Perfect Heroes?

Bbookowl_1 From Pat Rice:

Merry asked a great question in response to Loretta’s post:  what makes a character memorable?

      I have a lamentable memory for names and titles, but I can recall great characters all day long.  I might not remember his name, but I remember the hero of a romance who appeared to be lazily lying about in a hammock drinking beer and rotting away, when he was actually sharply analyzing his life and what had happened to him and how to correct it.  And proceeded to do so, with a great deal of humor. That hero made me laugh and cry.

          As I mentioned in my earlier comment, there is Laura Kinsale’s hero from FLOWERS IN THE STORM, who suffers a stroke, transforming his tremendous arrogance and genius to incoherence. He’s reduced to accepting aid from a heroine he would never have noticed in his prior life, and when she helped him get his life back, he didn’t return to his previous arrogance but realized she was more important than all the things he had previously loved.  That one seared my heart.

         But I think—for me—what makes a character most memorable is the immensity of the flaw he must overcome.  The larger the flaw, and the more he/she has to suffer to overcome it, the more I admire them. Think of Rochester’s tremendous pride and how he was brought down and suffered.

        So apparently I don’t need righteous things like honor or nobility to enjoy a character—I like flaws.  Figures.  But beneath the flaws, the character needs a strength and nobility of character to overcome the flaw, so maybe there’s hope for me yet.  I just have difficulty buying into perfect heroes.  I think perfect heroes need to have suffered to have learned to make the choices that make them noble.

                       Since I seem to be on a hero kick, how do you like your heroes?  Besides hot, I mean. Smileylove_2  Do you want them perfect?  Wounded?  Flawed?  Do they have to be beautiful? How about nerdy?

66 thoughts on “Perfect Heroes?”

  1. I’m with Cathy. My first thought was “SMART”. LOL! I’m not always looking for a huge flaw/wound to be overcome. Sometimes I want the flaw to stick around (in fact, I can think of one book where the hero regained his sight and I so wish I’d stopped reading while he was still blind; I LIKED him flawed).

    Reply
  2. I’m with Cathy. My first thought was “SMART”. LOL! I’m not always looking for a huge flaw/wound to be overcome. Sometimes I want the flaw to stick around (in fact, I can think of one book where the hero regained his sight and I so wish I’d stopped reading while he was still blind; I LIKED him flawed).

    Reply
  3. I’m with Cathy. My first thought was “SMART”. LOL! I’m not always looking for a huge flaw/wound to be overcome. Sometimes I want the flaw to stick around (in fact, I can think of one book where the hero regained his sight and I so wish I’d stopped reading while he was still blind; I LIKED him flawed).

    Reply
  4. Intelligence, definitely. And/or Talent. Harry from the “Harry and Dizzy” book and Daniel(?) from “The Shadow and the Star”(can’t remember the specifics). Also, reformed heroes who’ve suffered in their atonement. Edmund(?) in “Captives of the Night.” These guys are gorgeous, too, which helps of course; but I remember them for their non-physical characteristics.
    As for flaws – at the end of “Beauty” by Robin McKinley when the Beast changes back into a man, the heroine retreats from him and has to be coaxed back. Her reaction is “Where’s my Beast?” When flaws are suddenly removed, it’s like a different character has appeared. You have to get to know him again.

    Reply
  5. Intelligence, definitely. And/or Talent. Harry from the “Harry and Dizzy” book and Daniel(?) from “The Shadow and the Star”(can’t remember the specifics). Also, reformed heroes who’ve suffered in their atonement. Edmund(?) in “Captives of the Night.” These guys are gorgeous, too, which helps of course; but I remember them for their non-physical characteristics.
    As for flaws – at the end of “Beauty” by Robin McKinley when the Beast changes back into a man, the heroine retreats from him and has to be coaxed back. Her reaction is “Where’s my Beast?” When flaws are suddenly removed, it’s like a different character has appeared. You have to get to know him again.

