On Madness

Anne here, and today I'm musing on the subject of madness. I've always liked the Regency expression "blue-devilled" and this drawing by Cruikshank illustrates it perfectly. But blue-devilled, depressed, beset by anxiety, or mad — it's a fine line that separates them. BluedevilsCruikshank (1)
You might think madness is a strange subject for a Regency romance writer to be talking about, but recall if you will, the Regency period (1811—1820) came about because King George III was believed to be mad, and was incarcerated and treated for insanity. His eldest son, the Prince of Wales, was thus declared the Regent and ruled in his place until the king died.

These days some researchers believe that the poor king had a disease called porphyria, and was not insane at all. Porphyria involves a problem in the production of heme, which is a component of the protein in red blood cells. Heme production, which occurs in the bone marrow and liver, involves eight different enzymes and a shortage (deficiency) of a specific enzyme determines the type of porphyria. One of the possible symptoms of porphyria are mental changes, such as anxiety, confusion, hallucinations, disorientation or paranoia. (Information from this site.)

But the question is still being debated, and some historians today believe the king was insane after all, and exhibited classic signs of psychiatric illnesses such as bipolar disorder.  More information about this theory here.

_67006438_hawthornemadness_rexWhatever the truth, poor King George was considered to be mad, and received all kinds of horrible treatments intended to shock him back to sanity, but which to our eyes today seem more like torture. Ascribing his various symptoms to "evil humours" and having no real idea of how to treat them, his various doctors tried all kinds of extreme treatments — purging, blood-letting, blistering with arsenic powder, various toxic drugs and more. The king's final months were spent being bound in a straitjacket and sometimes chained to a chair. Towards the end, he was deaf and blind and living in misery. You might have seen the movie, The Madness of King George. (The image is from the stage play, staring the brilliant Nigel Hawthorne.)

History was not kind to those deemed "mad." If this was how they treated the king, imagine what conditions were like for ordinary folk.

As well, in a time when women were regarded as the property of their fathers, husbands or guardians, they could be placed in an insane asylum on the word of their male "protectors". Women were committed for such things as "female hysteria", for "frigidity," for believing in things their husbands did not — in spiritualism, for instance or for exhibiting "religious excitement". More information here.

"Lock hospitals" contained women who had contracted venereal disease — even though some of them had no doubt been infected by their husbands, who walked free to infect others. There are many tragic stories. 

And "normal people" could pay a penny or two to visit madhouses and be entertained by the antics of the lunatics locked up inside. (They treated orphanages in the same way, like a kind of zoo.)

PerfectRake

Of course rich families could organize to have their "mad" (or inconvenient) relatives treated in private institutions or even hidden away with a keeper or two in some rural retreat. Insanity was thought to be inheritable, and the taint of "bad blood" was something that nobody wanted to have associated with their family. In my novel, The Perfect Rake, this was the final decision Great-uncle Oswald made about his seriously unbalanced older brother — he was kept securely at home, in the country, with a keeper. (And yes, that's a new cover.)

So enough of gloom and misery and depressing tales, let's turn to other novels and romances that have dealt with or at least touched on madness in the regency and Victorian eras.

FlowersStormOne of my all-time favorite novels that deal with this topic is Flowers From The Storm, by the wonderful Laura Kinsale. In it, the hero, The Duke of Jervaulx, considered dissolute, reckless, and extravagant, is also a mathematical genius and corresponds with a Quaker mathematician. Later he disappears and the Quaker's daughter finds him — in a madhouse. It's a superb novel, and for years has been voted one of the top ten all-time favorite romances.

Another book that deals with madness is The Madness of Lord Ian McKenzie, by Jennifer Ashley.

MadnessLordIan

As a child young Lord Ian was placed in an asylum by his father, an Earl, for exhibiting symptoms which modern readers would recognize as Asperger's Syndrome, a form of Autism Spectrum Disorder. Years later, after his father's death, his older brother, the new earl, has his younger brother brought home. A wonderful romance, and currently on special.

CountessBelowStairsA third book that uses the spectre of inherited insanity in a wonderfully creative way is Eva Ibbotson's A Countess Below Stairs (also called The Secret Countess.) I shan't spoil it by explaining how it happens, but I do strongly suggest that if you haven't yet read this book, you've missed a real treat.

So, have you read any of the books I've mentioned? Can you think of any other novels that touch on the subject of madness? Do you find the way "madness" was treated in the past fascinating? Or is it a topic you'd much rather avoid?

205 thoughts on “On Madness”

  1. Love the new Rake cover, Anne! The history of treating madness is dismal indeed. Poor people would be luckier than George III because there wouldn’t be so many doctors giving horrendous treatments. I’ve researched the subject myself for my book The Wild Child, which dealt with asylums and how they could be used as punishments for unruly women. Living in the attic sounded pretty good by comparison.

    Reply
  2. Love the new Rake cover, Anne! The history of treating madness is dismal indeed. Poor people would be luckier than George III because there wouldn’t be so many doctors giving horrendous treatments. I’ve researched the subject myself for my book The Wild Child, which dealt with asylums and how they could be used as punishments for unruly women. Living in the attic sounded pretty good by comparison.

    Reply
  3. Love the new Rake cover, Anne! The history of treating madness is dismal indeed. Poor people would be luckier than George III because there wouldn’t be so many doctors giving horrendous treatments. I’ve researched the subject myself for my book The Wild Child, which dealt with asylums and how they could be used as punishments for unruly women. Living in the attic sounded pretty good by comparison.

    Reply
  4. Love the new Rake cover, Anne! The history of treating madness is dismal indeed. Poor people would be luckier than George III because there wouldn’t be so many doctors giving horrendous treatments. I’ve researched the subject myself for my book The Wild Child, which dealt with asylums and how they could be used as punishments for unruly women. Living in the attic sounded pretty good by comparison.

    Reply
  5. Love the new Rake cover, Anne! The history of treating madness is dismal indeed. Poor people would be luckier than George III because there wouldn’t be so many doctors giving horrendous treatments. I’ve researched the subject myself for my book The Wild Child, which dealt with asylums and how they could be used as punishments for unruly women. Living in the attic sounded pretty good by comparison.

    Reply
  6. Thank you for this excellent post and for solving a mystery for me. I recently reread Mary Jo’s Wild Child and I’ve been trying ever since to remember who wrote a book about a duke in a madhouse and a quaker woman who rescued him.

    Reply
  7. Thank you for this excellent post and for solving a mystery for me. I recently reread Mary Jo’s Wild Child and I’ve been trying ever since to remember who wrote a book about a duke in a madhouse and a quaker woman who rescued him.

