HAIR–Flaxen, waxen…

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   Pat here, obsessing over hair:

How many of you hate your hair? Wave your hands!  I don’t think I’ve ever met a person who has expressed satisfaction with their hair. If they have straight, they want curly, and vice versa. Blondes highlight and rinse their hair to be more blond. (and just spelling “blonde” correctly is a challenge requiring a sentence diagram!)  Brunettes would rather be red or blond, although I’m not certain I’ve ever met anyone who wanted to be a brunette. 

And because I don’t have room for a deep psychological analysis of why hair is so important to our self image, I’ll stick with the superficial: human nature doesn’t change much over the years. One has to assume our historical heroes and heroines obsessed as much as we do over their looks. And locks. As far back as the Greeks, women were using henna and decorating their hair with expensive ornaments. Roman women used curling irons—proving again that we’re never satisified with what we have—and they favored gold hair powder and often wore wigs. Even the men attended public barber shops. 

Renaissance_hair

And everyone’s seen those horrible portraits of Renaissance women with their high brows and hair pulled tight enough for migraines—they not only plucked their eyebrows to achieve that look, but they plucked their entire hair line!  Owwww.  Almost as bad as the sixties when teenage girls ironed their hair and slept on orange juice cans to achieve that “natural” look.   Is it that one can’t be beautiful without pain?

Since characterization—what makes our heroes and heroines tick—is a favorite interest of mine, I’m quite enamored of the psychology of hair. Heck, we’ve even had a play written about it.  Remember the song from HAIR?  "I want it long, straight, curly, fuzzy, snaggy, Afro_2
shaggy, ratty, matty, oily, greasy, fleecy… " Quite an ode!  Repulsive, maybe, but topical. <G> 

But have you ever noticed that we seldom give our characters bad hairAntique_long_hairstyle
Oh yeah, a few chicklit characters will scream about their hair, but these are modern characters who have hairdressers that can turn the most cantankerous mop into a gleaming shiny crown for a price. But our Regency heroines didn’t have access to electric curlers and mousse.  Wouldn’t they have bemoaned a frizzy hair day? That they were a mousy brown and not a shining blond?  What about their mothers, how often do they complain that their hair is getting thin as well as gray?  And our heroes!  How many bald ones have you Blueboygainsborough_2
noticed?  I love the website describing men’s “mullets”  through the ages. Really, men have worn some form of mullet for centuries!  The picture of Gainsborough’s Blue Boy looks like some greasy character dragged out of an alleyway after a bad night on the town.

Can’t you imagine that more than a few of our rakish bachelors started finding a comb full of hair when they reached their sophisticated thirties? Wouldn’t many of them be fretting over a receding hairline and a bald spot on the back of their heads?

It’s not just the looks of our characters that concern me.  How a person feels about her appearance is extremely important in how she behaves.  A heroine with frizzy mousy hair would want to cover it up.  In the Regency era, she might buy elaborate hats and bonnets, and prefer daytime outings when she could hide beneath headgear over elegant evening occasions requiring that she bare her pate for inspection.  Of course, in much of the Georgian era, the wealthy had access to excessive, expensive powdered wigs.  That might cover up thinning hair and mousy locks, but the weight of those things must have been crushing. How many went around with18th
aching heads? Not to mention the occasional mouse or flea infestation since the things were never washed. Ugh, shudder. I prefer less wealthy Georgian heroines, probably for that reason.

Another facet is how other people react to a character’s hair. I don’t care how brilliant our gallant heroine might be, but if she lacks shimmering thick locks, people won’t look her way to discover how intelligent she is.  Maybe curly-haired heroines are feisty for a reason–it’s the only way they can get attention!

I’m as guilty of giving my characters gorgeous hair as the next person for just that attention-getting reason. Healthy, handsome hair has always been a symbol of beauty and virility.  To some extent, the behavior is probably genetic.  Why would a cave man grab the hair of a nearly bald or gray woman to haul her home if he could have one with young, healthy hair?  The young one would be much more likely to reproduce. Or not fight back if her suitor had lovely hair, too. <G>

Bald_2
The question teasing at the back of my mind is this—What would happen if fashion dictated that we must all be bald? Or cover our hair so it can’t be seen? How would we judge people then?  By the size of their noses? The color of their skin?  The size of their eyes or forehead?  The number of wrinkles? No doubt, all of the above, choosing priorities by culture. 

Wouldn’t it be lovely if we could all put our characters and intelligence out for display instead of something so superficial as our looks? Maybe we should tattoo our IQs on our foreheads!

Okay, I’m ready, how do you feel about your hair? And what characteristic would you prefer become symbolic of health and virility?

135 thoughts on “HAIR–Flaxen, waxen…”

  1. I love this post, Pat! I’ve noticed in romance so many heroines are feisty red-heads (and so many romance WRITERS are too!), but not so much the men. Even auburn-haired men are apparently a big turn-off, with a few exceptions. Tall, dark and handsome still rules.*g*
    I used to have beautiful honey- blonde hair with body. After 4 kids, I have thin, graying hair with odd curls and sticking out clumps. My hairdresser keeps me blonde and cuts it cleverly to make me look “poofier.” Yes, I hate my hair!

    Reply
  2. I love this post, Pat! I’ve noticed in romance so many heroines are feisty red-heads (and so many romance WRITERS are too!), but not so much the men. Even auburn-haired men are apparently a big turn-off, with a few exceptions. Tall, dark and handsome still rules.*g*
    I used to have beautiful honey- blonde hair with body. After 4 kids, I have thin, graying hair with odd curls and sticking out clumps. My hairdresser keeps me blonde and cuts it cleverly to make me look “poofier.” Yes, I hate my hair!

    Reply
  3. I love this post, Pat! I’ve noticed in romance so many heroines are feisty red-heads (and so many romance WRITERS are too!), but not so much the men. Even auburn-haired men are apparently a big turn-off, with a few exceptions. Tall, dark and handsome still rules.*g*
    I used to have beautiful honey- blonde hair with body. After 4 kids, I have thin, graying hair with odd curls and sticking out clumps. My hairdresser keeps me blonde and cuts it cleverly to make me look “poofier.” Yes, I hate my hair!

    Reply
  4. I love this post, Pat! I’ve noticed in romance so many heroines are feisty red-heads (and so many romance WRITERS are too!), but not so much the men. Even auburn-haired men are apparently a big turn-off, with a few exceptions. Tall, dark and handsome still rules.*g*
    I used to have beautiful honey- blonde hair with body. After 4 kids, I have thin, graying hair with odd curls and sticking out clumps. My hairdresser keeps me blonde and cuts it cleverly to make me look “poofier.” Yes, I hate my hair!

    Reply
  5. I love this post, Pat! I’ve noticed in romance so many heroines are feisty red-heads (and so many romance WRITERS are too!), but not so much the men. Even auburn-haired men are apparently a big turn-off, with a few exceptions. Tall, dark and handsome still rules.*g*
    I used to have beautiful honey- blonde hair with body. After 4 kids, I have thin, graying hair with odd curls and sticking out clumps. My hairdresser keeps me blonde and cuts it cleverly to make me look “poofier.” Yes, I hate my hair!

    Reply
  6. I vaguely recall any number of scenes from old regency romances in which the heroine was getting her unsatisfactory hair re-done by a professional friseur, with bangs and ringlets around the ears. There were even some in which she had uncompromisingly straight hair and was being subjected to curling irons. Thus not all heroines have good hair.
    I think the medieval ladies worried less because their hair was covered up most of the time.

    Reply
  7. I vaguely recall any number of scenes from old regency romances in which the heroine was getting her unsatisfactory hair re-done by a professional friseur, with bangs and ringlets around the ears. There were even some in which she had uncompromisingly straight hair and was being subjected to curling irons. Thus not all heroines have good hair.
    I think the medieval ladies worried less because their hair was covered up most of the time.

    Reply
  8. I vaguely recall any number of scenes from old regency romances in which the heroine was getting her unsatisfactory hair re-done by a professional friseur, with bangs and ringlets around the ears. There were even some in which she had uncompromisingly straight hair and was being subjected to curling irons. Thus not all heroines have good hair.
    I think the medieval ladies worried less because their hair was covered up most of the time.

    Reply
  9. I vaguely recall any number of scenes from old regency romances in which the heroine was getting her unsatisfactory hair re-done by a professional friseur, with bangs and ringlets around the ears. There were even some in which she had uncompromisingly straight hair and was being subjected to curling irons. Thus not all heroines have good hair.
    I think the medieval ladies worried less because their hair was covered up most of the time.

    Reply
  10. I vaguely recall any number of scenes from old regency romances in which the heroine was getting her unsatisfactory hair re-done by a professional friseur, with bangs and ringlets around the ears. There were even some in which she had uncompromisingly straight hair and was being subjected to curling irons. Thus not all heroines have good hair.
    I think the medieval ladies worried less because their hair was covered up most of the time.

