Peacocks!

PeacockSpring is advancing which means that in villages and stately homes across the length and breadth of the British Isles the mournful cry of the peacock will start to ring out, followed by various news stories about how bad-tempered and/or exhausted peacocks have been causing havoc. Last year there was Kevin, a mischievous peacock causing mayhem in a Derbyshire village, then we heard about Henry the peacock who was so tired of being the only male in a flock of peahens (exhausting work!) that he flew away for some rest.

The peacock is a familiar sight at many of our stately homes in the UK. This one was displaying Peacock 1 for us at Corsham Court in Wiltshire when we visited. The peacock is a native bird to India and was probably introduced into Britain by the Romans. It has many sacred connotations. The name derives from the Old English and the earliest example of it referred to in writing comes from 1300: “Foure and xxti wild ges and a poucock.” In the 14th century Chaucer first used the word to describe ostentatious people who strutted about and it still carries this meaning to this day. In art a peacock feather in a painting was used as a symbol of pride and vanity.

Roast peacockI’ve been trying to discover how peacocks first became associated with stately homes.  Perhaps it was their designer plumage that the lord of the manor first identified with. Or perhaps it was simply that they were popular to eat at medieval banquets and a peacock on a table was a sign of wealth. Peacock pie was traditionally a Christmas dish at an aristocratic table despite the fact that the meat was supposedly rather tough. The one in this painting is looking rather perky for a bird that has been roasted!

The medieval popularity of the peacock led to a rather curious order of chivalry, “the vow of the Pavane peacock” whereby knights dedicated themselves to pursuing the virtues of honour, valour, generosity, compassion and wisdom. The ornamented their helmets with the bird’s feathers.  The Elizabethans named the pavane, a stately dance during which ladies’ gowns trailed along the floor behind them like peacocks’ tails, after the Spanish word for the bird and the Arbuthnot family crest features a peacock. As a surname it either derives from someone who was originally a peacock-keeper or a nickname to suggest a man who was a bit of a dandy or, curiously, the reverse!

352378Definitely the most important thing about the peacock is its appearance, or at least that of the male of the species. They are adorned with a spectacular fan of rear (not strictly tail) feathers that are decorated with “eyes” and form an elaborate train used to attract females. The peahen chooses her mate on the length of his tail and the number of his eyespots. Peacocks are agile too, able to run quickly as well as fly! The peacock cannot resist showing off and will display to anyone or anything it thinks worthy of attention – as well as to peahens!

From the 17th century onward a taste for what became known as “Chinese wallpaper” flourished in Britain and peacocks became a popular motif on wall coverings of all sorts, from paper to hangings.

The other notable thing about peacocks is their call, a mournful cry you often hear echoing Peacock at Kirby Hall around the gardens at mansions or haunting the ruins of castles. When we went to Kirby Hall in Northamptonshire a couple of years ago the cry of the peacocks as they perched on the walls seemed perfect to the setting of a half-ruined Elizabethan mansion. Above is a picture of the bad-tempered Kirby peacock which would try to bite you if you got too close! it's no wonder that peacocks are associated with the gothic elements of romantic historical fiction; The Pride of the Peacock by Victoria Holt was one of my favourite books as a teenager!

 So just for a bit of fun I wonder: If you were choosing a particular bird to inhabit your garden or feature on your wallpaper – or even inspire an order of chivalry – which one would you choose?

115 thoughts on “Peacocks!”

  1. My family used to live in India, but I’m sure I’ve seen more peacocks in Europe… One of the most amazing places to see them in Europe is in the palace gardens of Isola Bella in the north of Italy, where they are entirely white (Google “Isola Bella peacocks” – amazing!). Here in Canberra there’s actually a big population of wild peacocks. Recently one man here found one in his bathroom! I have NO idea where they come from.
    Our garden looks like a nature park; it’s totally surrounded by eucalyptus trees. Many of the local – wild – birds have got to know us so well that every spring they bring us their babies for food and attention! We have several generations of Australian magpies (not the same breed as European magpies), two friendly galahs, one kingfisher I named Steve (who comes to the door twice a day), a few sulphur-crested cockatoos, and about ten currawongs.
    I’ve gone bird crazy in the last few years.

    Reply
  2. My family used to live in India, but I’m sure I’ve seen more peacocks in Europe… One of the most amazing places to see them in Europe is in the palace gardens of Isola Bella in the north of Italy, where they are entirely white (Google “Isola Bella peacocks” – amazing!). Here in Canberra there’s actually a big population of wild peacocks. Recently one man here found one in his bathroom! I have NO idea where they come from.
    Our garden looks like a nature park; it’s totally surrounded by eucalyptus trees. Many of the local – wild – birds have got to know us so well that every spring they bring us their babies for food and attention! We have several generations of Australian magpies (not the same breed as European magpies), two friendly galahs, one kingfisher I named Steve (who comes to the door twice a day), a few sulphur-crested cockatoos, and about ten currawongs.
    I’ve gone bird crazy in the last few years.