    Reply
  6. Intelligence, definitely. And/or Talent. Harry from the “Harry and Dizzy” book and Daniel(?) from “The Shadow and the Star”(can’t remember the specifics). Also, reformed heroes who’ve suffered in their atonement. Edmund(?) in “Captives of the Night.” These guys are gorgeous, too, which helps of course; but I remember them for their non-physical characteristics.
    As for flaws – at the end of “Beauty” by Robin McKinley when the Beast changes back into a man, the heroine retreats from him and has to be coaxed back. Her reaction is “Where’s my Beast?” When flaws are suddenly removed, it’s like a different character has appeared. You have to get to know him again.

    Reply
  7. I honestly don’t care. Ethical is nice, but not even required. I’m interested in the story – was I entertained / do I believe these two as a couple? That said, I couldn’t get into a book where the gal had to learn to love the guy who tried to beat her to death or somesuch. I’m not a reader who puts herself into the story, just not wired that way. So if he would be attractive to me isn’t at issue.

    Reply
  8. I honestly don’t care. Ethical is nice, but not even required. I’m interested in the story – was I entertained / do I believe these two as a couple? That said, I couldn’t get into a book where the gal had to learn to love the guy who tried to beat her to death or somesuch. I’m not a reader who puts herself into the story, just not wired that way. So if he would be attractive to me isn’t at issue.

    Reply
  9. I honestly don’t care. Ethical is nice, but not even required. I’m interested in the story – was I entertained / do I believe these two as a couple? That said, I couldn’t get into a book where the gal had to learn to love the guy who tried to beat her to death or somesuch. I’m not a reader who puts herself into the story, just not wired that way. So if he would be attractive to me isn’t at issue.

    Reply
  10. Oh, heroes, what a lovely topic, I think we could talk endlessly on this one. I especially love heroes who are:
    –intelligent, quick-witted
    — either well-educated or highly skilled
    –reserved, keeps things to self, has secrets
    –sense of humor; witty is good, but sarcasm only early on, before he learns to luuuuuv
    –may be wounded, emotionally or physically, but copes w/ it on his own (and copes way better once he opens up to the heroine)
    –sensitive side to his nature, well hidden (often goes w/ wounded)
    –aristocracy optional, not required
    –hot always a plus (and a given)
    I adore the Kinsale heroes, and in general I tend to go for the reserved, tough on the outside, loving on the inside, guys with a dark past and a determination to carry on. Mr. Rochester, Max de Winter, Mr. Darcy, Raoul from Anne of Cambray, ST from Prince of Midnight… all yummy.
    the list goes on but without running to the bookshelves, I don’t always remember names!
    AND I love the heroes that my sister Wenches write. These guys are among the best of their kind!
    ~Susan

    Reply
  11. Oh, heroes, what a lovely topic, I think we could talk endlessly on this one. I especially love heroes who are:
    –intelligent, quick-witted
    — either well-educated or highly skilled
    –reserved, keeps things to self, has secrets
    –sense of humor; witty is good, but sarcasm only early on, before he learns to luuuuuv
    –may be wounded, emotionally or physically, but copes w/ it on his own (and copes way better once he opens up to the heroine)
    –sensitive side to his nature, well hidden (often goes w/ wounded)
    –aristocracy optional, not required
    –hot always a plus (and a given)
    I adore the Kinsale heroes, and in general I tend to go for the reserved, tough on the outside, loving on the inside, guys with a dark past and a determination to carry on. Mr. Rochester, Max de Winter, Mr. Darcy, Raoul from Anne of Cambray, ST from Prince of Midnight… all yummy.
    the list goes on but without running to the bookshelves, I don’t always remember names!
    AND I love the heroes that my sister Wenches write. These guys are among the best of their kind!
    ~Susan

