Pen Names & Evil Twins

From Susan/Miranda:

Jo suggested that this week I write about pseudonyms, being a psudonym-onous writer myself. “Pseudonym” has always had a faintly tainted sound to me, like some sort of grim medical condition, but then “pen name” isn’t much better, with its jolly, jaunty pen-pal quality. Personally I like to think of Miranda and Susan as my evil twins, two sides of my writing personality. For many years, Miranda did the work while Susan spent all the money, but lately things have been evening up. (For any late-comers, I’ve written for Pocket, Sonnet, and Harlequin Historicals as Miranda Jarrett, and now write for NAL/Dutton as Susan Holloway Scott.)

Of course, women in general have long been in the habit of having two names, taking their husband’s when they marry. (Ladies who marry younger titled sons get the rawest deal, becoming Lady HisFirstName, but then I suppose there are other compensations.)

But writers take extra names for other reasons. Samuel Clemens chose Mark Twain, a name drawn from riverboat jargon, to give instant credibility to his Mississippi stories. Benjamin Franklin became Poor Richard to lend his almanac a more folksy flavor to –– what else? –– increase sales. A famous eighteenth century landscape architect and writer dubbed himself “Capability” Brown to boost his reputation with potential noble clients (though his real name of Lancelot might have done that, too.) And sometimes the change is for convenience: a 19th century female reporter found the by-line Nellie Bly was much easier for her readers to remember than Elizabeth Cochrane Seaman.

Early in his career, Stephen King wrote books faster than his publisher thought wise to produce, and so also published as Richard Bachman. Nora Roberts uses J.D. Robb to signal her readers that this is a different kind of novel than her usual romance, just as WordWench Mary Jo Putney writes historicals with a fantasy element as M.J. Putney.

Because romance is mostly read by women, at least two male romance writers have taken female pseudonyms to boost their appeal. T. E. Huff was the gentleman behind Jennifer Wilde, and former RWA president Harold Lowry writes as Leigh Greenwood. But expectations can be misleading, too. While the wonderfully named Thea Devine and Merline Lovelace may sound like romance psudonyms, each is respectively married to Mr. Devine, and Mr. Lovelace.

Sales (or lack thereof) are another reason for a change of name. If a writer’s past been burdened with a bad sales record, a new name at new publishing house can offer a much-welcomed fresh start.

Sometimes, though, it’s not an author’s decision. Just as Anne Klein magically manages to design clothes from beyond the grave, there are writers’ names that become such a “franchise” that books continue to be produced after their deaths. The estate of V.C. Andrews hired Andrew Neiderman to continue to write the books that are now published under her name.

Another famous bestseller, Carolyn Keene, didn’t exist at all. The name is the psuedonym for a long list of authors who produced the hugely successful Nancy Drew mystries for the Stratemeyer Syndicate. Each writer was paid $125.00 a book, and in turn gave up all their rights –– a practice that’s still unfortunately common for Young Adult series books today.

When I first sold to Harlequin/Silhouette in the early nineties, their corporate policy (which has since changed) required writers to use pseudonyms. Their reasoning was that if they built up your career –– your own “brand” –– then they should have the right to keep the name if you moved along to another house.

At the time, I didn’t mind taking another name. Because I was still working at a college and my children were small, I wanted to separate my writing life from my personal one. I chose family names that were in the running for my children, but didn’t get used: Miranda and Jarrett Shippey were 19th century ancestors of mine, a teenaged brother and sister who left the family farm back east to find excitement and new lives with the California Gold Rush. Jarrett traveled by wagon train with another sister, Melissa, while Miranda somehow went by sea around South America. They seemed like worthy inspiration for me, whose great adventures are limited to what comes from my keyboard.

So what do you think of writers with two names? Does it seem an unnecessary contrivance that makes book-hunting a challenge, or do you see it as a way of differentiating kinds of books? Or do you have a story of your own to share of a “mistaken identity”?

(And now a quick promotional note: for a limited time, Borders is offering my latest book DUCHESS: A Novel of Sarah Churchill as part of their “3 for 2” promotion: buy any two of a select group of trade paperbacks, and receive a third for free. Check it out!)

