On the Trail of King Richard III

RichardNicola here, reflecting on the emotional effect that people and places in history can have on us. I’ve been a Ricardian, a supporter of King Richard III, since I read The Daughter of Time by Josephine Tey when I was about 12 years old. The much-maligned English monarch was a shoe-in to be my first adolescent crush; he was brave, loyal and devoted to the North of England, where I grew up.  I joined the Richard III Society and became enormously partisan and completely unable to entertain any other point of view about Richard other than that he was a total hero.

Fast forward six years and this became a little bit difficult. I was at London University, studying medieval history. Partisanship wasn’t really encouraged; independent thinking and the weighing up of the historical evidence was. And so began my long on/off relationship with Richard III and historical truth. Twenty five years later I studied Richard again for my MA dissertation in the context of why we need heroes. Regardless of my views of his guilt or innocence over the murder of the princes in the tower, one of the most infamous episodes in English history, I was certainly still very interested in him!

The discovery of Richard’s body buried beneath a modern day car park in the city of Leicester riveted people around the world. It Richard iii car park signwas the kind of story you simply could not make up and whilst it might not have answered the big questions such as the fate of the princes, it did tell us a lot about Richard himself from what he ate to how he died.

In 2014 the Richard III Visitor Centre opened on the site of his original burial and the following year he was re-buried across the road in Leicester Cathedral. Since then it has been my intention to visit the site of both of his graves and a couple of weeks ago I finally did. Leicester has certainly changed since the days when I lived there before I was married! The old part of the city centre that I remember is now largely pedestrianised, allowing you to wander around and admire the medieval buildings.

Angus and Richard IIIThere’s also a Richard III walking trail that takes you to a lot of ancient sites in the city that have a connection to the King. I made Angus, my pet dog, explore the trail with me; I’m not sure that he found it as interesting as I did but he dutifully accompanied me to the castle and the magazine gateway and Blue Boar Inn (now the Leicester Travelodge!)

The Visitor Centre is brilliant, encapsulating in one exhibition the complicated history of the Richard III memorial stone Wars of the Roses and how Richard came to be king in the first place. It’s quite Games of Thrones in style. Upstairs is an even better exhibition showing all the steps in the re-discovery of Richard’s body, the archaeological dig, the forensic examination, the DNA testing matching him to a living descendant. There is also a fascinating analysis of how Richard’s reputation has changed over the years; the strength of the Shakespearean myth and the gradual revision of views about him. It’s pretty balanced in it’s approach.

Finally, at the end of the tour, you get to see the place where Richard was originally buried. A glass floor covers the grave site. I’d been pretty much able to look at the rest of the exhibition with an objective eye but when I saw the tiny space into which they had bundled his body after Bosworth, I did feel pretty emotional. Luckily there was a steward on duty, which stopped me from crying, but only just!

Richard iii tombAcross the road at the cathedral it’s a different story. Richard’s tomb is perfect, in my opinion, simple but elegant, and standing beside it is a very moving experience. I particularly liked the anecdote later told by one of the vergers, that a couple of weeks after the king had been re-buried, a small child was looking at the tomb and said she particularly liked the sword on it. Everyone was puzzled because there was no sword engraved on the stone but the girl pointed out that when you looked at the cross cut into the top of it you could see the shadow of a sword. She was right! If you stand at the end of the tomb and look along the deep cut of the cross, you see the shadow of a sword. This was completely unintentional when the tomb was carved and the effect was created by the lights in the cathedral roof. They had to be exactly in the right position to cast that shadow and no one had set it up deliberately. Spooky!!

I found the whole day quite emotional and it reminded me of how strong the ties are that bind us to the people and places of the past. We all have our own heroes and heroines and they mean a lot to us. There are also places as well as people that are important or special to us and they will always resonate with us. Who is your historical hero? Do you feel an affinity with someone from the past, or with a particular historical place? 

170 thoughts on “On the Trail of King Richard III”

  1. Great blog – I also love the Richard III exhibition in Leicester.
    When researching for The Forgotten Secret which is set during the Irish war of independence, I came across Constance Markiewicz who totally inspired me. She was part of the Anglo-Irish aristocracy, married to a Polish count, and to an extent a rebel looking for a cause. She was a suffragette for a while, before throwing herself whole-heartedly into the fight for Irish independence. She was there at the 1916 Easter uprising, and imprisoned for her part in it, only escaping execution because she was a woman. She made the tricolour flag that flew above the Dublin GPO that week. Later she became the first woman MP in 1918, but never took her seat in Parliament (refusing to take the oath of allegiance, also she was once again in prison). She continued to play a large part in the war of independence, being president of the Cumann na mBan (women’s council). A woman in a man’s world, fighting for what she believed in.

    Reply
  2. Great blog – I also love the Richard III exhibition in Leicester.
    When researching for The Forgotten Secret which is set during the Irish war of independence, I came across Constance Markiewicz who totally inspired me. She was part of the Anglo-Irish aristocracy, married to a Polish count, and to an extent a rebel looking for a cause. She was a suffragette for a while, before throwing herself whole-heartedly into the fight for Irish independence. She was there at the 1916 Easter uprising, and imprisoned for her part in it, only escaping execution because she was a woman. She made the tricolour flag that flew above the Dublin GPO that week. Later she became the first woman MP in 1918, but never took her seat in Parliament (refusing to take the oath of allegiance, also she was once again in prison). She continued to play a large part in the war of independence, being president of the Cumann na mBan (women’s council). A woman in a man’s world, fighting for what she believed in.

    Reply
  3. Great blog – I also love the Richard III exhibition in Leicester.
    When researching for The Forgotten Secret which is set during the Irish war of independence, I came across Constance Markiewicz who totally inspired me. She was part of the Anglo-Irish aristocracy, married to a Polish count, and to an extent a rebel looking for a cause. She was a suffragette for a while, before throwing herself whole-heartedly into the fight for Irish independence. She was there at the 1916 Easter uprising, and imprisoned for her part in it, only escaping execution because she was a woman. She made the tricolour flag that flew above the Dublin GPO that week. Later she became the first woman MP in 1918, but never took her seat in Parliament (refusing to take the oath of allegiance, also she was once again in prison). She continued to play a large part in the war of independence, being president of the Cumann na mBan (women’s council). A woman in a man’s world, fighting for what she believed in.

    Reply
  4. Great blog – I also love the Richard III exhibition in Leicester.
    When researching for The Forgotten Secret which is set during the Irish war of independence, I came across Constance Markiewicz who totally inspired me. She was part of the Anglo-Irish aristocracy, married to a Polish count, and to an extent a rebel looking for a cause. She was a suffragette for a while, before throwing herself whole-heartedly into the fight for Irish independence. She was there at the 1916 Easter uprising, and imprisoned for her part in it, only escaping execution because she was a woman. She made the tricolour flag that flew above the Dublin GPO that week. Later she became the first woman MP in 1918, but never took her seat in Parliament (refusing to take the oath of allegiance, also she was once again in prison). She continued to play a large part in the war of independence, being president of the Cumann na mBan (women’s council). A woman in a man’s world, fighting for what she believed in.

    Reply
  5. Great blog – I also love the Richard III exhibition in Leicester.
    When researching for The Forgotten Secret which is set during the Irish war of independence, I came across Constance Markiewicz who totally inspired me. She was part of the Anglo-Irish aristocracy, married to a Polish count, and to an extent a rebel looking for a cause. She was a suffragette for a while, before throwing herself whole-heartedly into the fight for Irish independence. She was there at the 1916 Easter uprising, and imprisoned for her part in it, only escaping execution because she was a woman. She made the tricolour flag that flew above the Dublin GPO that week. Later she became the first woman MP in 1918, but never took her seat in Parliament (refusing to take the oath of allegiance, also she was once again in prison). She continued to play a large part in the war of independence, being president of the Cumann na mBan (women’s council). A woman in a man’s world, fighting for what she believed in.

    Reply
  6. Have you seen the TX series, “The White Queen”, based on the books by Phillipa Gregory? I thought it was well acted and gave some information of which I was not aware.***Spoiler alert**** the main surprise about Richard was that he didn’t kill the little princes, it was Henry VII’s mother, Margaret, trying to secure the throne for her son and get rid of any challenges to his rule. Now, based on her character in the show, I found that very plausible. I don’t know what evidence Ms Gregory used to come to this conclusion but it made a very good story. There was no mention of Richard’s scoliosis, nor did the actor hunch over to give that impression. Really, the story is worthy of a soap opera and all facets of human nature are on display.

