Pass the Popcorn!

 
Summertime — and the manuscript's finished, the revisions haven't begun, I've blown through some proposals — so it's movie time for me! I love going to the movies, though this summer I've been so busy that I've seen only a couple so far – loved the newest Harry Potter, and Star Trek, too. Otherwise, the cheaper, cozier alternative is movies at home, especially good when the weather is bad or it's too hot and muggy (like today! ughh!) to do much else, and if my husband and one or two of the sons and the friends are up for watching a good DVD, we put on some popcorn and curl up. 
 
Some people love movies over books, some vice versa, some like me, love them both. I can be far more forgiving of historical errors in a movie than in a novel. Movies have the obvious advantage of powerful visuals and sounds — which can be a fascinating shortcut way to create character and story — as well as the dynamism of sheer immediacy, and all of these can combine to stir emotions in a very direct way. Movies have a social factor that books do not have unless we're reading aloud — we can share the story with whoever is with us at the time. Truly nothing can top books for deep immersion in a story, and the print medium allows for intricate details of plot, setting, dialogue, interior thought and intimate description. But film is a powerful storytelling medium … and honestly after months of writing a book, the last thing I want to do, sometimes, is sit down and read. Movies give my brain a break from words, words, words …
 
Here's a list of some of my favorite movies – they tend to be deeply romantic, absolutely, and with some adventure and action. I don't often go for lots of drama and emotional impact unless there's a big dose of adventure and a good bit of fun. Movies teach a lot about good storytelling – plot, character development, the use of setting, description, dialogue, romance and action, and the all-important stirring of emotion that any good story relies upon. And what better way to do hero research than the movies?! 
 
Some of your favorite movies might be on this list too. These are in no particular order, but I'll aim for a general chronological grouping … medieval through modern.
 
Ladyhawke — All the mystique of the medieval era, with bravery, nobility, romance, magic, dastardly villains and juicy characters to love, a poignant, exciting story and some great one-liners ("Walk on the left, walk on the left!")
 
A Knight's Tale — full of anachronisms and full of fun, with lovely Heath Ledger (alas, gone too soon) and a sexy Chaucer in Paul Bettany ("Chaucer's the name, writing's the game"). Some very touching dramatic moments, too. Fantastic rock score, completely un-medieval, and yet we can easily buy into a fun, quirky romance. Not crazy about the princess, but Heath walks away with this one.
 
First Knight — Sean Connery, Richard Gere, Julia Ormond, Arthurian tales and The Best Kiss Ever. What more could one ask for. Love the visual style – the blue and gold palette is amazing.
 
Braveheart — be still, my Scottish heart. A bit gruesome at the end, but we bravely tough it through with Wallace, who thanks to Gibson's brilliance, we can love deeply enough by the end to endure … and despite some really wild inaccuracies, the film achieves what few books can boast — the viewer walks away knowing what it FELT like to follow Wallace. And that's worth a fact-twist or two.
 
Tristan and Isolde — a lovely little film, a story beautifully told. Sigh-worthy.
Tristan&isolde Robin Hood, Prince of Thieves — though we can't expect much from this super Hollywood treatment, it's a great time at the movies, with a few moments that are top notch for romance and for the romance of the Robin Hood legends. And Sean Connery. Nuff said.
 
Last of the mohicans Last of the Mohicans — Daniel Day Lewis and … the Other Best Kiss Ever!!!  I'm very partial to this movie, having grown up where the historical events took place (not where it was filmed!) — that fort was a familiar place in my childhood. Ah, the waterfall scene, and the scene where the sister decides her own fate … very powerful stuff. A good friend wrote some memorable music for the score. All good reasons for me to watch it again and again.
 
Pride_and_prejudice Pride and Prejudice — the one with Keira Knightley. Exquisitely done from first frame to last, and features the Best Walk Ever Across A Field By A Hero!! 
 
Sense and Sensibility — Hugh Grant in full disarming charm mode. Nuff said.
 
Pirates of the Caribbean — Johnny Depp, Orlando, all the rest — a howling good time and a movie that stands up to watching again and again.
 
Shakespeare in Love — oh how I love this movie. Anachronisms galore. Who cares! 
 
The Mummy — Brendan Fraser, Rachel Weisz, and some movie shtick aimed at 12 year old boys, but once upon a time I had a lot of those in my house, so I have very broad standards. Great banter. Icky stuff, but I can look away until the banter resumes. What's not to love about an Egyptian historical romantic adventure, but for bugs?
 
The Princess Bride — this has to be one of the most delightful movies ever made. Ever.
 
Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon — powerful, beautiful, fascinating, exciting. Endlessly watchable. My kids are martial artists, so I have acquired an interest, and this movie was right up my alley as a martial artist's romance-writing mom.
 
10 Things I Hate About You — a fabulous little film, Heath Ledger again, Julia Stiles very sharp as always. A brilliant, fun twist on Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew.
 
Bridget Jones' Diary — I could watch the ending a zillion times. And probably have done so, since there are channel-surfing guys with cable in my house. They may stop at a vampire movie, but I'll make them flip back to the end of Bridget Jones one more time.
 
Romancing the Stone — a romance writer's dream movie — who could ever tire of the mudslide, the smot-poking in the plane, or the druglord yelling, "Joan Wilder!!"
 
Notting Hill — Hugh Grant. Julia Roberts — a sweet charming movie with a solid, heart tugging romance.
 
So there you go, a list to take with you to the video store — and a list to add to!  There are a slew of movies I left out…. never enough time, let along blog length, to list them all.
 
What are some of YOUR favorite romantic, fun films? And which do you prefer, books, movies or love-them-equally, and why so?
 
Susan Sarah, wondering where her copy of Ladyhawke is ….
 

125 thoughts on “Pass the Popcorn!”

  1. Oh, what fun! You’ve got a number of my faves on your list Susan Sarah, though I have missed Tristan and Isolde. Must catch up with that one. Maggie, yes, your nominees are on my list too. Plus The Abduction Club, which I never lose an opportunity to recommend to all my friends because it is funny, clever, deeply romantic and with some gorgeous Irish scenery (and some gorgeous eye candy!)

    Reply
  2. Oh, what fun! You’ve got a number of my faves on your list Susan Sarah, though I have missed Tristan and Isolde. Must catch up with that one. Maggie, yes, your nominees are on my list too. Plus The Abduction Club, which I never lose an opportunity to recommend to all my friends because it is funny, clever, deeply romantic and with some gorgeous Irish scenery (and some gorgeous eye candy!)

    Reply
  3. Oh, what fun! You’ve got a number of my faves on your list Susan Sarah, though I have missed Tristan and Isolde. Must catch up with that one. Maggie, yes, your nominees are on my list too. Plus The Abduction Club, which I never lose an opportunity to recommend to all my friends because it is funny, clever, deeply romantic and with some gorgeous Irish scenery (and some gorgeous eye candy!)

    Reply
  4. Oh, what fun! You’ve got a number of my faves on your list Susan Sarah, though I have missed Tristan and Isolde. Must catch up with that one. Maggie, yes, your nominees are on my list too. Plus The Abduction Club, which I never lose an opportunity to recommend to all my friends because it is funny, clever, deeply romantic and with some gorgeous Irish scenery (and some gorgeous eye candy!)

    Reply
  5. Oh, what fun! You’ve got a number of my faves on your list Susan Sarah, though I have missed Tristan and Isolde. Must catch up with that one. Maggie, yes, your nominees are on my list too. Plus The Abduction Club, which I never lose an opportunity to recommend to all my friends because it is funny, clever, deeply romantic and with some gorgeous Irish scenery (and some gorgeous eye candy!)

