Once Dishonored — Interview with Mary Jo Putney

Anne here, and today I'm interviewing Mary Jo Putney about her new book, ONCE DISHONORED which is OUT TOMORROW!MJPOnceDishonored

I've read it twice now and thoroughly enjoyed it both times. It's also garnered some lovely reviews. Library Journal gave it a coveted starred review, and gave it this verdict: "In her own signature style, paying impeccable attention to period details, Putney continues to vindicate the honor of scoundrels in this fifth entry of the stunning “Rogues Redeemed” series (after Once a Spy). Fans of historicals will root for our brave, intelligent heroine and the hero who stands beside her."

Publisher's Weekly called it: "a believable, sensuous romance built on true friendship. With this emotional romance, Putney again proves why she’s a star of the genre."

Early readers too, are enthusiastic. One said: "What a treat! Such beautifully drawn, richly nuanced  characters—and happy endings for everyone, huzzah!"

Another said "Wow, I really love this hero! I can see why this book is getting rave reviews. I also like the theme of the wonderful heroine bonding with the other wonderful heroines from previous books in a supportive sisterhood. Mary Jo Putney's books are always wonderful, but this one is particularly moving to me."  

Another said: "I decided to have a quick glance at the first chapter of this book at bedtime and I was still reading three hours later! Literally couldn’t put it down and I was instantly engaged in both the hero and heroine’s lives." 

And here's one more: "I loved the parallel dishonor of the main characters and how they worked together to rehabilitate each other."

Anne again: The 5th book in the 'Rogues Redeemed' series, ONCE DISHONORED is about Lucas Mandeville, now Lord Foxton, whom we met in Once A Spy. Making a reluctant return to society, he sees a young woman in black being horribly insulted at a ball. Lucas being gallant to the fingertips, steps in and asks her to dance. She is Kendra, Lady Denshire, who he knew years before as Kendra Douglas.

Each of them is, in the eyes of society, disgraced, Lucas because in wartime he broke his parole — his word of honor as a gentleman — and escaped a French prison. Kendra's disgrace is one manufactured by her dastardly husband in order to get a divorce — and get his hands on her inheritance. He's also spirited away her young son. Lucas vows to help Kendra, and brings her into his circle of clever and influential friends.

Anne:  Mary Jo, thank you for the opportunity of interviewing you about ONCE DISHONORED (and getting to read the book early!) Many of your books deal with healing, redemption and reconciliation, and this one is no exception.

Once A Spy MM. (1)When we first met Lucas in Once a Spy, he was a bit of a lost soul, feeling unworthy and trying to make up for it by becoming a healer in France, being trained by a monk. In Once Dishonored, he's back in England but still feeling the negative effects of his broken parole. Tell us about Lucas. 

Mary Jo:  You're exactly right about Lucas being something of a lost soul, Anne.  We don't see him as a young man, but in his interactions with family, it's clear that he was a well-bred,  easy going fellow who followed the path laid out for him.  He and his cousin Simon, hero of Once a Spy, were close as brothers.  They went to school together at Harrow, then Lucas followed his late father into the Royal Navy.  So far so good.

But Lucas's experiences in prison broke him and when he escaped, he felt too dishonored to return to his former life and position in society.  Instead, he became the apprentice and caregiver of a bonesetting Franciscan friar.  He found he had a gift for healing, but not the calling to become a friar himself. So when his cousin Simon hunted him down, he eventually decided that it was time to go home.  But apart from his family, where does he belong?  Once Dishonored is the story of the new life he creates for himself.

Anne:  If Lucas is a man in need of redemption and a good cause and Kendra's is a most worthy cause. Tell us about Kendra.

Mary Jo:  Though an orphan and an heiress, Kendra Douglas was a normal young woman who just wanted a decent husband and a family.  She thought she would have that when she married Lord Denshire, but over time she found he was much less decent than expected. Eventually, he became a nightmare.  A new activity she takes up is fencing, which explains the dramatic cover of Kendra in fencing gear and carrying a foil.  She can work off anger over her situation, and makes friends among the Wednesday Morning Fencing Ladies–which include heroines of earlier books in this series. They're a formidable lot!  (The fencing salon she attends, Angelo's, was a real place that Word Wench Andrea Penrose blogged about.  I jumped on it!)

Anne: In this day of easy, widespread and no-fault divorce, I think a lot of people will be surprised — and angered — by the repercussions of divorce for the woman in this era. What were some of the things that Kendra faced?