    Reply
  7. Have you seen the TX series, “The White Queen”, based on the books by Phillipa Gregory? I thought it was well acted and gave some information of which I was not aware.***Spoiler alert**** the main surprise about Richard was that he didn’t kill the little princes, it was Henry VII’s mother, Margaret, trying to secure the throne for her son and get rid of any challenges to his rule. Now, based on her character in the show, I found that very plausible. I don’t know what evidence Ms Gregory used to come to this conclusion but it made a very good story. There was no mention of Richard’s scoliosis, nor did the actor hunch over to give that impression. Really, the story is worthy of a soap opera and all facets of human nature are on display.

    Reply
  8. Have you seen the TX series, “The White Queen”, based on the books by Phillipa Gregory? I thought it was well acted and gave some information of which I was not aware.***Spoiler alert**** the main surprise about Richard was that he didn’t kill the little princes, it was Henry VII’s mother, Margaret, trying to secure the throne for her son and get rid of any challenges to his rule. Now, based on her character in the show, I found that very plausible. I don’t know what evidence Ms Gregory used to come to this conclusion but it made a very good story. There was no mention of Richard’s scoliosis, nor did the actor hunch over to give that impression. Really, the story is worthy of a soap opera and all facets of human nature are on display.

    Reply
  9. Have you seen the TX series, “The White Queen”, based on the books by Phillipa Gregory? I thought it was well acted and gave some information of which I was not aware.***Spoiler alert**** the main surprise about Richard was that he didn’t kill the little princes, it was Henry VII’s mother, Margaret, trying to secure the throne for her son and get rid of any challenges to his rule. Now, based on her character in the show, I found that very plausible. I don’t know what evidence Ms Gregory used to come to this conclusion but it made a very good story. There was no mention of Richard’s scoliosis, nor did the actor hunch over to give that impression. Really, the story is worthy of a soap opera and all facets of human nature are on display.

    Reply
  10. Have you seen the TX series, “The White Queen”, based on the books by Phillipa Gregory? I thought it was well acted and gave some information of which I was not aware.***Spoiler alert**** the main surprise about Richard was that he didn’t kill the little princes, it was Henry VII’s mother, Margaret, trying to secure the throne for her son and get rid of any challenges to his rule. Now, based on her character in the show, I found that very plausible. I don’t know what evidence Ms Gregory used to come to this conclusion but it made a very good story. There was no mention of Richard’s scoliosis, nor did the actor hunch over to give that impression. Really, the story is worthy of a soap opera and all facets of human nature are on display.

    Reply
  11. Hi Kath! What an inspiring story that is about Constance Markiewicz. Although I’d heard the name I didn’t know much about her. She sounds an extraordinary woman with huge conviction and I love that there is finally as portrait of her in the Houses of Parliament. Thanks so much for sharing her story.

    Reply
  12. Hi Kath! What an inspiring story that is about Constance Markiewicz. Although I’d heard the name I didn’t know much about her. She sounds an extraordinary woman with huge conviction and I love that there is finally as portrait of her in the Houses of Parliament. Thanks so much for sharing her story.

    Reply
  13. Hi Kath! What an inspiring story that is about Constance Markiewicz. Although I’d heard the name I didn’t know much about her. She sounds an extraordinary woman with huge conviction and I love that there is finally as portrait of her in the Houses of Parliament. Thanks so much for sharing her story.

    Reply
  14. Hi Kath! What an inspiring story that is about Constance Markiewicz. Although I’d heard the name I didn’t know much about her. She sounds an extraordinary woman with huge conviction and I love that there is finally as portrait of her in the Houses of Parliament. Thanks so much for sharing her story.

    Reply
  15. Hi Kath! What an inspiring story that is about Constance Markiewicz. Although I’d heard the name I didn’t know much about her. She sounds an extraordinary woman with huge conviction and I love that there is finally as portrait of her in the Houses of Parliament. Thanks so much for sharing her story.

    Reply
  16. Hi Kathy! Yes, i did see The White Queen and enjoyed the series very much. I agree Margaret Beaufort’s character in the story and possibly in real life would make her a plausible suspect! The entire Wars of the Roses is full of real-life human emotion, isn’t it which is perhaps one of the reasons it’s so popular an inspiration for fiction!

    Reply
  17. Hi Kathy! Yes, i did see The White Queen and enjoyed the series very much. I agree Margaret Beaufort’s character in the story and possibly in real life would make her a plausible suspect! The entire Wars of the Roses is full of real-life human emotion, isn’t it which is perhaps one of the reasons it’s so popular an inspiration for fiction!

    Reply
  18. Hi Kathy! Yes, i did see The White Queen and enjoyed the series very much. I agree Margaret Beaufort’s character in the story and possibly in real life would make her a plausible suspect! The entire Wars of the Roses is full of real-life human emotion, isn’t it which is perhaps one of the reasons it’s so popular an inspiration for fiction!

    Reply
  19. Hi Kathy! Yes, i did see The White Queen and enjoyed the series very much. I agree Margaret Beaufort’s character in the story and possibly in real life would make her a plausible suspect! The entire Wars of the Roses is full of real-life human emotion, isn’t it which is perhaps one of the reasons it’s so popular an inspiration for fiction!

    Reply
  20. Hi Kathy! Yes, i did see The White Queen and enjoyed the series very much. I agree Margaret Beaufort’s character in the story and possibly in real life would make her a plausible suspect! The entire Wars of the Roses is full of real-life human emotion, isn’t it which is perhaps one of the reasons it’s so popular an inspiration for fiction!

    Reply
  21. How wonderful that your historical hero now has so many places where you can find out more about him. The discovery of his body and his splendidly simple tomb do make a marvellous and emotionally charged site to visit, and to pay one’s respects.
    My personal historical hero is Llewelyn ap Gruffydd, the Last Native Prince of Wales. His life was a long struggle to unite Wales against the much larger forces of the Norman kings, and frequent treachery from fiery and quarrelsome Welsh lords. He almost succeeded but was betrayed and beheaded in an ambush. His body is [probably] interred at Abbey-cym-Hir, but there are a number of ruined castles owned or built by him in North Wales; as well as a simple stone monument at Cilmeri. And of course there are many ballads about him, to rouse the Welsh spirit.

    Reply
  22. How wonderful that your historical hero now has so many places where you can find out more about him. The discovery of his body and his splendidly simple tomb do make a marvellous and emotionally charged site to visit, and to pay one’s respects.
    My personal historical hero is Llewelyn ap Gruffydd, the Last Native Prince of Wales. His life was a long struggle to unite Wales against the much larger forces of the Norman kings, and frequent treachery from fiery and quarrelsome Welsh lords. He almost succeeded but was betrayed and beheaded in an ambush. His body is [probably] interred at Abbey-cym-Hir, but there are a number of ruined castles owned or built by him in North Wales; as well as a simple stone monument at Cilmeri. And of course there are many ballads about him, to rouse the Welsh spirit.

    Reply
  23. How wonderful that your historical hero now has so many places where you can find out more about him. The discovery of his body and his splendidly simple tomb do make a marvellous and emotionally charged site to visit, and to pay one’s respects.
    My personal historical hero is Llewelyn ap Gruffydd, the Last Native Prince of Wales. His life was a long struggle to unite Wales against the much larger forces of the Norman kings, and frequent treachery from fiery and quarrelsome Welsh lords. He almost succeeded but was betrayed and beheaded in an ambush. His body is [probably] interred at Abbey-cym-Hir, but there are a number of ruined castles owned or built by him in North Wales; as well as a simple stone monument at Cilmeri. And of course there are many ballads about him, to rouse the Welsh spirit.

    Reply
  24. How wonderful that your historical hero now has so many places where you can find out more about him. The discovery of his body and his splendidly simple tomb do make a marvellous and emotionally charged site to visit, and to pay one’s respects.
    My personal historical hero is Llewelyn ap Gruffydd, the Last Native Prince of Wales. His life was a long struggle to unite Wales against the much larger forces of the Norman kings, and frequent treachery from fiery and quarrelsome Welsh lords. He almost succeeded but was betrayed and beheaded in an ambush. His body is [probably] interred at Abbey-cym-Hir, but there are a number of ruined castles owned or built by him in North Wales; as well as a simple stone monument at Cilmeri. And of course there are many ballads about him, to rouse the Welsh spirit.

    Reply
  25. How wonderful that your historical hero now has so many places where you can find out more about him. The discovery of his body and his splendidly simple tomb do make a marvellous and emotionally charged site to visit, and to pay one’s respects.
    My personal historical hero is Llewelyn ap Gruffydd, the Last Native Prince of Wales. His life was a long struggle to unite Wales against the much larger forces of the Norman kings, and frequent treachery from fiery and quarrelsome Welsh lords. He almost succeeded but was betrayed and beheaded in an ambush. His body is [probably] interred at Abbey-cym-Hir, but there are a number of ruined castles owned or built by him in North Wales; as well as a simple stone monument at Cilmeri. And of course there are many ballads about him, to rouse the Welsh spirit.

