On Becoming a Regency Woman, Part II

by Mary Jo

Cat_243_dover Since Wench Edith is busy with a delightful bit of family business, I’m going to take this opportunity to continue Monday’s discussion on what it would be like to transfer ourselves to the past by taking advantage of Elaine McCarthy’s excellent question: What would we like about living in Regency times?

For instance, in the ‘not-so-great’ column was the fact that a large number of us might not have reached our present ages because we would have been pushing up daisies in a churchyard.  As Talpianna said, and I’ve also heard, there has been more progress in medical science since 1900 than in all previous human history, and that sounds true.

As an addendum to that fact, probably the greatest human health advances have been because of publish health improvements, most coming in the late 19th century: clean water, cleaner air (there’s need to work on that one!), mass vaccinations, et al. 

Vaccinations are controversial these days, largely because we’ve not seen the kind of mass plagues that used to take out huge numbers of people.  Remember the novel MRS. MIKE, in which a city girl meets a handsome Canadian mountie in the far north, falls in love and marries him?  There’s a lot about the book that I don’t remember, but I remember vividly the woman who told the heroine that a child reminded her of a daughter of her "first family."  Turns out she meant that kids were so vulnerable to disease that it Flowerrose397_dover wasn’t unusual to lose all of one’s kids to diphtheria, smallpox, typhoid, or something equally awful.  And then have a ‘second family’–and possibly lose all those kids, too.  Chilling!  (Particularly if you remember the ending of the book.)

But at the same time–wouldn’t it be fantastic not to think of food as our enemy?  To be able to eat pies and cakes and roast beef without wondering if they might kill us?  ‘Twould be bliss indeed!

And in a related topic–how nice not to worry about weight all the time.  With a world full of Barbies to make us feel porky, and far too much fattening food at every turn, wouldn’t it be great to live in a society where a little padding was seen as a sign of health and prosperity?  And where as a matter of course, one did enough walking to stay healthy and appreciate nature? 

I think that simple things brought more pleasure.  These days, we swim in wonderful music whenever we Woman_reading207_dover wish.  People with iPods have so much music plugged directly into their heads that they can ignore reality altogether. Think of the joy of getting together with your neighbors and enjoying the skills of the pianist, the fiddler, the harpist!  Think of the pleasure of singing songs together with your family and friends.  Imagine the excitement of the local fair when it’s the only such entertainment available to you.

And then there’s courtship.  As Kalen pointed out, in the TV show Regency House party, the hostess was vastly deficient in her duties in not arranging more for the young ladies to do, especially co-ed activities.  What fun to have men competing for our favors!  (Okay, I’m suspending some disbelief to think there would be hordes of men competing for my attention, but maybe one or two. <g>)

Lovers393_dover How nice to have a man send flowers the morning after a ball instead of the dreary hooking up young people do today!  There’s no question that women today have vastly improved opportunities and freedoms.  But how lovely it would be to be able to tell a man NO!, I don’t want to go to bed with you!, and not have to explain why.  One of the harsher aspects of our modern day is that sexual freedom in practice means that a woman may have to defend her choice to keep her body to herself. 

I don’t doubt that Regency women were very busy, but I think they might not have been as harried as we are today, with so many choices, so many responsibilities, and the chronic belief that we’re being the eight-ball, that we’re missing something, that we’ve made the wrong choices and ruined our lives.

Fewer choices mean less stress.  (Ask anyone who has just had to pick the right health care options from an insurer!)  More time to do as one wishes means less stress.  How lovely to live in a day when one didn’t have to be Superwoman–it was enough simply to be A Regency Woman. 

Cat_on_books_70_dover A free book for you, Elaine!  Now the rest of you tell me what you think you’d like about living in Regency times–

Mary Jo

115 thoughts on “On Becoming a Regency Woman, Part II”

  1. Hmm, that’s a toughie. The books are so much nicer than the reality. LOL. I think I would like the leisure of the day. I can’t imagine not having to work and take care of everything (running around like a chicken with my head off). I think I would love to experience that. Of course then, I would have to be well to do with a husband who made a good living. 🙂

    Reply
  2. Hmm, that’s a toughie. The books are so much nicer than the reality. LOL. I think I would like the leisure of the day. I can’t imagine not having to work and take care of everything (running around like a chicken with my head off). I think I would love to experience that. Of course then, I would have to be well to do with a husband who made a good living. 🙂

    Reply
  3. Hmm, that’s a toughie. The books are so much nicer than the reality. LOL. I think I would like the leisure of the day. I can’t imagine not having to work and take care of everything (running around like a chicken with my head off). I think I would love to experience that. Of course then, I would have to be well to do with a husband who made a good living. 🙂