    Reply
  8. Thank you for this excellent post and for solving a mystery for me. I recently reread Mary Jo’s Wild Child and I’ve been trying ever since to remember who wrote a book about a duke in a madhouse and a quaker woman who rescued him.

    Reply
  9. Thank you for this excellent post and for solving a mystery for me. I recently reread Mary Jo’s Wild Child and I’ve been trying ever since to remember who wrote a book about a duke in a madhouse and a quaker woman who rescued him.

    Reply
  10. Thank you for this excellent post and for solving a mystery for me. I recently reread Mary Jo’s Wild Child and I’ve been trying ever since to remember who wrote a book about a duke in a madhouse and a quaker woman who rescued him.

    Reply
  11. I find the way madness was dealt with in the past more horrifying than fascinating. However, I can recommend a recent read – Mimi Matthews FAIR AS A STAR – where the heroine deals with depression. Lovely and loving read.

    Reply
  12. I find the way madness was dealt with in the past more horrifying than fascinating. However, I can recommend a recent read – Mimi Matthews FAIR AS A STAR – where the heroine deals with depression. Lovely and loving read.

    Reply
  13. I find the way madness was dealt with in the past more horrifying than fascinating. However, I can recommend a recent read – Mimi Matthews FAIR AS A STAR – where the heroine deals with depression. Lovely and loving read.

    Reply
  14. I find the way madness was dealt with in the past more horrifying than fascinating. However, I can recommend a recent read – Mimi Matthews FAIR AS A STAR – where the heroine deals with depression. Lovely and loving read.

    Reply
  15. I find the way madness was dealt with in the past more horrifying than fascinating. However, I can recommend a recent read – Mimi Matthews FAIR AS A STAR – where the heroine deals with depression. Lovely and loving read.

    Reply
  16. I was thinking of The Wild Child while reading this post. Not only is Meriel committed to an asylum, albeit briefly, but we also meet this other lady they rescue (sorry I forgot her name, was it Jenna?) that had been in there for a while and had been unjustly locked up by her husband. That such things could happen was criminal.
    Just by chance I am now in the middle of re-reading “Tempting Fortune” part of Jo Beverley’s Malloren series. In this book the subject of madness is not the main theme, but the subject is weaved throughout the whole series because the hero’s brother, the Marquess of Rothgar, is an important figure throughout the whole series, and his mother had been mad and that is the reason he wants to avoid marriage and procreation, to keep from passing the ‘tainted blood’. In Rothgar’s book, Devilish, we see another side of dealing with madness, the effect it has on the relatives and descendants of the person. I love that book so much.

    Reply
  17. I was thinking of The Wild Child while reading this post. Not only is Meriel committed to an asylum, albeit briefly, but we also meet this other lady they rescue (sorry I forgot her name, was it Jenna?) that had been in there for a while and had been unjustly locked up by her husband. That such things could happen was criminal.
    Just by chance I am now in the middle of re-reading “Tempting Fortune” part of Jo Beverley’s Malloren series. In this book the subject of madness is not the main theme, but the subject is weaved throughout the whole series because the hero’s brother, the Marquess of Rothgar, is an important figure throughout the whole series, and his mother had been mad and that is the reason he wants to avoid marriage and procreation, to keep from passing the ‘tainted blood’. In Rothgar’s book, Devilish, we see another side of dealing with madness, the effect it has on the relatives and descendants of the person. I love that book so much.

    Reply
  18. I was thinking of The Wild Child while reading this post. Not only is Meriel committed to an asylum, albeit briefly, but we also meet this other lady they rescue (sorry I forgot her name, was it Jenna?) that had been in there for a while and had been unjustly locked up by her husband. That such things could happen was criminal.
    Just by chance I am now in the middle of re-reading “Tempting Fortune” part of Jo Beverley’s Malloren series. In this book the subject of madness is not the main theme, but the subject is weaved throughout the whole series because the hero’s brother, the Marquess of Rothgar, is an important figure throughout the whole series, and his mother had been mad and that is the reason he wants to avoid marriage and procreation, to keep from passing the ‘tainted blood’. In Rothgar’s book, Devilish, we see another side of dealing with madness, the effect it has on the relatives and descendants of the person. I love that book so much.

    Reply
  19. I was thinking of The Wild Child while reading this post. Not only is Meriel committed to an asylum, albeit briefly, but we also meet this other lady they rescue (sorry I forgot her name, was it Jenna?) that had been in there for a while and had been unjustly locked up by her husband. That such things could happen was criminal.
    Just by chance I am now in the middle of re-reading “Tempting Fortune” part of Jo Beverley’s Malloren series. In this book the subject of madness is not the main theme, but the subject is weaved throughout the whole series because the hero’s brother, the Marquess of Rothgar, is an important figure throughout the whole series, and his mother had been mad and that is the reason he wants to avoid marriage and procreation, to keep from passing the ‘tainted blood’. In Rothgar’s book, Devilish, we see another side of dealing with madness, the effect it has on the relatives and descendants of the person. I love that book so much.

    Reply
  20. I was thinking of The Wild Child while reading this post. Not only is Meriel committed to an asylum, albeit briefly, but we also meet this other lady they rescue (sorry I forgot her name, was it Jenna?) that had been in there for a while and had been unjustly locked up by her husband. That such things could happen was criminal.
    Just by chance I am now in the middle of re-reading “Tempting Fortune” part of Jo Beverley’s Malloren series. In this book the subject of madness is not the main theme, but the subject is weaved throughout the whole series because the hero’s brother, the Marquess of Rothgar, is an important figure throughout the whole series, and his mother had been mad and that is the reason he wants to avoid marriage and procreation, to keep from passing the ‘tainted blood’. In Rothgar’s book, Devilish, we see another side of dealing with madness, the effect it has on the relatives and descendants of the person. I love that book so much.

    Reply
  21. Laynis, yes, Jenna was the woman locked in the asylum after her husband faked her death so he could inherit her fortune. Horrible, and entirely possible.
    You’re right that the specter of madness haunts the characters in Jo’s Malloren series, particularly Rothgar. Mental illness damages many lives and families now as well.

    Reply
  22. Laynis, yes, Jenna was the woman locked in the asylum after her husband faked her death so he could inherit her fortune. Horrible, and entirely possible.
    You’re right that the specter of madness haunts the characters in Jo’s Malloren series, particularly Rothgar. Mental illness damages many lives and families now as well.