    Reply
  26. Thank you, Beth. I can see how Llewelyn would capture the imagination! Having both stories and physical places to visit that are connected to a historical person are both such powerful ways of making the emotional connection.

    Reply
  27. Thank you, Beth. I can see how Llewelyn would capture the imagination! Having both stories and physical places to visit that are connected to a historical person are both such powerful ways of making the emotional connection.

    Reply
  28. Thank you, Beth. I can see how Llewelyn would capture the imagination! Having both stories and physical places to visit that are connected to a historical person are both such powerful ways of making the emotional connection.

    Reply
  29. Thank you, Beth. I can see how Llewelyn would capture the imagination! Having both stories and physical places to visit that are connected to a historical person are both such powerful ways of making the emotional connection.

    Reply
  30. Thank you, Beth. I can see how Llewelyn would capture the imagination! Having both stories and physical places to visit that are connected to a historical person are both such powerful ways of making the emotional connection.

    Reply
  31. I love Josephine Tey, but “A Daughter in Time” is my favourite. It also touched me when I first read it (time to dig it out again, I think!) I can’t remember how old I was (I think a teenager) but it was the first time I’d really understood the adage that history is written by the conquerors. I went on to read an academic biography of him that I enjoyed. But it is Ms. Tey’s work I remember best. I’ve always thought it would make a great stage play, given it all takes place in a hospital room!

    Reply
  32. I love Josephine Tey, but “A Daughter in Time” is my favourite. It also touched me when I first read it (time to dig it out again, I think!) I can’t remember how old I was (I think a teenager) but it was the first time I’d really understood the adage that history is written by the conquerors. I went on to read an academic biography of him that I enjoyed. But it is Ms. Tey’s work I remember best. I’ve always thought it would make a great stage play, given it all takes place in a hospital room!

    Reply
  33. I love Josephine Tey, but “A Daughter in Time” is my favourite. It also touched me when I first read it (time to dig it out again, I think!) I can’t remember how old I was (I think a teenager) but it was the first time I’d really understood the adage that history is written by the conquerors. I went on to read an academic biography of him that I enjoyed. But it is Ms. Tey’s work I remember best. I’ve always thought it would make a great stage play, given it all takes place in a hospital room!

    Reply
  34. I love Josephine Tey, but “A Daughter in Time” is my favourite. It also touched me when I first read it (time to dig it out again, I think!) I can’t remember how old I was (I think a teenager) but it was the first time I’d really understood the adage that history is written by the conquerors. I went on to read an academic biography of him that I enjoyed. But it is Ms. Tey’s work I remember best. I’ve always thought it would make a great stage play, given it all takes place in a hospital room!

    Reply
  35. I love Josephine Tey, but “A Daughter in Time” is my favourite. It also touched me when I first read it (time to dig it out again, I think!) I can’t remember how old I was (I think a teenager) but it was the first time I’d really understood the adage that history is written by the conquerors. I went on to read an academic biography of him that I enjoyed. But it is Ms. Tey’s work I remember best. I’ve always thought it would make a great stage play, given it all takes place in a hospital room!

    Reply
  36. I ended up doing some research on Richard myself for a university English project, and, perhaps unlike most people, I had never heard of any dispute to Shakespeare’s version. Everything I uncovered, from primary sources and secondary sources near to Richard’s own time, however, pointed to an entirely different narrative.
    Richard was (like other people) a complex human being: he had the Plantagenet temper, and lost it a few times that he lived to regret. At the same time, he was a man of deep loyalties who loved England passionately, and was fiercely loyal to what he saw as his oath and responsibility to govern. Yet much of the attention focused on him relates to the deaths of his nephews: did he do it? Didn’t he?
    I believe the story begins much further back; and in his assumption of the throne, there are a few points often overlooked.
    First of all, when Richard started out from York to guide the reign of his nephew, he fully intended that the boy would be king, while he himself served as guardian and guide until the young king grew to be of age. There’s nothing to suggest he had any dark design in his heart.
    Something changed dramatically, and in a very few days, however. Sources point to a dark mind at work–one who had large plans, if he could put Richard on the throne. In fact, though distantly, he was Richard’s rival claimant; and he is remembered by his title, Buckingham.
    It appears to have been Buckingham who suggested to Richard that he had no choice but to become king. I suspect, though I have not been able to prove, that it was Buckingham who urged Richard, within the first months of his reign, to take a protracted “tour” of England. During this time, Richard’s nephews were murdered, and rumors began that Richard was responsible–this while Buckingham had been left with authority over their keeping.
    Two claimants were now disposed of, and by a means that readily turned much popular sentiment against Richard. At this time, Buckingham himself rose in rebellion and asserted his claim to the throne. Had he won, he would have succeeded entirely. Instead, Richard defeated him, but the damage was largely done. Richard was an object of suspicion and infamy, facing enemies within and without. He knew that even if he defeated Henry Tudor, he could no longer govern with the open generosity and freedom that he recognized as ideal. Fatalistically, he resigned himself, and refused to gather his men for prayers on the evening of the battle of Bosworth Field.
    “If God is with us, we shall not need to pray. If not, any prayers of ours are idle blasphemy,” he is said to have replied.
    Shortly after Richard’s death, a source records that among the common people, Buckingham was held to have done exactly as I have outlined above–plotted Richard’s downfall and betrayed him to the utmost. Thus, it is not a new theory.

    Reply
  37. I ended up doing some research on Richard myself for a university English project, and, perhaps unlike most people, I had never heard of any dispute to Shakespeare’s version. Everything I uncovered, from primary sources and secondary sources near to Richard’s own time, however, pointed to an entirely different narrative.
    Richard was (like other people) a complex human being: he had the Plantagenet temper, and lost it a few times that he lived to regret. At the same time, he was a man of deep loyalties who loved England passionately, and was fiercely loyal to what he saw as his oath and responsibility to govern. Yet much of the attention focused on him relates to the deaths of his nephews: did he do it? Didn’t he?
    I believe the story begins much further back; and in his assumption of the throne, there are a few points often overlooked.
    First of all, when Richard started out from York to guide the reign of his nephew, he fully intended that the boy would be king, while he himself served as guardian and guide until the young king grew to be of age. There’s nothing to suggest he had any dark design in his heart.
    Something changed dramatically, and in a very few days, however. Sources point to a dark mind at work–one who had large plans, if he could put Richard on the throne. In fact, though distantly, he was Richard’s rival claimant; and he is remembered by his title, Buckingham.
    It appears to have been Buckingham who suggested to Richard that he had no choice but to become king. I suspect, though I have not been able to prove, that it was Buckingham who urged Richard, within the first months of his reign, to take a protracted “tour” of England. During this time, Richard’s nephews were murdered, and rumors began that Richard was responsible–this while Buckingham had been left with authority over their keeping.
    Two claimants were now disposed of, and by a means that readily turned much popular sentiment against Richard. At this time, Buckingham himself rose in rebellion and asserted his claim to the throne. Had he won, he would have succeeded entirely. Instead, Richard defeated him, but the damage was largely done. Richard was an object of suspicion and infamy, facing enemies within and without. He knew that even if he defeated Henry Tudor, he could no longer govern with the open generosity and freedom that he recognized as ideal. Fatalistically, he resigned himself, and refused to gather his men for prayers on the evening of the battle of Bosworth Field.
    “If God is with us, we shall not need to pray. If not, any prayers of ours are idle blasphemy,” he is said to have replied.
    Shortly after Richard’s death, a source records that among the common people, Buckingham was held to have done exactly as I have outlined above–plotted Richard’s downfall and betrayed him to the utmost. Thus, it is not a new theory.