Mary Jo:  English divorce law of the period was draconian, especially for women.  The only ground for divorce was adultery by the wife.  A husband could commit endless adulteries without consequences.  Here is the brief summary of divorce I included in the Author's Note of the book — and even this isn't that brief!

The few divorces granted were almost invariably on the grounds of adultery by the wife and there were two phases, the civil and religious.  The civil issue was a "CrimCon" trial, that is, the crime of adultery, usually meaning a lengthy, flagrant affair.  It was considered a matter of property; that is, the wife was the property of her husband and having an affair diminished her property value.  (Pause to insert an eye roll here.)

            The wife was not allowed to attend the trial nor to testify because under Anglo-Saxon common law, the husband and wife are one, and the one is the husband.  If the CrimCon suit was successful, the lover generally had to pay a large fine to the husband for alienation of affection. 

            Then the husband sued the wife for adultery and the trial was held in an ecclesiastical court.  If successful, the result would be divortium a mensa et thoro, that is, a separation of bed and board, and neither party could remarry.  For remarriage, a Parliamentary Private Bill of Divorcement had to be filed and a third trial was held. A successful result would be a divorce a vinculo matrimonii. 

Pretty grim!  Kendra's husband fabricated evidence to divorce her, and she's now a social pariah who is desperate to regain custody of her nine year old son.  Her situation seems hopeless — until she and Lucas join forces.  

OnceASoldier FinalAnne: Although all your books are stand-alones, they also often link up with characters from previous books and series. For instance, it was fun to meet up again with Lady Agnes Westerfield who founded the Westerfield Academy — the school for "boys of good birth and bad behavior."   

Mary Jo:  I like to write a community of friends, usually a group of men who have become virtually family for each other.  As close friends, it's not surprising that different characters turn up in each other's stories, but only as needed.  Note that last phrase: I never bring characters in just to make an appearance.  They have to have a real purpose in the story. As it happens, Kendra and Lucas need a lot of support, so a lot of former characters, both male and female, are enlisted in the quest for justice. (As the writer, I like to have a good excuse to check in with them. *G*)

Anne: Could you give us a taste of Once Dishonored, please?

Mary Jo:  The book begins with Lucas seeing Kendra being given the cut direct at a ball.  He asks her to dance, and they realize they'd met many years before, when Kendra was being presented to society.  They'd liked each other but they were going in different directions. Now their paths have crossed again.  Lucas (ie. Foxton) offers to escort her home when they leave the ball and she accepts his offer.

Foxton accompanied her to the vestibule, where an efficient footman produced Kendra’s black cloak and Foxton’s hat. After she donned the cloak, she took her escort’s arm and they descended to street level. He asked, “Where do you live? You said it was nearby.”

“Thorsay House. It’s just off St. James, only three blocks away.” Kendra was surprised by how relaxed she felt on his arm. Was it because they had a prior acquaintance, or because he didn’t judge, leer, or despise her? Perhaps both.

Foxton walked like the military officer he’d been: upright, quietly alert to their surroundings, and clearly not an easy victim. She wasn’t afraid of a short walk at night in this part of London, but it was no bad thing to have a capable male escort.

 "Thorsay," he said thoughtfully.  "Named for the group of Scottish islands between Orkney and Shetland?"

"Yes, all three of the archipelagos are more Norse than Celtic, though they're part of Scotland now.  Thorsay House belongs to the laird of the islands, and he allows Thorsayians to use it as a sort of boarding house when in London.  My grandmother was from Thorsay, first cousin to the Laird.  I spent summers there so I qualify as Thorsayian." The relaxed, accepting nature of Thorsay House had been a sanctuary in the hell her life had become. “I was grateful to be welcomed at the house when I needed a new home.

“You were forced out of your marital home?” Foxton asked quietly.

“Yes.” Her voice was stony. That had been the worst day of her life, a raging firestorm whose details blurred in her mind. What she remembered was pain and loss.

Neither of them spoke as they walked the short blocks to Thorsay House. At the bottom of the steps, she paused to pull her key from her reticule.

She was going to offer a polite thank-you for Foxton’s escort when he caught her gaze and said soberly, “Your life has been shattered, Kendra Douglas. Rage and grief are inevitable and likely necessary. But at some point you need to step beyond the anger toward your future. What is possible? What matters most to you, and how can you take the first steps toward achieving that?”

His words were a blade cutting through her inner turmoil. She drew a deep breath as she thought about what he’d said. Yes, it was time to move forward instead of standing still and burning. “That is the most useful advice I’ve yet received. You’ve implied that your life was also shattered. Did you learn wisdom by handling disaster well?”