    Reply
  6. I’d definitely add Dangerous Beauty to that list. Also Dangerous Liasons, and the Year of Living Dangerously. I enjoy danger apparently.
    Another one – Rob Roy, which I liked far better than Braveheart. Sorry – I couldn’t get past the late-30-something Mel playing the shy schoolboy with a crush. Seriously – it makes me laugh. The whole thing was just too over the top for me.

    Reply
  7. I’d definitely add Dangerous Beauty to that list. Also Dangerous Liasons, and the Year of Living Dangerously. I enjoy danger apparently.
    Another one – Rob Roy, which I liked far better than Braveheart. Sorry – I couldn’t get past the late-30-something Mel playing the shy schoolboy with a crush. Seriously – it makes me laugh. The whole thing was just too over the top for me.

    Reply
  8. I’d definitely add Dangerous Beauty to that list. Also Dangerous Liasons, and the Year of Living Dangerously. I enjoy danger apparently.
    Another one – Rob Roy, which I liked far better than Braveheart. Sorry – I couldn’t get past the late-30-something Mel playing the shy schoolboy with a crush. Seriously – it makes me laugh. The whole thing was just too over the top for me.

    Reply
  9. I’d definitely add Dangerous Beauty to that list. Also Dangerous Liasons, and the Year of Living Dangerously. I enjoy danger apparently.
    Another one – Rob Roy, which I liked far better than Braveheart. Sorry – I couldn’t get past the late-30-something Mel playing the shy schoolboy with a crush. Seriously – it makes me laugh. The whole thing was just too over the top for me.

    Reply
  10. I’d definitely add Dangerous Beauty to that list. Also Dangerous Liasons, and the Year of Living Dangerously. I enjoy danger apparently.
    Another one – Rob Roy, which I liked far better than Braveheart. Sorry – I couldn’t get past the late-30-something Mel playing the shy schoolboy with a crush. Seriously – it makes me laugh. The whole thing was just too over the top for me.

    Reply
  11. I love movies, especially in a darkened theatre where the characters are literally twice as big as life and I’m not distracted by telephone, laundry, whatever.
    Your list contains some of my (and my family’s) favorites, such as “Princess Bride”, full of charm and humor and surprising words of wisdom (“never engage in a land war in Asia”). It also had some new ones that I’ll look for. [Side note to Nicola: I tried to find Abduction Club a few years ago but it wasn’t available at that time in a US compatible format. Maybe I should try again.)
    I have some older favorites to add to the list:
    “His Girl Friday” — loved how they took a play with two male reporters, changed one of them to female but not much else, and made it into a timeless love story.
    “The Thin Man” (and sequels) — Nick hardly ever appears without a drink in his hands and is often the worse for wear, but his intelligence and the loving relationship he has with Nora shines through the liquor and cigarette smoke. These are among my husband’s favorite movies, although luckily he hasn’t picked up Nick’s bad habits.
    Victor Fleming’s movies — he was known as a man’s director, but he often got the best performances ever from his female stars (Jean Harlow, Judy Garland, etc). There was a recent profile of him in The New Yorker, and it points out that, unlike many of today’s films, the women were smart and beautiful and the men were men, not boys, who showed their smarts by loving the women precisely because of those qualities.
    “Cheri” — a recent release starring Michelle Pfeiffer and Rupert Friend, based on stories by Colette. Despite everything that should pull them apart they are, in fact, each other’s true love, and in that sense the movie is quite romantic (not to mention beautiful to look at). What makes the movie different from today’s romance novels is that love is not enough to guarantee a HEA.

    Reply
  12. I love movies, especially in a darkened theatre where the characters are literally twice as big as life and I’m not distracted by telephone, laundry, whatever.
    Your list contains some of my (and my family’s) favorites, such as “Princess Bride”, full of charm and humor and surprising words of wisdom (“never engage in a land war in Asia”). It also had some new ones that I’ll look for. [Side note to Nicola: I tried to find Abduction Club a few years ago but it wasn’t available at that time in a US compatible format. Maybe I should try again.)
    I have some older favorites to add to the list:
    “His Girl Friday” — loved how they took a play with two male reporters, changed one of them to female but not much else, and made it into a timeless love story.
    “The Thin Man” (and sequels) — Nick hardly ever appears without a drink in his hands and is often the worse for wear, but his intelligence and the loving relationship he has with Nora shines through the liquor and cigarette smoke. These are among my husband’s favorite movies, although luckily he hasn’t picked up Nick’s bad habits.
    Victor Fleming’s movies — he was known as a man’s director, but he often got the best performances ever from his female stars (Jean Harlow, Judy Garland, etc). There was a recent profile of him in The New Yorker, and it points out that, unlike many of today’s films, the women were smart and beautiful and the men were men, not boys, who showed their smarts by loving the women precisely because of those qualities.
    “Cheri” — a recent release starring Michelle Pfeiffer and Rupert Friend, based on stories by Colette. Despite everything that should pull them apart they are, in fact, each other’s true love, and in that sense the movie is quite romantic (not to mention beautiful to look at). What makes the movie different from today’s romance novels is that love is not enough to guarantee a HEA.

    Reply
  13. I love movies, especially in a darkened theatre where the characters are literally twice as big as life and I’m not distracted by telephone, laundry, whatever.
    Your list contains some of my (and my family’s) favorites, such as “Princess Bride”, full of charm and humor and surprising words of wisdom (“never engage in a land war in Asia”). It also had some new ones that I’ll look for. [Side note to Nicola: I tried to find Abduction Club a few years ago but it wasn’t available at that time in a US compatible format. Maybe I should try again.)
    I have some older favorites to add to the list:
    “His Girl Friday” — loved how they took a play with two male reporters, changed one of them to female but not much else, and made it into a timeless love story.
    “The Thin Man” (and sequels) — Nick hardly ever appears without a drink in his hands and is often the worse for wear, but his intelligence and the loving relationship he has with Nora shines through the liquor and cigarette smoke. These are among my husband’s favorite movies, although luckily he hasn’t picked up Nick’s bad habits.
    Victor Fleming’s movies — he was known as a man’s director, but he often got the best performances ever from his female stars (Jean Harlow, Judy Garland, etc). There was a recent profile of him in The New Yorker, and it points out that, unlike many of today’s films, the women were smart and beautiful and the men were men, not boys, who showed their smarts by loving the women precisely because of those qualities.
    “Cheri” — a recent release starring Michelle Pfeiffer and Rupert Friend, based on stories by Colette. Despite everything that should pull them apart they are, in fact, each other’s true love, and in that sense the movie is quite romantic (not to mention beautiful to look at). What makes the movie different from today’s romance novels is that love is not enough to guarantee a HEA.