    Reply
  38. I ended up doing some research on Richard myself for a university English project, and, perhaps unlike most people, I had never heard of any dispute to Shakespeare’s version. Everything I uncovered, from primary sources and secondary sources near to Richard’s own time, however, pointed to an entirely different narrative.
    Richard was (like other people) a complex human being: he had the Plantagenet temper, and lost it a few times that he lived to regret. At the same time, he was a man of deep loyalties who loved England passionately, and was fiercely loyal to what he saw as his oath and responsibility to govern. Yet much of the attention focused on him relates to the deaths of his nephews: did he do it? Didn’t he?
    I believe the story begins much further back; and in his assumption of the throne, there are a few points often overlooked.
    First of all, when Richard started out from York to guide the reign of his nephew, he fully intended that the boy would be king, while he himself served as guardian and guide until the young king grew to be of age. There’s nothing to suggest he had any dark design in his heart.
    Something changed dramatically, and in a very few days, however. Sources point to a dark mind at work–one who had large plans, if he could put Richard on the throne. In fact, though distantly, he was Richard’s rival claimant; and he is remembered by his title, Buckingham.
    It appears to have been Buckingham who suggested to Richard that he had no choice but to become king. I suspect, though I have not been able to prove, that it was Buckingham who urged Richard, within the first months of his reign, to take a protracted “tour” of England. During this time, Richard’s nephews were murdered, and rumors began that Richard was responsible–this while Buckingham had been left with authority over their keeping.
    Two claimants were now disposed of, and by a means that readily turned much popular sentiment against Richard. At this time, Buckingham himself rose in rebellion and asserted his claim to the throne. Had he won, he would have succeeded entirely. Instead, Richard defeated him, but the damage was largely done. Richard was an object of suspicion and infamy, facing enemies within and without. He knew that even if he defeated Henry Tudor, he could no longer govern with the open generosity and freedom that he recognized as ideal. Fatalistically, he resigned himself, and refused to gather his men for prayers on the evening of the battle of Bosworth Field.
    “If God is with us, we shall not need to pray. If not, any prayers of ours are idle blasphemy,” he is said to have replied.
    Shortly after Richard’s death, a source records that among the common people, Buckingham was held to have done exactly as I have outlined above–plotted Richard’s downfall and betrayed him to the utmost. Thus, it is not a new theory.

    Reply
  39. I ended up doing some research on Richard myself for a university English project, and, perhaps unlike most people, I had never heard of any dispute to Shakespeare’s version. Everything I uncovered, from primary sources and secondary sources near to Richard’s own time, however, pointed to an entirely different narrative.
    Richard was (like other people) a complex human being: he had the Plantagenet temper, and lost it a few times that he lived to regret. At the same time, he was a man of deep loyalties who loved England passionately, and was fiercely loyal to what he saw as his oath and responsibility to govern. Yet much of the attention focused on him relates to the deaths of his nephews: did he do it? Didn’t he?
    I believe the story begins much further back; and in his assumption of the throne, there are a few points often overlooked.
    First of all, when Richard started out from York to guide the reign of his nephew, he fully intended that the boy would be king, while he himself served as guardian and guide until the young king grew to be of age. There’s nothing to suggest he had any dark design in his heart.
    Something changed dramatically, and in a very few days, however. Sources point to a dark mind at work–one who had large plans, if he could put Richard on the throne. In fact, though distantly, he was Richard’s rival claimant; and he is remembered by his title, Buckingham.
    It appears to have been Buckingham who suggested to Richard that he had no choice but to become king. I suspect, though I have not been able to prove, that it was Buckingham who urged Richard, within the first months of his reign, to take a protracted “tour” of England. During this time, Richard’s nephews were murdered, and rumors began that Richard was responsible–this while Buckingham had been left with authority over their keeping.
    Two claimants were now disposed of, and by a means that readily turned much popular sentiment against Richard. At this time, Buckingham himself rose in rebellion and asserted his claim to the throne. Had he won, he would have succeeded entirely. Instead, Richard defeated him, but the damage was largely done. Richard was an object of suspicion and infamy, facing enemies within and without. He knew that even if he defeated Henry Tudor, he could no longer govern with the open generosity and freedom that he recognized as ideal. Fatalistically, he resigned himself, and refused to gather his men for prayers on the evening of the battle of Bosworth Field.
    “If God is with us, we shall not need to pray. If not, any prayers of ours are idle blasphemy,” he is said to have replied.
    Shortly after Richard’s death, a source records that among the common people, Buckingham was held to have done exactly as I have outlined above–plotted Richard’s downfall and betrayed him to the utmost. Thus, it is not a new theory.

    Reply
  40. I ended up doing some research on Richard myself for a university English project, and, perhaps unlike most people, I had never heard of any dispute to Shakespeare’s version. Everything I uncovered, from primary sources and secondary sources near to Richard’s own time, however, pointed to an entirely different narrative.
    Richard was (like other people) a complex human being: he had the Plantagenet temper, and lost it a few times that he lived to regret. At the same time, he was a man of deep loyalties who loved England passionately, and was fiercely loyal to what he saw as his oath and responsibility to govern. Yet much of the attention focused on him relates to the deaths of his nephews: did he do it? Didn’t he?
    I believe the story begins much further back; and in his assumption of the throne, there are a few points often overlooked.
    First of all, when Richard started out from York to guide the reign of his nephew, he fully intended that the boy would be king, while he himself served as guardian and guide until the young king grew to be of age. There’s nothing to suggest he had any dark design in his heart.
    Something changed dramatically, and in a very few days, however. Sources point to a dark mind at work–one who had large plans, if he could put Richard on the throne. In fact, though distantly, he was Richard’s rival claimant; and he is remembered by his title, Buckingham.
    It appears to have been Buckingham who suggested to Richard that he had no choice but to become king. I suspect, though I have not been able to prove, that it was Buckingham who urged Richard, within the first months of his reign, to take a protracted “tour” of England. During this time, Richard’s nephews were murdered, and rumors began that Richard was responsible–this while Buckingham had been left with authority over their keeping.
    Two claimants were now disposed of, and by a means that readily turned much popular sentiment against Richard. At this time, Buckingham himself rose in rebellion and asserted his claim to the throne. Had he won, he would have succeeded entirely. Instead, Richard defeated him, but the damage was largely done. Richard was an object of suspicion and infamy, facing enemies within and without. He knew that even if he defeated Henry Tudor, he could no longer govern with the open generosity and freedom that he recognized as ideal. Fatalistically, he resigned himself, and refused to gather his men for prayers on the evening of the battle of Bosworth Field.
    “If God is with us, we shall not need to pray. If not, any prayers of ours are idle blasphemy,” he is said to have replied.
    Shortly after Richard’s death, a source records that among the common people, Buckingham was held to have done exactly as I have outlined above–plotted Richard’s downfall and betrayed him to the utmost. Thus, it is not a new theory.

    Reply
  41. Have you read Rosemary Hawley Jarman’s WE SPEAK NO TREASON? It was published in the early 1970s and I read it long before I read DAUGHTER OF TIME—it was the first book I read that presented Richard III as heroic and not the murderer of the princes. The book is fiction, but I seem to remember footnotes where Jarman claimed some piece of exculpatory evidence was real.

    Reply
  42. Have you read Rosemary Hawley Jarman’s WE SPEAK NO TREASON? It was published in the early 1970s and I read it long before I read DAUGHTER OF TIME—it was the first book I read that presented Richard III as heroic and not the murderer of the princes. The book is fiction, but I seem to remember footnotes where Jarman claimed some piece of exculpatory evidence was real.

    Reply
  43. Have you read Rosemary Hawley Jarman’s WE SPEAK NO TREASON? It was published in the early 1970s and I read it long before I read DAUGHTER OF TIME—it was the first book I read that presented Richard III as heroic and not the murderer of the princes. The book is fiction, but I seem to remember footnotes where Jarman claimed some piece of exculpatory evidence was real.

    Reply
  44. Have you read Rosemary Hawley Jarman’s WE SPEAK NO TREASON? It was published in the early 1970s and I read it long before I read DAUGHTER OF TIME—it was the first book I read that presented Richard III as heroic and not the murderer of the princes. The book is fiction, but I seem to remember footnotes where Jarman claimed some piece of exculpatory evidence was real.

    Reply
  45. Have you read Rosemary Hawley Jarman’s WE SPEAK NO TREASON? It was published in the early 1970s and I read it long before I read DAUGHTER OF TIME—it was the first book I read that presented Richard III as heroic and not the murderer of the princes. The book is fiction, but I seem to remember footnotes where Jarman claimed some piece of exculpatory evidence was real.

    Reply
  46. Emmeline Pankhurst is someone I consider an amazing heroine for women’s rights. I’ve seen that terrible film of her at Ascot determined to win women the right to vote by making such a statement there in committing suicide to bring it forth.
    I have read, “The Daughter of Time” and was so moved by the representation of Richard III. The only exposure I had before was the Shakespeare play. He took enormous dramatic license with Richard.

    Reply
  47. Emmeline Pankhurst is someone I consider an amazing heroine for women’s rights. I’ve seen that terrible film of her at Ascot determined to win women the right to vote by making such a statement there in committing suicide to bring it forth.
    I have read, “The Daughter of Time” and was so moved by the representation of Richard III. The only exposure I had before was the Shakespeare play. He took enormous dramatic license with Richard.

