Peak Performance—the oldest golf club in Switzerland!

SamadenAndrea/Cara here, As many of you may have noticed, some of us Wenches have gallivanted hither and yon this summer and have been taking you on a virtual tour of our travels to historic places. (Trust me, your armchairs are SO much more comfortable than airline seats, and you don’t have to stand in security lines!) I’m going to continue the peregrinations today, but with a slightly different twist. I’m the resident Wench “jock,” so today instead of visiting castles or museums or Viking ruins, we’ll be taking a peek at some sporting history!

I just returned from playing golf at the oldest course in Switzerland (and the seventh oldest course in continental Europe.) The Engadine Golf Club, located a short drive from the legendary mountain resort village of St. Moritz, is not only set in a breathtaking beautiful setting, but it also has a fascinating history . . . so let’s tee it up and hit the fairways!

IMG_6808It all started with a letter. In 1890, the local St. Moritz newspaper published a letter—signed simply as “a golfer”—asking why there wasn’t golf in the valley to provide a summer sporting activity for visitors. A good question, thought Conradin Flugi von Aspermont, a local entrepreneur who was a pioneering force in bringing tourism to the remote Swiss mountains. During a visit to Great Britain, he had fallen in love with the game, and decided to bring a piece of the “auld sod” to the alpine meadows of the Engadine region. (The Engadine is a picturesque high valley that runs through the eastern Swiss Alps) 

Historisches Bild2The neighboring village of Samaden granted permission to the Hotel Bernina, now the legendary Badrutt’s Palace Hotel, to build an 18-hole golf course. (If you ever want to splurge on a memorable travel experience, I highly recommend Badrutt's. It's one of those historic grande dame hotel with glorious amenities and discreet service that makes you feel like royalty . . .even when you're not!) The first 9 holes were finished in 1891, and the first little white balls flew into the mountain air on August 15th. The yearly membership cost 25 Swiss francs, and visitors could play for 1 franc.

IMG_6785The Engadine Golf Club was founded two years later, in 1893, and in celebration held both a men’s and women’s tournament. (I looking at old photos, I decided that the women win not only style points but have some very powerful-looking swings. I’d like to see their scorecards matched up against those of the men!) Prince Henry of Prussia was an early member, and the Duke of Windsor, another avid golfer, was also a frequent visitor, both before and after his abdication.

Poster-oly-28-moritz-2The Swiss canton of Graubünden (or Grisons) really changed the game in 1923, when it voted to allow touring and luxury cars to travel on certain roads. St Moritz (population 710) and Samaden suddenly were suddenly more accessible to visitors,a and their glorious sunshine, and year-round outdoor sports soon made them the darlings of the . . . well, not quite jet set—but that was to come. St. Moritz hosted the Winter Olympics in 1928 (and again in 1948) and soon became the gold medal favorite destination of the glitterati. Today it’s an iconic enclave of uber-chic (I was picked up at the railway station by Badrutt’s Palace’s vintage Rolls-Royce, whose previous owner was Queen Elizabeth!)

And yet, despite all the hoopla, the Engadine Golf Club retains its rustic charm. Until 1984, cows continued to graze loose on the fairways. However it became so costly to clean up the droppings, that the club decided it was cheaper to pay the farmer to take their cows to munch elsewhere! (Like atop a mountain! As you see, I was doing chocolate research! No wonder Swiss goodies taste so good!)
IMG_6910

IMG_6786So that’s a very quick glimpse at one of the countless hidden little gems around the world that have a fun backstory. Which brings me to a personal aside . . . I know there are a lot of people who think golf is a silly game so you may be wondering why I’m talking about it? Well, allow me to explain.

IMG_6802For me, golf and a good book have a lot in common. Open the covers and turn to the first page—this is, start walking down the first fairway, and suddenly the nuances of language start to draw you in. Language in golf means the landscape itself. Every course is different, and its setting—ocean, mountain desert, parkland—is its genre. Within that genre, the individuality—the contours, the subtle slopes and dips, the twists and turns—speak in an infinite variety of voices.