    Reply
  14. I love movies, especially in a darkened theatre where the characters are literally twice as big as life and I’m not distracted by telephone, laundry, whatever.
    Your list contains some of my (and my family’s) favorites, such as “Princess Bride”, full of charm and humor and surprising words of wisdom (“never engage in a land war in Asia”). It also had some new ones that I’ll look for. [Side note to Nicola: I tried to find Abduction Club a few years ago but it wasn’t available at that time in a US compatible format. Maybe I should try again.)
    I have some older favorites to add to the list:
    “His Girl Friday” — loved how they took a play with two male reporters, changed one of them to female but not much else, and made it into a timeless love story.
    “The Thin Man” (and sequels) — Nick hardly ever appears without a drink in his hands and is often the worse for wear, but his intelligence and the loving relationship he has with Nora shines through the liquor and cigarette smoke. These are among my husband’s favorite movies, although luckily he hasn’t picked up Nick’s bad habits.
    Victor Fleming’s movies — he was known as a man’s director, but he often got the best performances ever from his female stars (Jean Harlow, Judy Garland, etc). There was a recent profile of him in The New Yorker, and it points out that, unlike many of today’s films, the women were smart and beautiful and the men were men, not boys, who showed their smarts by loving the women precisely because of those qualities.
    “Cheri” — a recent release starring Michelle Pfeiffer and Rupert Friend, based on stories by Colette. Despite everything that should pull them apart they are, in fact, each other’s true love, and in that sense the movie is quite romantic (not to mention beautiful to look at). What makes the movie different from today’s romance novels is that love is not enough to guarantee a HEA.

    Reply
  15. I love movies, especially in a darkened theatre where the characters are literally twice as big as life and I’m not distracted by telephone, laundry, whatever.
    Your list contains some of my (and my family’s) favorites, such as “Princess Bride”, full of charm and humor and surprising words of wisdom (“never engage in a land war in Asia”). It also had some new ones that I’ll look for. [Side note to Nicola: I tried to find Abduction Club a few years ago but it wasn’t available at that time in a US compatible format. Maybe I should try again.)
    I have some older favorites to add to the list:
    “His Girl Friday” — loved how they took a play with two male reporters, changed one of them to female but not much else, and made it into a timeless love story.
    “The Thin Man” (and sequels) — Nick hardly ever appears without a drink in his hands and is often the worse for wear, but his intelligence and the loving relationship he has with Nora shines through the liquor and cigarette smoke. These are among my husband’s favorite movies, although luckily he hasn’t picked up Nick’s bad habits.
    Victor Fleming’s movies — he was known as a man’s director, but he often got the best performances ever from his female stars (Jean Harlow, Judy Garland, etc). There was a recent profile of him in The New Yorker, and it points out that, unlike many of today’s films, the women were smart and beautiful and the men were men, not boys, who showed their smarts by loving the women precisely because of those qualities.
    “Cheri” — a recent release starring Michelle Pfeiffer and Rupert Friend, based on stories by Colette. Despite everything that should pull them apart they are, in fact, each other’s true love, and in that sense the movie is quite romantic (not to mention beautiful to look at). What makes the movie different from today’s romance novels is that love is not enough to guarantee a HEA.

    Reply
  16. Great list!
    The Philadelphia Story is a wonderful romance, plus there’s Cary Grant. And Katherine Hepburn and Jimmy Stewart.
    I also love Moonstruck, which is full of operatic, quotable moments. (“Chrissy! Bring me the big knife!”)

    Reply
  17. Great list!
    The Philadelphia Story is a wonderful romance, plus there’s Cary Grant. And Katherine Hepburn and Jimmy Stewart.
    I also love Moonstruck, which is full of operatic, quotable moments. (“Chrissy! Bring me the big knife!”)

    Reply
  18. Great list!
    The Philadelphia Story is a wonderful romance, plus there’s Cary Grant. And Katherine Hepburn and Jimmy Stewart.
    I also love Moonstruck, which is full of operatic, quotable moments. (“Chrissy! Bring me the big knife!”)

    Reply
  19. Great list!
    The Philadelphia Story is a wonderful romance, plus there’s Cary Grant. And Katherine Hepburn and Jimmy Stewart.
    I also love Moonstruck, which is full of operatic, quotable moments. (“Chrissy! Bring me the big knife!”)

    Reply
  20. Great list!
    The Philadelphia Story is a wonderful romance, plus there’s Cary Grant. And Katherine Hepburn and Jimmy Stewart.
    I also love Moonstruck, which is full of operatic, quotable moments. (“Chrissy! Bring me the big knife!”)

    Reply
  21. Oh, Susan, what a fun summer post! We have very similar taste in all -time favorites … P&P, Pirates, Princess Bride, Notting Hill . . . I would have to add some Cary Grant classics to the list. To Catch a Thief (with Grace Kelly smiling and saying “The Cat has a new kitten!”) and Bringing Up Baby. And I adore the Indiana Jones films too—just fun!
    Like you, I have much more tolerance for inaccuracies in movies . . .I am more willing to put my critical faculties on hold and just sit back and enjoy the show.

    Reply
  22. Oh, Susan, what a fun summer post! We have very similar taste in all -time favorites … P&P, Pirates, Princess Bride, Notting Hill . . . I would have to add some Cary Grant classics to the list. To Catch a Thief (with Grace Kelly smiling and saying “The Cat has a new kitten!”) and Bringing Up Baby. And I adore the Indiana Jones films too—just fun!
    Like you, I have much more tolerance for inaccuracies in movies . . .I am more willing to put my critical faculties on hold and just sit back and enjoy the show.

    Reply
  23. Oh, Susan, what a fun summer post! We have very similar taste in all -time favorites … P&P, Pirates, Princess Bride, Notting Hill . . . I would have to add some Cary Grant classics to the list. To Catch a Thief (with Grace Kelly smiling and saying “The Cat has a new kitten!”) and Bringing Up Baby. And I adore the Indiana Jones films too—just fun!
    Like you, I have much more tolerance for inaccuracies in movies . . .I am more willing to put my critical faculties on hold and just sit back and enjoy the show.

    Reply
  24. Oh, Susan, what a fun summer post! We have very similar taste in all -time favorites … P&P, Pirates, Princess Bride, Notting Hill . . . I would have to add some Cary Grant classics to the list. To Catch a Thief (with Grace Kelly smiling and saying “The Cat has a new kitten!”) and Bringing Up Baby. And I adore the Indiana Jones films too—just fun!
    Like you, I have much more tolerance for inaccuracies in movies . . .I am more willing to put my critical faculties on hold and just sit back and enjoy the show.

    Reply
  25. Oh, Susan, what a fun summer post! We have very similar taste in all -time favorites … P&P, Pirates, Princess Bride, Notting Hill . . . I would have to add some Cary Grant classics to the list. To Catch a Thief (with Grace Kelly smiling and saying “The Cat has a new kitten!”) and Bringing Up Baby. And I adore the Indiana Jones films too—just fun!
    Like you, I have much more tolerance for inaccuracies in movies . . .I am more willing to put my critical faculties on hold and just sit back and enjoy the show.

    Reply
  26. No one has mentioned my two favorite romantic movies yet: Dave and Bull Durham. I can watch them again and again and never get bored. The American President is right up there, but if I had to pick one presidential romantic comedy, it’d be Dave, hands down.
    And these aren’t romantic and fun, but my two favorite historical movies are Glory and Master & Commander.

    Reply
  27. No one has mentioned my two favorite romantic movies yet: Dave and Bull Durham. I can watch them again and again and never get bored. The American President is right up there, but if I had to pick one presidential romantic comedy, it’d be Dave, hands down.
    And these aren’t romantic and fun, but my two favorite historical movies are Glory and Master & Commander.

    Reply
  28. No one has mentioned my two favorite romantic movies yet: Dave and Bull Durham. I can watch them again and again and never get bored. The American President is right up there, but if I had to pick one presidential romantic comedy, it’d be Dave, hands down.
    And these aren’t romantic and fun, but my two favorite historical movies are Glory and Master & Commander.