    Reply
  23. Laynis, yes, Jenna was the woman locked in the asylum after her husband faked her death so he could inherit her fortune. Horrible, and entirely possible.
    You’re right that the specter of madness haunts the characters in Jo’s Malloren series, particularly Rothgar. Mental illness damages many lives and families now as well.

    Reply
  24. Laynis, yes, Jenna was the woman locked in the asylum after her husband faked her death so he could inherit her fortune. Horrible, and entirely possible.
    You’re right that the specter of madness haunts the characters in Jo’s Malloren series, particularly Rothgar. Mental illness damages many lives and families now as well.

    Reply
  25. Laynis, yes, Jenna was the woman locked in the asylum after her husband faked her death so he could inherit her fortune. Horrible, and entirely possible.
    You’re right that the specter of madness haunts the characters in Jo’s Malloren series, particularly Rothgar. Mental illness damages many lives and families now as well.

    Reply
  26. Mary Jo, I forgot about the Wild Child — another of the wonderful books that show the way women were unjustly incarcerated. I do love a book that will teach us something about the dark side of history and give us a happy ending as well.

    Reply
  27. Mary Jo, I forgot about the Wild Child — another of the wonderful books that show the way women were unjustly incarcerated. I do love a book that will teach us something about the dark side of history and give us a happy ending as well.

    Reply
  28. Mary Jo, I forgot about the Wild Child — another of the wonderful books that show the way women were unjustly incarcerated. I do love a book that will teach us something about the dark side of history and give us a happy ending as well.

    Reply
  29. Mary Jo, I forgot about the Wild Child — another of the wonderful books that show the way women were unjustly incarcerated. I do love a book that will teach us something about the dark side of history and give us a happy ending as well.

    Reply
  30. Mary Jo, I forgot about the Wild Child — another of the wonderful books that show the way women were unjustly incarcerated. I do love a book that will teach us something about the dark side of history and give us a happy ending as well.

    Reply
  31. “We all go a little mad sometimes.” So true, Theo. Isn’t it so much better these days when we recognize that there’s not “mad” or “sane” but a range of conditions that are often contextual.
    Glad you like the new Rake cover. I love that she’s a red-head — which she was. I did love the old one, though.

    Reply
  32. “We all go a little mad sometimes.” So true, Theo. Isn’t it so much better these days when we recognize that there’s not “mad” or “sane” but a range of conditions that are often contextual.
    Glad you like the new Rake cover. I love that she’s a red-head — which she was. I did love the old one, though.

    Reply
  33. “We all go a little mad sometimes.” So true, Theo. Isn’t it so much better these days when we recognize that there’s not “mad” or “sane” but a range of conditions that are often contextual.
    Glad you like the new Rake cover. I love that she’s a red-head — which she was. I did love the old one, though.

    Reply
  34. “We all go a little mad sometimes.” So true, Theo. Isn’t it so much better these days when we recognize that there’s not “mad” or “sane” but a range of conditions that are often contextual.
    Glad you like the new Rake cover. I love that she’s a red-head — which she was. I did love the old one, though.

    Reply
  35. “We all go a little mad sometimes.” So true, Theo. Isn’t it so much better these days when we recognize that there’s not “mad” or “sane” but a range of conditions that are often contextual.
    Glad you like the new Rake cover. I love that she’s a red-head — which she was. I did love the old one, though.

    Reply
  36. Thanks, Laynis — I forgot about Jo’s Malloren series too. I just knew that the wenchly community would come up with more that I couldn’t think of. I loved that series. Might be time for a reread.

    Reply
  37. Thanks, Laynis — I forgot about Jo’s Malloren series too. I just knew that the wenchly community would come up with more that I couldn’t think of. I loved that series. Might be time for a reread.

    Reply
  38. Thanks, Laynis — I forgot about Jo’s Malloren series too. I just knew that the wenchly community would come up with more that I couldn’t think of. I loved that series. Might be time for a reread.

    Reply
  39. Thanks, Laynis — I forgot about Jo’s Malloren series too. I just knew that the wenchly community would come up with more that I couldn’t think of. I loved that series. Might be time for a reread.

    Reply
  40. Thanks, Laynis — I forgot about Jo’s Malloren series too. I just knew that the wenchly community would come up with more that I couldn’t think of. I loved that series. Might be time for a reread.

    Reply
  41. I do love the new cover, but there was something about the old one that really drew me to the book. Not sure what it was.
    “We all go a little mad sometimes.” is from Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho, when Anthony Perkins is talking to Janet Leigh about his mother.
    “She just goes a little mad sometimes.
    We all go a little mad sometimes.
    Haven’t you?”
    😉

    Reply
  42. I do love the new cover, but there was something about the old one that really drew me to the book. Not sure what it was.
    “We all go a little mad sometimes.” is from Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho, when Anthony Perkins is talking to Janet Leigh about his mother.
    “She just goes a little mad sometimes.
    We all go a little mad sometimes.
    Haven’t you?”
    😉

    Reply
  43. I do love the new cover, but there was something about the old one that really drew me to the book. Not sure what it was.
    “We all go a little mad sometimes.” is from Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho, when Anthony Perkins is talking to Janet Leigh about his mother.
    “She just goes a little mad sometimes.
    We all go a little mad sometimes.
    Haven’t you?”
    😉

    Reply
  44. I do love the new cover, but there was something about the old one that really drew me to the book. Not sure what it was.
    “We all go a little mad sometimes.” is from Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho, when Anthony Perkins is talking to Janet Leigh about his mother.
    “She just goes a little mad sometimes.
    We all go a little mad sometimes.
    Haven’t you?”
    😉

    Reply
  45. I do love the new cover, but there was something about the old one that really drew me to the book. Not sure what it was.
    “We all go a little mad sometimes.” is from Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho, when Anthony Perkins is talking to Janet Leigh about his mother.
    “She just goes a little mad sometimes.
    We all go a little mad sometimes.
    Haven’t you?”
    😉

    Reply
  46. I remember doing a bit of research about this one time and discovering that the Quakers’ York Retreat was the beginning of more humane treatment of the insane. Sometimes I think that every time I read about a change for the good, it’s the Quakers behind it.

    Reply
  47. I remember doing a bit of research about this one time and discovering that the Quakers’ York Retreat was the beginning of more humane treatment of the insane. Sometimes I think that every time I read about a change for the good, it’s the Quakers behind it.

    Reply
  48. I remember doing a bit of research about this one time and discovering that the Quakers’ York Retreat was the beginning of more humane treatment of the insane. Sometimes I think that every time I read about a change for the good, it’s the Quakers behind it.