    Reply
  11. I’m surprised I have any hair left. It has been through so many incarnations. I was a tow-head when I was young, but that changed to brown mouse. In high school, I was in my Marilyn Monroe phase, platinum blonde. In college I was in my hippie long hair parted down the middle phase, which eventually metamorphosed into my gypsy black black hair days. There was the long afro look (even though I’m white), the Farah Fawcett, the Princess Diana. The two tone wedge. And finally back to brown with red tints. If I were to let it go, I’m sure my color would be white or some sort of dirty gray.
    I do like heroines with curly chestnut hair…always thick…always catching the sun…I also find it rather amusing that they never seem to have greasy hair, even when they are being chased through the country for weeks on end. I also think it is interesting that a lot of heroines reflect our current taste in beauty and not the time period they’re in. Although it is usually mentioned that they are not considered a beauty because their hair is strait or doesn’t hold the latest do or their lips are puffy or too big. I really can’t think of too many books where the heroine looked like what was considered pretty for that time period. The white painted faces, the beauty marks, the red cupid lips, the plucked hairlines/brows. What humans consider a mark of beauty has always been interesting to me. And, do men really think these fashion statements are beautiful?

    Reply
  12. I’m surprised I have any hair left. It has been through so many incarnations. I was a tow-head when I was young, but that changed to brown mouse. In high school, I was in my Marilyn Monroe phase, platinum blonde. In college I was in my hippie long hair parted down the middle phase, which eventually metamorphosed into my gypsy black black hair days. There was the long afro look (even though I’m white), the Farah Fawcett, the Princess Diana. The two tone wedge. And finally back to brown with red tints. If I were to let it go, I’m sure my color would be white or some sort of dirty gray.
    I do like heroines with curly chestnut hair…always thick…always catching the sun…I also find it rather amusing that they never seem to have greasy hair, even when they are being chased through the country for weeks on end. I also think it is interesting that a lot of heroines reflect our current taste in beauty and not the time period they’re in. Although it is usually mentioned that they are not considered a beauty because their hair is strait or doesn’t hold the latest do or their lips are puffy or too big. I really can’t think of too many books where the heroine looked like what was considered pretty for that time period. The white painted faces, the beauty marks, the red cupid lips, the plucked hairlines/brows. What humans consider a mark of beauty has always been interesting to me. And, do men really think these fashion statements are beautiful?

    Reply
  13. I’m surprised I have any hair left. It has been through so many incarnations. I was a tow-head when I was young, but that changed to brown mouse. In high school, I was in my Marilyn Monroe phase, platinum blonde. In college I was in my hippie long hair parted down the middle phase, which eventually metamorphosed into my gypsy black black hair days. There was the long afro look (even though I’m white), the Farah Fawcett, the Princess Diana. The two tone wedge. And finally back to brown with red tints. If I were to let it go, I’m sure my color would be white or some sort of dirty gray.
    I do like heroines with curly chestnut hair…always thick…always catching the sun…I also find it rather amusing that they never seem to have greasy hair, even when they are being chased through the country for weeks on end. I also think it is interesting that a lot of heroines reflect our current taste in beauty and not the time period they’re in. Although it is usually mentioned that they are not considered a beauty because their hair is strait or doesn’t hold the latest do or their lips are puffy or too big. I really can’t think of too many books where the heroine looked like what was considered pretty for that time period. The white painted faces, the beauty marks, the red cupid lips, the plucked hairlines/brows. What humans consider a mark of beauty has always been interesting to me. And, do men really think these fashion statements are beautiful?

    Reply
  14. I’m surprised I have any hair left. It has been through so many incarnations. I was a tow-head when I was young, but that changed to brown mouse. In high school, I was in my Marilyn Monroe phase, platinum blonde. In college I was in my hippie long hair parted down the middle phase, which eventually metamorphosed into my gypsy black black hair days. There was the long afro look (even though I’m white), the Farah Fawcett, the Princess Diana. The two tone wedge. And finally back to brown with red tints. If I were to let it go, I’m sure my color would be white or some sort of dirty gray.
    I do like heroines with curly chestnut hair…always thick…always catching the sun…I also find it rather amusing that they never seem to have greasy hair, even when they are being chased through the country for weeks on end. I also think it is interesting that a lot of heroines reflect our current taste in beauty and not the time period they’re in. Although it is usually mentioned that they are not considered a beauty because their hair is strait or doesn’t hold the latest do or their lips are puffy or too big. I really can’t think of too many books where the heroine looked like what was considered pretty for that time period. The white painted faces, the beauty marks, the red cupid lips, the plucked hairlines/brows. What humans consider a mark of beauty has always been interesting to me. And, do men really think these fashion statements are beautiful?

    Reply
  15. I’m surprised I have any hair left. It has been through so many incarnations. I was a tow-head when I was young, but that changed to brown mouse. In high school, I was in my Marilyn Monroe phase, platinum blonde. In college I was in my hippie long hair parted down the middle phase, which eventually metamorphosed into my gypsy black black hair days. There was the long afro look (even though I’m white), the Farah Fawcett, the Princess Diana. The two tone wedge. And finally back to brown with red tints. If I were to let it go, I’m sure my color would be white or some sort of dirty gray.
    I do like heroines with curly chestnut hair…always thick…always catching the sun…I also find it rather amusing that they never seem to have greasy hair, even when they are being chased through the country for weeks on end. I also think it is interesting that a lot of heroines reflect our current taste in beauty and not the time period they’re in. Although it is usually mentioned that they are not considered a beauty because their hair is strait or doesn’t hold the latest do or their lips are puffy or too big. I really can’t think of too many books where the heroine looked like what was considered pretty for that time period. The white painted faces, the beauty marks, the red cupid lips, the plucked hairlines/brows. What humans consider a mark of beauty has always been interesting to me. And, do men really think these fashion statements are beautiful?

    Reply
  16. Professor Pat! What a great post. I think health and virility should be measured in laughter and the number of smiles One flashes.
    As for hair… mine is half way down my back and curly thanks to a 6-month-old spiral perm. My mousy locks grow unevenly (yes, one side grows faster than the other) and while I a lot of hair, each strand is very thin. One interesting thing… since birth, I’ve had an inch wide blonde streak down the left side. Anything to make me stranger… 🙂
    My current 21st century heroine has hair just like mine. (easier for a first book, I suppose.) Her 19th century hero adores her curly locks. Just wait until she has to admit the curls are fake. Of course, in true hero style, he is looking forward to the real her.

    Reply
  17. Professor Pat! What a great post. I think health and virility should be measured in laughter and the number of smiles One flashes.
    As for hair… mine is half way down my back and curly thanks to a 6-month-old spiral perm. My mousy locks grow unevenly (yes, one side grows faster than the other) and while I a lot of hair, each strand is very thin. One interesting thing… since birth, I’ve had an inch wide blonde streak down the left side. Anything to make me stranger… 🙂
    My current 21st century heroine has hair just like mine. (easier for a first book, I suppose.) Her 19th century hero adores her curly locks. Just wait until she has to admit the curls are fake. Of course, in true hero style, he is looking forward to the real her.

    Reply
  18. Professor Pat! What a great post. I think health and virility should be measured in laughter and the number of smiles One flashes.
    As for hair… mine is half way down my back and curly thanks to a 6-month-old spiral perm. My mousy locks grow unevenly (yes, one side grows faster than the other) and while I a lot of hair, each strand is very thin. One interesting thing… since birth, I’ve had an inch wide blonde streak down the left side. Anything to make me stranger… 🙂
    My current 21st century heroine has hair just like mine. (easier for a first book, I suppose.) Her 19th century hero adores her curly locks. Just wait until she has to admit the curls are fake. Of course, in true hero style, he is looking forward to the real her.

    Reply
  19. Professor Pat! What a great post. I think health and virility should be measured in laughter and the number of smiles One flashes.
    As for hair… mine is half way down my back and curly thanks to a 6-month-old spiral perm. My mousy locks grow unevenly (yes, one side grows faster than the other) and while I a lot of hair, each strand is very thin. One interesting thing… since birth, I’ve had an inch wide blonde streak down the left side. Anything to make me stranger… 🙂
    My current 21st century heroine has hair just like mine. (easier for a first book, I suppose.) Her 19th century hero adores her curly locks. Just wait until she has to admit the curls are fake. Of course, in true hero style, he is looking forward to the real her.

    Reply
  20. Professor Pat! What a great post. I think health and virility should be measured in laughter and the number of smiles One flashes.
    As for hair… mine is half way down my back and curly thanks to a 6-month-old spiral perm. My mousy locks grow unevenly (yes, one side grows faster than the other) and while I a lot of hair, each strand is very thin. One interesting thing… since birth, I’ve had an inch wide blonde streak down the left side. Anything to make me stranger… 🙂
    My current 21st century heroine has hair just like mine. (easier for a first book, I suppose.) Her 19th century hero adores her curly locks. Just wait until she has to admit the curls are fake. Of course, in true hero style, he is looking forward to the real her.