39 thoughts on “Pen Names & Evil Twins”

  1. Hi Susan/Miranda.
    Thank you for answering my unasked question. I always wondered why you and Susan/Sarah went by two names. MJ, too. I never understood the distinction between Mary Jo and MJ. I just thought the publisher was trying to create more ‘white space’ on the cover.
    Do I find author pseudonyms annoying when looking for books? Well, frankly, no. If I didn’t know Susan Holloway and Miranda Jarrett were one in the same and I like one, I wouldn’t know I could like the other. Thus, I wouldn’t buy that ‘other’ author. Guess ya can’t know what ya don’t know.
    While having a ‘slash’ in one’s name, allowing both evil twins proper billing, could be annoying as heck, I think having a pseudonym would be fun and terribly convenient. There are lots of things I would like to do and say that I don’t because I’ve only one name. Perhaps that’s all for the better.
    Ah, well. It’s back to my ms with me.
    –the littlest wenchling

    Reply
  2. Hi Susan/Miranda.
    Thank you for answering my unasked question. I always wondered why you and Susan/Sarah went by two names. MJ, too. I never understood the distinction between Mary Jo and MJ. I just thought the publisher was trying to create more ‘white space’ on the cover.
    Do I find author pseudonyms annoying when looking for books? Well, frankly, no. If I didn’t know Susan Holloway and Miranda Jarrett were one in the same and I like one, I wouldn’t know I could like the other. Thus, I wouldn’t buy that ‘other’ author. Guess ya can’t know what ya don’t know.
    While having a ‘slash’ in one’s name, allowing both evil twins proper billing, could be annoying as heck, I think having a pseudonym would be fun and terribly convenient. There are lots of things I would like to do and say that I don’t because I’ve only one name. Perhaps that’s all for the better.
    Ah, well. It’s back to my ms with me.
    –the littlest wenchling

    Reply
  3. Hi Susan/Miranda.
    Thank you for answering my unasked question. I always wondered why you and Susan/Sarah went by two names. MJ, too. I never understood the distinction between Mary Jo and MJ. I just thought the publisher was trying to create more ‘white space’ on the cover.
    Do I find author pseudonyms annoying when looking for books? Well, frankly, no. If I didn’t know Susan Holloway and Miranda Jarrett were one in the same and I like one, I wouldn’t know I could like the other. Thus, I wouldn’t buy that ‘other’ author. Guess ya can’t know what ya don’t know.
    While having a ‘slash’ in one’s name, allowing both evil twins proper billing, could be annoying as heck, I think having a pseudonym would be fun and terribly convenient. There are lots of things I would like to do and say that I don’t because I’ve only one name. Perhaps that’s all for the better.
    Ah, well. It’s back to my ms with me.
    –the littlest wenchling

    Reply
  4. Excellent post about non de plumes.
    I don’t like when publishing houses dictate (or should I say “suggest”) a name change just for the sake of policy or convenience like when Avon asked Judy Cuevas to change her name to Judith Ivory.
    I can understand it when au established author goes into another genre like when Jayne Ann krentz started writing regencies as Amanda Quick.

    Reply
  5. Excellent post about non de plumes.
    I don’t like when publishing houses dictate (or should I say “suggest”) a name change just for the sake of policy or convenience like when Avon asked Judy Cuevas to change her name to Judith Ivory.
    I can understand it when au established author goes into another genre like when Jayne Ann krentz started writing regencies as Amanda Quick.

    Reply
  6. Excellent post about non de plumes.
    I don’t like when publishing houses dictate (or should I say “suggest”) a name change just for the sake of policy or convenience like when Avon asked Judy Cuevas to change her name to Judith Ivory.
    I can understand it when au established author goes into another genre like when Jayne Ann krentz started writing regencies as Amanda Quick.

    Reply
  7. So interesting to know the origins of your Miranda Jarrett name. Love the background!
    I’ve always wanted a pseudonym, it seemed so cool, like being a spy. But because my early books came out in hardcover, the Powers all expected me to use my real name, or a version thereof, so I did. But actually, MEP is only used professionally, so in a way it has morphed into my pseudonym. I have an altogether different name for “everyday” non-author use.

    Reply
  8. So interesting to know the origins of your Miranda Jarrett name. Love the background!
    I’ve always wanted a pseudonym, it seemed so cool, like being a spy. But because my early books came out in hardcover, the Powers all expected me to use my real name, or a version thereof, so I did. But actually, MEP is only used professionally, so in a way it has morphed into my pseudonym. I have an altogether different name for “everyday” non-author use.