    Reply
  49. I remember doing a bit of research about this one time and discovering that the Quakers’ York Retreat was the beginning of more humane treatment of the insane. Sometimes I think that every time I read about a change for the good, it’s the Quakers behind it.

    Reply
  50. I remember doing a bit of research about this one time and discovering that the Quakers’ York Retreat was the beginning of more humane treatment of the insane. Sometimes I think that every time I read about a change for the good, it’s the Quakers behind it.

    Reply
  51. I agree that The Madness of Lord Ian McKenzie and Flowers From The Storm are great reads, Anne, and now you’ve made me curious about A Countess Below Stairs. I don’t intentionally seek out books dealing with depression or madness as they can make me depressed or mad (angry).

    Reply
  52. I agree that The Madness of Lord Ian McKenzie and Flowers From The Storm are great reads, Anne, and now you’ve made me curious about A Countess Below Stairs. I don’t intentionally seek out books dealing with depression or madness as they can make me depressed or mad (angry).

    Reply
  53. I agree that The Madness of Lord Ian McKenzie and Flowers From The Storm are great reads, Anne, and now you’ve made me curious about A Countess Below Stairs. I don’t intentionally seek out books dealing with depression or madness as they can make me depressed or mad (angry).

    Reply
  54. I agree that The Madness of Lord Ian McKenzie and Flowers From The Storm are great reads, Anne, and now you’ve made me curious about A Countess Below Stairs. I don’t intentionally seek out books dealing with depression or madness as they can make me depressed or mad (angry).

    Reply
  55. I agree that The Madness of Lord Ian McKenzie and Flowers From The Storm are great reads, Anne, and now you’ve made me curious about A Countess Below Stairs. I don’t intentionally seek out books dealing with depression or madness as they can make me depressed or mad (angry).

    Reply
  56. Thanks, Lil — yes, the Quakers are responsible for leading the way in many social innovations. They led the way to prison reform as well in the 19th century. An admirable group.

    Reply
  57. Thanks, Lil — yes, the Quakers are responsible for leading the way in many social innovations. They led the way to prison reform as well in the 19th century. An admirable group.

    Reply
  58. Thanks, Lil — yes, the Quakers are responsible for leading the way in many social innovations. They led the way to prison reform as well in the 19th century. An admirable group.

    Reply
  59. Thanks, Lil — yes, the Quakers are responsible for leading the way in many social innovations. They led the way to prison reform as well in the 19th century. An admirable group.

    Reply
  60. Thanks, Lil — yes, the Quakers are responsible for leading the way in many social innovations. They led the way to prison reform as well in the 19th century. An admirable group.

    Reply
  61. Thanks, for the source of that quote, Theo — I didn’t recognize it. Been a long time since I watched Psycho.
    And yes, I was very fond of that original cover for The Perfect Rake — my first book with Berkley, and the cover was so classy and pretty.

    Reply
  62. Thanks, for the source of that quote, Theo — I didn’t recognize it. Been a long time since I watched Psycho.
    And yes, I was very fond of that original cover for The Perfect Rake — my first book with Berkley, and the cover was so classy and pretty.

    Reply
  63. Thanks, for the source of that quote, Theo — I didn’t recognize it. Been a long time since I watched Psycho.
    And yes, I was very fond of that original cover for The Perfect Rake — my first book with Berkley, and the cover was so classy and pretty.

    Reply
  64. Thanks, for the source of that quote, Theo — I didn’t recognize it. Been a long time since I watched Psycho.
    And yes, I was very fond of that original cover for The Perfect Rake — my first book with Berkley, and the cover was so classy and pretty.

    Reply
  65. Thanks, for the source of that quote, Theo — I didn’t recognize it. Been a long time since I watched Psycho.
    And yes, I was very fond of that original cover for The Perfect Rake — my first book with Berkley, and the cover was so classy and pretty.

    Reply
  66. What about Bedlam, a madhouse at the time that has made it as a word in our lexicon. You can imagine, just from the name, what the place was like for the poor inmates. The actual name of the hospital was St. Mary of Bethlehem, but was corrupted to the popular Bedlam.

    Reply
  67. What about Bedlam, a madhouse at the time that has made it as a word in our lexicon. You can imagine, just from the name, what the place was like for the poor inmates. The actual name of the hospital was St. Mary of Bethlehem, but was corrupted to the popular Bedlam.

    Reply
  68. What about Bedlam, a madhouse at the time that has made it as a word in our lexicon. You can imagine, just from the name, what the place was like for the poor inmates. The actual name of the hospital was St. Mary of Bethlehem, but was corrupted to the popular Bedlam.

    Reply
  69. What about Bedlam, a madhouse at the time that has made it as a word in our lexicon. You can imagine, just from the name, what the place was like for the poor inmates. The actual name of the hospital was St. Mary of Bethlehem, but was corrupted to the popular Bedlam.

    Reply
  70. What about Bedlam, a madhouse at the time that has made it as a word in our lexicon. You can imagine, just from the name, what the place was like for the poor inmates. The actual name of the hospital was St. Mary of Bethlehem, but was corrupted to the popular Bedlam.

    Reply
  71. I would highly recommend all of Eva Ibbotson’s romances. I first heard about her from the Word Wenches, for which I am very grateful

    Reply
  72. I would highly recommend all of Eva Ibbotson’s romances. I first heard about her from the Word Wenches, for which I am very grateful

    Reply
  73. I would highly recommend all of Eva Ibbotson’s romances. I first heard about her from the Word Wenches, for which I am very grateful

    Reply
  74. I would highly recommend all of Eva Ibbotson’s romances. I first heard about her from the Word Wenches, for which I am very grateful

    Reply
  75. I would highly recommend all of Eva Ibbotson’s romances. I first heard about her from the Word Wenches, for which I am very grateful

    Reply
  76. Donna H – Jane Eyre was the first book that came to mind when the topic was introduced. I read the book for the first time when I was ten, and have re-read it several times. The madwoman in the attic…

    Reply
  77. Donna H – Jane Eyre was the first book that came to mind when the topic was introduced. I read the book for the first time when I was ten, and have re-read it several times. The madwoman in the attic…

    Reply
  78. Donna H – Jane Eyre was the first book that came to mind when the topic was introduced. I read the book for the first time when I was ten, and have re-read it several times. The madwoman in the attic…

    Reply
  79. Donna H – Jane Eyre was the first book that came to mind when the topic was introduced. I read the book for the first time when I was ten, and have re-read it several times. The madwoman in the attic…

    Reply
  80. Donna H – Jane Eyre was the first book that came to mind when the topic was introduced. I read the book for the first time when I was ten, and have re-read it several times. The madwoman in the attic…

    Reply
  81. King George is such a sad story, and no doubt some of the treatments worsened his condition!
    I am rather oversensitive about the past treatment of people thought to be insane, so I have trouble reading some of the books with that storyline. I have avoided Flowers From The Storm for that reason. I did love The Madness of Lord Ian Mackenzie, but his incarceration took place before the action of the book. Likewise, the asylum only played a brief part in The Wild Child.
    The heroine of Mimi Matthews’ The Matrimonial Advertisement is threatened with being put in an asylum. Women being unjustly locked up by family members plays a big role in the plot, but she avoids incarceration, and justice is served in the end, so I didn’t find it overly angsty.