    Reply
  3. My family used to live in India, but I’m sure I’ve seen more peacocks in Europe… One of the most amazing places to see them in Europe is in the palace gardens of Isola Bella in the north of Italy, where they are entirely white (Google “Isola Bella peacocks” – amazing!). Here in Canberra there’s actually a big population of wild peacocks. Recently one man here found one in his bathroom! I have NO idea where they come from.
    Our garden looks like a nature park; it’s totally surrounded by eucalyptus trees. Many of the local – wild – birds have got to know us so well that every spring they bring us their babies for food and attention! We have several generations of Australian magpies (not the same breed as European magpies), two friendly galahs, one kingfisher I named Steve (who comes to the door twice a day), a few sulphur-crested cockatoos, and about ten currawongs.
    I’ve gone bird crazy in the last few years.

    Reply
  4. My family used to live in India, but I’m sure I’ve seen more peacocks in Europe… One of the most amazing places to see them in Europe is in the palace gardens of Isola Bella in the north of Italy, where they are entirely white (Google “Isola Bella peacocks” – amazing!). Here in Canberra there’s actually a big population of wild peacocks. Recently one man here found one in his bathroom! I have NO idea where they come from.
    Our garden looks like a nature park; it’s totally surrounded by eucalyptus trees. Many of the local – wild – birds have got to know us so well that every spring they bring us their babies for food and attention! We have several generations of Australian magpies (not the same breed as European magpies), two friendly galahs, one kingfisher I named Steve (who comes to the door twice a day), a few sulphur-crested cockatoos, and about ten currawongs.
    I’ve gone bird crazy in the last few years.

    Reply
  5. My family used to live in India, but I’m sure I’ve seen more peacocks in Europe… One of the most amazing places to see them in Europe is in the palace gardens of Isola Bella in the north of Italy, where they are entirely white (Google “Isola Bella peacocks” – amazing!). Here in Canberra there’s actually a big population of wild peacocks. Recently one man here found one in his bathroom! I have NO idea where they come from.
    Our garden looks like a nature park; it’s totally surrounded by eucalyptus trees. Many of the local – wild – birds have got to know us so well that every spring they bring us their babies for food and attention! We have several generations of Australian magpies (not the same breed as European magpies), two friendly galahs, one kingfisher I named Steve (who comes to the door twice a day), a few sulphur-crested cockatoos, and about ten currawongs.
    I’ve gone bird crazy in the last few years.

    Reply
  6. Other than the zoo, the only place I have ever seen live peacocks is on the farm of a friend who lives way down in the country. They told me that they use them as a alarm system because they raise such a racket when anyone comes around. I’m not sure if they were joking or not.
    As for myself, since my arthritis has gotten so bad, and I can’t walk as much as I used to, My enjoyment of the great outdoors is limited to sitting on my front porch. But it is a lovely porch, surrounded by flowers. I love watching the squirrels, rabbits, bees, and birds. I also enjoy the human friends and neighbors who pass by.
    The robins really impress me because they can spot a worm while they are flying and zero in on it and have lunch. Their eyesight must be incredible. Love the color of the cardinals and blue jays. I have a couple of doves who come by everyday. I call them the Bickersons because while the one in the front is silent, the one in the rear jabbers away incessantly. But my favorites are the hummingbirds. So tiny, but so beautiful. I feel blessed when they visit me.

    Reply
  7. Other than the zoo, the only place I have ever seen live peacocks is on the farm of a friend who lives way down in the country. They told me that they use them as a alarm system because they raise such a racket when anyone comes around. I’m not sure if they were joking or not.
    As for myself, since my arthritis has gotten so bad, and I can’t walk as much as I used to, My enjoyment of the great outdoors is limited to sitting on my front porch. But it is a lovely porch, surrounded by flowers. I love watching the squirrels, rabbits, bees, and birds. I also enjoy the human friends and neighbors who pass by.
    The robins really impress me because they can spot a worm while they are flying and zero in on it and have lunch. Their eyesight must be incredible. Love the color of the cardinals and blue jays. I have a couple of doves who come by everyday. I call them the Bickersons because while the one in the front is silent, the one in the rear jabbers away incessantly. But my favorites are the hummingbirds. So tiny, but so beautiful. I feel blessed when they visit me.

    Reply
  8. Other than the zoo, the only place I have ever seen live peacocks is on the farm of a friend who lives way down in the country. They told me that they use them as a alarm system because they raise such a racket when anyone comes around. I’m not sure if they were joking or not.
    As for myself, since my arthritis has gotten so bad, and I can’t walk as much as I used to, My enjoyment of the great outdoors is limited to sitting on my front porch. But it is a lovely porch, surrounded by flowers. I love watching the squirrels, rabbits, bees, and birds. I also enjoy the human friends and neighbors who pass by.
    The robins really impress me because they can spot a worm while they are flying and zero in on it and have lunch. Their eyesight must be incredible. Love the color of the cardinals and blue jays. I have a couple of doves who come by everyday. I call them the Bickersons because while the one in the front is silent, the one in the rear jabbers away incessantly. But my favorites are the hummingbirds. So tiny, but so beautiful. I feel blessed when they visit me.