    Reply
  12. Oh, heroes, what a lovely topic, I think we could talk endlessly on this one. I especially love heroes who are:
    –intelligent, quick-witted
    — either well-educated or highly skilled
    –reserved, keeps things to self, has secrets
    –sense of humor; witty is good, but sarcasm only early on, before he learns to luuuuuv
    –may be wounded, emotionally or physically, but copes w/ it on his own (and copes way better once he opens up to the heroine)
    –sensitive side to his nature, well hidden (often goes w/ wounded)
    –aristocracy optional, not required
    –hot always a plus (and a given)
    I adore the Kinsale heroes, and in general I tend to go for the reserved, tough on the outside, loving on the inside, guys with a dark past and a determination to carry on. Mr. Rochester, Max de Winter, Mr. Darcy, Raoul from Anne of Cambray, ST from Prince of Midnight… all yummy.
    the list goes on but without running to the bookshelves, I don’t always remember names!
    AND I love the heroes that my sister Wenches write. These guys are among the best of their kind!
    ~Susan

    Reply
  13. you have no idea how thrilled I am to hear readers like their heroes intelligent! And yeah, Susan, your list is exquisite. If we could only wrap all that up in one 100k word package…
    Interesting, Liz, that you don’t put yourself into the story. I think a lot of readers do, but we’d have to do a survey to prove me wrong. I can enjoy a good story, but the really, really good characters drag me into it.
    I think I ought to send a link to my editor and say see, see…intelligent! not necessarily hunky! see there. he can wear glasses!

    Reply
  14. you have no idea how thrilled I am to hear readers like their heroes intelligent! And yeah, Susan, your list is exquisite. If we could only wrap all that up in one 100k word package…
    Interesting, Liz, that you don’t put yourself into the story. I think a lot of readers do, but we’d have to do a survey to prove me wrong. I can enjoy a good story, but the really, really good characters drag me into it.
    I think I ought to send a link to my editor and say see, see…intelligent! not necessarily hunky! see there. he can wear glasses!

    Reply
  15. you have no idea how thrilled I am to hear readers like their heroes intelligent! And yeah, Susan, your list is exquisite. If we could only wrap all that up in one 100k word package…
    Interesting, Liz, that you don’t put yourself into the story. I think a lot of readers do, but we’d have to do a survey to prove me wrong. I can enjoy a good story, but the really, really good characters drag me into it.
    I think I ought to send a link to my editor and say see, see…intelligent! not necessarily hunky! see there. he can wear glasses!

    Reply
  16. I think flawed heroes are infinitely more interesting than perfect ones. Benedict Carsington is a case in point; he becomes much more attractive as he loses his perfection–although he is powerfully appealing physically from the opening scene. 🙂
    To intelligence,humor, sensitivity, and other qualities that have been mentioned, I would add vulnerability. I am not sure growth can occur without vulnerability.

    Reply
  17. I think flawed heroes are infinitely more interesting than perfect ones. Benedict Carsington is a case in point; he becomes much more attractive as he loses his perfection–although he is powerfully appealing physically from the opening scene. 🙂
    To intelligence,humor, sensitivity, and other qualities that have been mentioned, I would add vulnerability. I am not sure growth can occur without vulnerability.

    Reply
  18. I think flawed heroes are infinitely more interesting than perfect ones. Benedict Carsington is a case in point; he becomes much more attractive as he loses his perfection–although he is powerfully appealing physically from the opening scene. 🙂
    To intelligence,humor, sensitivity, and other qualities that have been mentioned, I would add vulnerability. I am not sure growth can occur without vulnerability.

    Reply
  19. Cathy said: “if a man can seduce a woman’s mind, her body will follow.”
    Ooooooh, Cathy, put a copyright on that and stick that phrase in your next manuscript! I wish I’d said that. Rats.
    Sherrie

    Reply
  20. Cathy said: “if a man can seduce a woman’s mind, her body will follow.”
    Ooooooh, Cathy, put a copyright on that and stick that phrase in your next manuscript! I wish I’d said that. Rats.
    Sherrie

    Reply
  21. Cathy said: “if a man can seduce a woman’s mind, her body will follow.”
    Ooooooh, Cathy, put a copyright on that and stick that phrase in your next manuscript! I wish I’d said that. Rats.
    Sherrie