    Reply
  82. King George is such a sad story, and no doubt some of the treatments worsened his condition!
    I am rather oversensitive about the past treatment of people thought to be insane, so I have trouble reading some of the books with that storyline. I have avoided Flowers From The Storm for that reason. I did love The Madness of Lord Ian Mackenzie, but his incarceration took place before the action of the book. Likewise, the asylum only played a brief part in The Wild Child.
    The heroine of Mimi Matthews’ The Matrimonial Advertisement is threatened with being put in an asylum. Women being unjustly locked up by family members plays a big role in the plot, but she avoids incarceration, and justice is served in the end, so I didn’t find it overly angsty.

    Reply
  83. King George is such a sad story, and no doubt some of the treatments worsened his condition!
    I am rather oversensitive about the past treatment of people thought to be insane, so I have trouble reading some of the books with that storyline. I have avoided Flowers From The Storm for that reason. I did love The Madness of Lord Ian Mackenzie, but his incarceration took place before the action of the book. Likewise, the asylum only played a brief part in The Wild Child.
    The heroine of Mimi Matthews’ The Matrimonial Advertisement is threatened with being put in an asylum. Women being unjustly locked up by family members plays a big role in the plot, but she avoids incarceration, and justice is served in the end, so I didn’t find it overly angsty.

    Reply
  84. King George is such a sad story, and no doubt some of the treatments worsened his condition!
    I am rather oversensitive about the past treatment of people thought to be insane, so I have trouble reading some of the books with that storyline. I have avoided Flowers From The Storm for that reason. I did love The Madness of Lord Ian Mackenzie, but his incarceration took place before the action of the book. Likewise, the asylum only played a brief part in The Wild Child.
    The heroine of Mimi Matthews’ The Matrimonial Advertisement is threatened with being put in an asylum. Women being unjustly locked up by family members plays a big role in the plot, but she avoids incarceration, and justice is served in the end, so I didn’t find it overly angsty.

    Reply
  85. King George is such a sad story, and no doubt some of the treatments worsened his condition!
    I am rather oversensitive about the past treatment of people thought to be insane, so I have trouble reading some of the books with that storyline. I have avoided Flowers From The Storm for that reason. I did love The Madness of Lord Ian Mackenzie, but his incarceration took place before the action of the book. Likewise, the asylum only played a brief part in The Wild Child.
    The heroine of Mimi Matthews’ The Matrimonial Advertisement is threatened with being put in an asylum. Women being unjustly locked up by family members plays a big role in the plot, but she avoids incarceration, and justice is served in the end, so I didn’t find it overly angsty.

    Reply
  86. Anne – I have read both Flowers from the Storm and The Madness of Ian MacKenzie. I think “Madness” is my favorite of Jennifer Ashley’s books. I also love the way Ian was portrayed in the other books in the series. But aside from historical romance – at least, 19th century historical romance – I would also like to mention Amanda Quick’s 1930’s set “Burning Cove” series, in which Adelaide escapes from the sanitarium where she has been sent by her husband so that he can benefit from her fortune, and the sanitarium “doctors” can use her as a guinea pig. And I believe the spectre of madness is raised in several of the other books in the series, including “The Other Lady Vanishes.” I believe it also a factor in Jayne Ann Krentz’s “Fogg Lake” series.

    Reply
  87. Anne – I have read both Flowers from the Storm and The Madness of Ian MacKenzie. I think “Madness” is my favorite of Jennifer Ashley’s books. I also love the way Ian was portrayed in the other books in the series. But aside from historical romance – at least, 19th century historical romance – I would also like to mention Amanda Quick’s 1930’s set “Burning Cove” series, in which Adelaide escapes from the sanitarium where she has been sent by her husband so that he can benefit from her fortune, and the sanitarium “doctors” can use her as a guinea pig. And I believe the spectre of madness is raised in several of the other books in the series, including “The Other Lady Vanishes.” I believe it also a factor in Jayne Ann Krentz’s “Fogg Lake” series.

    Reply
  88. Anne – I have read both Flowers from the Storm and The Madness of Ian MacKenzie. I think “Madness” is my favorite of Jennifer Ashley’s books. I also love the way Ian was portrayed in the other books in the series. But aside from historical romance – at least, 19th century historical romance – I would also like to mention Amanda Quick’s 1930’s set “Burning Cove” series, in which Adelaide escapes from the sanitarium where she has been sent by her husband so that he can benefit from her fortune, and the sanitarium “doctors” can use her as a guinea pig. And I believe the spectre of madness is raised in several of the other books in the series, including “The Other Lady Vanishes.” I believe it also a factor in Jayne Ann Krentz’s “Fogg Lake” series.

    Reply
  89. Anne – I have read both Flowers from the Storm and The Madness of Ian MacKenzie. I think “Madness” is my favorite of Jennifer Ashley’s books. I also love the way Ian was portrayed in the other books in the series. But aside from historical romance – at least, 19th century historical romance – I would also like to mention Amanda Quick’s 1930’s set “Burning Cove” series, in which Adelaide escapes from the sanitarium where she has been sent by her husband so that he can benefit from her fortune, and the sanitarium “doctors” can use her as a guinea pig. And I believe the spectre of madness is raised in several of the other books in the series, including “The Other Lady Vanishes.” I believe it also a factor in Jayne Ann Krentz’s “Fogg Lake” series.

    Reply
  90. Anne – I have read both Flowers from the Storm and The Madness of Ian MacKenzie. I think “Madness” is my favorite of Jennifer Ashley’s books. I also love the way Ian was portrayed in the other books in the series. But aside from historical romance – at least, 19th century historical romance – I would also like to mention Amanda Quick’s 1930’s set “Burning Cove” series, in which Adelaide escapes from the sanitarium where she has been sent by her husband so that he can benefit from her fortune, and the sanitarium “doctors” can use her as a guinea pig. And I believe the spectre of madness is raised in several of the other books in the series, including “The Other Lady Vanishes.” I believe it also a factor in Jayne Ann Krentz’s “Fogg Lake” series.