    Reply
  48. Emmeline Pankhurst is someone I consider an amazing heroine for women’s rights. I’ve seen that terrible film of her at Ascot determined to win women the right to vote by making such a statement there in committing suicide to bring it forth.
    I have read, “The Daughter of Time” and was so moved by the representation of Richard III. The only exposure I had before was the Shakespeare play. He took enormous dramatic license with Richard.

    Reply
  49. Emmeline Pankhurst is someone I consider an amazing heroine for women’s rights. I’ve seen that terrible film of her at Ascot determined to win women the right to vote by making such a statement there in committing suicide to bring it forth.
    I have read, “The Daughter of Time” and was so moved by the representation of Richard III. The only exposure I had before was the Shakespeare play. He took enormous dramatic license with Richard.

    Reply
  50. Emmeline Pankhurst is someone I consider an amazing heroine for women’s rights. I’ve seen that terrible film of her at Ascot determined to win women the right to vote by making such a statement there in committing suicide to bring it forth.
    I have read, “The Daughter of Time” and was so moved by the representation of Richard III. The only exposure I had before was the Shakespeare play. He took enormous dramatic license with Richard.

    Reply
  51. Twenty years ago I was lucky enough to visit York, where Richard has always had a good reputation. While there, I bought a pamphlet about the mystery of the boys’ death; it also proposed Buckingham as the most likely candidate for murderer, as suggested by Lucy. A history teacher at the school where I worked used the mystery to teach how different sources can give different interpretations of events. There was a mock trial of Richard, with defense and prosecutors, who quoted from the primary sources. The jury usually convicted Richard. I don’t think the defense was aware of Buckingham or Margaret as possible perps at that time.

    Reply
  52. Twenty years ago I was lucky enough to visit York, where Richard has always had a good reputation. While there, I bought a pamphlet about the mystery of the boys’ death; it also proposed Buckingham as the most likely candidate for murderer, as suggested by Lucy. A history teacher at the school where I worked used the mystery to teach how different sources can give different interpretations of events. There was a mock trial of Richard, with defense and prosecutors, who quoted from the primary sources. The jury usually convicted Richard. I don’t think the defense was aware of Buckingham or Margaret as possible perps at that time.

    Reply
  53. Twenty years ago I was lucky enough to visit York, where Richard has always had a good reputation. While there, I bought a pamphlet about the mystery of the boys’ death; it also proposed Buckingham as the most likely candidate for murderer, as suggested by Lucy. A history teacher at the school where I worked used the mystery to teach how different sources can give different interpretations of events. There was a mock trial of Richard, with defense and prosecutors, who quoted from the primary sources. The jury usually convicted Richard. I don’t think the defense was aware of Buckingham or Margaret as possible perps at that time.

    Reply
  54. Twenty years ago I was lucky enough to visit York, where Richard has always had a good reputation. While there, I bought a pamphlet about the mystery of the boys’ death; it also proposed Buckingham as the most likely candidate for murderer, as suggested by Lucy. A history teacher at the school where I worked used the mystery to teach how different sources can give different interpretations of events. There was a mock trial of Richard, with defense and prosecutors, who quoted from the primary sources. The jury usually convicted Richard. I don’t think the defense was aware of Buckingham or Margaret as possible perps at that time.

    Reply
  55. Twenty years ago I was lucky enough to visit York, where Richard has always had a good reputation. While there, I bought a pamphlet about the mystery of the boys’ death; it also proposed Buckingham as the most likely candidate for murderer, as suggested by Lucy. A history teacher at the school where I worked used the mystery to teach how different sources can give different interpretations of events. There was a mock trial of Richard, with defense and prosecutors, who quoted from the primary sources. The jury usually convicted Richard. I don’t think the defense was aware of Buckingham or Margaret as possible perps at that time.

    Reply
  56. Every year, Washington Romance Writers has a Retreat. For many years, the first day of the Retreat was preceded by a very popular signing at Turn the Page Books & Cafe in Boonsboro, Maryland. The signings would always include Nora Roberts, aka J. D. Robb, as well as guest authors from the Retreat. After one signing, the guest authors asked if we (the locals) could take them to visit Antietam Battleground, which was nearby. I believe Antietam is the site of one of the bloodiest battles of the American Civil War. And when I walked over the grounds that day, I could virtually feel the air pulsating with the cries of those spirits which lay beneath our feet. I’ve never had such a feeling before or sense. Very moving, to say the least…

    Reply
  57. Every year, Washington Romance Writers has a Retreat. For many years, the first day of the Retreat was preceded by a very popular signing at Turn the Page Books & Cafe in Boonsboro, Maryland. The signings would always include Nora Roberts, aka J. D. Robb, as well as guest authors from the Retreat. After one signing, the guest authors asked if we (the locals) could take them to visit Antietam Battleground, which was nearby. I believe Antietam is the site of one of the bloodiest battles of the American Civil War. And when I walked over the grounds that day, I could virtually feel the air pulsating with the cries of those spirits which lay beneath our feet. I’ve never had such a feeling before or sense. Very moving, to say the least…

    Reply
  58. Every year, Washington Romance Writers has a Retreat. For many years, the first day of the Retreat was preceded by a very popular signing at Turn the Page Books & Cafe in Boonsboro, Maryland. The signings would always include Nora Roberts, aka J. D. Robb, as well as guest authors from the Retreat. After one signing, the guest authors asked if we (the locals) could take them to visit Antietam Battleground, which was nearby. I believe Antietam is the site of one of the bloodiest battles of the American Civil War. And when I walked over the grounds that day, I could virtually feel the air pulsating with the cries of those spirits which lay beneath our feet. I’ve never had such a feeling before or sense. Very moving, to say the least…

    Reply
  59. Every year, Washington Romance Writers has a Retreat. For many years, the first day of the Retreat was preceded by a very popular signing at Turn the Page Books & Cafe in Boonsboro, Maryland. The signings would always include Nora Roberts, aka J. D. Robb, as well as guest authors from the Retreat. After one signing, the guest authors asked if we (the locals) could take them to visit Antietam Battleground, which was nearby. I believe Antietam is the site of one of the bloodiest battles of the American Civil War. And when I walked over the grounds that day, I could virtually feel the air pulsating with the cries of those spirits which lay beneath our feet. I’ve never had such a feeling before or sense. Very moving, to say the least…

    Reply
  60. Every year, Washington Romance Writers has a Retreat. For many years, the first day of the Retreat was preceded by a very popular signing at Turn the Page Books & Cafe in Boonsboro, Maryland. The signings would always include Nora Roberts, aka J. D. Robb, as well as guest authors from the Retreat. After one signing, the guest authors asked if we (the locals) could take them to visit Antietam Battleground, which was nearby. I believe Antietam is the site of one of the bloodiest battles of the American Civil War. And when I walked over the grounds that day, I could virtually feel the air pulsating with the cries of those spirits which lay beneath our feet. I’ve never had such a feeling before or sense. Very moving, to say the least…

    Reply
  61. It’s so interesting to see how influential the Josephine Tey book has been. I hadn’t thought of a stage play of it but I can see that would be brilliant! I wonder if anyone has ever done that – or thought if it!

    Reply
  62. It’s so interesting to see how influential the Josephine Tey book has been. I hadn’t thought of a stage play of it but I can see that would be brilliant! I wonder if anyone has ever done that – or thought if it!

    Reply
  63. It’s so interesting to see how influential the Josephine Tey book has been. I hadn’t thought of a stage play of it but I can see that would be brilliant! I wonder if anyone has ever done that – or thought if it!

    Reply
  64. It’s so interesting to see how influential the Josephine Tey book has been. I hadn’t thought of a stage play of it but I can see that would be brilliant! I wonder if anyone has ever done that – or thought if it!

    Reply
  65. It’s so interesting to see how influential the Josephine Tey book has been. I hadn’t thought of a stage play of it but I can see that would be brilliant! I wonder if anyone has ever done that – or thought if it!

    Reply
  66. Hi Patricia! Emmeline Pankhurst and the other suffragettes are very inspiring, aren’t they. Whenever there is an election and people say they aren’t going to vote, I want to shout: “people died so you could have this right!”

    Reply
  67. Hi Patricia! Emmeline Pankhurst and the other suffragettes are very inspiring, aren’t they. Whenever there is an election and people say they aren’t going to vote, I want to shout: “people died so you could have this right!”

    Reply
  68. Hi Patricia! Emmeline Pankhurst and the other suffragettes are very inspiring, aren’t they. Whenever there is an election and people say they aren’t going to vote, I want to shout: “people died so you could have this right!”