Kopie von Historisches Bild3A famous golf architect has written a book called Listening to the Land, and the best courses do just that. They fit in and use the topography to challenge, to inspire and yes, to bedevil a player. I love how the game makes you look at the terrain more closely. You need to be aware of the wind, subtle tilt of the greens and how that will make the ball roll. Is there dew on the grass or is there water nearby, which affects the grain of the greens because grass bends toward water? You have to be in the moment and really LOOK. So few things these days encourage you to do that.

IMG_6796And in between hitting the ball, you have time to walk and appreciate the way the light dances through the tall grasses, and how the birds fish in the lagoons. I love the challenge of trying to execute a shot. But most importantly, I love how it connects me to Nature and encourages me to take a deep breath and be aware of everything going on around me.

IMG_6811So what outdoor activity are you passionate about? I’m not a gardener (I don’t have the patience) or a fly fisherman (it’s a little too passive for me) but I understand the passion to those activities. I love hiking for the same reason I love golf. Now it’s your turn to wax poetic about what moves you about the outdoors!

85 thoughts on “Peak Performance—the oldest golf club in Switzerland!”

  1. I love gardening. I find it very relaxing. Sadly between the weather here in Ireland this year and personal troubles I just haven’t had the time for it. So my garden is a sorry sight at the moment. I also love walking. Usually on the beach but recently I started using a lovely walk way we have nearby. Again, relaxing and it gives me some ‘me time’ which I don’t have a lot of.
    Enjoyable post.

    Reply
  2. I love gardening. I find it very relaxing. Sadly between the weather here in Ireland this year and personal troubles I just haven’t had the time for it. So my garden is a sorry sight at the moment. I also love walking. Usually on the beach but recently I started using a lovely walk way we have nearby. Again, relaxing and it gives me some ‘me time’ which I don’t have a lot of.
    Enjoyable post.

    Reply
  3. I love gardening. I find it very relaxing. Sadly between the weather here in Ireland this year and personal troubles I just haven’t had the time for it. So my garden is a sorry sight at the moment. I also love walking. Usually on the beach but recently I started using a lovely walk way we have nearby. Again, relaxing and it gives me some ‘me time’ which I don’t have a lot of.
    Enjoyable post.

    Reply
  4. I love gardening. I find it very relaxing. Sadly between the weather here in Ireland this year and personal troubles I just haven’t had the time for it. So my garden is a sorry sight at the moment. I also love walking. Usually on the beach but recently I started using a lovely walk way we have nearby. Again, relaxing and it gives me some ‘me time’ which I don’t have a lot of.
    Enjoyable post.

    Reply
  5. I love gardening. I find it very relaxing. Sadly between the weather here in Ireland this year and personal troubles I just haven’t had the time for it. So my garden is a sorry sight at the moment. I also love walking. Usually on the beach but recently I started using a lovely walk way we have nearby. Again, relaxing and it gives me some ‘me time’ which I don’t have a lot of.
    Enjoyable post.

    Reply
  6. Teresa, I totally understand how gardening is both relaxing, connecting to Nature and so fulfilling when you see a concept take shape. I wish I had the temperament to do it. But I don’t! I’m way too impatient to see results! But I’m so glad there are people who love it.I galdly enjoy the fruits of their labor.
    Walking (I love a beach too) is a special Me Time for me too. I think it really recharges one’s resilience to everyday stress.
    Sending more hugs on the personal troubles. Losing a loved one is so hard.

    Reply
  7. Teresa, I totally understand how gardening is both relaxing, connecting to Nature and so fulfilling when you see a concept take shape. I wish I had the temperament to do it. But I don’t! I’m way too impatient to see results! But I’m so glad there are people who love it.I galdly enjoy the fruits of their labor.
    Walking (I love a beach too) is a special Me Time for me too. I think it really recharges one’s resilience to everyday stress.
    Sending more hugs on the personal troubles. Losing a loved one is so hard.

    Reply
  8. Teresa, I totally understand how gardening is both relaxing, connecting to Nature and so fulfilling when you see a concept take shape. I wish I had the temperament to do it. But I don’t! I’m way too impatient to see results! But I’m so glad there are people who love it.I galdly enjoy the fruits of their labor.
    Walking (I love a beach too) is a special Me Time for me too. I think it really recharges one’s resilience to everyday stress.
    Sending more hugs on the personal troubles. Losing a loved one is so hard.