    Reply
  21. I do remember the old Regencies were far more likely to have heroines who tortured their hair. And there for a while every heroine had to have some flaw she hated. But lately, all I’m seeing is gorgeous people in romance. I think I’d rather see a flawed one. Which could be why I’m enjoying Patricia Briggs’ Mercy Thompson urban fantasy series. The artwork on her latest cover shows a plain, half native-American, tattooed heroine that depicts the character as she describes herself, and it just makes her even more real.
    Kay, if I’m remembering correctly, even men used the white face paint, so one assumes consumptives were fashionable in the 18th century! Between all the fake paint and wigs, they succeeded in creating masks that kept everyone guessing. I wonder if that was the point?
    Nina, I love the idea of the hero loving the false curls! That’s a very nice twist of fate.

    Reply
  22. I do remember the old Regencies were far more likely to have heroines who tortured their hair. And there for a while every heroine had to have some flaw she hated. But lately, all I’m seeing is gorgeous people in romance. I think I’d rather see a flawed one. Which could be why I’m enjoying Patricia Briggs’ Mercy Thompson urban fantasy series. The artwork on her latest cover shows a plain, half native-American, tattooed heroine that depicts the character as she describes herself, and it just makes her even more real.
    Kay, if I’m remembering correctly, even men used the white face paint, so one assumes consumptives were fashionable in the 18th century! Between all the fake paint and wigs, they succeeded in creating masks that kept everyone guessing. I wonder if that was the point?
    Nina, I love the idea of the hero loving the false curls! That’s a very nice twist of fate.

    Reply
  23. I do remember the old Regencies were far more likely to have heroines who tortured their hair. And there for a while every heroine had to have some flaw she hated. But lately, all I’m seeing is gorgeous people in romance. I think I’d rather see a flawed one. Which could be why I’m enjoying Patricia Briggs’ Mercy Thompson urban fantasy series. The artwork on her latest cover shows a plain, half native-American, tattooed heroine that depicts the character as she describes herself, and it just makes her even more real.
    Kay, if I’m remembering correctly, even men used the white face paint, so one assumes consumptives were fashionable in the 18th century! Between all the fake paint and wigs, they succeeded in creating masks that kept everyone guessing. I wonder if that was the point?
    Nina, I love the idea of the hero loving the false curls! That’s a very nice twist of fate.

    Reply
  24. I do remember the old Regencies were far more likely to have heroines who tortured their hair. And there for a while every heroine had to have some flaw she hated. But lately, all I’m seeing is gorgeous people in romance. I think I’d rather see a flawed one. Which could be why I’m enjoying Patricia Briggs’ Mercy Thompson urban fantasy series. The artwork on her latest cover shows a plain, half native-American, tattooed heroine that depicts the character as she describes herself, and it just makes her even more real.
    Kay, if I’m remembering correctly, even men used the white face paint, so one assumes consumptives were fashionable in the 18th century! Between all the fake paint and wigs, they succeeded in creating masks that kept everyone guessing. I wonder if that was the point?
    Nina, I love the idea of the hero loving the false curls! That’s a very nice twist of fate.

    Reply
  25. I do remember the old Regencies were far more likely to have heroines who tortured their hair. And there for a while every heroine had to have some flaw she hated. But lately, all I’m seeing is gorgeous people in romance. I think I’d rather see a flawed one. Which could be why I’m enjoying Patricia Briggs’ Mercy Thompson urban fantasy series. The artwork on her latest cover shows a plain, half native-American, tattooed heroine that depicts the character as she describes herself, and it just makes her even more real.
    Kay, if I’m remembering correctly, even men used the white face paint, so one assumes consumptives were fashionable in the 18th century! Between all the fake paint and wigs, they succeeded in creating masks that kept everyone guessing. I wonder if that was the point?
    Nina, I love the idea of the hero loving the false curls! That’s a very nice twist of fate.

    Reply
  26. Hair, hair, glorious hair!
    I’ve had a little and a lot
    never been happy with what I got
    But still, when it comes to a Hero’s snare,
    there’s nothing like hair, hair, glorious hair!
    (Still, I once had a conceited beauty of a heroine whose hair fell out, and she had to learn to live with that.
    It made her a better person. Go know!)
    Wonderful subject, Pat.

    Reply
  27. Hair, hair, glorious hair!
    I’ve had a little and a lot
    never been happy with what I got
    But still, when it comes to a Hero’s snare,
    there’s nothing like hair, hair, glorious hair!
    (Still, I once had a conceited beauty of a heroine whose hair fell out, and she had to learn to live with that.
    It made her a better person. Go know!)
    Wonderful subject, Pat.

    Reply
  28. Hair, hair, glorious hair!
    I’ve had a little and a lot
    never been happy with what I got
    But still, when it comes to a Hero’s snare,
    there’s nothing like hair, hair, glorious hair!
    (Still, I once had a conceited beauty of a heroine whose hair fell out, and she had to learn to live with that.
    It made her a better person. Go know!)
    Wonderful subject, Pat.

    Reply
  29. Hair, hair, glorious hair!
    I’ve had a little and a lot
    never been happy with what I got
    But still, when it comes to a Hero’s snare,
    there’s nothing like hair, hair, glorious hair!
    (Still, I once had a conceited beauty of a heroine whose hair fell out, and she had to learn to live with that.
    It made her a better person. Go know!)
    Wonderful subject, Pat.

    Reply
  30. Hair, hair, glorious hair!
    I’ve had a little and a lot
    never been happy with what I got
    But still, when it comes to a Hero’s snare,
    there’s nothing like hair, hair, glorious hair!
    (Still, I once had a conceited beauty of a heroine whose hair fell out, and she had to learn to live with that.
    It made her a better person. Go know!)
    Wonderful subject, Pat.

    Reply
  31. I think the painting faces was related to covering up pock marks from small pox, if one could afford it. Probably no one wants to be brunette because it’s so common. Whereas, heroines should be extraordinary in some way. I did the hair ironing thing during the early 70s and then succumbed to a “poodle” perm in the 80s. Now I feel that getting the gray covered is sufficient and I don’t worry about whether it curls (it does). Hair does say a lot about the general state of health- many conditions can cause loss of hair as a symptom. Another thing to consider- during pregnancy the hair grows in thickly as a response to estrogen. After delivery it thins out to its pre-pregnancy state. Perhaps our approval of thick hair in heroines is related to an asessment of her potential fertility.

    Reply
  32. I think the painting faces was related to covering up pock marks from small pox, if one could afford it. Probably no one wants to be brunette because it’s so common. Whereas, heroines should be extraordinary in some way. I did the hair ironing thing during the early 70s and then succumbed to a “poodle” perm in the 80s. Now I feel that getting the gray covered is sufficient and I don’t worry about whether it curls (it does). Hair does say a lot about the general state of health- many conditions can cause loss of hair as a symptom. Another thing to consider- during pregnancy the hair grows in thickly as a response to estrogen. After delivery it thins out to its pre-pregnancy state. Perhaps our approval of thick hair in heroines is related to an asessment of her potential fertility.

    Reply
  33. I think the painting faces was related to covering up pock marks from small pox, if one could afford it. Probably no one wants to be brunette because it’s so common. Whereas, heroines should be extraordinary in some way. I did the hair ironing thing during the early 70s and then succumbed to a “poodle” perm in the 80s. Now I feel that getting the gray covered is sufficient and I don’t worry about whether it curls (it does). Hair does say a lot about the general state of health- many conditions can cause loss of hair as a symptom. Another thing to consider- during pregnancy the hair grows in thickly as a response to estrogen. After delivery it thins out to its pre-pregnancy state. Perhaps our approval of thick hair in heroines is related to an asessment of her potential fertility.

    Reply
  34. I think the painting faces was related to covering up pock marks from small pox, if one could afford it. Probably no one wants to be brunette because it’s so common. Whereas, heroines should be extraordinary in some way. I did the hair ironing thing during the early 70s and then succumbed to a “poodle” perm in the 80s. Now I feel that getting the gray covered is sufficient and I don’t worry about whether it curls (it does). Hair does say a lot about the general state of health- many conditions can cause loss of hair as a symptom. Another thing to consider- during pregnancy the hair grows in thickly as a response to estrogen. After delivery it thins out to its pre-pregnancy state. Perhaps our approval of thick hair in heroines is related to an asessment of her potential fertility.

    Reply
  35. I think the painting faces was related to covering up pock marks from small pox, if one could afford it. Probably no one wants to be brunette because it’s so common. Whereas, heroines should be extraordinary in some way. I did the hair ironing thing during the early 70s and then succumbed to a “poodle” perm in the 80s. Now I feel that getting the gray covered is sufficient and I don’t worry about whether it curls (it does). Hair does say a lot about the general state of health- many conditions can cause loss of hair as a symptom. Another thing to consider- during pregnancy the hair grows in thickly as a response to estrogen. After delivery it thins out to its pre-pregnancy state. Perhaps our approval of thick hair in heroines is related to an asessment of her potential fertility.

    Reply
  36. An addendum concerning the beautiful bald lady: There was a Robert Heinlein SF (Starship Trooper) where the spaceship pilots were usually females and they shaved their heads because long, flowing hair would get in the way without gravity to hold it down. It was also a sort of club membership sign, if the uniform wasn’t enough.