    Reply
  4. Hmm, that’s a toughie. The books are so much nicer than the reality. LOL. I think I would like the leisure of the day. I can’t imagine not having to work and take care of everything (running around like a chicken with my head off). I think I would love to experience that. Of course then, I would have to be well to do with a husband who made a good living. 🙂

    Reply
  5. Hmm, that’s a toughie. The books are so much nicer than the reality. LOL. I think I would like the leisure of the day. I can’t imagine not having to work and take care of everything (running around like a chicken with my head off). I think I would love to experience that. Of course then, I would have to be well to do with a husband who made a good living. 🙂

    Reply
  6. What I’d like about living in the Regency? I’d wouldn’t be working in an office and having to solve all my department’s payroll and purchasing problems, nor to troubleshoot everyone’s internet access, nor to monitor our compliance with state and accrediting agency regulations, etc. I’m sure I’d have OTHER problems, but at least I wouldn’t have THOSE.
    Oh, and the clothes are wonderful. The men’s even more than the women’s. I’d enjoy getting to ogle men in their finery–the only thing I can think of now that even comes close is Marines in dress uniform.

    Reply
  7. What I’d like about living in the Regency? I’d wouldn’t be working in an office and having to solve all my department’s payroll and purchasing problems, nor to troubleshoot everyone’s internet access, nor to monitor our compliance with state and accrediting agency regulations, etc. I’m sure I’d have OTHER problems, but at least I wouldn’t have THOSE.
    Oh, and the clothes are wonderful. The men’s even more than the women’s. I’d enjoy getting to ogle men in their finery–the only thing I can think of now that even comes close is Marines in dress uniform.

    Reply
  8. What I’d like about living in the Regency? I’d wouldn’t be working in an office and having to solve all my department’s payroll and purchasing problems, nor to troubleshoot everyone’s internet access, nor to monitor our compliance with state and accrediting agency regulations, etc. I’m sure I’d have OTHER problems, but at least I wouldn’t have THOSE.
    Oh, and the clothes are wonderful. The men’s even more than the women’s. I’d enjoy getting to ogle men in their finery–the only thing I can think of now that even comes close is Marines in dress uniform.

    Reply
  9. What I’d like about living in the Regency? I’d wouldn’t be working in an office and having to solve all my department’s payroll and purchasing problems, nor to troubleshoot everyone’s internet access, nor to monitor our compliance with state and accrediting agency regulations, etc. I’m sure I’d have OTHER problems, but at least I wouldn’t have THOSE.
    Oh, and the clothes are wonderful. The men’s even more than the women’s. I’d enjoy getting to ogle men in their finery–the only thing I can think of now that even comes close is Marines in dress uniform.

    Reply
  10. What I’d like about living in the Regency? I’d wouldn’t be working in an office and having to solve all my department’s payroll and purchasing problems, nor to troubleshoot everyone’s internet access, nor to monitor our compliance with state and accrediting agency regulations, etc. I’m sure I’d have OTHER problems, but at least I wouldn’t have THOSE.
    Oh, and the clothes are wonderful. The men’s even more than the women’s. I’d enjoy getting to ogle men in their finery–the only thing I can think of now that even comes close is Marines in dress uniform.

    Reply
  11. Mary Jo, this is always one of my favorite games! When we were kids, my sister and I used to play “what if we lived in the olden days” all the time, telling each other what we’d miss, and what we’d love.
    One of the things that really appeals to me is how much people walked in the Regency. I love walking. I live a few miles away from a little town that has become very trendy while maintaining its quaint fishing village origins. The big thing in Gig (hard G) Harbor is walking. It’s a walker-friendly town, and no matter what the weather, you see lots of people out walking their dogs and visiting all the darling little shops that line the streets. During the summer, shopkeepers throw open their doors and display their goods on little tables and racks right on the sidewalk. There are no parking lots. You park on the street like a Christian and walk to your destination.
    I think it might have been that way during the Regency, a walker-friendly era. I can imagine little country villages being the same as Gig Harbor, where complete strangers smile and say hello as you pass them on the streets. I’ll bet there were no incidents of road rage like we have nowadays!
    Another thing I would just LOVE is the ability to visit great mansions and be shown around by the housekeeper. Nowadays, you wouldn’t dare walk up to a private residence or estate and expect to be given a tour and refreshments!