He smiled with wry self-mockery. “No, I learned by handling it badly. I’m willing to tell you the whole disgraceful tale if you’re interested.”

Her eyes narrowed as she studied him, wanting to see beyond the handsome features to the man’s soul. Once she’d thought herself a good judge of people, but recent years had destroyed that belief.

Now she forced herself to lower her defenses and really look. Perhaps she was wrong, but she felt that Lucas Mandeville was a man she could trust, at least a little. “I’d like to hear that disgraceful tale, preferably over a brandy. Will you join me for talk? Only talk.”

“Only talk,” he agreed, looking mildly amused at her wariness.

She unlocked the door and stepped inside, leaving it open for Lord Foxton to follow. Thorsay House was quiet at this hour. There were no other guests at the moment, and Mr. and Mrs. Brown, the couple who maintained the house, were in bed by now. 

A candle was burning on the narrow table in the vestibule. She lifted the candlestick and led the way into a small sitting room on the left. While she lit the lamps, Foxton knelt on the hearth and roused the embers of the coal fire to warmer life. Like a Scot, he didn’t stand on ceremony and wait for someone else to perform mundane tasks.

After the fire was burning easily, he stood and gazed around the sitting room. The walls were festooned with Scottish weaponry: arcs of swords and battle axes, daggers and shields, and a range of other implements of death. He moved to a wheel of dirks and traced his fingertips over the foot-and-a-half length of one.

“A Highland dirk,” she said. “Very good for close fighting.”

He smiled a little and turned back toward her. “Does Thorsay House expect to be invaded by the English?”

“If they come, we’re prepared.” OnceAScoundrel

Anne: Lovely fighting words there. What are you working on next? Is there not one more hero-in-waiting, one of the "Rogues Redeemed" who escaped that cellar in Portugal?

Mary Jo:  Indeed there is!  Chantry was one of the five men in the Portuguese cellar.  He turns up again in Once a Scoundrel, where he is working for the British Embassy in Constantinople under the name Ramsay.  I'm working on his book now for next year. It's time for him to go home and take up his responsibilities–whether he wants to or not!

Anne: Oh good, I really liked him as Ramsay in Once a Scoundrel when he helped with the escape. He was definitely a hero-in-waiting. 

Mary Jo: Thanks for interviewing me, Anne!  

Anne: My absolute pleasure, Mary Jo, especially since I get to read the book early. *g*

Mary Jo will be giving a book away to someone who comments within the next two days. The  question: Do you like seeing characters from early books, or do you find them tedious?

215 thoughts on “Once Dishonored — Interview with Mary Jo Putney”

  1. Nothing exciting to say; just that I can barely wait until tomorrow. I am always eager for a book by Mary Jo, and I have been eagerly following the Rogues Redeemed stories.

    Reply
  2. Nothing exciting to say; just that I can barely wait until tomorrow. I am always eager for a book by Mary Jo, and I have been eagerly following the Rogues Redeemed stories.

    Reply
  3. Nothing exciting to say; just that I can barely wait until tomorrow. I am always eager for a book by Mary Jo, and I have been eagerly following the Rogues Redeemed stories.

    Reply
  4. Nothing exciting to say; just that I can barely wait until tomorrow. I am always eager for a book by Mary Jo, and I have been eagerly following the Rogues Redeemed stories.

    Reply
  5. Nothing exciting to say; just that I can barely wait until tomorrow. I am always eager for a book by Mary Jo, and I have been eagerly following the Rogues Redeemed stories.

    Reply
  6. Lovely interview and the very best of luck with the book Mary Jo.
    I’m having trouble with reading and answering comments on the blog. Is this happening to anyone else?

    Reply
  7. Lovely interview and the very best of luck with the book Mary Jo.
    I’m having trouble with reading and answering comments on the blog. Is this happening to anyone else?

    Reply
  8. Lovely interview and the very best of luck with the book Mary Jo.
    I’m having trouble with reading and answering comments on the blog. Is this happening to anyone else?

    Reply
  9. Lovely interview and the very best of luck with the book Mary Jo.
    I’m having trouble with reading and answering comments on the blog. Is this happening to anyone else?

    Reply
  10. Lovely interview and the very best of luck with the book Mary Jo.
    I’m having trouble with reading and answering comments on the blog. Is this happening to anyone else?

    Reply
  11. This book sounds so interesting! I don’t mind seeing characters from previous books. Almost expect it in a series. Sometimes feels like running into an old friend. Love the cover. You don’t need it, but best of luck!

    Reply
  12. This book sounds so interesting! I don’t mind seeing characters from previous books. Almost expect it in a series. Sometimes feels like running into an old friend. Love the cover. You don’t need it, but best of luck!