    Reply
  22. Oops! Hit the “post” button instead of “preview” button with my previous message, so now I have to type a new one.
    I, too, love intelligent (especially super-intelligent) heroes. Another story line I love is gorgeous-hero-plain-heroine stories. And as I said earlier, honorable heroes make my little heart go pitter-pat. Conversely, I also love a hero who is a rogue with less-than-honorable intentions. (Think Captain Jack Sparrow!)
    The Reluctant Hero is a sure bet, and nerdy heroes are fine too, because they are almost always really intelligent.
    Sherrie

    Reply
  23. Oops! Hit the “post” button instead of “preview” button with my previous message, so now I have to type a new one.
    I, too, love intelligent (especially super-intelligent) heroes. Another story line I love is gorgeous-hero-plain-heroine stories. And as I said earlier, honorable heroes make my little heart go pitter-pat. Conversely, I also love a hero who is a rogue with less-than-honorable intentions. (Think Captain Jack Sparrow!)
    The Reluctant Hero is a sure bet, and nerdy heroes are fine too, because they are almost always really intelligent.
    Sherrie

    Reply
  24. Oops! Hit the “post” button instead of “preview” button with my previous message, so now I have to type a new one.
    I, too, love intelligent (especially super-intelligent) heroes. Another story line I love is gorgeous-hero-plain-heroine stories. And as I said earlier, honorable heroes make my little heart go pitter-pat. Conversely, I also love a hero who is a rogue with less-than-honorable intentions. (Think Captain Jack Sparrow!)
    The Reluctant Hero is a sure bet, and nerdy heroes are fine too, because they are almost always really intelligent.
    Sherrie

    Reply
  25. The best romance heroes are providers, protectors, and drop-dead handsome. I love bad boy heroes best of all, but I don’t care for any “hero” who is abusive whether physically or verbally.
    Most of the very best heroes are rogues with strong goals and tender hearts. (Captain Jack Sparrow or William Thatcher)
    Plus, they always have worthy opponents. I think a really terrific villain helps make a leading man that much more heroic.
    Jacquie

    Reply
  26. The best romance heroes are providers, protectors, and drop-dead handsome. I love bad boy heroes best of all, but I don’t care for any “hero” who is abusive whether physically or verbally.
    Most of the very best heroes are rogues with strong goals and tender hearts. (Captain Jack Sparrow or William Thatcher)
    Plus, they always have worthy opponents. I think a really terrific villain helps make a leading man that much more heroic.
    Jacquie

    Reply
  27. The best romance heroes are providers, protectors, and drop-dead handsome. I love bad boy heroes best of all, but I don’t care for any “hero” who is abusive whether physically or verbally.
    Most of the very best heroes are rogues with strong goals and tender hearts. (Captain Jack Sparrow or William Thatcher)
    Plus, they always have worthy opponents. I think a really terrific villain helps make a leading man that much more heroic.
    Jacquie

    Reply
  28. I’m not sure I have much to add except that he should have the capacity to change. Some of my favorite heroes are written by Jayne Ann Krentz in her various incarnations; and one thing I like about the books is that her strongest themes tend to involve reconciliation, usually brought about by the heroine, who either draws a loner into a family (by blood or by choice) or finds a way to reconcile him with his own estranged relatives or to make peace with someone on whom he seeks vengeance.
    Protectiveness is big. I don’t like the domineering-type of alpha male (as Tanya Huff’s romance writer/vampire hero Henry Fitzroy remarks, “he could use a good swift kick in his windswept desire;” but I like the “I’m going to stand between you and peril” type.
    I’m really a sucker for the Percy Blakeney type, who I guess would be a variety of the nerdly hero–the apparent fop/egghead/dim bulb who turns out to be brave and dashing and brilliant. My favorite, of course, is El Velludo Venceador…

    Reply
  29. I’m not sure I have much to add except that he should have the capacity to change. Some of my favorite heroes are written by Jayne Ann Krentz in her various incarnations; and one thing I like about the books is that her strongest themes tend to involve reconciliation, usually brought about by the heroine, who either draws a loner into a family (by blood or by choice) or finds a way to reconcile him with his own estranged relatives or to make peace with someone on whom he seeks vengeance.
    Protectiveness is big. I don’t like the domineering-type of alpha male (as Tanya Huff’s romance writer/vampire hero Henry Fitzroy remarks, “he could use a good swift kick in his windswept desire;” but I like the “I’m going to stand between you and peril” type.
    I’m really a sucker for the Percy Blakeney type, who I guess would be a variety of the nerdly hero–the apparent fop/egghead/dim bulb who turns out to be brave and dashing and brilliant. My favorite, of course, is El Velludo Venceador…