    Reply
  9. Teresa, I totally understand how gardening is both relaxing, connecting to Nature and so fulfilling when you see a concept take shape. I wish I had the temperament to do it. But I don’t! I’m way too impatient to see results! But I’m so glad there are people who love it.I galdly enjoy the fruits of their labor.
    Walking (I love a beach too) is a special Me Time for me too. I think it really recharges one’s resilience to everyday stress.
    Sending more hugs on the personal troubles. Losing a loved one is so hard.

    Reply
  10. Teresa, I totally understand how gardening is both relaxing, connecting to Nature and so fulfilling when you see a concept take shape. I wish I had the temperament to do it. But I don’t! I’m way too impatient to see results! But I’m so glad there are people who love it.I galdly enjoy the fruits of their labor.
    Walking (I love a beach too) is a special Me Time for me too. I think it really recharges one’s resilience to everyday stress.
    Sending more hugs on the personal troubles. Losing a loved one is so hard.

    Reply
  11. Thank you for this post. I have never understood the allure of golfing, but you have opened my eyes to view it another way.
    I don’t have any particular favorite outdoor activity, I just love watching nature any way I can.

    Reply
  12. Thank you for this post. I have never understood the allure of golfing, but you have opened my eyes to view it another way.
    I don’t have any particular favorite outdoor activity, I just love watching nature any way I can.

    Reply
  13. Thank you for this post. I have never understood the allure of golfing, but you have opened my eyes to view it another way.
    I don’t have any particular favorite outdoor activity, I just love watching nature any way I can.

    Reply
  14. Thank you for this post. I have never understood the allure of golfing, but you have opened my eyes to view it another way.
    I don’t have any particular favorite outdoor activity, I just love watching nature any way I can.

    Reply
  15. Thank you for this post. I have never understood the allure of golfing, but you have opened my eyes to view it another way.
    I don’t have any particular favorite outdoor activity, I just love watching nature any way I can.

    Reply
  16. Andrea, what a lovely paean to how golf connects you to the land! I will totally leave the athletics to you. *G* I wouldn’t say I’m much of a garden, but I love tending the flowers on my deck in the summer. I water, I deadhead, I fight back the sweet potato vines, which have gone a little mad this summer. In the process, I notice the breezes, the birds, and the cats inside the screened porch who would like to come in and join me!

    Reply
  17. Andrea, what a lovely paean to how golf connects you to the land! I will totally leave the athletics to you. *G* I wouldn’t say I’m much of a garden, but I love tending the flowers on my deck in the summer. I water, I deadhead, I fight back the sweet potato vines, which have gone a little mad this summer. In the process, I notice the breezes, the birds, and the cats inside the screened porch who would like to come in and join me!

    Reply
  18. Andrea, what a lovely paean to how golf connects you to the land! I will totally leave the athletics to you. *G* I wouldn’t say I’m much of a garden, but I love tending the flowers on my deck in the summer. I water, I deadhead, I fight back the sweet potato vines, which have gone a little mad this summer. In the process, I notice the breezes, the birds, and the cats inside the screened porch who would like to come in and join me!

    Reply
  19. Andrea, what a lovely paean to how golf connects you to the land! I will totally leave the athletics to you. *G* I wouldn’t say I’m much of a garden, but I love tending the flowers on my deck in the summer. I water, I deadhead, I fight back the sweet potato vines, which have gone a little mad this summer. In the process, I notice the breezes, the birds, and the cats inside the screened porch who would like to come in and join me!

    Reply
  20. Andrea, what a lovely paean to how golf connects you to the land! I will totally leave the athletics to you. *G* I wouldn’t say I’m much of a garden, but I love tending the flowers on my deck in the summer. I water, I deadhead, I fight back the sweet potato vines, which have gone a little mad this summer. In the process, I notice the breezes, the birds, and the cats inside the screened porch who would like to come in and join me!

    Reply
  21. Before old age has turned me virtually housebound, I used to garden and I used to walk. I am working very diligently to attempt to build up my strength, so I can return to walking (and perhaps to limited gardening.)
    Alas, golfing is NOT for me (I have the world’s WORSE hand-eye coordination), but it has always seemed to me a wonderful excuse for a planned walk — and increasing you ability with ball would be an added thrill.