    Reply
  9. Other than the zoo, the only place I have ever seen live peacocks is on the farm of a friend who lives way down in the country. They told me that they use them as a alarm system because they raise such a racket when anyone comes around. I’m not sure if they were joking or not.
    As for myself, since my arthritis has gotten so bad, and I can’t walk as much as I used to, My enjoyment of the great outdoors is limited to sitting on my front porch. But it is a lovely porch, surrounded by flowers. I love watching the squirrels, rabbits, bees, and birds. I also enjoy the human friends and neighbors who pass by.
    The robins really impress me because they can spot a worm while they are flying and zero in on it and have lunch. Their eyesight must be incredible. Love the color of the cardinals and blue jays. I have a couple of doves who come by everyday. I call them the Bickersons because while the one in the front is silent, the one in the rear jabbers away incessantly. But my favorites are the hummingbirds. So tiny, but so beautiful. I feel blessed when they visit me.

    Reply
  10. Other than the zoo, the only place I have ever seen live peacocks is on the farm of a friend who lives way down in the country. They told me that they use them as a alarm system because they raise such a racket when anyone comes around. I’m not sure if they were joking or not.
    As for myself, since my arthritis has gotten so bad, and I can’t walk as much as I used to, My enjoyment of the great outdoors is limited to sitting on my front porch. But it is a lovely porch, surrounded by flowers. I love watching the squirrels, rabbits, bees, and birds. I also enjoy the human friends and neighbors who pass by.
    The robins really impress me because they can spot a worm while they are flying and zero in on it and have lunch. Their eyesight must be incredible. Love the color of the cardinals and blue jays. I have a couple of doves who come by everyday. I call them the Bickersons because while the one in the front is silent, the one in the rear jabbers away incessantly. But my favorites are the hummingbirds. So tiny, but so beautiful. I feel blessed when they visit me.

    Reply
  11. Nicola, you have greatly expanded my knowledge of peacocks! I didn’t realize they might have come to Britain with the Romans.
    Lots of nice birds around her if, but if I could choose, I’d like a treeful of Anne’s lorikeets!

    Reply
  12. Nicola, you have greatly expanded my knowledge of peacocks! I didn’t realize they might have come to Britain with the Romans.
    Lots of nice birds around her if, but if I could choose, I’d like a treeful of Anne’s lorikeets!

    Reply
  13. Nicola, you have greatly expanded my knowledge of peacocks! I didn’t realize they might have come to Britain with the Romans.
    Lots of nice birds around her if, but if I could choose, I’d like a treeful of Anne’s lorikeets!

    Reply
  14. Nicola, you have greatly expanded my knowledge of peacocks! I didn’t realize they might have come to Britain with the Romans.
    Lots of nice birds around her if, but if I could choose, I’d like a treeful of Anne’s lorikeets!

    Reply
  15. Nicola, you have greatly expanded my knowledge of peacocks! I didn’t realize they might have come to Britain with the Romans.
    Lots of nice birds around her if, but if I could choose, I’d like a treeful of Anne’s lorikeets!

    Reply
  16. The Isola Bella peacocks sounds extraordinary, Sonya. They must look so beautiful in a setting like that. I’ve seen a white peacock in the UK but they are quite rare. As for finding one in the bathroom – yikes!
    I love hearing about the birds in Australia and other parts of the world that are so different from the UK. They are generally more colourful as well and when I travel I love the different sounds they make. It’s one of the ways by which I know I’m somewhere different!

    Reply
  17. The Isola Bella peacocks sounds extraordinary, Sonya. They must look so beautiful in a setting like that. I’ve seen a white peacock in the UK but they are quite rare. As for finding one in the bathroom – yikes!
    I love hearing about the birds in Australia and other parts of the world that are so different from the UK. They are generally more colourful as well and when I travel I love the different sounds they make. It’s one of the ways by which I know I’m somewhere different!

    Reply
  18. The Isola Bella peacocks sounds extraordinary, Sonya. They must look so beautiful in a setting like that. I’ve seen a white peacock in the UK but they are quite rare. As for finding one in the bathroom – yikes!
    I love hearing about the birds in Australia and other parts of the world that are so different from the UK. They are generally more colourful as well and when I travel I love the different sounds they make. It’s one of the ways by which I know I’m somewhere different!

    Reply
  19. The Isola Bella peacocks sounds extraordinary, Sonya. They must look so beautiful in a setting like that. I’ve seen a white peacock in the UK but they are quite rare. As for finding one in the bathroom – yikes!
    I love hearing about the birds in Australia and other parts of the world that are so different from the UK. They are generally more colourful as well and when I travel I love the different sounds they make. It’s one of the ways by which I know I’m somewhere different!