    Reply
  9. So interesting to know the origins of your Miranda Jarrett name. Love the background!
    I’ve always wanted a pseudonym, it seemed so cool, like being a spy. But because my early books came out in hardcover, the Powers all expected me to use my real name, or a version thereof, so I did. But actually, MEP is only used professionally, so in a way it has morphed into my pseudonym. I have an altogether different name for “everyday” non-author use.

    Reply
  10. Well, I totally get the reasons why authors might want to have mulitple writing names, but I personally think it’s really isn’t necessary. Either way, if there is a particular set of writing that I don’t normally read, I won’t whichever name is on the cover. But on the other hand, if I truly love the author, then I might want to try out the other types, even if if it is a theme I don’t normally read — and if I’m not aware of another name, then I can’t. Hope that makes some sense there. LOL 🙂
    Lois

    Reply
  11. Well, I totally get the reasons why authors might want to have mulitple writing names, but I personally think it’s really isn’t necessary. Either way, if there is a particular set of writing that I don’t normally read, I won’t whichever name is on the cover. But on the other hand, if I truly love the author, then I might want to try out the other types, even if if it is a theme I don’t normally read — and if I’m not aware of another name, then I can’t. Hope that makes some sense there. LOL 🙂
    Lois

    Reply
  12. Well, I totally get the reasons why authors might want to have mulitple writing names, but I personally think it’s really isn’t necessary. Either way, if there is a particular set of writing that I don’t normally read, I won’t whichever name is on the cover. But on the other hand, if I truly love the author, then I might want to try out the other types, even if if it is a theme I don’t normally read — and if I’m not aware of another name, then I can’t. Hope that makes some sense there. LOL 🙂
    Lois

    Reply
  13. “While the wonderfully named Thea Devine and Merline Lovelace may sound like romance psudonyms, each is respectively married to Mr. Devine, and Mr. Lovelace.”
    ***************************************
    This reminds me when I wrote a trivia game on genres. The romance category was by far the least popular compared to mystery and scifi. I had a feeling it would be so I wrote what I considered easy questions like —
    Male writer Tom Huff wrote romance novels like LOVE’S TENDER FURY in the 1970s as:
    A) Jennifer Wilde
    B) Rosemary Rogers
    C) Eva Lovelace
    Everyone but one person picked C) Eva Lovelace because they thought it sounded exactly like romance writer’s name.
    I had to tell them that “Eva Lovelace” was the character that Katharine Hepburn played in her first Oscar winning role in MORNING GLORY. 😉
    My moniker is also another Hepburn character — Linda Seton in the movie HOLIDAY with Cary Grant.

    Reply
  14. “While the wonderfully named Thea Devine and Merline Lovelace may sound like romance psudonyms, each is respectively married to Mr. Devine, and Mr. Lovelace.”
    ***************************************
    This reminds me when I wrote a trivia game on genres. The romance category was by far the least popular compared to mystery and scifi. I had a feeling it would be so I wrote what I considered easy questions like —
    Male writer Tom Huff wrote romance novels like LOVE’S TENDER FURY in the 1970s as:
    A) Jennifer Wilde
    B) Rosemary Rogers
    C) Eva Lovelace
    Everyone but one person picked C) Eva Lovelace because they thought it sounded exactly like romance writer’s name.
    I had to tell them that “Eva Lovelace” was the character that Katharine Hepburn played in her first Oscar winning role in MORNING GLORY. 😉
    My moniker is also another Hepburn character — Linda Seton in the movie HOLIDAY with Cary Grant.

    Reply
  15. “While the wonderfully named Thea Devine and Merline Lovelace may sound like romance psudonyms, each is respectively married to Mr. Devine, and Mr. Lovelace.”
    ***************************************
    This reminds me when I wrote a trivia game on genres. The romance category was by far the least popular compared to mystery and scifi. I had a feeling it would be so I wrote what I considered easy questions like —
    Male writer Tom Huff wrote romance novels like LOVE’S TENDER FURY in the 1970s as:
    A) Jennifer Wilde
    B) Rosemary Rogers
    C) Eva Lovelace
    Everyone but one person picked C) Eva Lovelace because they thought it sounded exactly like romance writer’s name.
    I had to tell them that “Eva Lovelace” was the character that Katharine Hepburn played in her first Oscar winning role in MORNING GLORY. 😉
    My moniker is also another Hepburn character — Linda Seton in the movie HOLIDAY with Cary Grant.