    Reply
  30. I’m not sure I have much to add except that he should have the capacity to change. Some of my favorite heroes are written by Jayne Ann Krentz in her various incarnations; and one thing I like about the books is that her strongest themes tend to involve reconciliation, usually brought about by the heroine, who either draws a loner into a family (by blood or by choice) or finds a way to reconcile him with his own estranged relatives or to make peace with someone on whom he seeks vengeance.
    Protectiveness is big. I don’t like the domineering-type of alpha male (as Tanya Huff’s romance writer/vampire hero Henry Fitzroy remarks, “he could use a good swift kick in his windswept desire;” but I like the “I’m going to stand between you and peril” type.
    I’m really a sucker for the Percy Blakeney type, who I guess would be a variety of the nerdly hero–the apparent fop/egghead/dim bulb who turns out to be brave and dashing and brilliant. My favorite, of course, is El Velludo Venceador…

    Reply
  31. Pat– a real life example like the guy in the hammock. I had a friend, smart guy, who went though a phase where he slept all day and stayed up all night watching old movies on TV. We were really worried about him, thought he was depressed or falling apart in some way, especially since this went on for a while– until he moved to LA, went to film school, and became a successful screen writer. I guess he was actually doing something when he was watching all those old movies.
    about characters:
    I’ll try to take up my own challenge. I’ll try to go into a bit more detail about Reggie Davenport in MJP’s “The Rake” The character first appears (and gets interesting) in the Diabolical Baron. Towards the end there is a great swordfight scene where he is almost killed, and when his opponent announces who he is, which means Reggie has lost the title (Earl) and property he thought he would have, with the point of a sword at his neck, he laughs. Then you see the same character go through dealing with his alcoholism in “the Rake” It’s the rather deep exploration of character- including the relapses on alcohol, the experiences of abuse and trauma in his background. The character growth occurs in the context of a romantic relationship. He’s competent, wounded, intelligent, and a good swordsman. (The best in England, except for the guy he was fighting. ) The character is explored as such a deep level, that he can’t help but be memorable. There is the theme also, of being brought from a lonely status into connection with others — or perhaps being brought from status of having only meaningful connections with men, to having meaningful connections with women and children as well. (I know we’re not really supposed to single out one of the writers, but what’s the point of being on a blog with your favorite writers if you can’t talk about their work.)
    I meant to write about a female character with similar dynamics, but it’s getting too late.
    Merry

    Reply
  32. Pat– a real life example like the guy in the hammock. I had a friend, smart guy, who went though a phase where he slept all day and stayed up all night watching old movies on TV. We were really worried about him, thought he was depressed or falling apart in some way, especially since this went on for a while– until he moved to LA, went to film school, and became a successful screen writer. I guess he was actually doing something when he was watching all those old movies.
    about characters:
    I’ll try to take up my own challenge. I’ll try to go into a bit more detail about Reggie Davenport in MJP’s “The Rake” The character first appears (and gets interesting) in the Diabolical Baron. Towards the end there is a great swordfight scene where he is almost killed, and when his opponent announces who he is, which means Reggie has lost the title (Earl) and property he thought he would have, with the point of a sword at his neck, he laughs. Then you see the same character go through dealing with his alcoholism in “the Rake” It’s the rather deep exploration of character- including the relapses on alcohol, the experiences of abuse and trauma in his background. The character growth occurs in the context of a romantic relationship. He’s competent, wounded, intelligent, and a good swordsman. (The best in England, except for the guy he was fighting. ) The character is explored as such a deep level, that he can’t help but be memorable. There is the theme also, of being brought from a lonely status into connection with others — or perhaps being brought from status of having only meaningful connections with men, to having meaningful connections with women and children as well. (I know we’re not really supposed to single out one of the writers, but what’s the point of being on a blog with your favorite writers if you can’t talk about their work.)
    I meant to write about a female character with similar dynamics, but it’s getting too late.
    Merry