    Reply
  69. Hi Patricia! Emmeline Pankhurst and the other suffragettes are very inspiring, aren’t they. Whenever there is an election and people say they aren’t going to vote, I want to shout: “people died so you could have this right!”

    Reply
  70. Hi Patricia! Emmeline Pankhurst and the other suffragettes are very inspiring, aren’t they. Whenever there is an election and people say they aren’t going to vote, I want to shout: “people died so you could have this right!”

    Reply
  71. Hi Peg! I remember that the loyalty of the City of York to Richard was one of the things that moved me the most about the reaction to his death. There is a TV programme called the Trial of Richard III which I’ve never seen but must look up; In it SPOILERS he is exonerated.

    Reply
  72. Hi Peg! I remember that the loyalty of the City of York to Richard was one of the things that moved me the most about the reaction to his death. There is a TV programme called the Trial of Richard III which I’ve never seen but must look up; In it SPOILERS he is exonerated.

    Reply
  73. Hi Peg! I remember that the loyalty of the City of York to Richard was one of the things that moved me the most about the reaction to his death. There is a TV programme called the Trial of Richard III which I’ve never seen but must look up; In it SPOILERS he is exonerated.

    Reply
  74. Hi Peg! I remember that the loyalty of the City of York to Richard was one of the things that moved me the most about the reaction to his death. There is a TV programme called the Trial of Richard III which I’ve never seen but must look up; In it SPOILERS he is exonerated.

    Reply
  75. Hi Peg! I remember that the loyalty of the City of York to Richard was one of the things that moved me the most about the reaction to his death. There is a TV programme called the Trial of Richard III which I’ve never seen but must look up; In it SPOILERS he is exonerated.

    Reply
  76. I would love to visit the Antietam Battleground. I’e hear so much about the atmosphere there and the experience of visiting. That must have been an extraordinary and poignant experience.

    Reply
  77. I would love to visit the Antietam Battleground. I’e hear so much about the atmosphere there and the experience of visiting. That must have been an extraordinary and poignant experience.

    Reply
  78. I would love to visit the Antietam Battleground. I’e hear so much about the atmosphere there and the experience of visiting. That must have been an extraordinary and poignant experience.

    Reply
  79. I would love to visit the Antietam Battleground. I’e hear so much about the atmosphere there and the experience of visiting. That must have been an extraordinary and poignant experience.

    Reply
  80. I would love to visit the Antietam Battleground. I’e hear so much about the atmosphere there and the experience of visiting. That must have been an extraordinary and poignant experience.

    Reply
  81. I’ve visited her house in Sligo some years ago when I was staying with my brother. She was a remarkable woman.

    Reply
  82. I’ve visited her house in Sligo some years ago when I was staying with my brother. She was a remarkable woman.

    Reply
  83. I’ve visited her house in Sligo some years ago when I was staying with my brother. She was a remarkable woman.

    Reply
  84. I’ve visited her house in Sligo some years ago when I was staying with my brother. She was a remarkable woman.

    Reply
  85. I’ve visited her house in Sligo some years ago when I was staying with my brother. She was a remarkable woman.

    Reply
  86. I too admire Richard 111 very much. When his bones were discovered I happened to be doing an online course about him. It made it all the more poignant and interesting. I watched the funeral on tv during this time. I had only just discovered the Josephine Tey book as well and enjoyed it.
    A famous grave I’ve been lucky to visit is Jane Austen’s about two years ago. I felt very emotional standing there and understand completely how you felt at Richard’s grave.

    Reply
  87. I too admire Richard 111 very much. When his bones were discovered I happened to be doing an online course about him. It made it all the more poignant and interesting. I watched the funeral on tv during this time. I had only just discovered the Josephine Tey book as well and enjoyed it.
    A famous grave I’ve been lucky to visit is Jane Austen’s about two years ago. I felt very emotional standing there and understand completely how you felt at Richard’s grave.

    Reply
  88. I too admire Richard 111 very much. When his bones were discovered I happened to be doing an online course about him. It made it all the more poignant and interesting. I watched the funeral on tv during this time. I had only just discovered the Josephine Tey book as well and enjoyed it.
    A famous grave I’ve been lucky to visit is Jane Austen’s about two years ago. I felt very emotional standing there and understand completely how you felt at Richard’s grave.

    Reply
  89. I too admire Richard 111 very much. When his bones were discovered I happened to be doing an online course about him. It made it all the more poignant and interesting. I watched the funeral on tv during this time. I had only just discovered the Josephine Tey book as well and enjoyed it.
    A famous grave I’ve been lucky to visit is Jane Austen’s about two years ago. I felt very emotional standing there and understand completely how you felt at Richard’s grave.

    Reply
  90. I too admire Richard 111 very much. When his bones were discovered I happened to be doing an online course about him. It made it all the more poignant and interesting. I watched the funeral on tv during this time. I had only just discovered the Josephine Tey book as well and enjoyed it.
    A famous grave I’ve been lucky to visit is Jane Austen’s about two years ago. I felt very emotional standing there and understand completely how you felt at Richard’s grave.

    Reply
  91. Hi Nicola. I wrote a novel about Buckingham in which ‘he did it.’ I believe he thought he had a good chance to usurp Richard’s position and become king; Prof Carol Rawcliffe in her book about the Dukes of Buckingham also thinks he was aiming for the throne. His letters to Tudor, which no longer exist, apparently did not mention ‘asking Henry Tudor’ to take the throne at all–they just asked Tudor to join the rebellion. I cannot really imagine Buckingham wanting this stranger crowned when he had a better claim to the throne by blood, being a descendant of Thomas of Woodstock, Edward III’s youngest son AND he also was a Beaufort maternally. Margaret B was his aunt by marriage but also related through his mother, who shared the same name. I think Bucks may have been played by Bishop Morton and Margaret.

    Reply
  92. Hi Nicola. I wrote a novel about Buckingham in which ‘he did it.’ I believe he thought he had a good chance to usurp Richard’s position and become king; Prof Carol Rawcliffe in her book about the Dukes of Buckingham also thinks he was aiming for the throne. His letters to Tudor, which no longer exist, apparently did not mention ‘asking Henry Tudor’ to take the throne at all–they just asked Tudor to join the rebellion. I cannot really imagine Buckingham wanting this stranger crowned when he had a better claim to the throne by blood, being a descendant of Thomas of Woodstock, Edward III’s youngest son AND he also was a Beaufort maternally. Margaret B was his aunt by marriage but also related through his mother, who shared the same name. I think Bucks may have been played by Bishop Morton and Margaret.

    Reply
  93. Hi Nicola. I wrote a novel about Buckingham in which ‘he did it.’ I believe he thought he had a good chance to usurp Richard’s position and become king; Prof Carol Rawcliffe in her book about the Dukes of Buckingham also thinks he was aiming for the throne. His letters to Tudor, which no longer exist, apparently did not mention ‘asking Henry Tudor’ to take the throne at all–they just asked Tudor to join the rebellion. I cannot really imagine Buckingham wanting this stranger crowned when he had a better claim to the throne by blood, being a descendant of Thomas of Woodstock, Edward III’s youngest son AND he also was a Beaufort maternally. Margaret B was his aunt by marriage but also related through his mother, who shared the same name. I think Bucks may have been played by Bishop Morton and Margaret.

    Reply
  94. Hi Nicola. I wrote a novel about Buckingham in which ‘he did it.’ I believe he thought he had a good chance to usurp Richard’s position and become king; Prof Carol Rawcliffe in her book about the Dukes of Buckingham also thinks he was aiming for the throne. His letters to Tudor, which no longer exist, apparently did not mention ‘asking Henry Tudor’ to take the throne at all–they just asked Tudor to join the rebellion. I cannot really imagine Buckingham wanting this stranger crowned when he had a better claim to the throne by blood, being a descendant of Thomas of Woodstock, Edward III’s youngest son AND he also was a Beaufort maternally. Margaret B was his aunt by marriage but also related through his mother, who shared the same name. I think Bucks may have been played by Bishop Morton and Margaret.

    Reply
  95. Hi Nicola. I wrote a novel about Buckingham in which ‘he did it.’ I believe he thought he had a good chance to usurp Richard’s position and become king; Prof Carol Rawcliffe in her book about the Dukes of Buckingham also thinks he was aiming for the throne. His letters to Tudor, which no longer exist, apparently did not mention ‘asking Henry Tudor’ to take the throne at all–they just asked Tudor to join the rebellion. I cannot really imagine Buckingham wanting this stranger crowned when he had a better claim to the throne by blood, being a descendant of Thomas of Woodstock, Edward III’s youngest son AND he also was a Beaufort maternally. Margaret B was his aunt by marriage but also related through his mother, who shared the same name. I think Bucks may have been played by Bishop Morton and Margaret.