    Reply
  16. I know lots of writers who use multiple pseudonyms, and I like it. It helps me, as a reader, prepare for the kind of book I’m going to get (and getting into the right headspace can be key, IMO). And while I don’t think it’s always strictly necessary, I do think the multiple name thing can be especially handy for those writing things that are wildly divergent (like the chaptermate I have who writes both Inspirational and Erotic romances). Some writers might really want/need to keep their audiences from stumbling over each other.
    Besides, in the age of the internet it’s easy to either keep the identities far far apart, or to let folks know that multiple names are really all one writer (and then there’s the insider’s jokes, like the quote Kinley MacGregor/Sherrilyn Kenyon gave herself; I thought that was a hoot).

    Reply
  17. I know lots of writers who use multiple pseudonyms, and I like it. It helps me, as a reader, prepare for the kind of book I’m going to get (and getting into the right headspace can be key, IMO). And while I don’t think it’s always strictly necessary, I do think the multiple name thing can be especially handy for those writing things that are wildly divergent (like the chaptermate I have who writes both Inspirational and Erotic romances). Some writers might really want/need to keep their audiences from stumbling over each other.
    Besides, in the age of the internet it’s easy to either keep the identities far far apart, or to let folks know that multiple names are really all one writer (and then there’s the insider’s jokes, like the quote Kinley MacGregor/Sherrilyn Kenyon gave herself; I thought that was a hoot).

    Reply
  18. I know lots of writers who use multiple pseudonyms, and I like it. It helps me, as a reader, prepare for the kind of book I’m going to get (and getting into the right headspace can be key, IMO). And while I don’t think it’s always strictly necessary, I do think the multiple name thing can be especially handy for those writing things that are wildly divergent (like the chaptermate I have who writes both Inspirational and Erotic romances). Some writers might really want/need to keep their audiences from stumbling over each other.
    Besides, in the age of the internet it’s easy to either keep the identities far far apart, or to let folks know that multiple names are really all one writer (and then there’s the insider’s jokes, like the quote Kinley MacGregor/Sherrilyn Kenyon gave herself; I thought that was a hoot).

    Reply
  19. These thoughts remind me of a lively debate on one of the boards at last year’s NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month) session, on the topic of: should writers use their own names on their books ? If you use a pen name, is it somehow cheating or saying that deep down you are somehow ashamed of your work and want to keep a distance ?
    My own decision to use a created name for my writing life is because a)I’ve thought the idea of a nom de plume was unbelievably cool ever since I discovered the concept as a child reader (insert joke about not having matured since here), and b) In my ‘day life’ I’m involved in counselling, and I want to prevent any possiblity that clients might think I used their life as fodder for the entertainment of others.

    Reply
  20. These thoughts remind me of a lively debate on one of the boards at last year’s NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month) session, on the topic of: should writers use their own names on their books ? If you use a pen name, is it somehow cheating or saying that deep down you are somehow ashamed of your work and want to keep a distance ?
    My own decision to use a created name for my writing life is because a)I’ve thought the idea of a nom de plume was unbelievably cool ever since I discovered the concept as a child reader (insert joke about not having matured since here), and b) In my ‘day life’ I’m involved in counselling, and I want to prevent any possiblity that clients might think I used their life as fodder for the entertainment of others.

    Reply
  21. These thoughts remind me of a lively debate on one of the boards at last year’s NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month) session, on the topic of: should writers use their own names on their books ? If you use a pen name, is it somehow cheating or saying that deep down you are somehow ashamed of your work and want to keep a distance ?
    My own decision to use a created name for my writing life is because a)I’ve thought the idea of a nom de plume was unbelievably cool ever since I discovered the concept as a child reader (insert joke about not having matured since here), and b) In my ‘day life’ I’m involved in counselling, and I want to prevent any possiblity that clients might think I used their life as fodder for the entertainment of others.

    Reply
  22. I use Chase because everyone can pronounce it. Not the case with my real name. Anyway, I’m totally in favor of pen names. I think it’s espeically good for Geminis, who are evil twins to themselves from the get-go. When I’m writing, I’m Loretta Chase. The rest of the time I’m that other person. And they’re not the same person.