    Reply
  33. Pat– a real life example like the guy in the hammock. I had a friend, smart guy, who went though a phase where he slept all day and stayed up all night watching old movies on TV. We were really worried about him, thought he was depressed or falling apart in some way, especially since this went on for a while– until he moved to LA, went to film school, and became a successful screen writer. I guess he was actually doing something when he was watching all those old movies.
    about characters:
    I’ll try to take up my own challenge. I’ll try to go into a bit more detail about Reggie Davenport in MJP’s “The Rake” The character first appears (and gets interesting) in the Diabolical Baron. Towards the end there is a great swordfight scene where he is almost killed, and when his opponent announces who he is, which means Reggie has lost the title (Earl) and property he thought he would have, with the point of a sword at his neck, he laughs. Then you see the same character go through dealing with his alcoholism in “the Rake” It’s the rather deep exploration of character- including the relapses on alcohol, the experiences of abuse and trauma in his background. The character growth occurs in the context of a romantic relationship. He’s competent, wounded, intelligent, and a good swordsman. (The best in England, except for the guy he was fighting. ) The character is explored as such a deep level, that he can’t help but be memorable. There is the theme also, of being brought from a lonely status into connection with others — or perhaps being brought from status of having only meaningful connections with men, to having meaningful connections with women and children as well. (I know we’re not really supposed to single out one of the writers, but what’s the point of being on a blog with your favorite writers if you can’t talk about their work.)
    I meant to write about a female character with similar dynamics, but it’s getting too late.
    Merry

    Reply
  34. wonderful food for thought, all of you, thank you. I’m glad this blog allows for archives so I can go back and ponder this next difficult guy I have to work with.
    And some nice laughs with which to start my day! Swift kick in his windswept desire! Ya gotta luv it!

    Reply
  35. wonderful food for thought, all of you, thank you. I’m glad this blog allows for archives so I can go back and ponder this next difficult guy I have to work with.
    And some nice laughs with which to start my day! Swift kick in his windswept desire! Ya gotta luv it!

    Reply
  36. wonderful food for thought, all of you, thank you. I’m glad this blog allows for archives so I can go back and ponder this next difficult guy I have to work with.
    And some nice laughs with which to start my day! Swift kick in his windswept desire! Ya gotta luv it!

    Reply
  37. Totally off subject, Pat, but on Squawk Radio Monday, the topic was future trends in romance and what readers would like to see more of, and your name came up: “I’d love to see more romances dealing in Magic (Patricia Rice).”

    Reply
  38. Totally off subject, Pat, but on Squawk Radio Monday, the topic was future trends in romance and what readers would like to see more of, and your name came up: “I’d love to see more romances dealing in Magic (Patricia Rice).”

    Reply
  39. Totally off subject, Pat, but on Squawk Radio Monday, the topic was future trends in romance and what readers would like to see more of, and your name came up: “I’d love to see more romances dealing in Magic (Patricia Rice).”

    Reply
  40. Pat – I think you’re right and many (if not most) readers do. Certainly a lot of my friends have indicated they do. When Simple Jess came out I thought it was amazing but a number of my friends complained they couldn’t see themselves with someone mentally slow. I was “You’re not Althea!” but it really was an issue for them in their enjoyment of the book. I actually get bored of all the movie star men.

    Reply
  41. Pat – I think you’re right and many (if not most) readers do. Certainly a lot of my friends have indicated they do. When Simple Jess came out I thought it was amazing but a number of my friends complained they couldn’t see themselves with someone mentally slow. I was “You’re not Althea!” but it really was an issue for them in their enjoyment of the book. I actually get bored of all the movie star men.

    Reply
  42. Pat – I think you’re right and many (if not most) readers do. Certainly a lot of my friends have indicated they do. When Simple Jess came out I thought it was amazing but a number of my friends complained they couldn’t see themselves with someone mentally slow. I was “You’re not Althea!” but it really was an issue for them in their enjoyment of the book. I actually get bored of all the movie star men.