    Reply
  22. Before old age has turned me virtually housebound, I used to garden and I used to walk. I am working very diligently to attempt to build up my strength, so I can return to walking (and perhaps to limited gardening.)
    Alas, golfing is NOT for me (I have the world’s WORSE hand-eye coordination), but it has always seemed to me a wonderful excuse for a planned walk — and increasing you ability with ball would be an added thrill.

    Reply
  23. Before old age has turned me virtually housebound, I used to garden and I used to walk. I am working very diligently to attempt to build up my strength, so I can return to walking (and perhaps to limited gardening.)
    Alas, golfing is NOT for me (I have the world’s WORSE hand-eye coordination), but it has always seemed to me a wonderful excuse for a planned walk — and increasing you ability with ball would be an added thrill.

    Reply
  24. Before old age has turned me virtually housebound, I used to garden and I used to walk. I am working very diligently to attempt to build up my strength, so I can return to walking (and perhaps to limited gardening.)
    Alas, golfing is NOT for me (I have the world’s WORSE hand-eye coordination), but it has always seemed to me a wonderful excuse for a planned walk — and increasing you ability with ball would be an added thrill.

    Reply
  25. Before old age has turned me virtually housebound, I used to garden and I used to walk. I am working very diligently to attempt to build up my strength, so I can return to walking (and perhaps to limited gardening.)
    Alas, golfing is NOT for me (I have the world’s WORSE hand-eye coordination), but it has always seemed to me a wonderful excuse for a planned walk — and increasing you ability with ball would be an added thrill.

    Reply
  26. Sue, good luck with the strengthening. I really think you’re never too old to do some gentle exercises, and see improvements. Many local Ys and gyms have classes geared for seniors and it might be worth a visit to see if you like it.
    Mark Twain called golf “a good walk spoiled”! There are day I agree, when the ball is flying in all directions. But not really, because I don’t take it seriously and just enjoy being out there.

    Reply
  27. Sue, good luck with the strengthening. I really think you’re never too old to do some gentle exercises, and see improvements. Many local Ys and gyms have classes geared for seniors and it might be worth a visit to see if you like it.
    Mark Twain called golf “a good walk spoiled”! There are day I agree, when the ball is flying in all directions. But not really, because I don’t take it seriously and just enjoy being out there.

    Reply
  28. Sue, good luck with the strengthening. I really think you’re never too old to do some gentle exercises, and see improvements. Many local Ys and gyms have classes geared for seniors and it might be worth a visit to see if you like it.
    Mark Twain called golf “a good walk spoiled”! There are day I agree, when the ball is flying in all directions. But not really, because I don’t take it seriously and just enjoy being out there.

    Reply
  29. Sue, good luck with the strengthening. I really think you’re never too old to do some gentle exercises, and see improvements. Many local Ys and gyms have classes geared for seniors and it might be worth a visit to see if you like it.
    Mark Twain called golf “a good walk spoiled”! There are day I agree, when the ball is flying in all directions. But not really, because I don’t take it seriously and just enjoy being out there.

    Reply
  30. Sue, good luck with the strengthening. I really think you’re never too old to do some gentle exercises, and see improvements. Many local Ys and gyms have classes geared for seniors and it might be worth a visit to see if you like it.
    Mark Twain called golf “a good walk spoiled”! There are day I agree, when the ball is flying in all directions. But not really, because I don’t take it seriously and just enjoy being out there.

    Reply
  31. Loved the post Andrea. Although I’m not a golfer, I have enjoyed walking across the links at many beautiful courses.
    When in my physical prime I played soccer, cricket and squash. Some people say that winning is less important than enjoying the game but I always played to win! I think the physical exertion produces endorphins, leading to a feeling of well being which is enhanced by winning! Like golf courses, many cricket grounds are located in beautiful surroundings. My favorite is the ground at Lynmouth (north Devon coast) in the valley of rocks. If you play there you may be watched by the many wild goats grazing the hill sides.
    Nowadays I exercise by hill walking. When in the hills one can be far away from the crowds and enjoy glorious natural scenery. In the UK we are extremely lucky to have very varied scenery over short distances. For example on the Lakeland fells the views are simply breathtaking. One can spend a day on the tops and then next day stroll through beautiful valleys and lakes …. weather permitting!
    At home I spend a lot of time in my garden. Being close to plants has a very calming effect and experimenting with different planting and color schemes is quite fascinating. I have recently erected some arches to support various climbers, particularly roses. Walking through a tunnel of roses takes one to a different ‘room’ of the garden. My wife and I also frequently visit gardens in historic houses, comparing my efforts with the work of some of the great gardeners. Last week we went to Hidcote Manor Garden, created by the American Lawrence Johnston. The garden is designed as a series of ‘rooms’ and we were particularly impressed by the fuschia garden … the next project for my own garden!