    Reply
  23. I use Chase because everyone can pronounce it. Not the case with my real name. Anyway, I’m totally in favor of pen names. I think it’s espeically good for Geminis, who are evil twins to themselves from the get-go. When I’m writing, I’m Loretta Chase. The rest of the time I’m that other person. And they’re not the same person.

    Reply
  24. I use Chase because everyone can pronounce it. Not the case with my real name. Anyway, I’m totally in favor of pen names. I think it’s espeically good for Geminis, who are evil twins to themselves from the get-go. When I’m writing, I’m Loretta Chase. The rest of the time I’m that other person. And they’re not the same person.

    Reply
  25. Thank you Susan/Miranda for an interesting post . . . I’ve often wondered if writers ever develop pseudonyms that are alphabetically close to a)their favorite author or b)someone whose fans they’re trying to attract–so that they’d be close by on the bookstore shelf for browsers?

    Reply
  26. Thank you Susan/Miranda for an interesting post . . . I’ve often wondered if writers ever develop pseudonyms that are alphabetically close to a)their favorite author or b)someone whose fans they’re trying to attract–so that they’d be close by on the bookstore shelf for browsers?

    Reply
  27. Thank you Susan/Miranda for an interesting post . . . I’ve often wondered if writers ever develop pseudonyms that are alphabetically close to a)their favorite author or b)someone whose fans they’re trying to attract–so that they’d be close by on the bookstore shelf for browsers?

    Reply
  28. Thanks for all the great comments…
    Seton — LOL about the Lovelace connection! It does sound so much like what people perceive to be a romance writer’s name. Though I know Merline does find that perception preferable than having cab drivers ask if she’s related to 70’s porn star Linda Lovelace.:P
    Kalen — I hadn’t heard about Kinley MacGregor/Sherrilyn Kenyon giving herself a quote, but that IS a hoot. Hmmmmm….something to consider….
    Maya — Interesting that some writers consider it somehow shameful or deceptive to have a pen-name. I guess I still share your child-reader perception; I thought it was cool, too. Having grown up with one of the top ten names of my generation (in my H.S. English class senior year, there were five Susans in a class of twenty students!), I thought it was waaaayyyy cool to finally choose a name that no one else had. Of course, now Miranda’s on all those top baby name lists, too, and Susan’s the exotic one.
    Loretta — Yes, we Gemini do know the power of the Twin Girls, Evil or otherwise. 🙂
    RevMelinda — I remember when I was first considering a psuedonym, many more romance writers had them. There were a lot of theories, too. Choose an “L” and you’d be near Johanna Lindsey. Choose a “D” or “E”, and you’d be at reader eye level in most stores. Never go with the beginning of the alphabet (too high on the shelf) or the end (too low.) I wonder if anyone still worries about that now–?
    Susan/Miranda

    Reply
  29. Thanks for all the great comments…
    Seton — LOL about the Lovelace connection! It does sound so much like what people perceive to be a romance writer’s name. Though I know Merline does find that perception preferable than having cab drivers ask if she’s related to 70’s porn star Linda Lovelace.:P
    Kalen — I hadn’t heard about Kinley MacGregor/Sherrilyn Kenyon giving herself a quote, but that IS a hoot. Hmmmmm….something to consider….
    Maya — Interesting that some writers consider it somehow shameful or deceptive to have a pen-name. I guess I still share your child-reader perception; I thought it was cool, too. Having grown up with one of the top ten names of my generation (in my H.S. English class senior year, there were five Susans in a class of twenty students!), I thought it was waaaayyyy cool to finally choose a name that no one else had. Of course, now Miranda’s on all those top baby name lists, too, and Susan’s the exotic one.
    Loretta — Yes, we Gemini do know the power of the Twin Girls, Evil or otherwise. 🙂
    RevMelinda — I remember when I was first considering a psuedonym, many more romance writers had them. There were a lot of theories, too. Choose an “L” and you’d be near Johanna Lindsey. Choose a “D” or “E”, and you’d be at reader eye level in most stores. Never go with the beginning of the alphabet (too high on the shelf) or the end (too low.) I wonder if anyone still worries about that now–?
    Susan/Miranda