    Reply
  43. I adored SIMPLY JESS! So in that case, I was enjoying for story and not putting myself in anyone’s place. But in romance, it’s a tough line to walk.
    Thanks for the heads’ up, Wylene. I don’t get to drop in on other blogs very frequently, but I have some friends over at Squawk Radio. Guess I need to drop by and see if they’re taking my name in vain. One of these days I’ll figure out if trackbacks will take us back and forth, but I just don’t have time to experiment with all this fun stuff.

    Reply
  44. I adored SIMPLY JESS! So in that case, I was enjoying for story and not putting myself in anyone’s place. But in romance, it’s a tough line to walk.
    Thanks for the heads’ up, Wylene. I don’t get to drop in on other blogs very frequently, but I have some friends over at Squawk Radio. Guess I need to drop by and see if they’re taking my name in vain. One of these days I’ll figure out if trackbacks will take us back and forth, but I just don’t have time to experiment with all this fun stuff.

    Reply
  45. I adored SIMPLY JESS! So in that case, I was enjoying for story and not putting myself in anyone’s place. But in romance, it’s a tough line to walk.
    Thanks for the heads’ up, Wylene. I don’t get to drop in on other blogs very frequently, but I have some friends over at Squawk Radio. Guess I need to drop by and see if they’re taking my name in vain. One of these days I’ll figure out if trackbacks will take us back and forth, but I just don’t have time to experiment with all this fun stuff.

    Reply
  46. Pat, a follow-up on the intelligent hero topic. One hero I still remember fondly is the guy in Hazard. He was unassuming and physically average. I think he was a secretary to one of the Rogues. But he was the guy behind the scenes who got things done, and he could be intimidating when he wanted to be. That kind of hidden/latent power is seductive. Linda Howard had readers clamoring for more of John Medina, a very non-descript bit character in “Kill and Tell.”

    Reply
  47. Pat, a follow-up on the intelligent hero topic. One hero I still remember fondly is the guy in Hazard. He was unassuming and physically average. I think he was a secretary to one of the Rogues. But he was the guy behind the scenes who got things done, and he could be intimidating when he wanted to be. That kind of hidden/latent power is seductive. Linda Howard had readers clamoring for more of John Medina, a very non-descript bit character in “Kill and Tell.”

    Reply
  48. Pat, a follow-up on the intelligent hero topic. One hero I still remember fondly is the guy in Hazard. He was unassuming and physically average. I think he was a secretary to one of the Rogues. But he was the guy behind the scenes who got things done, and he could be intimidating when he wanted to be. That kind of hidden/latent power is seductive. Linda Howard had readers clamoring for more of John Medina, a very non-descript bit character in “Kill and Tell.”

    Reply
  49. Yes, I take one that’s perfectly nerdly, outrageously handsome, very manly and yet good-hearted — on rye please!
    (sorry, pregnancy has made me more hungry than lusty) : D

    Reply
  50. Yes, I take one that’s perfectly nerdly, outrageously handsome, very manly and yet good-hearted — on rye please!
    (sorry, pregnancy has made me more hungry than lusty) : D

    Reply
  51. Yes, I take one that’s perfectly nerdly, outrageously handsome, very manly and yet good-hearted — on rye please!
    (sorry, pregnancy has made me more hungry than lusty) : D

    Reply
  52. Hello. I am researching the connection between James Murray , first editor of the English Oxford dictionary, and Elsie Mayflower. A search on Google gives me Word Wenches as a link..but then I am stuck. any ideas ?

    Reply
  53. Hello. I am researching the connection between James Murray , first editor of the English Oxford dictionary, and Elsie Mayflower. A search on Google gives me Word Wenches as a link..but then I am stuck. any ideas ?

    Reply
  54. Hello. I am researching the connection between James Murray , first editor of the English Oxford dictionary, and Elsie Mayflower. A search on Google gives me Word Wenches as a link..but then I am stuck. any ideas ?

    Reply

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