    Reply
  37. An addendum concerning the beautiful bald lady: There was a Robert Heinlein SF (Starship Trooper) where the spaceship pilots were usually females and they shaved their heads because long, flowing hair would get in the way without gravity to hold it down. It was also a sort of club membership sign, if the uniform wasn’t enough.

    Reply
  38. An addendum concerning the beautiful bald lady: There was a Robert Heinlein SF (Starship Trooper) where the spaceship pilots were usually females and they shaved their heads because long, flowing hair would get in the way without gravity to hold it down. It was also a sort of club membership sign, if the uniform wasn’t enough.

    Reply
  39. An addendum concerning the beautiful bald lady: There was a Robert Heinlein SF (Starship Trooper) where the spaceship pilots were usually females and they shaved their heads because long, flowing hair would get in the way without gravity to hold it down. It was also a sort of club membership sign, if the uniform wasn’t enough.

    Reply
  40. An addendum concerning the beautiful bald lady: There was a Robert Heinlein SF (Starship Trooper) where the spaceship pilots were usually females and they shaved their heads because long, flowing hair would get in the way without gravity to hold it down. It was also a sort of club membership sign, if the uniform wasn’t enough.

    Reply
  41. ***I’m not certain I’ve ever met anyone who wanted to be a brunette.***
    You must not live in the Bay Area. LOL! I have a few friends who are blonde naturally, but most of them dye it dark. My best friend is a natural blonde who dyes her hair dark brown. My sister is a natural blonde who dyes her hair black. And then there’s Savannah (the hair dresser) whose hair is a different colour every week . . . and my friend Karen who takes full advantage of her pale locks to run bright pink streaks through them. I don’t know a single person who bleaches their hair in an attempt to be blonde. Everyone is going the other way.
    But then we are way out here on the Left Coast . . . *grin*
    I’ve learned to love my curly hair as an adult, but as a child of the 70s (when the Farrah feather ruled) my hair was a misery. My nickname in gradeschool was “Mop Head.”

    Reply
  42. ***I’m not certain I’ve ever met anyone who wanted to be a brunette.***
    You must not live in the Bay Area. LOL! I have a few friends who are blonde naturally, but most of them dye it dark. My best friend is a natural blonde who dyes her hair dark brown. My sister is a natural blonde who dyes her hair black. And then there’s Savannah (the hair dresser) whose hair is a different colour every week . . . and my friend Karen who takes full advantage of her pale locks to run bright pink streaks through them. I don’t know a single person who bleaches their hair in an attempt to be blonde. Everyone is going the other way.
    But then we are way out here on the Left Coast . . . *grin*
    I’ve learned to love my curly hair as an adult, but as a child of the 70s (when the Farrah feather ruled) my hair was a misery. My nickname in gradeschool was “Mop Head.”

    Reply
  43. ***I’m not certain I’ve ever met anyone who wanted to be a brunette.***
    You must not live in the Bay Area. LOL! I have a few friends who are blonde naturally, but most of them dye it dark. My best friend is a natural blonde who dyes her hair dark brown. My sister is a natural blonde who dyes her hair black. And then there’s Savannah (the hair dresser) whose hair is a different colour every week . . . and my friend Karen who takes full advantage of her pale locks to run bright pink streaks through them. I don’t know a single person who bleaches their hair in an attempt to be blonde. Everyone is going the other way.
    But then we are way out here on the Left Coast . . . *grin*
    I’ve learned to love my curly hair as an adult, but as a child of the 70s (when the Farrah feather ruled) my hair was a misery. My nickname in gradeschool was “Mop Head.”

    Reply
  44. ***I’m not certain I’ve ever met anyone who wanted to be a brunette.***
    You must not live in the Bay Area. LOL! I have a few friends who are blonde naturally, but most of them dye it dark. My best friend is a natural blonde who dyes her hair dark brown. My sister is a natural blonde who dyes her hair black. And then there’s Savannah (the hair dresser) whose hair is a different colour every week . . . and my friend Karen who takes full advantage of her pale locks to run bright pink streaks through them. I don’t know a single person who bleaches their hair in an attempt to be blonde. Everyone is going the other way.
    But then we are way out here on the Left Coast . . . *grin*
    I’ve learned to love my curly hair as an adult, but as a child of the 70s (when the Farrah feather ruled) my hair was a misery. My nickname in gradeschool was “Mop Head.”

    Reply
  45. ***I’m not certain I’ve ever met anyone who wanted to be a brunette.***
    You must not live in the Bay Area. LOL! I have a few friends who are blonde naturally, but most of them dye it dark. My best friend is a natural blonde who dyes her hair dark brown. My sister is a natural blonde who dyes her hair black. And then there’s Savannah (the hair dresser) whose hair is a different colour every week . . . and my friend Karen who takes full advantage of her pale locks to run bright pink streaks through them. I don’t know a single person who bleaches their hair in an attempt to be blonde. Everyone is going the other way.
    But then we are way out here on the Left Coast . . . *grin*
    I’ve learned to love my curly hair as an adult, but as a child of the 70s (when the Farrah feather ruled) my hair was a misery. My nickname in gradeschool was “Mop Head.”

    Reply
  46. Ahh, Edith, I take it you’re rocking to Hair today. “G”
    I assume there are all kinds of genetic built-in reasons we lust after gorgeous hair. I can almost wager that you can take an average female, put her in a gorgeous wig, and the same men who didn’t notice her a minute before would crane their necks to watch a wig. Life is cruel!
    Wow, Kalen, I had no idea brunettes were the rage on the Left Coast–anything to be different, I suspect. My CA daughter is always sending group pictures of my granddaughter and her friends, and she seems to be the only brunette among the surfer blondes. Kids have disgustingly healthy hair!

    Reply
  47. Ahh, Edith, I take it you’re rocking to Hair today. “G”
    I assume there are all kinds of genetic built-in reasons we lust after gorgeous hair. I can almost wager that you can take an average female, put her in a gorgeous wig, and the same men who didn’t notice her a minute before would crane their necks to watch a wig. Life is cruel!
    Wow, Kalen, I had no idea brunettes were the rage on the Left Coast–anything to be different, I suspect. My CA daughter is always sending group pictures of my granddaughter and her friends, and she seems to be the only brunette among the surfer blondes. Kids have disgustingly healthy hair!

    Reply
  48. Ahh, Edith, I take it you’re rocking to Hair today. “G”
    I assume there are all kinds of genetic built-in reasons we lust after gorgeous hair. I can almost wager that you can take an average female, put her in a gorgeous wig, and the same men who didn’t notice her a minute before would crane their necks to watch a wig. Life is cruel!
    Wow, Kalen, I had no idea brunettes were the rage on the Left Coast–anything to be different, I suspect. My CA daughter is always sending group pictures of my granddaughter and her friends, and she seems to be the only brunette among the surfer blondes. Kids have disgustingly healthy hair!

    Reply
  49. Ahh, Edith, I take it you’re rocking to Hair today. “G”
    I assume there are all kinds of genetic built-in reasons we lust after gorgeous hair. I can almost wager that you can take an average female, put her in a gorgeous wig, and the same men who didn’t notice her a minute before would crane their necks to watch a wig. Life is cruel!
    Wow, Kalen, I had no idea brunettes were the rage on the Left Coast–anything to be different, I suspect. My CA daughter is always sending group pictures of my granddaughter and her friends, and she seems to be the only brunette among the surfer blondes. Kids have disgustingly healthy hair!

    Reply
  50. Ahh, Edith, I take it you’re rocking to Hair today. “G”
    I assume there are all kinds of genetic built-in reasons we lust after gorgeous hair. I can almost wager that you can take an average female, put her in a gorgeous wig, and the same men who didn’t notice her a minute before would crane their necks to watch a wig. Life is cruel!
    Wow, Kalen, I had no idea brunettes were the rage on the Left Coast–anything to be different, I suspect. My CA daughter is always sending group pictures of my granddaughter and her friends, and she seems to be the only brunette among the surfer blondes. Kids have disgustingly healthy hair!

    Reply
  51. While I despaired of my very curly hair when I was younger and straight hair was the fashion, I’ve come to love it now. I like that it has a mind of its own and never looks the same way two days in a row. Of course, without a good cut and 21st C hair care products, I might sing a different tune. It does make me like heroines with curly hair, however.
    Which leads to a question I sometimes ask myself: in what ways do I want Romance heroines to be like me (see curly hair,above), in what ways do I want them to be different, and what things don’t I care about? While this question sprang (is that a word?) from a physical descriptor, my question refers to larger issues as well such as personality, politics, and so on.

    Reply
  52. While I despaired of my very curly hair when I was younger and straight hair was the fashion, I’ve come to love it now. I like that it has a mind of its own and never looks the same way two days in a row. Of course, without a good cut and 21st C hair care products, I might sing a different tune. It does make me like heroines with curly hair, however.
    Which leads to a question I sometimes ask myself: in what ways do I want Romance heroines to be like me (see curly hair,above), in what ways do I want them to be different, and what things don’t I care about? While this question sprang (is that a word?) from a physical descriptor, my question refers to larger issues as well such as personality, politics, and so on.