    Reply
  29. No one has mentioned my two favorite romantic movies yet: Dave and Bull Durham. I can watch them again and again and never get bored. The American President is right up there, but if I had to pick one presidential romantic comedy, it’d be Dave, hands down.
    And these aren’t romantic and fun, but my two favorite historical movies are Glory and Master & Commander.

    Reply
  30. No one has mentioned my two favorite romantic movies yet: Dave and Bull Durham. I can watch them again and again and never get bored. The American President is right up there, but if I had to pick one presidential romantic comedy, it’d be Dave, hands down.
    And these aren’t romantic and fun, but my two favorite historical movies are Glory and Master & Commander.

    Reply
  31. Quite a few of my favorites have been listed.
    I’d like to add a couple of John Wayne movies.
    “The Quiet Man” with Maureen O’Hara and “Stagecoach” …the original one in black and white.

    Reply
  32. Quite a few of my favorites have been listed.
    I’d like to add a couple of John Wayne movies.
    “The Quiet Man” with Maureen O’Hara and “Stagecoach” …the original one in black and white.

    Reply
  33. Quite a few of my favorites have been listed.
    I’d like to add a couple of John Wayne movies.
    “The Quiet Man” with Maureen O’Hara and “Stagecoach” …the original one in black and white.

    Reply
  34. Quite a few of my favorites have been listed.
    I’d like to add a couple of John Wayne movies.
    “The Quiet Man” with Maureen O’Hara and “Stagecoach” …the original one in black and white.

    Reply
  35. Quite a few of my favorites have been listed.
    I’d like to add a couple of John Wayne movies.
    “The Quiet Man” with Maureen O’Hara and “Stagecoach” …the original one in black and white.

    Reply
  36. Fabulous list, Susan! I won’t watch the movies with bloody battles, but I’ve seen all the romantic ones listed, which is quite a feat since I rarely watch movies… You’ve struck a chord.

    Reply
  37. Fabulous list, Susan! I won’t watch the movies with bloody battles, but I’ve seen all the romantic ones listed, which is quite a feat since I rarely watch movies… You’ve struck a chord.

    Reply
  38. Fabulous list, Susan! I won’t watch the movies with bloody battles, but I’ve seen all the romantic ones listed, which is quite a feat since I rarely watch movies… You’ve struck a chord.

    Reply
  39. Fabulous list, Susan! I won’t watch the movies with bloody battles, but I’ve seen all the romantic ones listed, which is quite a feat since I rarely watch movies… You’ve struck a chord.

    Reply
  40. Fabulous list, Susan! I won’t watch the movies with bloody battles, but I’ve seen all the romantic ones listed, which is quite a feat since I rarely watch movies… You’ve struck a chord.

    Reply
  41. Sherrie,here.
    Hot button! Hot button! Susan, I simply ADORE movies, and you have listed some of my all-time favorites. I can’t tell you how many times I have watched Princess Bride and cackled like a fool the whole way through. That movie has stood the test of time.
    Other favorites: Days of Heaven–a love triangle, transient farm workers, the eve of WWI. The cinematography is utterly spectacular. Moulin Rouge–Bizarre, mesmerizing, haunting. Nothing like I expected. Chicago–eye-popping visuals, a dancer’s delight (Richard Geer–a tap-dancing lawyer!), with a sly undercurrent of humor. Master and Commander–sheer wow! The sea battles are spectacular, and Russell Crowe and Paul Bettany are a superb team! Have seen this movie at least 15 times–even more than Princess Bride! *g*
    Other favorites are Starlight Hotel, a New Zealand film about the unlikely friendship between a runaway girl and a disillusioned young man running from the law. Visually spectacular. Takes place in NZ during the depression era after WWI.
    And then there’s Blazing Saddles. (Eating beans around the campfire–need I say more?) The Green Mile. Love, Actually. The Die Hard series. The Chronicles of Narnia. Witness. Bladerunner. The Elephant Man. I could go on. And on. And onnnn . . .

    Reply
  42. Sherrie,here.
    Hot button! Hot button! Susan, I simply ADORE movies, and you have listed some of my all-time favorites. I can’t tell you how many times I have watched Princess Bride and cackled like a fool the whole way through. That movie has stood the test of time.
    Other favorites: Days of Heaven–a love triangle, transient farm workers, the eve of WWI. The cinematography is utterly spectacular. Moulin Rouge–Bizarre, mesmerizing, haunting. Nothing like I expected. Chicago–eye-popping visuals, a dancer’s delight (Richard Geer–a tap-dancing lawyer!), with a sly undercurrent of humor. Master and Commander–sheer wow! The sea battles are spectacular, and Russell Crowe and Paul Bettany are a superb team! Have seen this movie at least 15 times–even more than Princess Bride! *g*
    Other favorites are Starlight Hotel, a New Zealand film about the unlikely friendship between a runaway girl and a disillusioned young man running from the law. Visually spectacular. Takes place in NZ during the depression era after WWI.
    And then there’s Blazing Saddles. (Eating beans around the campfire–need I say more?) The Green Mile. Love, Actually. The Die Hard series. The Chronicles of Narnia. Witness. Bladerunner. The Elephant Man. I could go on. And on. And onnnn . . .

    Reply
  43. Sherrie,here.
    Hot button! Hot button! Susan, I simply ADORE movies, and you have listed some of my all-time favorites. I can’t tell you how many times I have watched Princess Bride and cackled like a fool the whole way through. That movie has stood the test of time.
    Other favorites: Days of Heaven–a love triangle, transient farm workers, the eve of WWI. The cinematography is utterly spectacular. Moulin Rouge–Bizarre, mesmerizing, haunting. Nothing like I expected. Chicago–eye-popping visuals, a dancer’s delight (Richard Geer–a tap-dancing lawyer!), with a sly undercurrent of humor. Master and Commander–sheer wow! The sea battles are spectacular, and Russell Crowe and Paul Bettany are a superb team! Have seen this movie at least 15 times–even more than Princess Bride! *g*
    Other favorites are Starlight Hotel, a New Zealand film about the unlikely friendship between a runaway girl and a disillusioned young man running from the law. Visually spectacular. Takes place in NZ during the depression era after WWI.
    And then there’s Blazing Saddles. (Eating beans around the campfire–need I say more?) The Green Mile. Love, Actually. The Die Hard series. The Chronicles of Narnia. Witness. Bladerunner. The Elephant Man. I could go on. And on. And onnnn . . .

    Reply
  44. Sherrie,here.
    Hot button! Hot button! Susan, I simply ADORE movies, and you have listed some of my all-time favorites. I can’t tell you how many times I have watched Princess Bride and cackled like a fool the whole way through. That movie has stood the test of time.
    Other favorites: Days of Heaven–a love triangle, transient farm workers, the eve of WWI. The cinematography is utterly spectacular. Moulin Rouge–Bizarre, mesmerizing, haunting. Nothing like I expected. Chicago–eye-popping visuals, a dancer’s delight (Richard Geer–a tap-dancing lawyer!), with a sly undercurrent of humor. Master and Commander–sheer wow! The sea battles are spectacular, and Russell Crowe and Paul Bettany are a superb team! Have seen this movie at least 15 times–even more than Princess Bride! *g*
    Other favorites are Starlight Hotel, a New Zealand film about the unlikely friendship between a runaway girl and a disillusioned young man running from the law. Visually spectacular. Takes place in NZ during the depression era after WWI.
    And then there’s Blazing Saddles. (Eating beans around the campfire–need I say more?) The Green Mile. Love, Actually. The Die Hard series. The Chronicles of Narnia. Witness. Bladerunner. The Elephant Man. I could go on. And on. And onnnn . . .