    Reply
  13. This book sounds so interesting! I don’t mind seeing characters from previous books. Almost expect it in a series. Sometimes feels like running into an old friend. Love the cover. You don’t need it, but best of luck!

    Reply
  14. This book sounds so interesting! I don’t mind seeing characters from previous books. Almost expect it in a series. Sometimes feels like running into an old friend. Love the cover. You don’t need it, but best of luck!

    Reply
  15. This book sounds so interesting! I don’t mind seeing characters from previous books. Almost expect it in a series. Sometimes feels like running into an old friend. Love the cover. You don’t need it, but best of luck!

    Reply
  16. Marvelous interview! Yes! I love seeing characters from previous books making appearances in the newly released books!
    I love the Rogues Redeemed series. Congratulation, Mary Jo.

    Reply
  17. Marvelous interview! Yes! I love seeing characters from previous books making appearances in the newly released books!
    I love the Rogues Redeemed series. Congratulation, Mary Jo.

    Reply
  18. Marvelous interview! Yes! I love seeing characters from previous books making appearances in the newly released books!
    I love the Rogues Redeemed series. Congratulation, Mary Jo.

    Reply
  19. Marvelous interview! Yes! I love seeing characters from previous books making appearances in the newly released books!
    I love the Rogues Redeemed series. Congratulation, Mary Jo.

    Reply
  20. Marvelous interview! Yes! I love seeing characters from previous books making appearances in the newly released books!
    I love the Rogues Redeemed series. Congratulation, Mary Jo.

    Reply
  21. Ahh, I love having old ‘friends’ turn up in new books. It’s why I have so very many of Jo Beverly’s books from over the years. This look like one I need to add to my to-read list.

    Reply
  22. Ahh, I love having old ‘friends’ turn up in new books. It’s why I have so very many of Jo Beverly’s books from over the years. This look like one I need to add to my to-read list.

    Reply
  23. Ahh, I love having old ‘friends’ turn up in new books. It’s why I have so very many of Jo Beverly’s books from over the years. This look like one I need to add to my to-read list.

    Reply
  24. Ahh, I love having old ‘friends’ turn up in new books. It’s why I have so very many of Jo Beverly’s books from over the years. This look like one I need to add to my to-read list.

    Reply
  25. Ahh, I love having old ‘friends’ turn up in new books. It’s why I have so very many of Jo Beverly’s books from over the years. This look like one I need to add to my to-read list.

    Reply
  26. I cannot wait till the book arrives at my door – it has been on order so let’s hope the delivery is quick. I have so enjoyed this group of men and their difficulties, struggles but mostly their loves. Then to know that Ramsey/Chantry is still to come. I have been waiting for him.
    Thankyou Mary Jo Putney for your wonderful stories that stay with me for quite some time. I have had to collect your books so I can be sure to have them when I want to read them again and again.
    Thanks for the interview Anne Gracie.

    Reply
  27. I cannot wait till the book arrives at my door – it has been on order so let’s hope the delivery is quick. I have so enjoyed this group of men and their difficulties, struggles but mostly their loves. Then to know that Ramsey/Chantry is still to come. I have been waiting for him.
    Thankyou Mary Jo Putney for your wonderful stories that stay with me for quite some time. I have had to collect your books so I can be sure to have them when I want to read them again and again.
    Thanks for the interview Anne Gracie.

    Reply
  28. I cannot wait till the book arrives at my door – it has been on order so let’s hope the delivery is quick. I have so enjoyed this group of men and their difficulties, struggles but mostly their loves. Then to know that Ramsey/Chantry is still to come. I have been waiting for him.
    Thankyou Mary Jo Putney for your wonderful stories that stay with me for quite some time. I have had to collect your books so I can be sure to have them when I want to read them again and again.
    Thanks for the interview Anne Gracie.

    Reply
  29. I cannot wait till the book arrives at my door – it has been on order so let’s hope the delivery is quick. I have so enjoyed this group of men and their difficulties, struggles but mostly their loves. Then to know that Ramsey/Chantry is still to come. I have been waiting for him.
    Thankyou Mary Jo Putney for your wonderful stories that stay with me for quite some time. I have had to collect your books so I can be sure to have them when I want to read them again and again.
    Thanks for the interview Anne Gracie.