    Reply
  30. Thanks for all the great comments…
    Seton — LOL about the Lovelace connection! It does sound so much like what people perceive to be a romance writer’s name. Though I know Merline does find that perception preferable than having cab drivers ask if she’s related to 70’s porn star Linda Lovelace.:P
    Kalen — I hadn’t heard about Kinley MacGregor/Sherrilyn Kenyon giving herself a quote, but that IS a hoot. Hmmmmm….something to consider….
    Maya — Interesting that some writers consider it somehow shameful or deceptive to have a pen-name. I guess I still share your child-reader perception; I thought it was cool, too. Having grown up with one of the top ten names of my generation (in my H.S. English class senior year, there were five Susans in a class of twenty students!), I thought it was waaaayyyy cool to finally choose a name that no one else had. Of course, now Miranda’s on all those top baby name lists, too, and Susan’s the exotic one.
    Loretta — Yes, we Gemini do know the power of the Twin Girls, Evil or otherwise. 🙂
    RevMelinda — I remember when I was first considering a psuedonym, many more romance writers had them. There were a lot of theories, too. Choose an “L” and you’d be near Johanna Lindsey. Choose a “D” or “E”, and you’d be at reader eye level in most stores. Never go with the beginning of the alphabet (too high on the shelf) or the end (too low.) I wonder if anyone still worries about that now–?
    Susan/Miranda

    Reply
  31. I’ve begged publishers to reduce my name to Pat Rice instead of Patricia, but apparently once you’re in the computer as one name, they hate messing with it. Should I ever develop this weird story I’m working on, I’m going to insist on a nom de plume with the letter “j” in it. It’s obviously a good letter, if you’ll take a look at the bestseller lists!
    But on a personal level, I have no memory for names. (Did you know there’s a scientific name for the inability to remember faces? I think there ought to be one for someone who has no memory banks for names. Maybe there is.) So when I meet someone who has TWO names, I get really desperate. Just trying to remember a person’s name is difficult enough, but to remember which name to call them by goes way beyond my ability to manage. It’s the written word I remember best, so both Susans would end up being their pseudonyms in my head if I didn’t know them first under their real names.

    Reply
  32. I’ve begged publishers to reduce my name to Pat Rice instead of Patricia, but apparently once you’re in the computer as one name, they hate messing with it. Should I ever develop this weird story I’m working on, I’m going to insist on a nom de plume with the letter “j” in it. It’s obviously a good letter, if you’ll take a look at the bestseller lists!
    But on a personal level, I have no memory for names. (Did you know there’s a scientific name for the inability to remember faces? I think there ought to be one for someone who has no memory banks for names. Maybe there is.) So when I meet someone who has TWO names, I get really desperate. Just trying to remember a person’s name is difficult enough, but to remember which name to call them by goes way beyond my ability to manage. It’s the written word I remember best, so both Susans would end up being their pseudonyms in my head if I didn’t know them first under their real names.

    Reply
  33. I’ve begged publishers to reduce my name to Pat Rice instead of Patricia, but apparently once you’re in the computer as one name, they hate messing with it. Should I ever develop this weird story I’m working on, I’m going to insist on a nom de plume with the letter “j” in it. It’s obviously a good letter, if you’ll take a look at the bestseller lists!
    But on a personal level, I have no memory for names. (Did you know there’s a scientific name for the inability to remember faces? I think there ought to be one for someone who has no memory banks for names. Maybe there is.) So when I meet someone who has TWO names, I get really desperate. Just trying to remember a person’s name is difficult enough, but to remember which name to call them by goes way beyond my ability to manage. It’s the written word I remember best, so both Susans would end up being their pseudonyms in my head if I didn’t know them first under their real names.

    Reply
  34. As a Layton and as a Felber, and as a Gemini, we applaud the use of two names for book publishing or anything else.
    How nice to make use of both personalities without being put on medication!
    (insert smiley emoticon here)
    Thanks,
    us

    Reply
  35. As a Layton and as a Felber, and as a Gemini, we applaud the use of two names for book publishing or anything else.
    How nice to make use of both personalities without being put on medication!
    (insert smiley emoticon here)
    Thanks,
    us

    Reply
  36. As a Layton and as a Felber, and as a Gemini, we applaud the use of two names for book publishing or anything else.
    How nice to make use of both personalities without being put on medication!
    (insert smiley emoticon here)
    Thanks,
    us

    Reply

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