so the wheels may be a little creaky yet.

    Reply
  125. ooookay, I just read everyone’s notes and started to respond and Typepad turned them all upside down on me so I can’t see them while I type. So now I have to rely on my very bad memory. I know I laughed over Virginia’s “novels and sausages” comment. That’s just about right. I am in utter awe of that much research and rewriting, but 200k words makes two books as far as I’m concerned!
    Susan, you are definitely a Lexus and one of those writers I admire. Really, it’s impossible to pass judgment on process. It’s the result that matters. So why on earth people want to argue qty vs quality is beyond me. Because they can’t figure any other way of judging?
    Linda, the blog theo and I are talking about is http://www.ninc.com/blog.
    It’s a blog written by members of the multipubbed genre fiction authors of Novelists Inc. It just started up this week, so the wheels may be a little creaky yet.

    Reply
  126. Deducting romance novels on your taxes? Yes, it’s market research – as are cable TV fees, DVDs, movie tickets and the like. The good thing is it goes on your Schedule C, ‘above the line”, where it’s worth more. But you need to keep records and be prepared if audited to establish a solid specific link between the expense of books, etc. and your writing, whether sold or unsold, and you must have a profit motive (you can’t be writing as a hobby with no intention of ever selling).
    The down side (for totally self employeds) is that if you reduce the taxes on your writing income, you also pay less in self employment taxes, which are what establish your Social Security coverage, and that may matter to you more some years down the line. I’m not saying you shouldn’t take legitimate expenses and reduce your taxes now – I’m only saying that you need to make some plans for possible reduced retirement benefits in future.
    As for the question before us, I’d rather have quality than quantity. In a desperate situation I’ll read anything at all, but I won’t buy a second book by an author whose first one was crummy, dumbed down, florid idiocy.

    Reply
  127. Deducting romance novels on your taxes? Yes, it’s market research – as are cable TV fees, DVDs, movie tickets and the like. The good thing is it goes on your Schedule C, ‘above the line”, where it’s worth more. But you need to keep records and be prepared if audited to establish a solid specific link between the expense of books, etc. and your writing, whether sold or unsold, and you must have a profit motive (you can’t be writing as a hobby with no intention of ever selling).
    The down side (for totally self employeds) is that if you reduce the taxes on your writing income, you also pay less in self employment taxes, which are what establish your Social Security coverage, and that may matter to you more some years down the line. I’m not saying you shouldn’t take legitimate expenses and reduce your taxes now – I’m only saying that you need to make some plans for possible reduced retirement benefits in future.
    As for the question before us, I’d rather have quality than quantity. In a desperate situation I’ll read anything at all, but I won’t buy a second book by an author whose first one was crummy, dumbed down, florid idiocy.

    Reply
  128. Deducting romance novels on your taxes? Yes, it’s market research – as are cable TV fees, DVDs, movie tickets and the like. The good thing is it goes on your Schedule C, ‘above the line”, where it’s worth more. But you need to keep records and be prepared if audited to establish a solid specific link between the expense of books, etc. and your writing, whether sold or unsold, and you must have a profit motive (you can’t be writing as a hobby with no intention of ever selling).
    The down side (for totally self employeds) is that if you reduce the taxes on your writing income, you also pay less in self employment taxes, which are what establish your Social Security coverage, and that may matter to you more some years down the line. I’m not saying you shouldn’t take legitimate expenses and reduce your taxes now – I’m only saying that you need to make some plans for possible reduced retirement benefits in future.
    As for the question before us, I’d rather have quality than quantity. In a desperate situation I’ll read anything at all, but I won’t buy a second book by an author whose first one was crummy, dumbed down, florid idiocy.