    Reply
  30. I cannot wait till the book arrives at my door – it has been on order so let’s hope the delivery is quick. I have so enjoyed this group of men and their difficulties, struggles but mostly their loves. Then to know that Ramsey/Chantry is still to come. I have been waiting for him.
    Thankyou Mary Jo Putney for your wonderful stories that stay with me for quite some time. I have had to collect your books so I can be sure to have them when I want to read them again and again.
    Thanks for the interview Anne Gracie.

    Reply
  31. I was lucky enough to read an advance copy of Once Dishonored – I loved it and I’m sure other readers will love it just as much as I did! So pleased to hear there will be one more book in this series – can’t wait! As regards characters returning from previous books in a series, I really like that as it’s fun to get a glimpse of them and see what’s been happening in their lives (provided it’s not something horrible of course!)

    Reply
  32. I was lucky enough to read an advance copy of Once Dishonored – I loved it and I’m sure other readers will love it just as much as I did! So pleased to hear there will be one more book in this series – can’t wait! As regards characters returning from previous books in a series, I really like that as it’s fun to get a glimpse of them and see what’s been happening in their lives (provided it’s not something horrible of course!)

    Reply
  33. I was lucky enough to read an advance copy of Once Dishonored – I loved it and I’m sure other readers will love it just as much as I did! So pleased to hear there will be one more book in this series – can’t wait! As regards characters returning from previous books in a series, I really like that as it’s fun to get a glimpse of them and see what’s been happening in their lives (provided it’s not something horrible of course!)

    Reply
  34. I was lucky enough to read an advance copy of Once Dishonored – I loved it and I’m sure other readers will love it just as much as I did! So pleased to hear there will be one more book in this series – can’t wait! As regards characters returning from previous books in a series, I really like that as it’s fun to get a glimpse of them and see what’s been happening in their lives (provided it’s not something horrible of course!)

    Reply
  35. I was lucky enough to read an advance copy of Once Dishonored – I loved it and I’m sure other readers will love it just as much as I did! So pleased to hear there will be one more book in this series – can’t wait! As regards characters returning from previous books in a series, I really like that as it’s fun to get a glimpse of them and see what’s been happening in their lives (provided it’s not something horrible of course!)

    Reply
  36. My print copy has been pre-ordered and I expect it tomorrow or Wed. I know it will be enjoyed. Reading good books has been the one good thing about having to stay at home. Plenty of time to read!
    Thank you for being dependable all these years.

    Reply
  37. My print copy has been pre-ordered and I expect it tomorrow or Wed. I know it will be enjoyed. Reading good books has been the one good thing about having to stay at home. Plenty of time to read!
    Thank you for being dependable all these years.

    Reply
  38. My print copy has been pre-ordered and I expect it tomorrow or Wed. I know it will be enjoyed. Reading good books has been the one good thing about having to stay at home. Plenty of time to read!
    Thank you for being dependable all these years.

    Reply
  39. My print copy has been pre-ordered and I expect it tomorrow or Wed. I know it will be enjoyed. Reading good books has been the one good thing about having to stay at home. Plenty of time to read!
    Thank you for being dependable all these years.

    Reply
  40. My print copy has been pre-ordered and I expect it tomorrow or Wed. I know it will be enjoyed. Reading good books has been the one good thing about having to stay at home. Plenty of time to read!
    Thank you for being dependable all these years.

    Reply
  41. What a great interview and excerpt! Thank you, Mary Jo and Anne. I’m generally happy to have a character from an earlier book make an appearance in a subsequent book. I have read books, however, where a veritable crowd of prior heroes, heroines, and their multitudinous offspring appear; that can be daunting.

    Reply
  42. What a great interview and excerpt! Thank you, Mary Jo and Anne. I’m generally happy to have a character from an earlier book make an appearance in a subsequent book. I have read books, however, where a veritable crowd of prior heroes, heroines, and their multitudinous offspring appear; that can be daunting.

    Reply
  43. What a great interview and excerpt! Thank you, Mary Jo and Anne. I’m generally happy to have a character from an earlier book make an appearance in a subsequent book. I have read books, however, where a veritable crowd of prior heroes, heroines, and their multitudinous offspring appear; that can be daunting.

    Reply
  44. What a great interview and excerpt! Thank you, Mary Jo and Anne. I’m generally happy to have a character from an earlier book make an appearance in a subsequent book. I have read books, however, where a veritable crowd of prior heroes, heroines, and their multitudinous offspring appear; that can be daunting.

    Reply
  45. What a great interview and excerpt! Thank you, Mary Jo and Anne. I’m generally happy to have a character from an earlier book make an appearance in a subsequent book. I have read books, however, where a veritable crowd of prior heroes, heroines, and their multitudinous offspring appear; that can be daunting.