    Reply
  20. The Isola Bella peacocks sounds extraordinary, Sonya. They must look so beautiful in a setting like that. I’ve seen a white peacock in the UK but they are quite rare. As for finding one in the bathroom – yikes!
    I love hearing about the birds in Australia and other parts of the world that are so different from the UK. They are generally more colourful as well and when I travel I love the different sounds they make. It’s one of the ways by which I know I’m somewhere different!

    Reply
  21. I imagine peacocks would be a brilliant variation on a guard dog, Mary! if it weren’t for the fact that they call very early in the morning I;d love to have them around here. Our neighbour has a cockerel who performs the alarm function, however!
    I loved seeing hummingbirds when I was in the states and elsewhere. So tiny and vivid! It sounds as though you have a lovely variety of furred, feathered and human life passing by your porch.

    Reply
  22. I imagine peacocks would be a brilliant variation on a guard dog, Mary! if it weren’t for the fact that they call very early in the morning I;d love to have them around here. Our neighbour has a cockerel who performs the alarm function, however!
    I loved seeing hummingbirds when I was in the states and elsewhere. So tiny and vivid! It sounds as though you have a lovely variety of furred, feathered and human life passing by your porch.

    Reply
  23. I imagine peacocks would be a brilliant variation on a guard dog, Mary! if it weren’t for the fact that they call very early in the morning I;d love to have them around here. Our neighbour has a cockerel who performs the alarm function, however!
    I loved seeing hummingbirds when I was in the states and elsewhere. So tiny and vivid! It sounds as though you have a lovely variety of furred, feathered and human life passing by your porch.

    Reply
  24. I imagine peacocks would be a brilliant variation on a guard dog, Mary! if it weren’t for the fact that they call very early in the morning I;d love to have them around here. Our neighbour has a cockerel who performs the alarm function, however!
    I loved seeing hummingbirds when I was in the states and elsewhere. So tiny and vivid! It sounds as though you have a lovely variety of furred, feathered and human life passing by your porch.

    Reply
  25. I imagine peacocks would be a brilliant variation on a guard dog, Mary! if it weren’t for the fact that they call very early in the morning I;d love to have them around here. Our neighbour has a cockerel who performs the alarm function, however!
    I loved seeing hummingbirds when I was in the states and elsewhere. So tiny and vivid! It sounds as though you have a lovely variety of furred, feathered and human life passing by your porch.

    Reply
  26. Oh I agree, Mary Jo! Wouldn’t that be stunning? Whenever Anne posts the pictures I wish we had them here. The closest thing is the green parakeets that have now colonised the south of England after escaping from a private collection. They sound far too exotic to be in a London park!

    Reply
  27. Oh I agree, Mary Jo! Wouldn’t that be stunning? Whenever Anne posts the pictures I wish we had them here. The closest thing is the green parakeets that have now colonised the south of England after escaping from a private collection. They sound far too exotic to be in a London park!

    Reply
  28. Oh I agree, Mary Jo! Wouldn’t that be stunning? Whenever Anne posts the pictures I wish we had them here. The closest thing is the green parakeets that have now colonised the south of England after escaping from a private collection. They sound far too exotic to be in a London park!

    Reply
  29. Oh I agree, Mary Jo! Wouldn’t that be stunning? Whenever Anne posts the pictures I wish we had them here. The closest thing is the green parakeets that have now colonised the south of England after escaping from a private collection. They sound far too exotic to be in a London park!

    Reply
  30. Oh I agree, Mary Jo! Wouldn’t that be stunning? Whenever Anne posts the pictures I wish we had them here. The closest thing is the green parakeets that have now colonised the south of England after escaping from a private collection. They sound far too exotic to be in a London park!

    Reply
  31. A couple of years ago I visited Stonehenge and while eating a sandwich in the outdoor cafe area a wicked looking crow perched within 2 ft of my shoulder watching me devour the food. An American tourist took a snapshot, commenting that it looked as though some ancient magic was about to take place! If that tourist happens to be reading this, I would appreciate a copy of the pic!
    I feed the wild birds in my garden and some have become very tame. The robins in particular follow me everywhere, including inside the garden shed. The wood pigeons are perhaps the most interesting to watch. They exhibit remarkable ingenuity at problem solving … that is getting at the bird food intended for small birds. I have seen them hanging upside down trying to penetrate the access hole in a feeder, and also jumping up and down on top of the feeder to shake seed onto the ground. I rather fiendishly set little problems for them by hanging feeders in very awkward places. Observing evolution in action!