    Reply
  91. Wives were sent to mental hospitals in the 20th century as well. Post partum depression wasn’t well recognized until fairly recently. Many who were sent to the hospitals could retreat so far from the treatment that they become mad.
    Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin wrote a book Maria or the Wrongs of Women in which a wife was sent to an asylum. if my memory isn’t playing me false.
    I have always thought that if the poor King hadn’t been mad at the beginning of his treatment, he surely would have been after it. The movie the madness of king George is one I can’t sit through.

    Reply
  92. Wives were sent to mental hospitals in the 20th century as well. Post partum depression wasn’t well recognized until fairly recently. Many who were sent to the hospitals could retreat so far from the treatment that they become mad.
    Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin wrote a book Maria or the Wrongs of Women in which a wife was sent to an asylum. if my memory isn’t playing me false.
    I have always thought that if the poor King hadn’t been mad at the beginning of his treatment, he surely would have been after it. The movie the madness of king George is one I can’t sit through.

    Reply
  93. Wives were sent to mental hospitals in the 20th century as well. Post partum depression wasn’t well recognized until fairly recently. Many who were sent to the hospitals could retreat so far from the treatment that they become mad.
    Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin wrote a book Maria or the Wrongs of Women in which a wife was sent to an asylum. if my memory isn’t playing me false.
    I have always thought that if the poor King hadn’t been mad at the beginning of his treatment, he surely would have been after it. The movie the madness of king George is one I can’t sit through.

    Reply
  94. Wives were sent to mental hospitals in the 20th century as well. Post partum depression wasn’t well recognized until fairly recently. Many who were sent to the hospitals could retreat so far from the treatment that they become mad.
    Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin wrote a book Maria or the Wrongs of Women in which a wife was sent to an asylum. if my memory isn’t playing me false.
    I have always thought that if the poor King hadn’t been mad at the beginning of his treatment, he surely would have been after it. The movie the madness of king George is one I can’t sit through.

    Reply
  95. Wives were sent to mental hospitals in the 20th century as well. Post partum depression wasn’t well recognized until fairly recently. Many who were sent to the hospitals could retreat so far from the treatment that they become mad.
    Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin wrote a book Maria or the Wrongs of Women in which a wife was sent to an asylum. if my memory isn’t playing me false.
    I have always thought that if the poor King hadn’t been mad at the beginning of his treatment, he surely would have been after it. The movie the madness of king George is one I can’t sit through.

    Reply
  96. I have read Flowers from the Storm and agree that it is a well written book. However, some parts of it disturb me. The doctors of the day weren’t so stupid that they didn’t understand the effects of a stroke and committing a duke wasn’t as easy as committing a wife. I really would like a discussion on that novel sometime. Also, there was no way the marriage of the Duke and the Quaker could be easily set aside. Only when two Quakers married could they marry by Quaker rules. If a Quaker married any one who wasn’t a Quaker, the marriage was valid until proven otherwise on grounds of impotence, bigamy, or insanity.It took the brother of the Earl Portsmouth years to have the brother declared mentally incompetent to marry and then to have the marriage annulled. At that time every one believed it was possible for even one who was insane to have a period of lucidity in which he/she could enter into a valid marriage. I just have trouble believing that Quakers would want the woman to become a bigamist. I prefer the book , I think the title is Moonlight Madness where the woman has built an airplane.

    Reply
  97. I have read Flowers from the Storm and agree that it is a well written book. However, some parts of it disturb me. The doctors of the day weren’t so stupid that they didn’t understand the effects of a stroke and committing a duke wasn’t as easy as committing a wife. I really would like a discussion on that novel sometime. Also, there was no way the marriage of the Duke and the Quaker could be easily set aside. Only when two Quakers married could they marry by Quaker rules. If a Quaker married any one who wasn’t a Quaker, the marriage was valid until proven otherwise on grounds of impotence, bigamy, or insanity.It took the brother of the Earl Portsmouth years to have the brother declared mentally incompetent to marry and then to have the marriage annulled. At that time every one believed it was possible for even one who was insane to have a period of lucidity in which he/she could enter into a valid marriage. I just have trouble believing that Quakers would want the woman to become a bigamist. I prefer the book , I think the title is Moonlight Madness where the woman has built an airplane.

    Reply
  98. I have read Flowers from the Storm and agree that it is a well written book. However, some parts of it disturb me. The doctors of the day weren’t so stupid that they didn’t understand the effects of a stroke and committing a duke wasn’t as easy as committing a wife. I really would like a discussion on that novel sometime. Also, there was no way the marriage of the Duke and the Quaker could be easily set aside. Only when two Quakers married could they marry by Quaker rules. If a Quaker married any one who wasn’t a Quaker, the marriage was valid until proven otherwise on grounds of impotence, bigamy, or insanity.It took the brother of the Earl Portsmouth years to have the brother declared mentally incompetent to marry and then to have the marriage annulled. At that time every one believed it was possible for even one who was insane to have a period of lucidity in which he/she could enter into a valid marriage. I just have trouble believing that Quakers would want the woman to become a bigamist. I prefer the book , I think the title is Moonlight Madness where the woman has built an airplane.

    Reply
  99. I have read Flowers from the Storm and agree that it is a well written book. However, some parts of it disturb me. The doctors of the day weren’t so stupid that they didn’t understand the effects of a stroke and committing a duke wasn’t as easy as committing a wife. I really would like a discussion on that novel sometime. Also, there was no way the marriage of the Duke and the Quaker could be easily set aside. Only when two Quakers married could they marry by Quaker rules. If a Quaker married any one who wasn’t a Quaker, the marriage was valid until proven otherwise on grounds of impotence, bigamy, or insanity.It took the brother of the Earl Portsmouth years to have the brother declared mentally incompetent to marry and then to have the marriage annulled. At that time every one believed it was possible for even one who was insane to have a period of lucidity in which he/she could enter into a valid marriage. I just have trouble believing that Quakers would want the woman to become a bigamist. I prefer the book , I think the title is Moonlight Madness where the woman has built an airplane.