    Reply
  45. Sherrie,here.
    Hot button! Hot button! Susan, I simply ADORE movies, and you have listed some of my all-time favorites. I can’t tell you how many times I have watched Princess Bride and cackled like a fool the whole way through. That movie has stood the test of time.
    Other favorites: Days of Heaven–a love triangle, transient farm workers, the eve of WWI. The cinematography is utterly spectacular. Moulin Rouge–Bizarre, mesmerizing, haunting. Nothing like I expected. Chicago–eye-popping visuals, a dancer’s delight (Richard Geer–a tap-dancing lawyer!), with a sly undercurrent of humor. Master and Commander–sheer wow! The sea battles are spectacular, and Russell Crowe and Paul Bettany are a superb team! Have seen this movie at least 15 times–even more than Princess Bride! *g*
    Other favorites are Starlight Hotel, a New Zealand film about the unlikely friendship between a runaway girl and a disillusioned young man running from the law. Visually spectacular. Takes place in NZ during the depression era after WWI.
    And then there’s Blazing Saddles. (Eating beans around the campfire–need I say more?) The Green Mile. Love, Actually. The Die Hard series. The Chronicles of Narnia. Witness. Bladerunner. The Elephant Man. I could go on. And on. And onnnn . . .

    Reply
  46. Aw – I love Ladyhawke. Love it. It’s always been a favourite of mine. I have a soft spot for the newer Masterpiece Classic Jane Austen adaptations – particularly the “Sense and Sensibility” miniseries with Dominic Cooper and the “Persuasion” movie with Sally Hawkins. Le sigh.
    Another miniseries that became an instant romantic favourite is “Lost in Austen” – about a Pride & Prejudice fangirl who accidentally trades places with Elizabeth Bennet in her favourite novel and ends up royally screwing up the plotlines – not to mention winning Darcy’s attention.
    By the way, I nominated the Wenches for an E for Excellent blogger award on my blog!

    Reply
  47. Aw – I love Ladyhawke. Love it. It’s always been a favourite of mine. I have a soft spot for the newer Masterpiece Classic Jane Austen adaptations – particularly the “Sense and Sensibility” miniseries with Dominic Cooper and the “Persuasion” movie with Sally Hawkins. Le sigh.
    Another miniseries that became an instant romantic favourite is “Lost in Austen” – about a Pride & Prejudice fangirl who accidentally trades places with Elizabeth Bennet in her favourite novel and ends up royally screwing up the plotlines – not to mention winning Darcy’s attention.
    By the way, I nominated the Wenches for an E for Excellent blogger award on my blog!

    Reply
  48. Aw – I love Ladyhawke. Love it. It’s always been a favourite of mine. I have a soft spot for the newer Masterpiece Classic Jane Austen adaptations – particularly the “Sense and Sensibility” miniseries with Dominic Cooper and the “Persuasion” movie with Sally Hawkins. Le sigh.
    Another miniseries that became an instant romantic favourite is “Lost in Austen” – about a Pride & Prejudice fangirl who accidentally trades places with Elizabeth Bennet in her favourite novel and ends up royally screwing up the plotlines – not to mention winning Darcy’s attention.
    By the way, I nominated the Wenches for an E for Excellent blogger award on my blog!

    Reply
  49. Aw – I love Ladyhawke. Love it. It’s always been a favourite of mine. I have a soft spot for the newer Masterpiece Classic Jane Austen adaptations – particularly the “Sense and Sensibility” miniseries with Dominic Cooper and the “Persuasion” movie with Sally Hawkins. Le sigh.
    Another miniseries that became an instant romantic favourite is “Lost in Austen” – about a Pride & Prejudice fangirl who accidentally trades places with Elizabeth Bennet in her favourite novel and ends up royally screwing up the plotlines – not to mention winning Darcy’s attention.
    By the way, I nominated the Wenches for an E for Excellent blogger award on my blog!

    Reply
  50. Aw – I love Ladyhawke. Love it. It’s always been a favourite of mine. I have a soft spot for the newer Masterpiece Classic Jane Austen adaptations – particularly the “Sense and Sensibility” miniseries with Dominic Cooper and the “Persuasion” movie with Sally Hawkins. Le sigh.
    Another miniseries that became an instant romantic favourite is “Lost in Austen” – about a Pride & Prejudice fangirl who accidentally trades places with Elizabeth Bennet in her favourite novel and ends up royally screwing up the plotlines – not to mention winning Darcy’s attention.
    By the way, I nominated the Wenches for an E for Excellent blogger award on my blog!

    Reply
  51. You’ve named a lot of my favorite movies, and I’m glad to find someone who loved “Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves” as much as I did. 🙂 I saw it 5 times in the theatre when it came out. “I’d die for you.” Sigh…
    I would also recommend “Love Actually,” “Chocolat,” and “Music & Lyrics.”

    Reply
  52. You’ve named a lot of my favorite movies, and I’m glad to find someone who loved “Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves” as much as I did. 🙂 I saw it 5 times in the theatre when it came out. “I’d die for you.” Sigh…
    I would also recommend “Love Actually,” “Chocolat,” and “Music & Lyrics.”

    Reply
  53. You’ve named a lot of my favorite movies, and I’m glad to find someone who loved “Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves” as much as I did. 🙂 I saw it 5 times in the theatre when it came out. “I’d die for you.” Sigh…
    I would also recommend “Love Actually,” “Chocolat,” and “Music & Lyrics.”

    Reply
  54. You’ve named a lot of my favorite movies, and I’m glad to find someone who loved “Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves” as much as I did. 🙂 I saw it 5 times in the theatre when it came out. “I’d die for you.” Sigh…
    I would also recommend “Love Actually,” “Chocolat,” and “Music & Lyrics.”

    Reply
  55. You’ve named a lot of my favorite movies, and I’m glad to find someone who loved “Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves” as much as I did. 🙂 I saw it 5 times in the theatre when it came out. “I’d die for you.” Sigh…
    I would also recommend “Love Actually,” “Chocolat,” and “Music & Lyrics.”

    Reply
  56. Thanks, what great suggestions, with some old favorites I had forgotten about, like old classics — The Quiet Man, Philadelphia Story, His Girl Friday .. .and new classics like Dirty Dancing (endlessly watchable), Bull Durham, Love Actually! yumm.
    Sherrie, I agree with you on movies, I’m just a big movie fan especially if there’s adventure, romance, poignancy and/or a quirky touch. If it’s dark, depressing, emotionally stressful, I’m outta there. Even so, I do love all the Lethal Weapons and especially the Die Hards, and while they don’t deliver the romantic fun thrill of most of the list we’re talking about here, they’re enormously good movies — as often as I’ve seen John McLaine go at it with the bad guys, I still wince and look away, or else yell out a warning.
    I have the strange ability (?) to mostly forget the endings of movies (a friend says it’s the influence of a lot of Neptune in my Libran chart…) — so I can watch movies again and still be surprised. Works for books too. 🙂
    Thanks for the thumbs up “E for Excellent” blog rating, AnimeJune (love the name)!
    If you all could choose only ONE movie for that desert island stay (somehow there’s a DVD player and an electrical source there, haha) … what would it be?
    I could be stranded with a copy of Ladyhawke or Princess Bride ….
    ~ Susan Sarah