    Reply
  32. A couple of years ago I visited Stonehenge and while eating a sandwich in the outdoor cafe area a wicked looking crow perched within 2 ft of my shoulder watching me devour the food. An American tourist took a snapshot, commenting that it looked as though some ancient magic was about to take place! If that tourist happens to be reading this, I would appreciate a copy of the pic!
    I feed the wild birds in my garden and some have become very tame. The robins in particular follow me everywhere, including inside the garden shed. The wood pigeons are perhaps the most interesting to watch. They exhibit remarkable ingenuity at problem solving … that is getting at the bird food intended for small birds. I have seen them hanging upside down trying to penetrate the access hole in a feeder, and also jumping up and down on top of the feeder to shake seed onto the ground. I rather fiendishly set little problems for them by hanging feeders in very awkward places. Observing evolution in action!

    Reply
  33. A couple of years ago I visited Stonehenge and while eating a sandwich in the outdoor cafe area a wicked looking crow perched within 2 ft of my shoulder watching me devour the food. An American tourist took a snapshot, commenting that it looked as though some ancient magic was about to take place! If that tourist happens to be reading this, I would appreciate a copy of the pic!
    I feed the wild birds in my garden and some have become very tame. The robins in particular follow me everywhere, including inside the garden shed. The wood pigeons are perhaps the most interesting to watch. They exhibit remarkable ingenuity at problem solving … that is getting at the bird food intended for small birds. I have seen them hanging upside down trying to penetrate the access hole in a feeder, and also jumping up and down on top of the feeder to shake seed onto the ground. I rather fiendishly set little problems for them by hanging feeders in very awkward places. Observing evolution in action!

    Reply
  34. A couple of years ago I visited Stonehenge and while eating a sandwich in the outdoor cafe area a wicked looking crow perched within 2 ft of my shoulder watching me devour the food. An American tourist took a snapshot, commenting that it looked as though some ancient magic was about to take place! If that tourist happens to be reading this, I would appreciate a copy of the pic!
    I feed the wild birds in my garden and some have become very tame. The robins in particular follow me everywhere, including inside the garden shed. The wood pigeons are perhaps the most interesting to watch. They exhibit remarkable ingenuity at problem solving … that is getting at the bird food intended for small birds. I have seen them hanging upside down trying to penetrate the access hole in a feeder, and also jumping up and down on top of the feeder to shake seed onto the ground. I rather fiendishly set little problems for them by hanging feeders in very awkward places. Observing evolution in action!

    Reply
  35. A couple of years ago I visited Stonehenge and while eating a sandwich in the outdoor cafe area a wicked looking crow perched within 2 ft of my shoulder watching me devour the food. An American tourist took a snapshot, commenting that it looked as though some ancient magic was about to take place! If that tourist happens to be reading this, I would appreciate a copy of the pic!
    I feed the wild birds in my garden and some have become very tame. The robins in particular follow me everywhere, including inside the garden shed. The wood pigeons are perhaps the most interesting to watch. They exhibit remarkable ingenuity at problem solving … that is getting at the bird food intended for small birds. I have seen them hanging upside down trying to penetrate the access hole in a feeder, and also jumping up and down on top of the feeder to shake seed onto the ground. I rather fiendishly set little problems for them by hanging feeders in very awkward places. Observing evolution in action!

    Reply
  36. What an interesting post, Nicola! The only live peacocks I’ve seen are those at Andalusia, the farm of American (Georgian) author Flannery O’Connor. She is the first thing I think of when someone mentions peacocks. I highly recommend her essay “Living with a Peacock.” A second and more recent association is with Eloisa James’s upcoming novel, Too Wilde to Wed. Peacocks feature prominently in that story.

    Reply
  37. What an interesting post, Nicola! The only live peacocks I’ve seen are those at Andalusia, the farm of American (Georgian) author Flannery O’Connor. She is the first thing I think of when someone mentions peacocks. I highly recommend her essay “Living with a Peacock.” A second and more recent association is with Eloisa James’s upcoming novel, Too Wilde to Wed. Peacocks feature prominently in that story.

    Reply
  38. What an interesting post, Nicola! The only live peacocks I’ve seen are those at Andalusia, the farm of American (Georgian) author Flannery O’Connor. She is the first thing I think of when someone mentions peacocks. I highly recommend her essay “Living with a Peacock.” A second and more recent association is with Eloisa James’s upcoming novel, Too Wilde to Wed. Peacocks feature prominently in that story.

    Reply
  39. What an interesting post, Nicola! The only live peacocks I’ve seen are those at Andalusia, the farm of American (Georgian) author Flannery O’Connor. She is the first thing I think of when someone mentions peacocks. I highly recommend her essay “Living with a Peacock.” A second and more recent association is with Eloisa James’s upcoming novel, Too Wilde to Wed. Peacocks feature prominently in that story.

    Reply
  40. What an interesting post, Nicola! The only live peacocks I’ve seen are those at Andalusia, the farm of American (Georgian) author Flannery O’Connor. She is the first thing I think of when someone mentions peacocks. I highly recommend her essay “Living with a Peacock.” A second and more recent association is with Eloisa James’s upcoming novel, Too Wilde to Wed. Peacocks feature prominently in that story.