    Reply
  100. I have read Flowers from the Storm and agree that it is a well written book. However, some parts of it disturb me. The doctors of the day weren’t so stupid that they didn’t understand the effects of a stroke and committing a duke wasn’t as easy as committing a wife. I really would like a discussion on that novel sometime. Also, there was no way the marriage of the Duke and the Quaker could be easily set aside. Only when two Quakers married could they marry by Quaker rules. If a Quaker married any one who wasn’t a Quaker, the marriage was valid until proven otherwise on grounds of impotence, bigamy, or insanity.It took the brother of the Earl Portsmouth years to have the brother declared mentally incompetent to marry and then to have the marriage annulled. At that time every one believed it was possible for even one who was insane to have a period of lucidity in which he/she could enter into a valid marriage. I just have trouble believing that Quakers would want the woman to become a bigamist. I prefer the book , I think the title is Moonlight Madness where the woman has built an airplane.

    Reply
  101. Winterset by Candace Camp comes to mind.
    I do find the way “madness” was treated in the past fascinating, whether the people considered as “mad” were actually mentally ill or who simply didn’t behave like they were “supposed to behave”. Or somebody just wanted to get rid of their wife, relative etc. and just shoved them into madhouse. I think of two examples from history: Prince Philip’s mother Princess Alice of Battenberg (I think there’s at least one documentary about her on Youtube) and Harriet Mordaunt, mistress of Edward VII.

    Reply
  102. Winterset by Candace Camp comes to mind.
    I do find the way “madness” was treated in the past fascinating, whether the people considered as “mad” were actually mentally ill or who simply didn’t behave like they were “supposed to behave”. Or somebody just wanted to get rid of their wife, relative etc. and just shoved them into madhouse. I think of two examples from history: Prince Philip’s mother Princess Alice of Battenberg (I think there’s at least one documentary about her on Youtube) and Harriet Mordaunt, mistress of Edward VII.

    Reply
  103. Winterset by Candace Camp comes to mind.
    I do find the way “madness” was treated in the past fascinating, whether the people considered as “mad” were actually mentally ill or who simply didn’t behave like they were “supposed to behave”. Or somebody just wanted to get rid of their wife, relative etc. and just shoved them into madhouse. I think of two examples from history: Prince Philip’s mother Princess Alice of Battenberg (I think there’s at least one documentary about her on Youtube) and Harriet Mordaunt, mistress of Edward VII.

    Reply
  104. Winterset by Candace Camp comes to mind.
    I do find the way “madness” was treated in the past fascinating, whether the people considered as “mad” were actually mentally ill or who simply didn’t behave like they were “supposed to behave”. Or somebody just wanted to get rid of their wife, relative etc. and just shoved them into madhouse. I think of two examples from history: Prince Philip’s mother Princess Alice of Battenberg (I think there’s at least one documentary about her on Youtube) and Harriet Mordaunt, mistress of Edward VII.

    Reply
  105. Winterset by Candace Camp comes to mind.
    I do find the way “madness” was treated in the past fascinating, whether the people considered as “mad” were actually mentally ill or who simply didn’t behave like they were “supposed to behave”. Or somebody just wanted to get rid of their wife, relative etc. and just shoved them into madhouse. I think of two examples from history: Prince Philip’s mother Princess Alice of Battenberg (I think there’s at least one documentary about her on Youtube) and Harriet Mordaunt, mistress of Edward VII.

    Reply
  106. Karin, I love Flowers from the Storm — yes it’s a bad situation, but so well portrayed and such a happy ending.
    And yes, Mimi Matthews has touched on the subject in several of her books.

    Reply
  107. Karin, I love Flowers from the Storm — yes it’s a bad situation, but so well portrayed and such a happy ending.
    And yes, Mimi Matthews has touched on the subject in several of her books.

    Reply
  108. Karin, I love Flowers from the Storm — yes it’s a bad situation, but so well portrayed and such a happy ending.
    And yes, Mimi Matthews has touched on the subject in several of her books.

    Reply
  109. Karin, I love Flowers from the Storm — yes it’s a bad situation, but so well portrayed and such a happy ending.
    And yes, Mimi Matthews has touched on the subject in several of her books.

    Reply
  110. Karin, I love Flowers from the Storm — yes it’s a bad situation, but so well portrayed and such a happy ending.
    And yes, Mimi Matthews has touched on the subject in several of her books.

    Reply
  111. Thanks so much, Binnie — I didn’t think of Amanda Quick’s Burning Cove series, but you’re right. And that was set in the 1930’s, wasn’t it? I haven’t read the Fogg Lake series. I tend to reread my favorite JAK/AQ books and miss some of the newer ones.
    Do I gather that you haven’t read the Eva Ibbotson book I mentioned? You must! I know you’ll love it.

    Reply
  112. Thanks so much, Binnie — I didn’t think of Amanda Quick’s Burning Cove series, but you’re right. And that was set in the 1930’s, wasn’t it? I haven’t read the Fogg Lake series. I tend to reread my favorite JAK/AQ books and miss some of the newer ones.
    Do I gather that you haven’t read the Eva Ibbotson book I mentioned? You must! I know you’ll love it.

    Reply
  113. Thanks so much, Binnie — I didn’t think of Amanda Quick’s Burning Cove series, but you’re right. And that was set in the 1930’s, wasn’t it? I haven’t read the Fogg Lake series. I tend to reread my favorite JAK/AQ books and miss some of the newer ones.
    Do I gather that you haven’t read the Eva Ibbotson book I mentioned? You must! I know you’ll love it.

    Reply
  114. Thanks so much, Binnie — I didn’t think of Amanda Quick’s Burning Cove series, but you’re right. And that was set in the 1930’s, wasn’t it? I haven’t read the Fogg Lake series. I tend to reread my favorite JAK/AQ books and miss some of the newer ones.
    Do I gather that you haven’t read the Eva Ibbotson book I mentioned? You must! I know you’ll love it.

    Reply
  115. Thanks so much, Binnie — I didn’t think of Amanda Quick’s Burning Cove series, but you’re right. And that was set in the 1930’s, wasn’t it? I haven’t read the Fogg Lake series. I tend to reread my favorite JAK/AQ books and miss some of the newer ones.
    Do I gather that you haven’t read the Eva Ibbotson book I mentioned? You must! I know you’ll love it.

    Reply
  116. Oh, I know, Nancy, and some of the treatments were dreadful. I think we’ve probably all seen One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest, too, and know it wasn’t just women who were mistreated.
    I agree, the movie of The Madness of King George was very hard to sit through — but compelling.

    Reply
  117. Oh, I know, Nancy, and some of the treatments were dreadful. I think we’ve probably all seen One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest, too, and know it wasn’t just women who were mistreated.
    I agree, the movie of The Madness of King George was very hard to sit through — but compelling.

    Reply
  118. Oh, I know, Nancy, and some of the treatments were dreadful. I think we’ve probably all seen One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest, too, and know it wasn’t just women who were mistreated.
    I agree, the movie of The Madness of King George was very hard to sit through — but compelling.