    Reply
  46. I like to see characters from previous stories, so long as they have a purpose on the new story and their behavior is consistent with their behavior in the previous book.
    This us an excellent interview.
    I’ve enjoyed all of your books so far, in part because of the careful attention to historical detail and accuracy, and also the development of well rounded, interesting characters – and thoroughly dastardly villains. The first series of yours that I read was ‘The Lost Lords’ and one of my favourites of your books was and is ‘The Rake’, with its focus on the struggle with sobriety. I’m looking forward to reading this book.

    Reply
  47. I like to see characters from previous stories, so long as they have a purpose on the new story and their behavior is consistent with their behavior in the previous book.
    This us an excellent interview.
    I’ve enjoyed all of your books so far, in part because of the careful attention to historical detail and accuracy, and also the development of well rounded, interesting characters – and thoroughly dastardly villains. The first series of yours that I read was ‘The Lost Lords’ and one of my favourites of your books was and is ‘The Rake’, with its focus on the struggle with sobriety. I’m looking forward to reading this book.

    Reply
  48. I like to see characters from previous stories, so long as they have a purpose on the new story and their behavior is consistent with their behavior in the previous book.
    This us an excellent interview.
    I’ve enjoyed all of your books so far, in part because of the careful attention to historical detail and accuracy, and also the development of well rounded, interesting characters – and thoroughly dastardly villains. The first series of yours that I read was ‘The Lost Lords’ and one of my favourites of your books was and is ‘The Rake’, with its focus on the struggle with sobriety. I’m looking forward to reading this book.

    Reply
  49. I like to see characters from previous stories, so long as they have a purpose on the new story and their behavior is consistent with their behavior in the previous book.
    This us an excellent interview.
    I’ve enjoyed all of your books so far, in part because of the careful attention to historical detail and accuracy, and also the development of well rounded, interesting characters – and thoroughly dastardly villains. The first series of yours that I read was ‘The Lost Lords’ and one of my favourites of your books was and is ‘The Rake’, with its focus on the struggle with sobriety. I’m looking forward to reading this book.

    Reply
  50. I like to see characters from previous stories, so long as they have a purpose on the new story and their behavior is consistent with their behavior in the previous book.
    This us an excellent interview.
    I’ve enjoyed all of your books so far, in part because of the careful attention to historical detail and accuracy, and also the development of well rounded, interesting characters – and thoroughly dastardly villains. The first series of yours that I read was ‘The Lost Lords’ and one of my favourites of your books was and is ‘The Rake’, with its focus on the struggle with sobriety. I’m looking forward to reading this book.

    Reply
  51. You know, that’s probably one of the two things that I like about Kindle. I still prefer the paper in my hands, but it’s darned awesome to get that instant gratification of having the book almost the second it’s released. I know what I’ll be doing today 🙂

    Reply
  52. You know, that’s probably one of the two things that I like about Kindle. I still prefer the paper in my hands, but it’s darned awesome to get that instant gratification of having the book almost the second it’s released. I know what I’ll be doing today 🙂

    Reply
  53. You know, that’s probably one of the two things that I like about Kindle. I still prefer the paper in my hands, but it’s darned awesome to get that instant gratification of having the book almost the second it’s released. I know what I’ll be doing today 🙂

    Reply
  54. You know, that’s probably one of the two things that I like about Kindle. I still prefer the paper in my hands, but it’s darned awesome to get that instant gratification of having the book almost the second it’s released. I know what I’ll be doing today 🙂

    Reply
  55. You know, that’s probably one of the two things that I like about Kindle. I still prefer the paper in my hands, but it’s darned awesome to get that instant gratification of having the book almost the second it’s released. I know what I’ll be doing today 🙂

    Reply
  56. I have to switch to a different search engine to be able to read comments. Google Chrome won’t open the comments section at all even though it’s what I’ve been using since I first discovered the blog.

    Reply
  57. I have to switch to a different search engine to be able to read comments. Google Chrome won’t open the comments section at all even though it’s what I’ve been using since I first discovered the blog.

    Reply
  58. I have to switch to a different search engine to be able to read comments. Google Chrome won’t open the comments section at all even though it’s what I’ve been using since I first discovered the blog.

    Reply
  59. I have to switch to a different search engine to be able to read comments. Google Chrome won’t open the comments section at all even though it’s what I’ve been using since I first discovered the blog.

    Reply
  60. I have to switch to a different search engine to be able to read comments. Google Chrome won’t open the comments section at all even though it’s what I’ve been using since I first discovered the blog.