    Reply
  57. Thanks, what great suggestions, with some old favorites I had forgotten about, like old classics — The Quiet Man, Philadelphia Story, His Girl Friday .. .and new classics like Dirty Dancing (endlessly watchable), Bull Durham, Love Actually! yumm.
    Sherrie, I agree with you on movies, I’m just a big movie fan especially if there’s adventure, romance, poignancy and/or a quirky touch. If it’s dark, depressing, emotionally stressful, I’m outta there. Even so, I do love all the Lethal Weapons and especially the Die Hards, and while they don’t deliver the romantic fun thrill of most of the list we’re talking about here, they’re enormously good movies — as often as I’ve seen John McLaine go at it with the bad guys, I still wince and look away, or else yell out a warning.
    I have the strange ability (?) to mostly forget the endings of movies (a friend says it’s the influence of a lot of Neptune in my Libran chart…) — so I can watch movies again and still be surprised. Works for books too. 🙂
    Thanks for the thumbs up “E for Excellent” blog rating, AnimeJune (love the name)!
    If you all could choose only ONE movie for that desert island stay (somehow there’s a DVD player and an electrical source there, haha) … what would it be?
    I could be stranded with a copy of Ladyhawke or Princess Bride ….
    ~ Susan Sarah

    Reply
  58. Thanks, what great suggestions, with some old favorites I had forgotten about, like old classics — The Quiet Man, Philadelphia Story, His Girl Friday .. .and new classics like Dirty Dancing (endlessly watchable), Bull Durham, Love Actually! yumm.
    Sherrie, I agree with you on movies, I’m just a big movie fan especially if there’s adventure, romance, poignancy and/or a quirky touch. If it’s dark, depressing, emotionally stressful, I’m outta there. Even so, I do love all the Lethal Weapons and especially the Die Hards, and while they don’t deliver the romantic fun thrill of most of the list we’re talking about here, they’re enormously good movies — as often as I’ve seen John McLaine go at it with the bad guys, I still wince and look away, or else yell out a warning.
    I have the strange ability (?) to mostly forget the endings of movies (a friend says it’s the influence of a lot of Neptune in my Libran chart…) — so I can watch movies again and still be surprised. Works for books too. 🙂
    Thanks for the thumbs up “E for Excellent” blog rating, AnimeJune (love the name)!
    If you all could choose only ONE movie for that desert island stay (somehow there’s a DVD player and an electrical source there, haha) … what would it be?
    I could be stranded with a copy of Ladyhawke or Princess Bride ….
    ~ Susan Sarah

    Reply
  59. Thanks, what great suggestions, with some old favorites I had forgotten about, like old classics — The Quiet Man, Philadelphia Story, His Girl Friday .. .and new classics like Dirty Dancing (endlessly watchable), Bull Durham, Love Actually! yumm.
    Sherrie, I agree with you on movies, I’m just a big movie fan especially if there’s adventure, romance, poignancy and/or a quirky touch. If it’s dark, depressing, emotionally stressful, I’m outta there. Even so, I do love all the Lethal Weapons and especially the Die Hards, and while they don’t deliver the romantic fun thrill of most of the list we’re talking about here, they’re enormously good movies — as often as I’ve seen John McLaine go at it with the bad guys, I still wince and look away, or else yell out a warning.
    I have the strange ability (?) to mostly forget the endings of movies (a friend says it’s the influence of a lot of Neptune in my Libran chart…) — so I can watch movies again and still be surprised. Works for books too. 🙂
    Thanks for the thumbs up “E for Excellent” blog rating, AnimeJune (love the name)!
    If you all could choose only ONE movie for that desert island stay (somehow there’s a DVD player and an electrical source there, haha) … what would it be?
    I could be stranded with a copy of Ladyhawke or Princess Bride ….
    ~ Susan Sarah

    Reply
  60. Thanks, what great suggestions, with some old favorites I had forgotten about, like old classics — The Quiet Man, Philadelphia Story, His Girl Friday .. .and new classics like Dirty Dancing (endlessly watchable), Bull Durham, Love Actually! yumm.
    Sherrie, I agree with you on movies, I’m just a big movie fan especially if there’s adventure, romance, poignancy and/or a quirky touch. If it’s dark, depressing, emotionally stressful, I’m outta there. Even so, I do love all the Lethal Weapons and especially the Die Hards, and while they don’t deliver the romantic fun thrill of most of the list we’re talking about here, they’re enormously good movies — as often as I’ve seen John McLaine go at it with the bad guys, I still wince and look away, or else yell out a warning.
    I have the strange ability (?) to mostly forget the endings of movies (a friend says it’s the influence of a lot of Neptune in my Libran chart…) — so I can watch movies again and still be surprised. Works for books too. 🙂
    Thanks for the thumbs up “E for Excellent” blog rating, AnimeJune (love the name)!
    If you all could choose only ONE movie for that desert island stay (somehow there’s a DVD player and an electrical source there, haha) … what would it be?
    I could be stranded with a copy of Ladyhawke or Princess Bride ….
    ~ Susan Sarah

    Reply
  61. The desert island movie . . . almost an impossible choice . . . but I think I’d have to go with To Catch A Thief.

    Reply
  62. The desert island movie . . . almost an impossible choice . . . but I think I’d have to go with To Catch A Thief.

    Reply
  63. The desert island movie . . . almost an impossible choice . . . but I think I’d have to go with To Catch A Thief.

    Reply
  64. The desert island movie . . . almost an impossible choice . . . but I think I’d have to go with To Catch A Thief.

    Reply
  65. The desert island movie . . . almost an impossible choice . . . but I think I’d have to go with To Catch A Thief.

    Reply
  66. I adore A Knight’s Tale! Hilarious, great soundtrack, awesome actors, wonderful quippy lines. I could’ve done without the princess, though. I also love Moulin Rouge, with its big, splashy sets and costumes and those musical numbers!
    As for the more dramatic movies, I liked Tristan and Isolde. I liked the movie version of Atonement as well (or, really, anything that James McAvoy is in ), but the book is a million times better.

    Reply
  67. I adore A Knight’s Tale! Hilarious, great soundtrack, awesome actors, wonderful quippy lines. I could’ve done without the princess, though. I also love Moulin Rouge, with its big, splashy sets and costumes and those musical numbers!
    As for the more dramatic movies, I liked Tristan and Isolde. I liked the movie version of Atonement as well (or, really, anything that James McAvoy is in ), but the book is a million times better.

    Reply
  68. I adore A Knight’s Tale! Hilarious, great soundtrack, awesome actors, wonderful quippy lines. I could’ve done without the princess, though. I also love Moulin Rouge, with its big, splashy sets and costumes and those musical numbers!
    As for the more dramatic movies, I liked Tristan and Isolde. I liked the movie version of Atonement as well (or, really, anything that James McAvoy is in ), but the book is a million times better.

    Reply
  69. I adore A Knight’s Tale! Hilarious, great soundtrack, awesome actors, wonderful quippy lines. I could’ve done without the princess, though. I also love Moulin Rouge, with its big, splashy sets and costumes and those musical numbers!
    As for the more dramatic movies, I liked Tristan and Isolde. I liked the movie version of Atonement as well (or, really, anything that James McAvoy is in ), but the book is a million times better.

    Reply
  70. I adore A Knight’s Tale! Hilarious, great soundtrack, awesome actors, wonderful quippy lines. I could’ve done without the princess, though. I also love Moulin Rouge, with its big, splashy sets and costumes and those musical numbers!
    As for the more dramatic movies, I liked Tristan and Isolde. I liked the movie version of Atonement as well (or, really, anything that James McAvoy is in ), but the book is a million times better.