    Reply
  41. Peacocks at Henry Doorley Zoo (Omaha) are soon on the Zoo paths. We have some photos of one that crossed out path. He was stunning, silent, and non-aggressive.
    As for bird watching, i adore the American Robin and the Cardinal. Gene Stratton-Porter wrote a book “The Song of the Cardinal” which was a diatribe against shooting birds just for their plumage. It’s not my favorite of her books, but it was important in launching her career as a writer.
    And there is a children’s book (I THINK it’s called Fiddler’s Fancy) from which my children and I learned that our cardinals in Missouri also say “wet year” as opposed the the “What cheer” that is usually written.

    Reply
  42. Peacocks at Henry Doorley Zoo (Omaha) are soon on the Zoo paths. We have some photos of one that crossed out path. He was stunning, silent, and non-aggressive.
    As for bird watching, i adore the American Robin and the Cardinal. Gene Stratton-Porter wrote a book “The Song of the Cardinal” which was a diatribe against shooting birds just for their plumage. It’s not my favorite of her books, but it was important in launching her career as a writer.
    And there is a children’s book (I THINK it’s called Fiddler’s Fancy) from which my children and I learned that our cardinals in Missouri also say “wet year” as opposed the the “What cheer” that is usually written.

    Reply
  43. Peacocks at Henry Doorley Zoo (Omaha) are soon on the Zoo paths. We have some photos of one that crossed out path. He was stunning, silent, and non-aggressive.
    As for bird watching, i adore the American Robin and the Cardinal. Gene Stratton-Porter wrote a book “The Song of the Cardinal” which was a diatribe against shooting birds just for their plumage. It’s not my favorite of her books, but it was important in launching her career as a writer.
    And there is a children’s book (I THINK it’s called Fiddler’s Fancy) from which my children and I learned that our cardinals in Missouri also say “wet year” as opposed the the “What cheer” that is usually written.

    Reply
  44. Peacocks at Henry Doorley Zoo (Omaha) are soon on the Zoo paths. We have some photos of one that crossed out path. He was stunning, silent, and non-aggressive.
    As for bird watching, i adore the American Robin and the Cardinal. Gene Stratton-Porter wrote a book “The Song of the Cardinal” which was a diatribe against shooting birds just for their plumage. It’s not my favorite of her books, but it was important in launching her career as a writer.
    And there is a children’s book (I THINK it’s called Fiddler’s Fancy) from which my children and I learned that our cardinals in Missouri also say “wet year” as opposed the the “What cheer” that is usually written.

    Reply
  45. Peacocks at Henry Doorley Zoo (Omaha) are soon on the Zoo paths. We have some photos of one that crossed out path. He was stunning, silent, and non-aggressive.
    As for bird watching, i adore the American Robin and the Cardinal. Gene Stratton-Porter wrote a book “The Song of the Cardinal” which was a diatribe against shooting birds just for their plumage. It’s not my favorite of her books, but it was important in launching her career as a writer.
    And there is a children’s book (I THINK it’s called Fiddler’s Fancy) from which my children and I learned that our cardinals in Missouri also say “wet year” as opposed the the “What cheer” that is usually written.

    Reply
  46. Ducks! I love ducks! I also extend this to the other waterfowl, geese and swans. The only problem is, they don’t come to me, so I have to go to the river to see them. Which is why I’ll include turkeys on my list. The turkeys come to my back yard, most likely because I feed them. They love black oil sunflower seed, but turn their beaks up at corn. Quack, quack. Honk, honk. Gobble, gobble.

    Reply
  47. Ducks! I love ducks! I also extend this to the other waterfowl, geese and swans. The only problem is, they don’t come to me, so I have to go to the river to see them. Which is why I’ll include turkeys on my list. The turkeys come to my back yard, most likely because I feed them. They love black oil sunflower seed, but turn their beaks up at corn. Quack, quack. Honk, honk. Gobble, gobble.

    Reply
  48. Ducks! I love ducks! I also extend this to the other waterfowl, geese and swans. The only problem is, they don’t come to me, so I have to go to the river to see them. Which is why I’ll include turkeys on my list. The turkeys come to my back yard, most likely because I feed them. They love black oil sunflower seed, but turn their beaks up at corn. Quack, quack. Honk, honk. Gobble, gobble.

    Reply
  49. Ducks! I love ducks! I also extend this to the other waterfowl, geese and swans. The only problem is, they don’t come to me, so I have to go to the river to see them. Which is why I’ll include turkeys on my list. The turkeys come to my back yard, most likely because I feed them. They love black oil sunflower seed, but turn their beaks up at corn. Quack, quack. Honk, honk. Gobble, gobble.