    Reply
  53. While I despaired of my very curly hair when I was younger and straight hair was the fashion, I’ve come to love it now. I like that it has a mind of its own and never looks the same way two days in a row. Of course, without a good cut and 21st C hair care products, I might sing a different tune. It does make me like heroines with curly hair, however.
    Which leads to a question I sometimes ask myself: in what ways do I want Romance heroines to be like me (see curly hair,above), in what ways do I want them to be different, and what things don’t I care about? While this question sprang (is that a word?) from a physical descriptor, my question refers to larger issues as well such as personality, politics, and so on.

    Reply
  54. While I despaired of my very curly hair when I was younger and straight hair was the fashion, I’ve come to love it now. I like that it has a mind of its own and never looks the same way two days in a row. Of course, without a good cut and 21st C hair care products, I might sing a different tune. It does make me like heroines with curly hair, however.
    Which leads to a question I sometimes ask myself: in what ways do I want Romance heroines to be like me (see curly hair,above), in what ways do I want them to be different, and what things don’t I care about? While this question sprang (is that a word?) from a physical descriptor, my question refers to larger issues as well such as personality, politics, and so on.

    Reply
  55. While I despaired of my very curly hair when I was younger and straight hair was the fashion, I’ve come to love it now. I like that it has a mind of its own and never looks the same way two days in a row. Of course, without a good cut and 21st C hair care products, I might sing a different tune. It does make me like heroines with curly hair, however.
    Which leads to a question I sometimes ask myself: in what ways do I want Romance heroines to be like me (see curly hair,above), in what ways do I want them to be different, and what things don’t I care about? While this question sprang (is that a word?) from a physical descriptor, my question refers to larger issues as well such as personality, politics, and so on.

    Reply
  56. As a teen in the 80’s, I hated my straight hair and got regular perms. When I finally let it go natural in the 90’s, I was shocked to suddenly start getting compliments on my hair–which turned out to be thick, shiny, and a nice DARK brown once I stopped frying it with chemicals.
    Now that it’s going noticeably gray, every few months I get a deep, dark red, not-found-in-nature overlay over my natural brown. It covers the gray and still works with my skin tone in a way black, blonde, or red wouldn’t.
    So far all my heroines have had dark hair, so they’re like me in that, but I tend to give them the curls I’ve always envied.

    Reply
  57. As a teen in the 80’s, I hated my straight hair and got regular perms. When I finally let it go natural in the 90’s, I was shocked to suddenly start getting compliments on my hair–which turned out to be thick, shiny, and a nice DARK brown once I stopped frying it with chemicals.
    Now that it’s going noticeably gray, every few months I get a deep, dark red, not-found-in-nature overlay over my natural brown. It covers the gray and still works with my skin tone in a way black, blonde, or red wouldn’t.
    So far all my heroines have had dark hair, so they’re like me in that, but I tend to give them the curls I’ve always envied.

    Reply
  58. As a teen in the 80’s, I hated my straight hair and got regular perms. When I finally let it go natural in the 90’s, I was shocked to suddenly start getting compliments on my hair–which turned out to be thick, shiny, and a nice DARK brown once I stopped frying it with chemicals.
    Now that it’s going noticeably gray, every few months I get a deep, dark red, not-found-in-nature overlay over my natural brown. It covers the gray and still works with my skin tone in a way black, blonde, or red wouldn’t.
    So far all my heroines have had dark hair, so they’re like me in that, but I tend to give them the curls I’ve always envied.

    Reply
  59. As a teen in the 80’s, I hated my straight hair and got regular perms. When I finally let it go natural in the 90’s, I was shocked to suddenly start getting compliments on my hair–which turned out to be thick, shiny, and a nice DARK brown once I stopped frying it with chemicals.
    Now that it’s going noticeably gray, every few months I get a deep, dark red, not-found-in-nature overlay over my natural brown. It covers the gray and still works with my skin tone in a way black, blonde, or red wouldn’t.
    So far all my heroines have had dark hair, so they’re like me in that, but I tend to give them the curls I’ve always envied.

    Reply
  60. As a teen in the 80’s, I hated my straight hair and got regular perms. When I finally let it go natural in the 90’s, I was shocked to suddenly start getting compliments on my hair–which turned out to be thick, shiny, and a nice DARK brown once I stopped frying it with chemicals.
    Now that it’s going noticeably gray, every few months I get a deep, dark red, not-found-in-nature overlay over my natural brown. It covers the gray and still works with my skin tone in a way black, blonde, or red wouldn’t.
    So far all my heroines have had dark hair, so they’re like me in that, but I tend to give them the curls I’ve always envied.

    Reply
  61. I must be an exception, because I really like my hair. I think it is one of my best features, and yes i am a brunette! While there are a lot of artificial blondes around here, too, Austrians seem to like brown hair too as I know quite a few people who colour their hair a nice chestnut or something like that. I even had people approach me a few times, asking where I had my hair coloured…. when it is all natural. *grin* I guess it has a lot to do with skin tone, though. I’d look completely washed out as a blonde…. back to books, I seem to recall quite a few heroines who worried about having “unfashionable” hair. And I wish there were more hair challenged heroes – at least there’d be a chance of the mullet dissapearing from our covers then!

    Reply
  62. I must be an exception, because I really like my hair. I think it is one of my best features, and yes i am a brunette! While there are a lot of artificial blondes around here, too, Austrians seem to like brown hair too as I know quite a few people who colour their hair a nice chestnut or something like that. I even had people approach me a few times, asking where I had my hair coloured…. when it is all natural. *grin* I guess it has a lot to do with skin tone, though. I’d look completely washed out as a blonde…. back to books, I seem to recall quite a few heroines who worried about having “unfashionable” hair. And I wish there were more hair challenged heroes – at least there’d be a chance of the mullet dissapearing from our covers then!

    Reply
  63. I must be an exception, because I really like my hair. I think it is one of my best features, and yes i am a brunette! While there are a lot of artificial blondes around here, too, Austrians seem to like brown hair too as I know quite a few people who colour their hair a nice chestnut or something like that. I even had people approach me a few times, asking where I had my hair coloured…. when it is all natural. *grin* I guess it has a lot to do with skin tone, though. I’d look completely washed out as a blonde…. back to books, I seem to recall quite a few heroines who worried about having “unfashionable” hair. And I wish there were more hair challenged heroes – at least there’d be a chance of the mullet dissapearing from our covers then!

    Reply
  64. I must be an exception, because I really like my hair. I think it is one of my best features, and yes i am a brunette! While there are a lot of artificial blondes around here, too, Austrians seem to like brown hair too as I know quite a few people who colour their hair a nice chestnut or something like that. I even had people approach me a few times, asking where I had my hair coloured…. when it is all natural. *grin* I guess it has a lot to do with skin tone, though. I’d look completely washed out as a blonde…. back to books, I seem to recall quite a few heroines who worried about having “unfashionable” hair. And I wish there were more hair challenged heroes – at least there’d be a chance of the mullet dissapearing from our covers then!

    Reply
  65. I must be an exception, because I really like my hair. I think it is one of my best features, and yes i am a brunette! While there are a lot of artificial blondes around here, too, Austrians seem to like brown hair too as I know quite a few people who colour their hair a nice chestnut or something like that. I even had people approach me a few times, asking where I had my hair coloured…. when it is all natural. *grin* I guess it has a lot to do with skin tone, though. I’d look completely washed out as a blonde…. back to books, I seem to recall quite a few heroines who worried about having “unfashionable” hair. And I wish there were more hair challenged heroes – at least there’d be a chance of the mullet dissapearing from our covers then!

    Reply
  66. I’m one of the “hair challenged” gentleman with a high forehead. The thing I hate about my grey hair is to get it cut. So it goes from very short to six months long.
    Ladies hair? Nothing like a long haired blonde.

    Reply
  67. I’m one of the “hair challenged” gentleman with a high forehead. The thing I hate about my grey hair is to get it cut. So it goes from very short to six months long.
    Ladies hair? Nothing like a long haired blonde.

    Reply
  68. I’m one of the “hair challenged” gentleman with a high forehead. The thing I hate about my grey hair is to get it cut. So it goes from very short to six months long.
    Ladies hair? Nothing like a long haired blonde.

    Reply
  69. I’m one of the “hair challenged” gentleman with a high forehead. The thing I hate about my grey hair is to get it cut. So it goes from very short to six months long.
    Ladies hair? Nothing like a long haired blonde.

    Reply
  70. I’m one of the “hair challenged” gentleman with a high forehead. The thing I hate about my grey hair is to get it cut. So it goes from very short to six months long.
    Ladies hair? Nothing like a long haired blonde.

    Reply
  71. I read somewhere that people sent their wigs to the baker’s to be heated in the oven to kill the lice. Makes sense to me, I suppose, but ugh, the smell!

    Reply
  72. I read somewhere that people sent their wigs to the baker’s to be heated in the oven to kill the lice. Makes sense to me, I suppose, but ugh, the smell!

    Reply
  73. I read somewhere that people sent their wigs to the baker’s to be heated in the oven to kill the lice. Makes sense to me, I suppose, but ugh, the smell!