    Reply
  61. I’m so looking forward to reading this book–pre-ordered long ago and it’s waiting for me now. Although I’ll probably get the hard copy as well. And I very much enjoy reading stories of groups of friends. The Rogues Redeemed from the Westerfield Academy are among my favorites–love Lady Agnes too. The only sad part is having to wait months for the next one! 🙂

    Reply
  62. I’m so looking forward to reading this book–pre-ordered long ago and it’s waiting for me now. Although I’ll probably get the hard copy as well. And I very much enjoy reading stories of groups of friends. The Rogues Redeemed from the Westerfield Academy are among my favorites–love Lady Agnes too. The only sad part is having to wait months for the next one! 🙂

    Reply
  63. I’m so looking forward to reading this book–pre-ordered long ago and it’s waiting for me now. Although I’ll probably get the hard copy as well. And I very much enjoy reading stories of groups of friends. The Rogues Redeemed from the Westerfield Academy are among my favorites–love Lady Agnes too. The only sad part is having to wait months for the next one! 🙂

    Reply
  64. I’m so looking forward to reading this book–pre-ordered long ago and it’s waiting for me now. Although I’ll probably get the hard copy as well. And I very much enjoy reading stories of groups of friends. The Rogues Redeemed from the Westerfield Academy are among my favorites–love Lady Agnes too. The only sad part is having to wait months for the next one! 🙂

    Reply
  65. I’m so looking forward to reading this book–pre-ordered long ago and it’s waiting for me now. Although I’ll probably get the hard copy as well. And I very much enjoy reading stories of groups of friends. The Rogues Redeemed from the Westerfield Academy are among my favorites–love Lady Agnes too. The only sad part is having to wait months for the next one! 🙂

    Reply
  66. In the best novels, the characters become real to me and I sometimes regret having to part with them. So, getting to renew an old fictional friendship is always fun for me.

    Reply
  67. In the best novels, the characters become real to me and I sometimes regret having to part with them. So, getting to renew an old fictional friendship is always fun for me.

    Reply
  68. In the best novels, the characters become real to me and I sometimes regret having to part with them. So, getting to renew an old fictional friendship is always fun for me.

    Reply
  69. In the best novels, the characters become real to me and I sometimes regret having to part with them. So, getting to renew an old fictional friendship is always fun for me.

    Reply
  70. In the best novels, the characters become real to me and I sometimes regret having to part with them. So, getting to renew an old fictional friendship is always fun for me.

    Reply
  71. Thanks for the interview….actually, the cover alone is enough to knock your socks off.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  72. Thanks for the interview….actually, the cover alone is enough to knock your socks off.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  73. Thanks for the interview….actually, the cover alone is enough to knock your socks off.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  74. Thanks for the interview….actually, the cover alone is enough to knock your socks off.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  75. Thanks for the interview….actually, the cover alone is enough to knock your socks off.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  76. I’ve been impatiently awaiting this book. I’m even more anxious to read it now that I’ve read that little snippet.
    As for having characters show up again, I do very much enjoy it when they show up organically. Then you can enjoy their appearance again and also when you don’t have to know their backstory to appreciate them.
    I have read a few series where previous characters seem to be thrown in and there isn’t an obviously good reason why. At those times they seem to just clutter the scene.

    Reply
  77. I’ve been impatiently awaiting this book. I’m even more anxious to read it now that I’ve read that little snippet.
    As for having characters show up again, I do very much enjoy it when they show up organically. Then you can enjoy their appearance again and also when you don’t have to know their backstory to appreciate them.
    I have read a few series where previous characters seem to be thrown in and there isn’t an obviously good reason why. At those times they seem to just clutter the scene.

    Reply
  78. I’ve been impatiently awaiting this book. I’m even more anxious to read it now that I’ve read that little snippet.
    As for having characters show up again, I do very much enjoy it when they show up organically. Then you can enjoy their appearance again and also when you don’t have to know their backstory to appreciate them.
    I have read a few series where previous characters seem to be thrown in and there isn’t an obviously good reason why. At those times they seem to just clutter the scene.

    Reply
  79. I’ve been impatiently awaiting this book. I’m even more anxious to read it now that I’ve read that little snippet.
    As for having characters show up again, I do very much enjoy it when they show up organically. Then you can enjoy their appearance again and also when you don’t have to know their backstory to appreciate them.
    I have read a few series where previous characters seem to be thrown in and there isn’t an obviously good reason why. At those times they seem to just clutter the scene.