    Reply
  129. Deducting romance novels on your taxes? Yes, it’s market research – as are cable TV fees, DVDs, movie tickets and the like. The good thing is it goes on your Schedule C, ‘above the line”, where it’s worth more. But you need to keep records and be prepared if audited to establish a solid specific link between the expense of books, etc. and your writing, whether sold or unsold, and you must have a profit motive (you can’t be writing as a hobby with no intention of ever selling).
    The down side (for totally self employeds) is that if you reduce the taxes on your writing income, you also pay less in self employment taxes, which are what establish your Social Security coverage, and that may matter to you more some years down the line. I’m not saying you shouldn’t take legitimate expenses and reduce your taxes now – I’m only saying that you need to make some plans for possible reduced retirement benefits in future.
    As for the question before us, I’d rather have quality than quantity. In a desperate situation I’ll read anything at all, but I won’t buy a second book by an author whose first one was crummy, dumbed down, florid idiocy.

    Reply
  130. Deducting romance novels on your taxes? Yes, it’s market research – as are cable TV fees, DVDs, movie tickets and the like. The good thing is it goes on your Schedule C, ‘above the line”, where it’s worth more. But you need to keep records and be prepared if audited to establish a solid specific link between the expense of books, etc. and your writing, whether sold or unsold, and you must have a profit motive (you can’t be writing as a hobby with no intention of ever selling).
    The down side (for totally self employeds) is that if you reduce the taxes on your writing income, you also pay less in self employment taxes, which are what establish your Social Security coverage, and that may matter to you more some years down the line. I’m not saying you shouldn’t take legitimate expenses and reduce your taxes now – I’m only saying that you need to make some plans for possible reduced retirement benefits in future.
    As for the question before us, I’d rather have quality than quantity. In a desperate situation I’ll read anything at all, but I won’t buy a second book by an author whose first one was crummy, dumbed down, florid idiocy.

    Reply
  131. Ahh, Pat, thank you! *g*
    But as for being a Lexus — I think I’m probably more like my own car: an aging Camry wagon with lots of miles, but absolutely reliable and capable of getting you where you want to go. Now THAT’s a writer car!

    Reply
  132. Ahh, Pat, thank you! *g*
    But as for being a Lexus — I think I’m probably more like my own car: an aging Camry wagon with lots of miles, but absolutely reliable and capable of getting you where you want to go. Now THAT’s a writer car!

    Reply
  133. Ahh, Pat, thank you! *g*
    But as for being a Lexus — I think I’m probably more like my own car: an aging Camry wagon with lots of miles, but absolutely reliable and capable of getting you where you want to go. Now THAT’s a writer car!

    Reply
  134. Ahh, Pat, thank you! *g*
    But as for being a Lexus — I think I’m probably more like my own car: an aging Camry wagon with lots of miles, but absolutely reliable and capable of getting you where you want to go. Now THAT’s a writer car!

    Reply
  135. Ahh, Pat, thank you! *g*
    But as for being a Lexus — I think I’m probably more like my own car: an aging Camry wagon with lots of miles, but absolutely reliable and capable of getting you where you want to go. Now THAT’s a writer car!

    Reply
  136. Janice,
    Thanks for the additional info. I do keep records of my expenses. I have a signed contract for my novella, and my WIPs as proof that I’m serious. If the IRS comes after me, I’m ready.
    Yes, I’m writing for money. Writing is very hard work, and I intend to make a few dollars. And until then, I’ll deduct the expenses.

    Reply
  137. Janice,
    Thanks for the additional info. I do keep records of my expenses. I have a signed contract for my novella, and my WIPs as proof that I’m serious. If the IRS comes after me, I’m ready.
    Yes, I’m writing for money. Writing is very hard work, and I intend to make a few dollars. And until then, I’ll deduct the expenses.

    Reply
  138. Janice,
    Thanks for the additional info. I do keep records of my expenses. I have a signed contract for my novella, and my WIPs as proof that I’m serious. If the IRS comes after me, I’m ready.
    Yes, I’m writing for money. Writing is very hard work, and I intend to make a few dollars. And until then, I’ll deduct the expenses.