    Reply
  74. I read somewhere that people sent their wigs to the baker’s to be heated in the oven to kill the lice. Makes sense to me, I suppose, but ugh, the smell!

    Reply
  75. I read somewhere that people sent their wigs to the baker’s to be heated in the oven to kill the lice. Makes sense to me, I suppose, but ugh, the smell!

    Reply
  76. Ah, the things I learn from readers! Baked wig…ewwwwww, but now that scene will haunt me until I find a use for it.
    So Louis, I have no problem with high foreheads. Why do men prefer blondes?
    Wow, Liz, I deem thee a Genuine Original! I really don’t believe I’ve ever met someone who loved their hair, even though I’ve been mortally envious of many. Does my California theory work for Austria–there are so many blondes that people want to be unique by going brunette?
    Hmmm, what characteristics do I prefer in my books? I don’t think I really care one way or another about physical appearance, although I’ll admit to a partiality to dark curly-haired men. But I suspect I will always prefer characters who have the same opinions as I do, because of course, that makes them intelligent, right? “G”

    Reply
  77. Ah, the things I learn from readers! Baked wig…ewwwwww, but now that scene will haunt me until I find a use for it.
    So Louis, I have no problem with high foreheads. Why do men prefer blondes?
    Wow, Liz, I deem thee a Genuine Original! I really don’t believe I’ve ever met someone who loved their hair, even though I’ve been mortally envious of many. Does my California theory work for Austria–there are so many blondes that people want to be unique by going brunette?
    Hmmm, what characteristics do I prefer in my books? I don’t think I really care one way or another about physical appearance, although I’ll admit to a partiality to dark curly-haired men. But I suspect I will always prefer characters who have the same opinions as I do, because of course, that makes them intelligent, right? “G”

    Reply
  78. Ah, the things I learn from readers! Baked wig…ewwwwww, but now that scene will haunt me until I find a use for it.
    So Louis, I have no problem with high foreheads. Why do men prefer blondes?
    Wow, Liz, I deem thee a Genuine Original! I really don’t believe I’ve ever met someone who loved their hair, even though I’ve been mortally envious of many. Does my California theory work for Austria–there are so many blondes that people want to be unique by going brunette?
    Hmmm, what characteristics do I prefer in my books? I don’t think I really care one way or another about physical appearance, although I’ll admit to a partiality to dark curly-haired men. But I suspect I will always prefer characters who have the same opinions as I do, because of course, that makes them intelligent, right? “G”

    Reply
  79. Ah, the things I learn from readers! Baked wig…ewwwwww, but now that scene will haunt me until I find a use for it.
    So Louis, I have no problem with high foreheads. Why do men prefer blondes?
    Wow, Liz, I deem thee a Genuine Original! I really don’t believe I’ve ever met someone who loved their hair, even though I’ve been mortally envious of many. Does my California theory work for Austria–there are so many blondes that people want to be unique by going brunette?
    Hmmm, what characteristics do I prefer in my books? I don’t think I really care one way or another about physical appearance, although I’ll admit to a partiality to dark curly-haired men. But I suspect I will always prefer characters who have the same opinions as I do, because of course, that makes them intelligent, right? “G”

    Reply
  80. Ah, the things I learn from readers! Baked wig…ewwwwww, but now that scene will haunt me until I find a use for it.
    So Louis, I have no problem with high foreheads. Why do men prefer blondes?
    Wow, Liz, I deem thee a Genuine Original! I really don’t believe I’ve ever met someone who loved their hair, even though I’ve been mortally envious of many. Does my California theory work for Austria–there are so many blondes that people want to be unique by going brunette?
    Hmmm, what characteristics do I prefer in my books? I don’t think I really care one way or another about physical appearance, although I’ll admit to a partiality to dark curly-haired men. But I suspect I will always prefer characters who have the same opinions as I do, because of course, that makes them intelligent, right? “G”

    Reply
  81. I feel that I did a bellyflop in the gene pool. I didn’t inherit my mother’s gorgeous red hair (I got very dark brown–my dad’s was black–instead); but I did get her sunburn-in-five-minutes redhead complexion. I’m now enjoying–but not very much–my grandmother’s female-pattern thinning-to-baldness.
    I was thinking of Edith’s book as I read. Also, Barbara Cartland has at least one heroine whose hair was in desperate case due to illness and mistreatment, but the hero called in the local white witch/herbwife, who had a number of natural remedies that worked. As, I believe, also happened in Edith’s book–time to read that one again.
    I fancy blond heroes, but there aren’t nearly enough of them.
    Incidentally, lots of authors remember to describe their fair-haired heroes as “blond,” not “blonde”; but how many remember to refer to the dark ones as “brunet”?

    Reply
  82. I feel that I did a bellyflop in the gene pool. I didn’t inherit my mother’s gorgeous red hair (I got very dark brown–my dad’s was black–instead); but I did get her sunburn-in-five-minutes redhead complexion. I’m now enjoying–but not very much–my grandmother’s female-pattern thinning-to-baldness.
    I was thinking of Edith’s book as I read. Also, Barbara Cartland has at least one heroine whose hair was in desperate case due to illness and mistreatment, but the hero called in the local white witch/herbwife, who had a number of natural remedies that worked. As, I believe, also happened in Edith’s book–time to read that one again.
    I fancy blond heroes, but there aren’t nearly enough of them.
    Incidentally, lots of authors remember to describe their fair-haired heroes as “blond,” not “blonde”; but how many remember to refer to the dark ones as “brunet”?

    Reply
  83. I feel that I did a bellyflop in the gene pool. I didn’t inherit my mother’s gorgeous red hair (I got very dark brown–my dad’s was black–instead); but I did get her sunburn-in-five-minutes redhead complexion. I’m now enjoying–but not very much–my grandmother’s female-pattern thinning-to-baldness.
    I was thinking of Edith’s book as I read. Also, Barbara Cartland has at least one heroine whose hair was in desperate case due to illness and mistreatment, but the hero called in the local white witch/herbwife, who had a number of natural remedies that worked. As, I believe, also happened in Edith’s book–time to read that one again.
    I fancy blond heroes, but there aren’t nearly enough of them.
    Incidentally, lots of authors remember to describe their fair-haired heroes as “blond,” not “blonde”; but how many remember to refer to the dark ones as “brunet”?

    Reply
  84. I feel that I did a bellyflop in the gene pool. I didn’t inherit my mother’s gorgeous red hair (I got very dark brown–my dad’s was black–instead); but I did get her sunburn-in-five-minutes redhead complexion. I’m now enjoying–but not very much–my grandmother’s female-pattern thinning-to-baldness.
    I was thinking of Edith’s book as I read. Also, Barbara Cartland has at least one heroine whose hair was in desperate case due to illness and mistreatment, but the hero called in the local white witch/herbwife, who had a number of natural remedies that worked. As, I believe, also happened in Edith’s book–time to read that one again.
    I fancy blond heroes, but there aren’t nearly enough of them.
    Incidentally, lots of authors remember to describe their fair-haired heroes as “blond,” not “blonde”; but how many remember to refer to the dark ones as “brunet”?

    Reply
  85. I feel that I did a bellyflop in the gene pool. I didn’t inherit my mother’s gorgeous red hair (I got very dark brown–my dad’s was black–instead); but I did get her sunburn-in-five-minutes redhead complexion. I’m now enjoying–but not very much–my grandmother’s female-pattern thinning-to-baldness.
    I was thinking of Edith’s book as I read. Also, Barbara Cartland has at least one heroine whose hair was in desperate case due to illness and mistreatment, but the hero called in the local white witch/herbwife, who had a number of natural remedies that worked. As, I believe, also happened in Edith’s book–time to read that one again.
    I fancy blond heroes, but there aren’t nearly enough of them.
    Incidentally, lots of authors remember to describe their fair-haired heroes as “blond,” not “blonde”; but how many remember to refer to the dark ones as “brunet”?

    Reply
  86. ***My CA daughter is always sending group pictures of my granddaughter and her friends, and she seems to be the only brunette among the surfer blondes.***
    I’m going to guess they’re in SoCal. It’s like a whole nothere state from San Francisco. LOL!

    Reply
  87. ***My CA daughter is always sending group pictures of my granddaughter and her friends, and she seems to be the only brunette among the surfer blondes.***
    I’m going to guess they’re in SoCal. It’s like a whole nothere state from San Francisco. LOL!

    Reply
  88. ***My CA daughter is always sending group pictures of my granddaughter and her friends, and she seems to be the only brunette among the surfer blondes.***
    I’m going to guess they’re in SoCal. It’s like a whole nothere state from San Francisco. LOL!

    Reply
  89. ***My CA daughter is always sending group pictures of my granddaughter and her friends, and she seems to be the only brunette among the surfer blondes.***
    I’m going to guess they’re in SoCal. It’s like a whole nothere state from San Francisco. LOL!

    Reply
  90. ***My CA daughter is always sending group pictures of my granddaughter and her friends, and she seems to be the only brunette among the surfer blondes.***
    I’m going to guess they’re in SoCal. It’s like a whole nothere state from San Francisco. LOL!