    Reply
  80. I’ve been impatiently awaiting this book. I’m even more anxious to read it now that I’ve read that little snippet.
    As for having characters show up again, I do very much enjoy it when they show up organically. Then you can enjoy their appearance again and also when you don’t have to know their backstory to appreciate them.
    I have read a few series where previous characters seem to be thrown in and there isn’t an obviously good reason why. At those times they seem to just clutter the scene.

    Reply
  81. I love to catch up with characters from earlier books and find out what’s happening with them – that’s why I enjoy reading series.

    Reply
  82. I love to catch up with characters from earlier books and find out what’s happening with them – that’s why I enjoy reading series.

    Reply
  83. I love to catch up with characters from earlier books and find out what’s happening with them – that’s why I enjoy reading series.

    Reply
  84. I love to catch up with characters from earlier books and find out what’s happening with them – that’s why I enjoy reading series.

    Reply
  85. I love to catch up with characters from earlier books and find out what’s happening with them – that’s why I enjoy reading series.

    Reply
  86. I can’t wait for my print copy to arrive!
    I do like the characters from other books in a series to appear as it is like seeing old friends and finding out what has happened to them since our last meeting. Your characters always seem to have a reason for being in a subsequent novel and at times this reason is very important to the story line. I think it can make the novel more interesting.

    Reply
  87. I can’t wait for my print copy to arrive!
    I do like the characters from other books in a series to appear as it is like seeing old friends and finding out what has happened to them since our last meeting. Your characters always seem to have a reason for being in a subsequent novel and at times this reason is very important to the story line. I think it can make the novel more interesting.

    Reply
  88. I can’t wait for my print copy to arrive!
    I do like the characters from other books in a series to appear as it is like seeing old friends and finding out what has happened to them since our last meeting. Your characters always seem to have a reason for being in a subsequent novel and at times this reason is very important to the story line. I think it can make the novel more interesting.

    Reply
  89. I can’t wait for my print copy to arrive!
    I do like the characters from other books in a series to appear as it is like seeing old friends and finding out what has happened to them since our last meeting. Your characters always seem to have a reason for being in a subsequent novel and at times this reason is very important to the story line. I think it can make the novel more interesting.

    Reply
  90. I can’t wait for my print copy to arrive!
    I do like the characters from other books in a series to appear as it is like seeing old friends and finding out what has happened to them since our last meeting. Your characters always seem to have a reason for being in a subsequent novel and at times this reason is very important to the story line. I think it can make the novel more interesting.

    Reply
  91. I love seeing characters from early books and how they are tied in and how their story develops. To me that makes it very interesting and it’s like meeting an old friend.

    Reply
  92. I love seeing characters from early books and how they are tied in and how their story develops. To me that makes it very interesting and it’s like meeting an old friend.

    Reply
  93. I love seeing characters from early books and how they are tied in and how their story develops. To me that makes it very interesting and it’s like meeting an old friend.

    Reply
  94. I love seeing characters from early books and how they are tied in and how their story develops. To me that makes it very interesting and it’s like meeting an old friend.

    Reply
  95. I love seeing characters from early books and how they are tied in and how their story develops. To me that makes it very interesting and it’s like meeting an old friend.

    Reply
  96. Teresa, Chrome has been giving us problems lately. We hope we’ve got that fixed. If you’re still having problems, you might try downloading Firefox at, I think, Firefox.com Several of us use it for working with Typepad and it gives no problems. Easier. though, if we’ve fixed the Chrome issue at this end!

    Reply
  97. Teresa, Chrome has been giving us problems lately. We hope we’ve got that fixed. If you’re still having problems, you might try downloading Firefox at, I think, Firefox.com Several of us use it for working with Typepad and it gives no problems. Easier. though, if we’ve fixed the Chrome issue at this end!

    Reply
  98. Teresa, Chrome has been giving us problems lately. We hope we’ve got that fixed. If you’re still having problems, you might try downloading Firefox at, I think, Firefox.com Several of us use it for working with Typepad and it gives no problems. Easier. though, if we’ve fixed the Chrome issue at this end!

    Reply
  99. Teresa, Chrome has been giving us problems lately. We hope we’ve got that fixed. If you’re still having problems, you might try downloading Firefox at, I think, Firefox.com Several of us use it for working with Typepad and it gives no problems. Easier. though, if we’ve fixed the Chrome issue at this end!

    Reply
  100. Teresa, Chrome has been giving us problems lately. We hope we’ve got that fixed. If you’re still having problems, you might try downloading Firefox at, I think, Firefox.com Several of us use it for working with Typepad and it gives no problems. Easier. though, if we’ve fixed the Chrome issue at this end!

    Reply

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