    Reply
  96. I adored him after reading “The Sunne and the Splendour”. There was no way he could be so crippled as Shakespeare declared and participate and lead such incredible military campaigns. Power does strange things to some people, so I am very conflicted about the princes in the tower.

    Reply
  97. I adored him after reading “The Sunne and the Splendour”. There was no way he could be so crippled as Shakespeare declared and participate and lead such incredible military campaigns. Power does strange things to some people, so I am very conflicted about the princes in the tower.

    Reply
  98. I adored him after reading “The Sunne and the Splendour”. There was no way he could be so crippled as Shakespeare declared and participate and lead such incredible military campaigns. Power does strange things to some people, so I am very conflicted about the princes in the tower.

    Reply
  99. I adored him after reading “The Sunne and the Splendour”. There was no way he could be so crippled as Shakespeare declared and participate and lead such incredible military campaigns. Power does strange things to some people, so I am very conflicted about the princes in the tower.

    Reply
  100. I adored him after reading “The Sunne and the Splendour”. There was no way he could be so crippled as Shakespeare declared and participate and lead such incredible military campaigns. Power does strange things to some people, so I am very conflicted about the princes in the tower.

    Reply
  101. Today the Blog AND Comments were so good, interesting and thought provoking. My extreme reads over the years have been Robin Hood, King Arthur et al, Richard the Lionheart and Eleanor of Aquitaine. Of course, that brings in Henry II and Thomas a Becket. So much reading there (fictional & non) that I never got into Richard III. After Sharon Kaye Penman books and The White Queen, I see more reading in my future!

    Reply
  102. Today the Blog AND Comments were so good, interesting and thought provoking. My extreme reads over the years have been Robin Hood, King Arthur et al, Richard the Lionheart and Eleanor of Aquitaine. Of course, that brings in Henry II and Thomas a Becket. So much reading there (fictional & non) that I never got into Richard III. After Sharon Kaye Penman books and The White Queen, I see more reading in my future!

    Reply
  103. Today the Blog AND Comments were so good, interesting and thought provoking. My extreme reads over the years have been Robin Hood, King Arthur et al, Richard the Lionheart and Eleanor of Aquitaine. Of course, that brings in Henry II and Thomas a Becket. So much reading there (fictional & non) that I never got into Richard III. After Sharon Kaye Penman books and The White Queen, I see more reading in my future!

    Reply
  104. Today the Blog AND Comments were so good, interesting and thought provoking. My extreme reads over the years have been Robin Hood, King Arthur et al, Richard the Lionheart and Eleanor of Aquitaine. Of course, that brings in Henry II and Thomas a Becket. So much reading there (fictional & non) that I never got into Richard III. After Sharon Kaye Penman books and The White Queen, I see more reading in my future!

    Reply
  105. Today the Blog AND Comments were so good, interesting and thought provoking. My extreme reads over the years have been Robin Hood, King Arthur et al, Richard the Lionheart and Eleanor of Aquitaine. Of course, that brings in Henry II and Thomas a Becket. So much reading there (fictional & non) that I never got into Richard III. After Sharon Kaye Penman books and The White Queen, I see more reading in my future!

    Reply
  106. Thanks for sharing your experiences, Nicola. As a teenager I too became a great fan of Richard’s too after reading Josephine Tey. The whole story is so full of drama and emotion that it’s easy to easy why it still produces a strong reaction in people and inspires so many writers. Another of my youthful heroes was Alexander the Great. His achievements were amazing but his personality is so full of contradictions he remains absolutely fascinating to me and I was thrilled to visit Macedon, his homeland in Greece. One of the sites I went to was Vergina, where there is a wonderful museum with finds from several royal tombs included that of Alexander’s father. The day I visited – this was twenty five years ago – I was lucky enough to view the entrance to Philip’s tomb with no one else around. The tomb is intact within the ancient burial mound and in those days you went down an open stairway leading down to ancient ground level. It was quite dark apart from spotlighting directed onto the doors of the tomb and I sat on the steps thinking that this is where Alexander said his final goodbye to his father. For one very strange moment it felt almost as if it would be possible to step back in time … still makes me feel quite shivery whenever I think about it!

    Reply
  107. Thanks for sharing your experiences, Nicola. As a teenager I too became a great fan of Richard’s too after reading Josephine Tey. The whole story is so full of drama and emotion that it’s easy to easy why it still produces a strong reaction in people and inspires so many writers. Another of my youthful heroes was Alexander the Great. His achievements were amazing but his personality is so full of contradictions he remains absolutely fascinating to me and I was thrilled to visit Macedon, his homeland in Greece. One of the sites I went to was Vergina, where there is a wonderful museum with finds from several royal tombs included that of Alexander’s father. The day I visited – this was twenty five years ago – I was lucky enough to view the entrance to Philip’s tomb with no one else around. The tomb is intact within the ancient burial mound and in those days you went down an open stairway leading down to ancient ground level. It was quite dark apart from spotlighting directed onto the doors of the tomb and I sat on the steps thinking that this is where Alexander said his final goodbye to his father. For one very strange moment it felt almost as if it would be possible to step back in time … still makes me feel quite shivery whenever I think about it!

    Reply
  108. Thanks for sharing your experiences, Nicola. As a teenager I too became a great fan of Richard’s too after reading Josephine Tey. The whole story is so full of drama and emotion that it’s easy to easy why it still produces a strong reaction in people and inspires so many writers. Another of my youthful heroes was Alexander the Great. His achievements were amazing but his personality is so full of contradictions he remains absolutely fascinating to me and I was thrilled to visit Macedon, his homeland in Greece. One of the sites I went to was Vergina, where there is a wonderful museum with finds from several royal tombs included that of Alexander’s father. The day I visited – this was twenty five years ago – I was lucky enough to view the entrance to Philip’s tomb with no one else around. The tomb is intact within the ancient burial mound and in those days you went down an open stairway leading down to ancient ground level. It was quite dark apart from spotlighting directed onto the doors of the tomb and I sat on the steps thinking that this is where Alexander said his final goodbye to his father. For one very strange moment it felt almost as if it would be possible to step back in time … still makes me feel quite shivery whenever I think about it!

    Reply
  109. Thanks for sharing your experiences, Nicola. As a teenager I too became a great fan of Richard’s too after reading Josephine Tey. The whole story is so full of drama and emotion that it’s easy to easy why it still produces a strong reaction in people and inspires so many writers. Another of my youthful heroes was Alexander the Great. His achievements were amazing but his personality is so full of contradictions he remains absolutely fascinating to me and I was thrilled to visit Macedon, his homeland in Greece. One of the sites I went to was Vergina, where there is a wonderful museum with finds from several royal tombs included that of Alexander’s father. The day I visited – this was twenty five years ago – I was lucky enough to view the entrance to Philip’s tomb with no one else around. The tomb is intact within the ancient burial mound and in those days you went down an open stairway leading down to ancient ground level. It was quite dark apart from spotlighting directed onto the doors of the tomb and I sat on the steps thinking that this is where Alexander said his final goodbye to his father. For one very strange moment it felt almost as if it would be possible to step back in time … still makes me feel quite shivery whenever I think about it!

    Reply
  110. Thanks for sharing your experiences, Nicola. As a teenager I too became a great fan of Richard’s too after reading Josephine Tey. The whole story is so full of drama and emotion that it’s easy to easy why it still produces a strong reaction in people and inspires so many writers. Another of my youthful heroes was Alexander the Great. His achievements were amazing but his personality is so full of contradictions he remains absolutely fascinating to me and I was thrilled to visit Macedon, his homeland in Greece. One of the sites I went to was Vergina, where there is a wonderful museum with finds from several royal tombs included that of Alexander’s father. The day I visited – this was twenty five years ago – I was lucky enough to view the entrance to Philip’s tomb with no one else around. The tomb is intact within the ancient burial mound and in those days you went down an open stairway leading down to ancient ground level. It was quite dark apart from spotlighting directed onto the doors of the tomb and I sat on the steps thinking that this is where Alexander said his final goodbye to his father. For one very strange moment it felt almost as if it would be possible to step back in time … still makes me feel quite shivery whenever I think about it!

    Reply
  111. Nicola: I totally agree on the “people have die” statement. My first election was the 1948 race which Thomas Dewey (my candidate) lost. The only elections — of any type — that I have missed since then were the two (or three?) times I woke up on election day to sick to get to the polls.