    Reply
  91. I have blonde hair, and I have always wanted to be a brunette. Why? My mother is very dark – dark skin, dark hair, dark eyes. My dad is a blonde. As a 16 year old it was very depressing to have complete strangers say “Oh I know who’s daughter you are!” I’d look at my dad and see a balding 40 something with a big nose. Very very depressing.
    On the positive side I have thick hair – got that from Dad too, none of my sisters’ is as thick – so I’m hoping menopause won’t cause me to lose it all.
    As for straight and curly, I wish I had one or the other. I have parts that curl, and parts that don’t. It’s not a dramatic curl, but if I don’t do something to my hair before work (in terms of styling) it sticks out in odd spots.

    Reply
  92. I have blonde hair, and I have always wanted to be a brunette. Why? My mother is very dark – dark skin, dark hair, dark eyes. My dad is a blonde. As a 16 year old it was very depressing to have complete strangers say “Oh I know who’s daughter you are!” I’d look at my dad and see a balding 40 something with a big nose. Very very depressing.
    On the positive side I have thick hair – got that from Dad too, none of my sisters’ is as thick – so I’m hoping menopause won’t cause me to lose it all.
    As for straight and curly, I wish I had one or the other. I have parts that curl, and parts that don’t. It’s not a dramatic curl, but if I don’t do something to my hair before work (in terms of styling) it sticks out in odd spots.

    Reply
  93. I have blonde hair, and I have always wanted to be a brunette. Why? My mother is very dark – dark skin, dark hair, dark eyes. My dad is a blonde. As a 16 year old it was very depressing to have complete strangers say “Oh I know who’s daughter you are!” I’d look at my dad and see a balding 40 something with a big nose. Very very depressing.
    On the positive side I have thick hair – got that from Dad too, none of my sisters’ is as thick – so I’m hoping menopause won’t cause me to lose it all.
    As for straight and curly, I wish I had one or the other. I have parts that curl, and parts that don’t. It’s not a dramatic curl, but if I don’t do something to my hair before work (in terms of styling) it sticks out in odd spots.

    Reply
  94. I have blonde hair, and I have always wanted to be a brunette. Why? My mother is very dark – dark skin, dark hair, dark eyes. My dad is a blonde. As a 16 year old it was very depressing to have complete strangers say “Oh I know who’s daughter you are!” I’d look at my dad and see a balding 40 something with a big nose. Very very depressing.
    On the positive side I have thick hair – got that from Dad too, none of my sisters’ is as thick – so I’m hoping menopause won’t cause me to lose it all.
    As for straight and curly, I wish I had one or the other. I have parts that curl, and parts that don’t. It’s not a dramatic curl, but if I don’t do something to my hair before work (in terms of styling) it sticks out in odd spots.

    Reply
  95. I have blonde hair, and I have always wanted to be a brunette. Why? My mother is very dark – dark skin, dark hair, dark eyes. My dad is a blonde. As a 16 year old it was very depressing to have complete strangers say “Oh I know who’s daughter you are!” I’d look at my dad and see a balding 40 something with a big nose. Very very depressing.
    On the positive side I have thick hair – got that from Dad too, none of my sisters’ is as thick – so I’m hoping menopause won’t cause me to lose it all.
    As for straight and curly, I wish I had one or the other. I have parts that curl, and parts that don’t. It’s not a dramatic curl, but if I don’t do something to my hair before work (in terms of styling) it sticks out in odd spots.

    Reply
  96. At least “brunette” is the same whether it’s noun or adjective, but I’m thinking I’ve never called my dark-haired men “brunet.” Even with the spelling, it sounds too feminine.
    I think I like “nothere” as a word, Kalen. Let’s find a way of using it!
    The straight and curly thing is nowhere near as problematic these days with the quantity of styling products available. I can remember in the seventies when Dippity-do was as good as it got!

    Reply
  97. At least “brunette” is the same whether it’s noun or adjective, but I’m thinking I’ve never called my dark-haired men “brunet.” Even with the spelling, it sounds too feminine.
    I think I like “nothere” as a word, Kalen. Let’s find a way of using it!
    The straight and curly thing is nowhere near as problematic these days with the quantity of styling products available. I can remember in the seventies when Dippity-do was as good as it got!

    Reply
  98. At least “brunette” is the same whether it’s noun or adjective, but I’m thinking I’ve never called my dark-haired men “brunet.” Even with the spelling, it sounds too feminine.
    I think I like “nothere” as a word, Kalen. Let’s find a way of using it!
    The straight and curly thing is nowhere near as problematic these days with the quantity of styling products available. I can remember in the seventies when Dippity-do was as good as it got!

    Reply
  99. At least “brunette” is the same whether it’s noun or adjective, but I’m thinking I’ve never called my dark-haired men “brunet.” Even with the spelling, it sounds too feminine.
    I think I like “nothere” as a word, Kalen. Let’s find a way of using it!
    The straight and curly thing is nowhere near as problematic these days with the quantity of styling products available. I can remember in the seventies when Dippity-do was as good as it got!

    Reply
  100. At least “brunette” is the same whether it’s noun or adjective, but I’m thinking I’ve never called my dark-haired men “brunet.” Even with the spelling, it sounds too feminine.
    I think I like “nothere” as a word, Kalen. Let’s find a way of using it!
    The straight and curly thing is nowhere near as problematic these days with the quantity of styling products available. I can remember in the seventies when Dippity-do was as good as it got!

    Reply
  101. I find it sad that to this day the best product I can find to tame my curls is Infusium-23. I get lured into buying the expensive stuff that promises me perfect curl control, but I always seem to come back to the $9 (for a HUGE bottle) Infusium that my mom used on my hair when I was little. LOL!

    Reply
  102. I find it sad that to this day the best product I can find to tame my curls is Infusium-23. I get lured into buying the expensive stuff that promises me perfect curl control, but I always seem to come back to the $9 (for a HUGE bottle) Infusium that my mom used on my hair when I was little. LOL!

    Reply
  103. I find it sad that to this day the best product I can find to tame my curls is Infusium-23. I get lured into buying the expensive stuff that promises me perfect curl control, but I always seem to come back to the $9 (for a HUGE bottle) Infusium that my mom used on my hair when I was little. LOL!

    Reply
  104. I find it sad that to this day the best product I can find to tame my curls is Infusium-23. I get lured into buying the expensive stuff that promises me perfect curl control, but I always seem to come back to the $9 (for a HUGE bottle) Infusium that my mom used on my hair when I was little. LOL!

    Reply
  105. I find it sad that to this day the best product I can find to tame my curls is Infusium-23. I get lured into buying the expensive stuff that promises me perfect curl control, but I always seem to come back to the $9 (for a HUGE bottle) Infusium that my mom used on my hair when I was little. LOL!

    Reply
  106. Kalen, your hair is lovely! So says the straight-haired one. If I had curly hair I’d grow it down to my, well you get the picture.
    And you live in the cool part of the Bay Area. Here in the Land of Entitlement (other side of the tunnel) my daughter figured it out pretty fast. Six years ago she came home from kindergarten and asked, “Mom, do you have to be blond and live in a big house to be popular?”
    I explained about the trophy wife micro-climate.
    Ah, the smell of Dippity-Do is a huge part of my childhood! Not that I ever used it, but it was always in the house. I was a fey creature who ran wild, subsisting on Tang and Pop-Tarts, and I never combed my hair.

    Reply
  107. Kalen, your hair is lovely! So says the straight-haired one. If I had curly hair I’d grow it down to my, well you get the picture.
    And you live in the cool part of the Bay Area. Here in the Land of Entitlement (other side of the tunnel) my daughter figured it out pretty fast. Six years ago she came home from kindergarten and asked, “Mom, do you have to be blond and live in a big house to be popular?”
    I explained about the trophy wife micro-climate.
    Ah, the smell of Dippity-Do is a huge part of my childhood! Not that I ever used it, but it was always in the house. I was a fey creature who ran wild, subsisting on Tang and Pop-Tarts, and I never combed my hair.

    Reply
  108. Kalen, your hair is lovely! So says the straight-haired one. If I had curly hair I’d grow it down to my, well you get the picture.
    And you live in the cool part of the Bay Area. Here in the Land of Entitlement (other side of the tunnel) my daughter figured it out pretty fast. Six years ago she came home from kindergarten and asked, “Mom, do you have to be blond and live in a big house to be popular?”
    I explained about the trophy wife micro-climate.
    Ah, the smell of Dippity-Do is a huge part of my childhood! Not that I ever used it, but it was always in the house. I was a fey creature who ran wild, subsisting on Tang and Pop-Tarts, and I never combed my hair.

    Reply
  109. Kalen, your hair is lovely! So says the straight-haired one. If I had curly hair I’d grow it down to my, well you get the picture.
    And you live in the cool part of the Bay Area. Here in the Land of Entitlement (other side of the tunnel) my daughter figured it out pretty fast. Six years ago she came home from kindergarten and asked, “Mom, do you have to be blond and live in a big house to be popular?”
    I explained about the trophy wife micro-climate.
    Ah, the smell of Dippity-Do is a huge part of my childhood! Not that I ever used it, but it was always in the house. I was a fey creature who ran wild, subsisting on Tang and Pop-Tarts, and I never combed my hair.