    Reply
  32. Loved the post Andrea. Although I’m not a golfer, I have enjoyed walking across the links at many beautiful courses.
    When in my physical prime I played soccer, cricket and squash. Some people say that winning is less important than enjoying the game but I always played to win! I think the physical exertion produces endorphins, leading to a feeling of well being which is enhanced by winning! Like golf courses, many cricket grounds are located in beautiful surroundings. My favorite is the ground at Lynmouth (north Devon coast) in the valley of rocks. If you play there you may be watched by the many wild goats grazing the hill sides.
    Nowadays I exercise by hill walking. When in the hills one can be far away from the crowds and enjoy glorious natural scenery. In the UK we are extremely lucky to have very varied scenery over short distances. For example on the Lakeland fells the views are simply breathtaking. One can spend a day on the tops and then next day stroll through beautiful valleys and lakes …. weather permitting!
    At home I spend a lot of time in my garden. Being close to plants has a very calming effect and experimenting with different planting and color schemes is quite fascinating. I have recently erected some arches to support various climbers, particularly roses. Walking through a tunnel of roses takes one to a different ‘room’ of the garden. My wife and I also frequently visit gardens in historic houses, comparing my efforts with the work of some of the great gardeners. Last week we went to Hidcote Manor Garden, created by the American Lawrence Johnston. The garden is designed as a series of ‘rooms’ and we were particularly impressed by the fuschia garden … the next project for my own garden!

    Reply
  33. Loved the post Andrea. Although I’m not a golfer, I have enjoyed walking across the links at many beautiful courses.
    When in my physical prime I played soccer, cricket and squash. Some people say that winning is less important than enjoying the game but I always played to win! I think the physical exertion produces endorphins, leading to a feeling of well being which is enhanced by winning! Like golf courses, many cricket grounds are located in beautiful surroundings. My favorite is the ground at Lynmouth (north Devon coast) in the valley of rocks. If you play there you may be watched by the many wild goats grazing the hill sides.
    Nowadays I exercise by hill walking. When in the hills one can be far away from the crowds and enjoy glorious natural scenery. In the UK we are extremely lucky to have very varied scenery over short distances. For example on the Lakeland fells the views are simply breathtaking. One can spend a day on the tops and then next day stroll through beautiful valleys and lakes …. weather permitting!
    At home I spend a lot of time in my garden. Being close to plants has a very calming effect and experimenting with different planting and color schemes is quite fascinating. I have recently erected some arches to support various climbers, particularly roses. Walking through a tunnel of roses takes one to a different ‘room’ of the garden. My wife and I also frequently visit gardens in historic houses, comparing my efforts with the work of some of the great gardeners. Last week we went to Hidcote Manor Garden, created by the American Lawrence Johnston. The garden is designed as a series of ‘rooms’ and we were particularly impressed by the fuschia garden … the next project for my own garden!

    Reply
  34. Loved the post Andrea. Although I’m not a golfer, I have enjoyed walking across the links at many beautiful courses.
    When in my physical prime I played soccer, cricket and squash. Some people say that winning is less important than enjoying the game but I always played to win! I think the physical exertion produces endorphins, leading to a feeling of well being which is enhanced by winning! Like golf courses, many cricket grounds are located in beautiful surroundings. My favorite is the ground at Lynmouth (north Devon coast) in the valley of rocks. If you play there you may be watched by the many wild goats grazing the hill sides.
    Nowadays I exercise by hill walking. When in the hills one can be far away from the crowds and enjoy glorious natural scenery. In the UK we are extremely lucky to have very varied scenery over short distances. For example on the Lakeland fells the views are simply breathtaking. One can spend a day on the tops and then next day stroll through beautiful valleys and lakes …. weather permitting!
    At home I spend a lot of time in my garden. Being close to plants has a very calming effect and experimenting with different planting and color schemes is quite fascinating. I have recently erected some arches to support various climbers, particularly roses. Walking through a tunnel of roses takes one to a different ‘room’ of the garden. My wife and I also frequently visit gardens in historic houses, comparing my efforts with the work of some of the great gardeners. Last week we went to Hidcote Manor Garden, created by the American Lawrence Johnston. The garden is designed as a series of ‘rooms’ and we were particularly impressed by the fuschia garden … the next project for my own garden!