    Reply
  112. Nicola: I totally agree on the “people have die” statement. My first election was the 1948 race which Thomas Dewey (my candidate) lost. The only elections — of any type — that I have missed since then were the two (or three?) times I woke up on election day to sick to get to the polls.

    Reply
  113. Nicola: I totally agree on the “people have die” statement. My first election was the 1948 race which Thomas Dewey (my candidate) lost. The only elections — of any type — that I have missed since then were the two (or three?) times I woke up on election day to sick to get to the polls.

    Reply
  114. Nicola: I totally agree on the “people have die” statement. My first election was the 1948 race which Thomas Dewey (my candidate) lost. The only elections — of any type — that I have missed since then were the two (or three?) times I woke up on election day to sick to get to the polls.

    Reply
  115. Nicola: I totally agree on the “people have die” statement. My first election was the 1948 race which Thomas Dewey (my candidate) lost. The only elections — of any type — that I have missed since then were the two (or three?) times I woke up on election day to sick to get to the polls.

    Reply
  116. I join all the others above, in noting that Daughter of Time was my first “meeting” with Richard III. When asked “What one piece of missing information would you magically restore?” the genealogist in me always answers “The missing 1890” census. Bur if I had more choices I would add “What really happened to the princes in the tower?” and the much earlier “What is the real story of the killing of William Rufus?”

    Reply
  117. I join all the others above, in noting that Daughter of Time was my first “meeting” with Richard III. When asked “What one piece of missing information would you magically restore?” the genealogist in me always answers “The missing 1890” census. Bur if I had more choices I would add “What really happened to the princes in the tower?” and the much earlier “What is the real story of the killing of William Rufus?”

    Reply
  118. I join all the others above, in noting that Daughter of Time was my first “meeting” with Richard III. When asked “What one piece of missing information would you magically restore?” the genealogist in me always answers “The missing 1890” census. Bur if I had more choices I would add “What really happened to the princes in the tower?” and the much earlier “What is the real story of the killing of William Rufus?”

    Reply
  119. I join all the others above, in noting that Daughter of Time was my first “meeting” with Richard III. When asked “What one piece of missing information would you magically restore?” the genealogist in me always answers “The missing 1890” census. Bur if I had more choices I would add “What really happened to the princes in the tower?” and the much earlier “What is the real story of the killing of William Rufus?”

    Reply
  120. I join all the others above, in noting that Daughter of Time was my first “meeting” with Richard III. When asked “What one piece of missing information would you magically restore?” the genealogist in me always answers “The missing 1890” census. Bur if I had more choices I would add “What really happened to the princes in the tower?” and the much earlier “What is the real story of the killing of William Rufus?”

    Reply
  121. Hi Sue! yes, i think it’s really important to use your vote if you absolutely can. it’s easy for people who don’t remember the struggle for suffrage to forget how difficult it was.

    Reply
  122. Hi Sue! yes, i think it’s really important to use your vote if you absolutely can. it’s easy for people who don’t remember the struggle for suffrage to forget how difficult it was.

    Reply
  123. Hi Sue! yes, i think it’s really important to use your vote if you absolutely can. it’s easy for people who don’t remember the struggle for suffrage to forget how difficult it was.

    Reply
  124. Hi Sue! yes, i think it’s really important to use your vote if you absolutely can. it’s easy for people who don’t remember the struggle for suffrage to forget how difficult it was.

    Reply
  125. Hi Sue! yes, i think it’s really important to use your vote if you absolutely can. it’s easy for people who don’t remember the struggle for suffrage to forget how difficult it was.

    Reply
  126. How special to be able to visit Jane Austen’s grave, Teresa. That’s in Winchester Abbey, isn’t it? It really is poignant to reflect on their life and work whilst you are so close.

    Reply
  127. How special to be able to visit Jane Austen’s grave, Teresa. That’s in Winchester Abbey, isn’t it? It really is poignant to reflect on their life and work whilst you are so close.

    Reply
  128. How special to be able to visit Jane Austen’s grave, Teresa. That’s in Winchester Abbey, isn’t it? It really is poignant to reflect on their life and work whilst you are so close.

    Reply
  129. How special to be able to visit Jane Austen’s grave, Teresa. That’s in Winchester Abbey, isn’t it? It really is poignant to reflect on their life and work whilst you are so close.

    Reply
  130. How special to be able to visit Jane Austen’s grave, Teresa. That’s in Winchester Abbey, isn’t it? It really is poignant to reflect on their life and work whilst you are so close.

    Reply
  131. It is difficult to equate the princes issue with what is know of Richard’s character, isn’t it. I loved his characterisation in the The Sunne in Splendour too.

    Reply
  132. It is difficult to equate the princes issue with what is know of Richard’s character, isn’t it. I loved his characterisation in the The Sunne in Splendour too.

    Reply
  133. It is difficult to equate the princes issue with what is know of Richard’s character, isn’t it. I loved his characterisation in the The Sunne in Splendour too.

    Reply
  134. It is difficult to equate the princes issue with what is know of Richard’s character, isn’t it. I loved his characterisation in the The Sunne in Splendour too.

    Reply
  135. It is difficult to equate the princes issue with what is know of Richard’s character, isn’t it. I loved his characterisation in the The Sunne in Splendour too.

    Reply
  136. I’m loving this discussion too, Jeanne! You’ve obviously read about a very great many fascinating historical figures and reading about Richard III can only be a great continuation of that!

    Reply
  137. I’m loving this discussion too, Jeanne! You’ve obviously read about a very great many fascinating historical figures and reading about Richard III can only be a great continuation of that!

    Reply
  138. I’m loving this discussion too, Jeanne! You’ve obviously read about a very great many fascinating historical figures and reading about Richard III can only be a great continuation of that!

    Reply
  139. I’m loving this discussion too, Jeanne! You’ve obviously read about a very great many fascinating historical figures and reading about Richard III can only be a great continuation of that!

    Reply
  140. I’m loving this discussion too, Jeanne! You’ve obviously read about a very great many fascinating historical figures and reading about Richard III can only be a great continuation of that!

    Reply
  141. Wow, Gail, what an experience! Thank you for sharing that with us. I definitely think that when you are alone in a resonant place like that it feels as though the past is very close.

    Reply
  142. Wow, Gail, what an experience! Thank you for sharing that with us. I definitely think that when you are alone in a resonant place like that it feels as though the past is very close.

    Reply
  143. Wow, Gail, what an experience! Thank you for sharing that with us. I definitely think that when you are alone in a resonant place like that it feels as though the past is very close.

    Reply
  144. Wow, Gail, what an experience! Thank you for sharing that with us. I definitely think that when you are alone in a resonant place like that it feels as though the past is very close.

    Reply
  145. Wow, Gail, what an experience! Thank you for sharing that with us. I definitely think that when you are alone in a resonant place like that it feels as though the past is very close.

    Reply
  146. Yes! The story behind the killing of William Rufus is another intriguing mystery, isn’t it. For my next book I’ve written about Elizabeth I, Robert Dudley and Amy Robsart and the mystery of whether or not he had her murdered. The one after that, which I’m just starting, will be about Richard and the Princes. I hadn’t thought about William Rufus, though – must look into that too!

    Reply
  147. Yes! The story behind the killing of William Rufus is another intriguing mystery, isn’t it. For my next book I’ve written about Elizabeth I, Robert Dudley and Amy Robsart and the mystery of whether or not he had her murdered. The one after that, which I’m just starting, will be about Richard and the Princes. I hadn’t thought about William Rufus, though – must look into that too!

    Reply
  148. Yes! The story behind the killing of William Rufus is another intriguing mystery, isn’t it. For my next book I’ve written about Elizabeth I, Robert Dudley and Amy Robsart and the mystery of whether or not he had her murdered. The one after that, which I’m just starting, will be about Richard and the Princes. I hadn’t thought about William Rufus, though – must look into that too!

    Reply
  149. Yes! The story behind the killing of William Rufus is another intriguing mystery, isn’t it. For my next book I’ve written about Elizabeth I, Robert Dudley and Amy Robsart and the mystery of whether or not he had her murdered. The one after that, which I’m just starting, will be about Richard and the Princes. I hadn’t thought about William Rufus, though – must look into that too!

    Reply
  150. Yes! The story behind the killing of William Rufus is another intriguing mystery, isn’t it. For my next book I’ve written about Elizabeth I, Robert Dudley and Amy Robsart and the mystery of whether or not he had her murdered. The one after that, which I’m just starting, will be about Richard and the Princes. I hadn’t thought about William Rufus, though – must look into that too!

    Reply

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