    Reply
  139. Janice,
    Thanks for the additional info. I do keep records of my expenses. I have a signed contract for my novella, and my WIPs as proof that I’m serious. If the IRS comes after me, I’m ready.
    Yes, I’m writing for money. Writing is very hard work, and I intend to make a few dollars. And until then, I’ll deduct the expenses.

    Reply
  140. Janice,
    Thanks for the additional info. I do keep records of my expenses. I have a signed contract for my novella, and my WIPs as proof that I’m serious. If the IRS comes after me, I’m ready.
    Yes, I’m writing for money. Writing is very hard work, and I intend to make a few dollars. And until then, I’ll deduct the expenses.

    Reply
  141. And then, Linda, you can invest your money in this really low stock market instead of social security until they get the budget balanced! See, free tax AND investment advice!
    Susan, we have and have had lots of those Camrys. Definitely a writer’s car–cheap quality. “G”

    Reply
  142. And then, Linda, you can invest your money in this really low stock market instead of social security until they get the budget balanced! See, free tax AND investment advice!
    Susan, we have and have had lots of those Camrys. Definitely a writer’s car–cheap quality. “G”

    Reply
  143. And then, Linda, you can invest your money in this really low stock market instead of social security until they get the budget balanced! See, free tax AND investment advice!
    Susan, we have and have had lots of those Camrys. Definitely a writer’s car–cheap quality. “G”

    Reply
  144. And then, Linda, you can invest your money in this really low stock market instead of social security until they get the budget balanced! See, free tax AND investment advice!
    Susan, we have and have had lots of those Camrys. Definitely a writer’s car–cheap quality. “G”

    Reply
  145. And then, Linda, you can invest your money in this really low stock market instead of social security until they get the budget balanced! See, free tax AND investment advice!
    Susan, we have and have had lots of those Camrys. Definitely a writer’s car–cheap quality. “G”

    Reply
  146. I never really thought about it, but there is a connection between the car I drive and my reading style…see, I have a rather shabby looking ’94 Chevy that may not look like much, but it gets me where I want to go. And when my favorite authors have no new books out, I just go back to my shelf full of “keepers”. where I have a nearly complete backlist for most of the wenches, and I just pull out one of my old favorites. They are beginning to look a little shabby, but they get me where I want to go!

    Reply
  147. I never really thought about it, but there is a connection between the car I drive and my reading style…see, I have a rather shabby looking ’94 Chevy that may not look like much, but it gets me where I want to go. And when my favorite authors have no new books out, I just go back to my shelf full of “keepers”. where I have a nearly complete backlist for most of the wenches, and I just pull out one of my old favorites. They are beginning to look a little shabby, but they get me where I want to go!

    Reply
  148. I never really thought about it, but there is a connection between the car I drive and my reading style…see, I have a rather shabby looking ’94 Chevy that may not look like much, but it gets me where I want to go. And when my favorite authors have no new books out, I just go back to my shelf full of “keepers”. where I have a nearly complete backlist for most of the wenches, and I just pull out one of my old favorites. They are beginning to look a little shabby, but they get me where I want to go!

    Reply
  149. I never really thought about it, but there is a connection between the car I drive and my reading style…see, I have a rather shabby looking ’94 Chevy that may not look like much, but it gets me where I want to go. And when my favorite authors have no new books out, I just go back to my shelf full of “keepers”. where I have a nearly complete backlist for most of the wenches, and I just pull out one of my old favorites. They are beginning to look a little shabby, but they get me where I want to go!

    Reply
  150. I never really thought about it, but there is a connection between the car I drive and my reading style…see, I have a rather shabby looking ’94 Chevy that may not look like much, but it gets me where I want to go. And when my favorite authors have no new books out, I just go back to my shelf full of “keepers”. where I have a nearly complete backlist for most of the wenches, and I just pull out one of my old favorites. They are beginning to look a little shabby, but they get me where I want to go!

    Reply

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