    Reply
  119. Oh, I know, Nancy, and some of the treatments were dreadful. I think we’ve probably all seen One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest, too, and know it wasn’t just women who were mistreated.
    I agree, the movie of The Madness of King George was very hard to sit through — but compelling.

    Reply
  120. Oh, I know, Nancy, and some of the treatments were dreadful. I think we’ve probably all seen One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest, too, and know it wasn’t just women who were mistreated.
    I agree, the movie of The Madness of King George was very hard to sit through — but compelling.

    Reply
  121. It would make for an interesting discussion, I’m sure. It’s been a long time since I read it, but I have retained the impression that there was some corruption at work as well concerning the duke’s incarceration.

    Reply
  122. It would make for an interesting discussion, I’m sure. It’s been a long time since I read it, but I have retained the impression that there was some corruption at work as well concerning the duke’s incarceration.

    Reply
  123. It would make for an interesting discussion, I’m sure. It’s been a long time since I read it, but I have retained the impression that there was some corruption at work as well concerning the duke’s incarceration.

    Reply
  124. It would make for an interesting discussion, I’m sure. It’s been a long time since I read it, but I have retained the impression that there was some corruption at work as well concerning the duke’s incarceration.

    Reply
  125. It would make for an interesting discussion, I’m sure. It’s been a long time since I read it, but I have retained the impression that there was some corruption at work as well concerning the duke’s incarceration.

    Reply
  126. Thank you, Minna. I haven’t read that Candace Camp book — and I know almost nothing about Prince Phillip’s mother or Harriet Mordaunt. I’m off to investigate.
    I see there are several videos on youtube about her — thanks again.
    I love how well-informed the wenchly community is.

    Reply
  127. Thank you, Minna. I haven’t read that Candace Camp book — and I know almost nothing about Prince Phillip’s mother or Harriet Mordaunt. I’m off to investigate.
    I see there are several videos on youtube about her — thanks again.
    I love how well-informed the wenchly community is.

    Reply
  128. Thank you, Minna. I haven’t read that Candace Camp book — and I know almost nothing about Prince Phillip’s mother or Harriet Mordaunt. I’m off to investigate.
    I see there are several videos on youtube about her — thanks again.
    I love how well-informed the wenchly community is.

    Reply
  129. Thank you, Minna. I haven’t read that Candace Camp book — and I know almost nothing about Prince Phillip’s mother or Harriet Mordaunt. I’m off to investigate.
    I see there are several videos on youtube about her — thanks again.
    I love how well-informed the wenchly community is.

    Reply
  130. Thank you, Minna. I haven’t read that Candace Camp book — and I know almost nothing about Prince Phillip’s mother or Harriet Mordaunt. I’m off to investigate.
    I see there are several videos on youtube about her — thanks again.
    I love how well-informed the wenchly community is.

    Reply
  131. I find her far more admirable than her son, frankly. Despite her illness (or maybe because of it) and the way her own family treated her, she apparently helped quite a few people.

    Reply
  132. I find her far more admirable than her son, frankly. Despite her illness (or maybe because of it) and the way her own family treated her, she apparently helped quite a few people.

    Reply
  133. I find her far more admirable than her son, frankly. Despite her illness (or maybe because of it) and the way her own family treated her, she apparently helped quite a few people.

    Reply
  134. I find her far more admirable than her son, frankly. Despite her illness (or maybe because of it) and the way her own family treated her, she apparently helped quite a few people.

    Reply
  135. I find her far more admirable than her son, frankly. Despite her illness (or maybe because of it) and the way her own family treated her, she apparently helped quite a few people.

    Reply
  136. I saw a documentary about Prince Phillips mother a few years ago. She was indeed one of the most interesting persons I had never heard of.

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  137. I saw a documentary about Prince Phillips mother a few years ago. She was indeed one of the most interesting persons I had never heard of.

    Reply
  138. I saw a documentary about Prince Phillips mother a few years ago. She was indeed one of the most interesting persons I had never heard of.

    Reply
  139. I saw a documentary about Prince Phillips mother a few years ago. She was indeed one of the most interesting persons I had never heard of.

    Reply
  140. I saw a documentary about Prince Phillips mother a few years ago. She was indeed one of the most interesting persons I had never heard of.

    Reply
  141. Oh, oh! And let’s not forget Nellie Bly, who went to an asylum voluntarily in order to write a report about her experiences there.

    Reply
  142. Oh, oh! And let’s not forget Nellie Bly, who went to an asylum voluntarily in order to write a report about her experiences there.

    Reply
  143. Oh, oh! And let’s not forget Nellie Bly, who went to an asylum voluntarily in order to write a report about her experiences there.

    Reply
  144. Oh, oh! And let’s not forget Nellie Bly, who went to an asylum voluntarily in order to write a report about her experiences there.

    Reply
  145. Oh, oh! And let’s not forget Nellie Bly, who went to an asylum voluntarily in order to write a report about her experiences there.

    Reply
  146. Great post, Anne, and so sad to think about what was done to people in the past when they weren’t mad at all!
    What about Georgette Heyer’s ‘Cousin Kate’? Wasn’t her cousin Torquil a bit mad? It’s not one of my favourite Heyer books so I haven’t read it for a long time, but that’s how I remember it.

    Reply
  147. Great post, Anne, and so sad to think about what was done to people in the past when they weren’t mad at all!
    What about Georgette Heyer’s ‘Cousin Kate’? Wasn’t her cousin Torquil a bit mad? It’s not one of my favourite Heyer books so I haven’t read it for a long time, but that’s how I remember it.

    Reply
  148. Great post, Anne, and so sad to think about what was done to people in the past when they weren’t mad at all!
    What about Georgette Heyer’s ‘Cousin Kate’? Wasn’t her cousin Torquil a bit mad? It’s not one of my favourite Heyer books so I haven’t read it for a long time, but that’s how I remember it.

    Reply
  149. Great post, Anne, and so sad to think about what was done to people in the past when they weren’t mad at all!
    What about Georgette Heyer’s ‘Cousin Kate’? Wasn’t her cousin Torquil a bit mad? It’s not one of my favourite Heyer books so I haven’t read it for a long time, but that’s how I remember it.

    Reply
  150. Great post, Anne, and so sad to think about what was done to people in the past when they weren’t mad at all!
    What about Georgette Heyer’s ‘Cousin Kate’? Wasn’t her cousin Torquil a bit mad? It’s not one of my favourite Heyer books so I haven’t read it for a long time, but that’s how I remember it.

    Reply

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