    Reply
  35. Loved the post Andrea. Although I’m not a golfer, I have enjoyed walking across the links at many beautiful courses.
    When in my physical prime I played soccer, cricket and squash. Some people say that winning is less important than enjoying the game but I always played to win! I think the physical exertion produces endorphins, leading to a feeling of well being which is enhanced by winning! Like golf courses, many cricket grounds are located in beautiful surroundings. My favorite is the ground at Lynmouth (north Devon coast) in the valley of rocks. If you play there you may be watched by the many wild goats grazing the hill sides.
    Nowadays I exercise by hill walking. When in the hills one can be far away from the crowds and enjoy glorious natural scenery. In the UK we are extremely lucky to have very varied scenery over short distances. For example on the Lakeland fells the views are simply breathtaking. One can spend a day on the tops and then next day stroll through beautiful valleys and lakes …. weather permitting!
    At home I spend a lot of time in my garden. Being close to plants has a very calming effect and experimenting with different planting and color schemes is quite fascinating. I have recently erected some arches to support various climbers, particularly roses. Walking through a tunnel of roses takes one to a different ‘room’ of the garden. My wife and I also frequently visit gardens in historic houses, comparing my efforts with the work of some of the great gardeners. Last week we went to Hidcote Manor Garden, created by the American Lawrence Johnston. The garden is designed as a series of ‘rooms’ and we were particularly impressed by the fuschia garden … the next project for my own garden!

    Reply
  36. What a great comparison between golfing and reading. I enjoy walking myself, unfortunately I don’t do enough of it! Thank you for sharing your joy of golf and of the beautiful course in Switzerland.

    Reply
  37. What a great comparison between golfing and reading. I enjoy walking myself, unfortunately I don’t do enough of it! Thank you for sharing your joy of golf and of the beautiful course in Switzerland.

    Reply
  38. What a great comparison between golfing and reading. I enjoy walking myself, unfortunately I don’t do enough of it! Thank you for sharing your joy of golf and of the beautiful course in Switzerland.

    Reply
  39. What a great comparison between golfing and reading. I enjoy walking myself, unfortunately I don’t do enough of it! Thank you for sharing your joy of golf and of the beautiful course in Switzerland.

    Reply
  40. What a great comparison between golfing and reading. I enjoy walking myself, unfortunately I don’t do enough of it! Thank you for sharing your joy of golf and of the beautiful course in Switzerland.

    Reply
  41. Walking (and or hiking), birding and gardening are all ways I enjoy being outside and being “One with” nature. I used to be obsessive about gardening but now I just putter and find it more fun that way. When I’m outside I’m always watching the interaction between the critters, insects, plants, shadows, etc. Always fascinating.
    I do try to pay attention to the micro elements when I’m out. How a big shady area is cooler in the middle than on the edges. How the temperature drops when you drive into a forest area. How the leaves stir and dance like crazy before it rains. Actually long before it rains so that it gives you a clue (if you pay attention) that it is about to rain.
    What a fun fact to know that grass bends towards water. I’ll have to try to remember that next time I’m near a stream or pond and check it out.

    Reply
  42. Walking (and or hiking), birding and gardening are all ways I enjoy being outside and being “One with” nature. I used to be obsessive about gardening but now I just putter and find it more fun that way. When I’m outside I’m always watching the interaction between the critters, insects, plants, shadows, etc. Always fascinating.
    I do try to pay attention to the micro elements when I’m out. How a big shady area is cooler in the middle than on the edges. How the temperature drops when you drive into a forest area. How the leaves stir and dance like crazy before it rains. Actually long before it rains so that it gives you a clue (if you pay attention) that it is about to rain.
    What a fun fact to know that grass bends towards water. I’ll have to try to remember that next time I’m near a stream or pond and check it out.