    Reply
  50. Ducks! I love ducks! I also extend this to the other waterfowl, geese and swans. The only problem is, they don’t come to me, so I have to go to the river to see them. Which is why I’ll include turkeys on my list. The turkeys come to my back yard, most likely because I feed them. They love black oil sunflower seed, but turn their beaks up at corn. Quack, quack. Honk, honk. Gobble, gobble.

    Reply
  51. A number of years ago, my husband and I saw peacocks in Holland Park. The next day, I read a news article that the peacocks had just been reintroduced, having been removed to safety due to foxes. We were lucky to see them.

    Reply
  52. A number of years ago, my husband and I saw peacocks in Holland Park. The next day, I read a news article that the peacocks had just been reintroduced, having been removed to safety due to foxes. We were lucky to see them.

    Reply
  53. A number of years ago, my husband and I saw peacocks in Holland Park. The next day, I read a news article that the peacocks had just been reintroduced, having been removed to safety due to foxes. We were lucky to see them.

    Reply
  54. A number of years ago, my husband and I saw peacocks in Holland Park. The next day, I read a news article that the peacocks had just been reintroduced, having been removed to safety due to foxes. We were lucky to see them.

    Reply
  55. A number of years ago, my husband and I saw peacocks in Holland Park. The next day, I read a news article that the peacocks had just been reintroduced, having been removed to safety due to foxes. We were lucky to see them.

    Reply
  56. I think that a penguin design might make for some rather charming wallpaper. And if penguins were to inspire some chivalric order, they would be well dressed for any black tie events. (I refer to black and white penguins here.)

    Reply
  57. I think that a penguin design might make for some rather charming wallpaper. And if penguins were to inspire some chivalric order, they would be well dressed for any black tie events. (I refer to black and white penguins here.)

    Reply
  58. I think that a penguin design might make for some rather charming wallpaper. And if penguins were to inspire some chivalric order, they would be well dressed for any black tie events. (I refer to black and white penguins here.)

    Reply
  59. I think that a penguin design might make for some rather charming wallpaper. And if penguins were to inspire some chivalric order, they would be well dressed for any black tie events. (I refer to black and white penguins here.)

    Reply
  60. I think that a penguin design might make for some rather charming wallpaper. And if penguins were to inspire some chivalric order, they would be well dressed for any black tie events. (I refer to black and white penguins here.)

    Reply
  61. Some friends of mine lived on a farm where the owner kept peacocks, and they did function as an alarm system. They raised a racket whenever someone entered the property, and even when my friend so much as dropped a pan in the kitchen! They are beautiful but not very clever. Peacocks also wander loose at Grounds for Sculpture, which is a wonderful sculpture garden here in New Jersey. They even have a few white ones.
    I get a lot of birds in my backyard, but I get the biggest kick out of the hummingbirds, and the woodpeckers. And it’s always a thrill when I get the occasional colorful visitor, like a goldfinch or Baltimore oriole.

    Reply
  62. Some friends of mine lived on a farm where the owner kept peacocks, and they did function as an alarm system. They raised a racket whenever someone entered the property, and even when my friend so much as dropped a pan in the kitchen! They are beautiful but not very clever. Peacocks also wander loose at Grounds for Sculpture, which is a wonderful sculpture garden here in New Jersey. They even have a few white ones.
    I get a lot of birds in my backyard, but I get the biggest kick out of the hummingbirds, and the woodpeckers. And it’s always a thrill when I get the occasional colorful visitor, like a goldfinch or Baltimore oriole.

    Reply
  63. Some friends of mine lived on a farm where the owner kept peacocks, and they did function as an alarm system. They raised a racket whenever someone entered the property, and even when my friend so much as dropped a pan in the kitchen! They are beautiful but not very clever. Peacocks also wander loose at Grounds for Sculpture, which is a wonderful sculpture garden here in New Jersey. They even have a few white ones.
    I get a lot of birds in my backyard, but I get the biggest kick out of the hummingbirds, and the woodpeckers. And it’s always a thrill when I get the occasional colorful visitor, like a goldfinch or Baltimore oriole.

    Reply
  64. Some friends of mine lived on a farm where the owner kept peacocks, and they did function as an alarm system. They raised a racket whenever someone entered the property, and even when my friend so much as dropped a pan in the kitchen! They are beautiful but not very clever. Peacocks also wander loose at Grounds for Sculpture, which is a wonderful sculpture garden here in New Jersey. They even have a few white ones.
    I get a lot of birds in my backyard, but I get the biggest kick out of the hummingbirds, and the woodpeckers. And it’s always a thrill when I get the occasional colorful visitor, like a goldfinch or Baltimore oriole.