    Reply
  71. Last of the Mohicans (I love this movie!), Knight’s Tale (a great teaching tool for medieval life. The music does work really well.), and the A&E version of Pride and Prejudice are my three favorite movies. I’d forgotten about Romancing the Stone, it is a lot of fun. I don’t go to the movies often and haven’t seen many you mentioned. Another favorite I just remembered – Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade. Harrison Ford and Sean Connery are perfect in this film. It is too bad they didn’t pair up again for another one.

    Reply
  72. Last of the Mohicans (I love this movie!), Knight’s Tale (a great teaching tool for medieval life. The music does work really well.), and the A&E version of Pride and Prejudice are my three favorite movies. I’d forgotten about Romancing the Stone, it is a lot of fun. I don’t go to the movies often and haven’t seen many you mentioned. Another favorite I just remembered – Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade. Harrison Ford and Sean Connery are perfect in this film. It is too bad they didn’t pair up again for another one.

    Reply
  73. Last of the Mohicans (I love this movie!), Knight’s Tale (a great teaching tool for medieval life. The music does work really well.), and the A&E version of Pride and Prejudice are my three favorite movies. I’d forgotten about Romancing the Stone, it is a lot of fun. I don’t go to the movies often and haven’t seen many you mentioned. Another favorite I just remembered – Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade. Harrison Ford and Sean Connery are perfect in this film. It is too bad they didn’t pair up again for another one.

    Reply
  74. Last of the Mohicans (I love this movie!), Knight’s Tale (a great teaching tool for medieval life. The music does work really well.), and the A&E version of Pride and Prejudice are my three favorite movies. I’d forgotten about Romancing the Stone, it is a lot of fun. I don’t go to the movies often and haven’t seen many you mentioned. Another favorite I just remembered – Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade. Harrison Ford and Sean Connery are perfect in this film. It is too bad they didn’t pair up again for another one.

    Reply
  75. Last of the Mohicans (I love this movie!), Knight’s Tale (a great teaching tool for medieval life. The music does work really well.), and the A&E version of Pride and Prejudice are my three favorite movies. I’d forgotten about Romancing the Stone, it is a lot of fun. I don’t go to the movies often and haven’t seen many you mentioned. Another favorite I just remembered – Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade. Harrison Ford and Sean Connery are perfect in this film. It is too bad they didn’t pair up again for another one.

    Reply
  76. Off the top of my head & besides some of the others mentioned above —
    Casanova (the David Tennant version)
    Valmont (Colin Firth & Annette Bening)
    Bugsy (Warren Beatty & Annette Bening)
    The Affair of the Necklace (Hilary Swank)
    Cranford (Judi Dench)
    North & South (Richard Armitage)
    Doctor Who (all of the reboot, but particularly the Rose & the Doctor arc episodes)
    Torchwood (I mention Who & TW because they are like little movies)
    Sebastian (Dirk Bogarde & Susannah York)
    Boy on a Dolphin (Alan Ladd & Sophia Loren)
    Notorious (Cary Grant & Ingrid Bergman)
    Father Goose (Cary Grant & Leslie Caron)
    Love Actually (all the Brits)
    It Came from Beneath the Sea (Faith Domergue & Ken Tobey)
    Impromptu (Hugh Grant & Judy Davis)
    Sense & Sensibility (Emma Thompson version)
    The Duchess (Keira Knightley)
    Some of my picks may seem a little off the wall to some of you, but what they have in common is that, regardless of genre, they have a strong love story at the core of the movie.

    Reply
  77. Off the top of my head & besides some of the others mentioned above —
    Casanova (the David Tennant version)
    Valmont (Colin Firth & Annette Bening)
    Bugsy (Warren Beatty & Annette Bening)
    The Affair of the Necklace (Hilary Swank)
    Cranford (Judi Dench)
    North & South (Richard Armitage)
    Doctor Who (all of the reboot, but particularly the Rose & the Doctor arc episodes)
    Torchwood (I mention Who & TW because they are like little movies)
    Sebastian (Dirk Bogarde & Susannah York)
    Boy on a Dolphin (Alan Ladd & Sophia Loren)
    Notorious (Cary Grant & Ingrid Bergman)
    Father Goose (Cary Grant & Leslie Caron)
    Love Actually (all the Brits)
    It Came from Beneath the Sea (Faith Domergue & Ken Tobey)
    Impromptu (Hugh Grant & Judy Davis)
    Sense & Sensibility (Emma Thompson version)
    The Duchess (Keira Knightley)
    Some of my picks may seem a little off the wall to some of you, but what they have in common is that, regardless of genre, they have a strong love story at the core of the movie.

    Reply
  78. Off the top of my head & besides some of the others mentioned above —
    Casanova (the David Tennant version)
    Valmont (Colin Firth & Annette Bening)
    Bugsy (Warren Beatty & Annette Bening)
    The Affair of the Necklace (Hilary Swank)
    Cranford (Judi Dench)
    North & South (Richard Armitage)
    Doctor Who (all of the reboot, but particularly the Rose & the Doctor arc episodes)
    Torchwood (I mention Who & TW because they are like little movies)
    Sebastian (Dirk Bogarde & Susannah York)
    Boy on a Dolphin (Alan Ladd & Sophia Loren)
    Notorious (Cary Grant & Ingrid Bergman)
    Father Goose (Cary Grant & Leslie Caron)
    Love Actually (all the Brits)
    It Came from Beneath the Sea (Faith Domergue & Ken Tobey)
    Impromptu (Hugh Grant & Judy Davis)
    Sense & Sensibility (Emma Thompson version)
    The Duchess (Keira Knightley)
    Some of my picks may seem a little off the wall to some of you, but what they have in common is that, regardless of genre, they have a strong love story at the core of the movie.

    Reply
  79. Off the top of my head & besides some of the others mentioned above —
    Casanova (the David Tennant version)
    Valmont (Colin Firth & Annette Bening)
    Bugsy (Warren Beatty & Annette Bening)
    The Affair of the Necklace (Hilary Swank)
    Cranford (Judi Dench)
    North & South (Richard Armitage)
    Doctor Who (all of the reboot, but particularly the Rose & the Doctor arc episodes)
    Torchwood (I mention Who & TW because they are like little movies)
    Sebastian (Dirk Bogarde & Susannah York)
    Boy on a Dolphin (Alan Ladd & Sophia Loren)
    Notorious (Cary Grant & Ingrid Bergman)
    Father Goose (Cary Grant & Leslie Caron)
    Love Actually (all the Brits)
    It Came from Beneath the Sea (Faith Domergue & Ken Tobey)
    Impromptu (Hugh Grant & Judy Davis)
    Sense & Sensibility (Emma Thompson version)
    The Duchess (Keira Knightley)
    Some of my picks may seem a little off the wall to some of you, but what they have in common is that, regardless of genre, they have a strong love story at the core of the movie.

    Reply
  80. Off the top of my head & besides some of the others mentioned above —
    Casanova (the David Tennant version)
    Valmont (Colin Firth & Annette Bening)
    Bugsy (Warren Beatty & Annette Bening)
    The Affair of the Necklace (Hilary Swank)
    Cranford (Judi Dench)
    North & South (Richard Armitage)
    Doctor Who (all of the reboot, but particularly the Rose & the Doctor arc episodes)
    Torchwood (I mention Who & TW because they are like little movies)
    Sebastian (Dirk Bogarde & Susannah York)
    Boy on a Dolphin (Alan Ladd & Sophia Loren)
    Notorious (Cary Grant & Ingrid Bergman)
    Father Goose (Cary Grant & Leslie Caron)
    Love Actually (all the Brits)
    It Came from Beneath the Sea (Faith Domergue & Ken Tobey)
    Impromptu (Hugh Grant & Judy Davis)
    Sense & Sensibility (Emma Thompson version)
    The Duchess (Keira Knightley)
    Some of my picks may seem a little off the wall to some of you, but what they have in common is that, regardless of genre, they have a strong love story at the core of the movie.