    Reply
  43. Walking (and or hiking), birding and gardening are all ways I enjoy being outside and being “One with” nature. I used to be obsessive about gardening but now I just putter and find it more fun that way. When I’m outside I’m always watching the interaction between the critters, insects, plants, shadows, etc. Always fascinating.
    I do try to pay attention to the micro elements when I’m out. How a big shady area is cooler in the middle than on the edges. How the temperature drops when you drive into a forest area. How the leaves stir and dance like crazy before it rains. Actually long before it rains so that it gives you a clue (if you pay attention) that it is about to rain.
    What a fun fact to know that grass bends towards water. I’ll have to try to remember that next time I’m near a stream or pond and check it out.

    Reply
  44. Walking (and or hiking), birding and gardening are all ways I enjoy being outside and being “One with” nature. I used to be obsessive about gardening but now I just putter and find it more fun that way. When I’m outside I’m always watching the interaction between the critters, insects, plants, shadows, etc. Always fascinating.
    I do try to pay attention to the micro elements when I’m out. How a big shady area is cooler in the middle than on the edges. How the temperature drops when you drive into a forest area. How the leaves stir and dance like crazy before it rains. Actually long before it rains so that it gives you a clue (if you pay attention) that it is about to rain.
    What a fun fact to know that grass bends towards water. I’ll have to try to remember that next time I’m near a stream or pond and check it out.

    Reply
  45. Walking (and or hiking), birding and gardening are all ways I enjoy being outside and being “One with” nature. I used to be obsessive about gardening but now I just putter and find it more fun that way. When I’m outside I’m always watching the interaction between the critters, insects, plants, shadows, etc. Always fascinating.
    I do try to pay attention to the micro elements when I’m out. How a big shady area is cooler in the middle than on the edges. How the temperature drops when you drive into a forest area. How the leaves stir and dance like crazy before it rains. Actually long before it rains so that it gives you a clue (if you pay attention) that it is about to rain.
    What a fun fact to know that grass bends towards water. I’ll have to try to remember that next time I’m near a stream or pond and check it out.

    Reply
  46. I’ve never golfed. I do enjoy walking, hiking and gardening. Hiking in the woods especially, I take note of all the trees, flowers, mushrooms, rocks, and any other interesting things. And if it’s a hilly area hopefully there are some nice views along the way.

    Reply
  47. I’ve never golfed. I do enjoy walking, hiking and gardening. Hiking in the woods especially, I take note of all the trees, flowers, mushrooms, rocks, and any other interesting things. And if it’s a hilly area hopefully there are some nice views along the way.

    Reply
  48. I’ve never golfed. I do enjoy walking, hiking and gardening. Hiking in the woods especially, I take note of all the trees, flowers, mushrooms, rocks, and any other interesting things. And if it’s a hilly area hopefully there are some nice views along the way.

    Reply
  49. I’ve never golfed. I do enjoy walking, hiking and gardening. Hiking in the woods especially, I take note of all the trees, flowers, mushrooms, rocks, and any other interesting things. And if it’s a hilly area hopefully there are some nice views along the way.

    Reply
  50. I’ve never golfed. I do enjoy walking, hiking and gardening. Hiking in the woods especially, I take note of all the trees, flowers, mushrooms, rocks, and any other interesting things. And if it’s a hilly area hopefully there are some nice views along the way.

    Reply
  51. Well, we are so much on the same wavelength, Quantum! I played squash quite seriously for a while (I loved the cerebral challenge of the game, with all its angles) and yes, I do like competition too.
    It does get the juices flowing. I took up golf too late in life to ever be really good at it, so have mellowed my expectations and shrug off a bad round by concentrating on the natural beauty around me.
    Love the description of the cricket grounds with the goats. I’ve played on golf courses in the UK where sheep (dis)interested spectators.
    I love hiking too, and was able to some lovely walking through the Alps.
    I totally get show gardening is very relaxing and restorative. Your arches sound wonderful! Keep us all posted on the fuschia project!