    Reply
  110. Kalen, your hair is lovely! So says the straight-haired one. If I had curly hair I’d grow it down to my, well you get the picture.
    And you live in the cool part of the Bay Area. Here in the Land of Entitlement (other side of the tunnel) my daughter figured it out pretty fast. Six years ago she came home from kindergarten and asked, “Mom, do you have to be blond and live in a big house to be popular?”
    I explained about the trophy wife micro-climate.
    Ah, the smell of Dippity-Do is a huge part of my childhood! Not that I ever used it, but it was always in the house. I was a fey creature who ran wild, subsisting on Tang and Pop-Tarts, and I never combed my hair.

    Reply
  111. “I’m going to guess they’re in SoCal. It’s like a whole nothere state from San Francisco. LOL! |
    nother nother nother
    where did that extra “e” come from?”
    –Kalen Hughes
    Obviously, from Gertrude Stein’s famous description of Oakland, CA: “There is no THERE there.”

    Reply
  112. “I’m going to guess they’re in SoCal. It’s like a whole nothere state from San Francisco. LOL! |
    nother nother nother
    where did that extra “e” come from?”
    –Kalen Hughes
    Obviously, from Gertrude Stein’s famous description of Oakland, CA: “There is no THERE there.”

    Reply
  113. “I’m going to guess they’re in SoCal. It’s like a whole nothere state from San Francisco. LOL! |
    nother nother nother
    where did that extra “e” come from?”
    –Kalen Hughes
    Obviously, from Gertrude Stein’s famous description of Oakland, CA: “There is no THERE there.”

    Reply
  114. “I’m going to guess they’re in SoCal. It’s like a whole nothere state from San Francisco. LOL! |
    nother nother nother
    where did that extra “e” come from?”
    –Kalen Hughes
    Obviously, from Gertrude Stein’s famous description of Oakland, CA: “There is no THERE there.”

    Reply
  115. “I’m going to guess they’re in SoCal. It’s like a whole nothere state from San Francisco. LOL! |
    nother nother nother
    where did that extra “e” come from?”
    –Kalen Hughes
    Obviously, from Gertrude Stein’s famous description of Oakland, CA: “There is no THERE there.”

    Reply
  116. Ah, you folks are having too much fun while I’m working! I love the Stein quote, absolutely perfect!
    Tang and Poptarts…man, we could start a nostalgia committee here. Nothing like plastic juice and cardboard to stir memories. “G”
    Glad you could explain Barbie doll syndrome to your daughter. Write down your words of wisdom so I can send them to mine!
    I’m not familiar with Infusium, but if it works, stick with it. Most of the inexpensive products are made by the same manufacturers as the expensive ones, they just leave out some of the more expensive perfumes and whatnot.
    Louis, you sound like a smart man!

    Reply
  117. Ah, you folks are having too much fun while I’m working! I love the Stein quote, absolutely perfect!
    Tang and Poptarts…man, we could start a nostalgia committee here. Nothing like plastic juice and cardboard to stir memories. “G”
    Glad you could explain Barbie doll syndrome to your daughter. Write down your words of wisdom so I can send them to mine!
    I’m not familiar with Infusium, but if it works, stick with it. Most of the inexpensive products are made by the same manufacturers as the expensive ones, they just leave out some of the more expensive perfumes and whatnot.
    Louis, you sound like a smart man!

    Reply
  118. Ah, you folks are having too much fun while I’m working! I love the Stein quote, absolutely perfect!
    Tang and Poptarts…man, we could start a nostalgia committee here. Nothing like plastic juice and cardboard to stir memories. “G”
    Glad you could explain Barbie doll syndrome to your daughter. Write down your words of wisdom so I can send them to mine!
    I’m not familiar with Infusium, but if it works, stick with it. Most of the inexpensive products are made by the same manufacturers as the expensive ones, they just leave out some of the more expensive perfumes and whatnot.
    Louis, you sound like a smart man!

    Reply
  119. Ah, you folks are having too much fun while I’m working! I love the Stein quote, absolutely perfect!
    Tang and Poptarts…man, we could start a nostalgia committee here. Nothing like plastic juice and cardboard to stir memories. “G”
    Glad you could explain Barbie doll syndrome to your daughter. Write down your words of wisdom so I can send them to mine!
    I’m not familiar with Infusium, but if it works, stick with it. Most of the inexpensive products are made by the same manufacturers as the expensive ones, they just leave out some of the more expensive perfumes and whatnot.
    Louis, you sound like a smart man!

    Reply
  120. Ah, you folks are having too much fun while I’m working! I love the Stein quote, absolutely perfect!
    Tang and Poptarts…man, we could start a nostalgia committee here. Nothing like plastic juice and cardboard to stir memories. “G”
    Glad you could explain Barbie doll syndrome to your daughter. Write down your words of wisdom so I can send them to mine!
    I’m not familiar with Infusium, but if it works, stick with it. Most of the inexpensive products are made by the same manufacturers as the expensive ones, they just leave out some of the more expensive perfumes and whatnot.
    Louis, you sound like a smart man!

    Reply
  121. I’m another “odd” one, I guess, because I love my hair. I didn’t when I was young… I wished it was curly. Then, when it turned curly after puberty, I discovered what a pain natural curly hair can be. Sooo… I decided that God knows best, and if He chose this color and kind of hair for me, then there HAD to be a way to cut and style it that looked good on me! I found it, and now love my hair. Everyone else does, too, and says how healthy it is, so I try to encourage people to quit perming and coloring their hair, let it get healthy again, and discover why God thought their color and style was best for them!
    Oh… my hair was blond when I was little, but it darkened to brunette as I got older, which pleased me very much. I have NEVER wanted any other color hair than brunette!
    (P.S. I get SOOOO tired of all the feisty redheads in books! It’s starting to seem pretty unoriginal, IMO.)

    Reply
  122. I’m another “odd” one, I guess, because I love my hair. I didn’t when I was young… I wished it was curly. Then, when it turned curly after puberty, I discovered what a pain natural curly hair can be. Sooo… I decided that God knows best, and if He chose this color and kind of hair for me, then there HAD to be a way to cut and style it that looked good on me! I found it, and now love my hair. Everyone else does, too, and says how healthy it is, so I try to encourage people to quit perming and coloring their hair, let it get healthy again, and discover why God thought their color and style was best for them!
    Oh… my hair was blond when I was little, but it darkened to brunette as I got older, which pleased me very much. I have NEVER wanted any other color hair than brunette!
    (P.S. I get SOOOO tired of all the feisty redheads in books! It’s starting to seem pretty unoriginal, IMO.)

    Reply
  123. I’m another “odd” one, I guess, because I love my hair. I didn’t when I was young… I wished it was curly. Then, when it turned curly after puberty, I discovered what a pain natural curly hair can be. Sooo… I decided that God knows best, and if He chose this color and kind of hair for me, then there HAD to be a way to cut and style it that looked good on me! I found it, and now love my hair. Everyone else does, too, and says how healthy it is, so I try to encourage people to quit perming and coloring their hair, let it get healthy again, and discover why God thought their color and style was best for them!
    Oh… my hair was blond when I was little, but it darkened to brunette as I got older, which pleased me very much. I have NEVER wanted any other color hair than brunette!
    (P.S. I get SOOOO tired of all the feisty redheads in books! It’s starting to seem pretty unoriginal, IMO.)

    Reply
  124. I’m another “odd” one, I guess, because I love my hair. I didn’t when I was young… I wished it was curly. Then, when it turned curly after puberty, I discovered what a pain natural curly hair can be. Sooo… I decided that God knows best, and if He chose this color and kind of hair for me, then there HAD to be a way to cut and style it that looked good on me! I found it, and now love my hair. Everyone else does, too, and says how healthy it is, so I try to encourage people to quit perming and coloring their hair, let it get healthy again, and discover why God thought their color and style was best for them!
    Oh… my hair was blond when I was little, but it darkened to brunette as I got older, which pleased me very much. I have NEVER wanted any other color hair than brunette!
    (P.S. I get SOOOO tired of all the feisty redheads in books! It’s starting to seem pretty unoriginal, IMO.)

    Reply
  125. I’m another “odd” one, I guess, because I love my hair. I didn’t when I was young… I wished it was curly. Then, when it turned curly after puberty, I discovered what a pain natural curly hair can be. Sooo… I decided that God knows best, and if He chose this color and kind of hair for me, then there HAD to be a way to cut and style it that looked good on me! I found it, and now love my hair. Everyone else does, too, and says how healthy it is, so I try to encourage people to quit perming and coloring their hair, let it get healthy again, and discover why God thought their color and style was best for them!
    Oh… my hair was blond when I was little, but it darkened to brunette as I got older, which pleased me very much. I have NEVER wanted any other color hair than brunette!
    (P.S. I get SOOOO tired of all the feisty redheads in books! It’s starting to seem pretty unoriginal, IMO.)

    Reply

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