    Reply
  81. Most of those movies are familiar to me. Here are some more:
    Ai rabu yu -Japanese movie
    Roxanne
    Apollo 13
    Beutiful Mind
    Young Einstein

    Reply
  82. Most of those movies are familiar to me. Here are some more:
    Ai rabu yu -Japanese movie
    Roxanne
    Apollo 13
    Beutiful Mind
    Young Einstein

    Reply
  83. Most of those movies are familiar to me. Here are some more:
    Ai rabu yu -Japanese movie
    Roxanne
    Apollo 13
    Beutiful Mind
    Young Einstein

    Reply
  84. Most of those movies are familiar to me. Here are some more:
    Ai rabu yu -Japanese movie
    Roxanne
    Apollo 13
    Beutiful Mind
    Young Einstein

    Reply
  85. Most of those movies are familiar to me. Here are some more:
    Ai rabu yu -Japanese movie
    Roxanne
    Apollo 13
    Beutiful Mind
    Young Einstein

    Reply
  86. “The Quiet Man”, love the train station scene
    “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes”, if you get a chance see this on the big screen the jewelry is amazing.
    Anything with Cary Grant
    “Rear Window”, love the scene where Raymond Burr looks into the camera.
    “Queen Margot”, don’t know about the historical accuracy but the costumes are great.
    “Babettes Feast”, what a whimsical movie.

    Reply
  87. “The Quiet Man”, love the train station scene
    “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes”, if you get a chance see this on the big screen the jewelry is amazing.
    Anything with Cary Grant
    “Rear Window”, love the scene where Raymond Burr looks into the camera.
    “Queen Margot”, don’t know about the historical accuracy but the costumes are great.
    “Babettes Feast”, what a whimsical movie.

    Reply
  88. “The Quiet Man”, love the train station scene
    “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes”, if you get a chance see this on the big screen the jewelry is amazing.
    Anything with Cary Grant
    “Rear Window”, love the scene where Raymond Burr looks into the camera.
    “Queen Margot”, don’t know about the historical accuracy but the costumes are great.
    “Babettes Feast”, what a whimsical movie.

    Reply
  89. “The Quiet Man”, love the train station scene
    “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes”, if you get a chance see this on the big screen the jewelry is amazing.
    Anything with Cary Grant
    “Rear Window”, love the scene where Raymond Burr looks into the camera.
    “Queen Margot”, don’t know about the historical accuracy but the costumes are great.
    “Babettes Feast”, what a whimsical movie.

    Reply
  90. “The Quiet Man”, love the train station scene
    “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes”, if you get a chance see this on the big screen the jewelry is amazing.
    Anything with Cary Grant
    “Rear Window”, love the scene where Raymond Burr looks into the camera.
    “Queen Margot”, don’t know about the historical accuracy but the costumes are great.
    “Babettes Feast”, what a whimsical movie.

    Reply
  91. Michelle Pfeiffer has come up several times. Along the lines of Midsummer Night’s Dream is Stardust. I will definitely need to watch it several times because the visuals are so rich and complex. Speaking of visuals, the Lord of the Ring movies are great. The books were treated most respectfully and Viggo Mortensen couldn’t be more perfect as Aragorn if he was born in Middle Earth.
    My high school daughter hates it, but the rest of the family loves Casablanca. What a gem of tight acting and cinematography. The lines are immortal too.
    Thanks for the list.
    LynS.

    Reply
  92. Michelle Pfeiffer has come up several times. Along the lines of Midsummer Night’s Dream is Stardust. I will definitely need to watch it several times because the visuals are so rich and complex. Speaking of visuals, the Lord of the Ring movies are great. The books were treated most respectfully and Viggo Mortensen couldn’t be more perfect as Aragorn if he was born in Middle Earth.
    My high school daughter hates it, but the rest of the family loves Casablanca. What a gem of tight acting and cinematography. The lines are immortal too.
    Thanks for the list.
    LynS.

    Reply
  93. Michelle Pfeiffer has come up several times. Along the lines of Midsummer Night’s Dream is Stardust. I will definitely need to watch it several times because the visuals are so rich and complex. Speaking of visuals, the Lord of the Ring movies are great. The books were treated most respectfully and Viggo Mortensen couldn’t be more perfect as Aragorn if he was born in Middle Earth.
    My high school daughter hates it, but the rest of the family loves Casablanca. What a gem of tight acting and cinematography. The lines are immortal too.
    Thanks for the list.
    LynS.

    Reply
  94. Michelle Pfeiffer has come up several times. Along the lines of Midsummer Night’s Dream is Stardust. I will definitely need to watch it several times because the visuals are so rich and complex. Speaking of visuals, the Lord of the Ring movies are great. The books were treated most respectfully and Viggo Mortensen couldn’t be more perfect as Aragorn if he was born in Middle Earth.
    My high school daughter hates it, but the rest of the family loves Casablanca. What a gem of tight acting and cinematography. The lines are immortal too.
    Thanks for the list.
    LynS.

    Reply
  95. Michelle Pfeiffer has come up several times. Along the lines of Midsummer Night’s Dream is Stardust. I will definitely need to watch it several times because the visuals are so rich and complex. Speaking of visuals, the Lord of the Ring movies are great. The books were treated most respectfully and Viggo Mortensen couldn’t be more perfect as Aragorn if he was born in Middle Earth.
    My high school daughter hates it, but the rest of the family loves Casablanca. What a gem of tight acting and cinematography. The lines are immortal too.
    Thanks for the list.
    LynS.

    Reply
  96. So many great movies! I do have to quibble with the hideous, horrendous P&P version with Kiera Knightley – the A&E version is far and away the better of the two!
    The black and white 1940 version of P&P with Laurence Olivier and Greer Garson plays fast and loose with the plot but is so much fun, I can forgive that.

    Reply
  97. So many great movies! I do have to quibble with the hideous, horrendous P&P version with Kiera Knightley – the A&E version is far and away the better of the two!
    The black and white 1940 version of P&P with Laurence Olivier and Greer Garson plays fast and loose with the plot but is so much fun, I can forgive that.

    Reply
  98. So many great movies! I do have to quibble with the hideous, horrendous P&P version with Kiera Knightley – the A&E version is far and away the better of the two!
    The black and white 1940 version of P&P with Laurence Olivier and Greer Garson plays fast and loose with the plot but is so much fun, I can forgive that.

    Reply
  99. So many great movies! I do have to quibble with the hideous, horrendous P&P version with Kiera Knightley – the A&E version is far and away the better of the two!
    The black and white 1940 version of P&P with Laurence Olivier and Greer Garson plays fast and loose with the plot but is so much fun, I can forgive that.

    Reply
  100. So many great movies! I do have to quibble with the hideous, horrendous P&P version with Kiera Knightley – the A&E version is far and away the better of the two!
    The black and white 1940 version of P&P with Laurence Olivier and Greer Garson plays fast and loose with the plot but is so much fun, I can forgive that.

    Reply

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