    Reply
  52. Well, we are so much on the same wavelength, Quantum! I played squash quite seriously for a while (I loved the cerebral challenge of the game, with all its angles) and yes, I do like competition too.
    It does get the juices flowing. I took up golf too late in life to ever be really good at it, so have mellowed my expectations and shrug off a bad round by concentrating on the natural beauty around me.
    Love the description of the cricket grounds with the goats. I’ve played on golf courses in the UK where sheep (dis)interested spectators.
    I love hiking too, and was able to some lovely walking through the Alps.
    I totally get show gardening is very relaxing and restorative. Your arches sound wonderful! Keep us all posted on the fuschia project!

    Reply
  53. Well, we are so much on the same wavelength, Quantum! I played squash quite seriously for a while (I loved the cerebral challenge of the game, with all its angles) and yes, I do like competition too.
    It does get the juices flowing. I took up golf too late in life to ever be really good at it, so have mellowed my expectations and shrug off a bad round by concentrating on the natural beauty around me.
    Love the description of the cricket grounds with the goats. I’ve played on golf courses in the UK where sheep (dis)interested spectators.
    I love hiking too, and was able to some lovely walking through the Alps.
    I totally get show gardening is very relaxing and restorative. Your arches sound wonderful! Keep us all posted on the fuschia project!

    Reply
  54. Well, we are so much on the same wavelength, Quantum! I played squash quite seriously for a while (I loved the cerebral challenge of the game, with all its angles) and yes, I do like competition too.
    It does get the juices flowing. I took up golf too late in life to ever be really good at it, so have mellowed my expectations and shrug off a bad round by concentrating on the natural beauty around me.
    Love the description of the cricket grounds with the goats. I’ve played on golf courses in the UK where sheep (dis)interested spectators.
    I love hiking too, and was able to some lovely walking through the Alps.
    I totally get show gardening is very relaxing and restorative. Your arches sound wonderful! Keep us all posted on the fuschia project!

    Reply
  55. Well, we are so much on the same wavelength, Quantum! I played squash quite seriously for a while (I loved the cerebral challenge of the game, with all its angles) and yes, I do like competition too.
    It does get the juices flowing. I took up golf too late in life to ever be really good at it, so have mellowed my expectations and shrug off a bad round by concentrating on the natural beauty around me.
    Love the description of the cricket grounds with the goats. I’ve played on golf courses in the UK where sheep (dis)interested spectators.
    I love hiking too, and was able to some lovely walking through the Alps.
    I totally get show gardening is very relaxing and restorative. Your arches sound wonderful! Keep us all posted on the fuschia project!

    Reply
  56. Glad to hear that you, too, find a joy in watching all the tiny interactions of Nature, like the bugs and birds and various critters, as well as the shadows and textures. I think being aware of the world around us makes us appreciate nuances, which in this day of cyber-obsession is becoming a lost art. I love your description of noticing that rain is coming. I think we should all pay more attention to seeing things like this.

    Reply
  57. Glad to hear that you, too, find a joy in watching all the tiny interactions of Nature, like the bugs and birds and various critters, as well as the shadows and textures. I think being aware of the world around us makes us appreciate nuances, which in this day of cyber-obsession is becoming a lost art. I love your description of noticing that rain is coming. I think we should all pay more attention to seeing things like this.

    Reply
  58. Glad to hear that you, too, find a joy in watching all the tiny interactions of Nature, like the bugs and birds and various critters, as well as the shadows and textures. I think being aware of the world around us makes us appreciate nuances, which in this day of cyber-obsession is becoming a lost art. I love your description of noticing that rain is coming. I think we should all pay more attention to seeing things like this.

    Reply
  59. Glad to hear that you, too, find a joy in watching all the tiny interactions of Nature, like the bugs and birds and various critters, as well as the shadows and textures. I think being aware of the world around us makes us appreciate nuances, which in this day of cyber-obsession is becoming a lost art. I love your description of noticing that rain is coming. I think we should all pay more attention to seeing things like this.

    Reply
  60. Glad to hear that you, too, find a joy in watching all the tiny interactions of Nature, like the bugs and birds and various critters, as well as the shadows and textures. I think being aware of the world around us makes us appreciate nuances, which in this day of cyber-obsession is becoming a lost art. I love your description of noticing that rain is coming. I think we should all pay more attention to seeing things like this.

    Reply

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