    Reply
  65. Some friends of mine lived on a farm where the owner kept peacocks, and they did function as an alarm system. They raised a racket whenever someone entered the property, and even when my friend so much as dropped a pan in the kitchen! They are beautiful but not very clever. Peacocks also wander loose at Grounds for Sculpture, which is a wonderful sculpture garden here in New Jersey. They even have a few white ones.
    I get a lot of birds in my backyard, but I get the biggest kick out of the hummingbirds, and the woodpeckers. And it’s always a thrill when I get the occasional colorful visitor, like a goldfinch or Baltimore oriole.

    Reply
  66. The Hollywood cemetery where my parents are buried has peacocks and cats. They seem to coexist, but the peacocks are looking pretty ratty. They have the run of the grounds, but the birds stick close to their cages, where the food is. The cats (I am thinking they are rodent control officers) may be seen here and there.

    Reply
  67. The Hollywood cemetery where my parents are buried has peacocks and cats. They seem to coexist, but the peacocks are looking pretty ratty. They have the run of the grounds, but the birds stick close to their cages, where the food is. The cats (I am thinking they are rodent control officers) may be seen here and there.

    Reply
  68. The Hollywood cemetery where my parents are buried has peacocks and cats. They seem to coexist, but the peacocks are looking pretty ratty. They have the run of the grounds, but the birds stick close to their cages, where the food is. The cats (I am thinking they are rodent control officers) may be seen here and there.

    Reply
  69. The Hollywood cemetery where my parents are buried has peacocks and cats. They seem to coexist, but the peacocks are looking pretty ratty. They have the run of the grounds, but the birds stick close to their cages, where the food is. The cats (I am thinking they are rodent control officers) may be seen here and there.

    Reply
  70. The Hollywood cemetery where my parents are buried has peacocks and cats. They seem to coexist, but the peacocks are looking pretty ratty. They have the run of the grounds, but the birds stick close to their cages, where the food is. The cats (I am thinking they are rodent control officers) may be seen here and there.

    Reply
  71. I can just imagine that, Quantum. Crows and ravens have very strong mythology around them and in a setting like that… I had no idea that wood pigeons were so clever. I must watch them more closely.

    Reply
  72. I can just imagine that, Quantum. Crows and ravens have very strong mythology around them and in a setting like that… I had no idea that wood pigeons were so clever. I must watch them more closely.

    Reply
  73. I can just imagine that, Quantum. Crows and ravens have very strong mythology around them and in a setting like that… I had no idea that wood pigeons were so clever. I must watch them more closely.

    Reply
  74. I can just imagine that, Quantum. Crows and ravens have very strong mythology around them and in a setting like that… I had no idea that wood pigeons were so clever. I must watch them more closely.

    Reply
  75. I can just imagine that, Quantum. Crows and ravens have very strong mythology around them and in a setting like that… I had no idea that wood pigeons were so clever. I must watch them more closely.

    Reply
  76. It’s disappointing to hear that peacocks aren’t very clever. Still I suppose they have the looks if not the brains! Woodpeckers are such fun to watch. We have a pair visit our garden and go on the bird feeder. The dog is scared of the tapping sound they make!

    Reply
  77. It’s disappointing to hear that peacocks aren’t very clever. Still I suppose they have the looks if not the brains! Woodpeckers are such fun to watch. We have a pair visit our garden and go on the bird feeder. The dog is scared of the tapping sound they make!

    Reply
  78. It’s disappointing to hear that peacocks aren’t very clever. Still I suppose they have the looks if not the brains! Woodpeckers are such fun to watch. We have a pair visit our garden and go on the bird feeder. The dog is scared of the tapping sound they make!

    Reply
  79. It’s disappointing to hear that peacocks aren’t very clever. Still I suppose they have the looks if not the brains! Woodpeckers are such fun to watch. We have a pair visit our garden and go on the bird feeder. The dog is scared of the tapping sound they make!

    Reply
  80. It’s disappointing to hear that peacocks aren’t very clever. Still I suppose they have the looks if not the brains! Woodpeckers are such fun to watch. We have a pair visit our garden and go on the bird feeder. The dog is scared of the tapping sound they make!

    Reply
  81. Goodness, what a strange combination, Janice! I guess the cats have learned to leave the peacocks alone and as pest control I can see the point of keeping the cats, but I wonder if the peacock food encourages rodents!

    Reply
  82. Goodness, what a strange combination, Janice! I guess the cats have learned to leave the peacocks alone and as pest control I can see the point of keeping the cats, but I wonder if the peacock food encourages rodents!

    Reply
  83. Goodness, what a strange combination, Janice! I guess the cats have learned to leave the peacocks alone and as pest control I can see the point of keeping the cats, but I wonder if the peacock food encourages rodents!

    Reply
  84. Goodness, what a strange combination, Janice! I guess the cats have learned to leave the peacocks alone and as pest control I can see the point of keeping the cats, but I wonder if the peacock food encourages rodents!

    Reply
  85. Goodness, what a strange combination, Janice! I guess the cats have learned to leave the peacocks alone and as pest control I can see the point of keeping the cats, but I wonder if the peacock food encourages rodents!

    Reply

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