    Reply
  12. Mary Jo, this is always one of my favorite games! When we were kids, my sister and I used to play “what if we lived in the olden days” all the time, telling each other what we’d miss, and what we’d love.
    One of the things that really appeals to me is how much people walked in the Regency. I love walking. I live a few miles away from a little town that has become very trendy while maintaining its quaint fishing village origins. The big thing in Gig (hard G) Harbor is walking. It’s a walker-friendly town, and no matter what the weather, you see lots of people out walking their dogs and visiting all the darling little shops that line the streets. During the summer, shopkeepers throw open their doors and display their goods on little tables and racks right on the sidewalk. There are no parking lots. You park on the street like a Christian and walk to your destination.
    I think it might have been that way during the Regency, a walker-friendly era. I can imagine little country villages being the same as Gig Harbor, where complete strangers smile and say hello as you pass them on the streets. I’ll bet there were no incidents of road rage like we have nowadays!
    Another thing I would just LOVE is the ability to visit great mansions and be shown around by the housekeeper. Nowadays, you wouldn’t dare walk up to a private residence or estate and expect to be given a tour and refreshments!

    Reply
  13. Mary Jo, this is always one of my favorite games! When we were kids, my sister and I used to play “what if we lived in the olden days” all the time, telling each other what we’d miss, and what we’d love.
    One of the things that really appeals to me is how much people walked in the Regency. I love walking. I live a few miles away from a little town that has become very trendy while maintaining its quaint fishing village origins. The big thing in Gig (hard G) Harbor is walking. It’s a walker-friendly town, and no matter what the weather, you see lots of people out walking their dogs and visiting all the darling little shops that line the streets. During the summer, shopkeepers throw open their doors and display their goods on little tables and racks right on the sidewalk. There are no parking lots. You park on the street like a Christian and walk to your destination.
    I think it might have been that way during the Regency, a walker-friendly era. I can imagine little country villages being the same as Gig Harbor, where complete strangers smile and say hello as you pass them on the streets. I’ll bet there were no incidents of road rage like we have nowadays!
    Another thing I would just LOVE is the ability to visit great mansions and be shown around by the housekeeper. Nowadays, you wouldn’t dare walk up to a private residence or estate and expect to be given a tour and refreshments!

    Reply
  14. Mary Jo, this is always one of my favorite games! When we were kids, my sister and I used to play “what if we lived in the olden days” all the time, telling each other what we’d miss, and what we’d love.
    One of the things that really appeals to me is how much people walked in the Regency. I love walking. I live a few miles away from a little town that has become very trendy while maintaining its quaint fishing village origins. The big thing in Gig (hard G) Harbor is walking. It’s a walker-friendly town, and no matter what the weather, you see lots of people out walking their dogs and visiting all the darling little shops that line the streets. During the summer, shopkeepers throw open their doors and display their goods on little tables and racks right on the sidewalk. There are no parking lots. You park on the street like a Christian and walk to your destination.
    I think it might have been that way during the Regency, a walker-friendly era. I can imagine little country villages being the same as Gig Harbor, where complete strangers smile and say hello as you pass them on the streets. I’ll bet there were no incidents of road rage like we have nowadays!
    Another thing I would just LOVE is the ability to visit great mansions and be shown around by the housekeeper. Nowadays, you wouldn’t dare walk up to a private residence or estate and expect to be given a tour and refreshments!

    Reply
  15. Mary Jo, this is always one of my favorite games! When we were kids, my sister and I used to play “what if we lived in the olden days” all the time, telling each other what we’d miss, and what we’d love.
    One of the things that really appeals to me is how much people walked in the Regency. I love walking. I live a few miles away from a little town that has become very trendy while maintaining its quaint fishing village origins. The big thing in Gig (hard G) Harbor is walking. It’s a walker-friendly town, and no matter what the weather, you see lots of people out walking their dogs and visiting all the darling little shops that line the streets. During the summer, shopkeepers throw open their doors and display their goods on little tables and racks right on the sidewalk. There are no parking lots. You park on the street like a Christian and walk to your destination.
    I think it might have been that way during the Regency, a walker-friendly era. I can imagine little country villages being the same as Gig Harbor, where complete strangers smile and say hello as you pass them on the streets. I’ll bet there were no incidents of road rage like we have nowadays!
    Another thing I would just LOVE is the ability to visit great mansions and be shown around by the housekeeper. Nowadays, you wouldn’t dare walk up to a private residence or estate and expect to be given a tour and refreshments!

    Reply
  16. *wave back* Hi, Susan! Yes,I’m quite near Seattle–in the tiny podunk backwater town of Olalla, which is so small that we seldom get a dot on a map. You must come to Gig Harbor sometime this summer and enjoy the very Regencyish feel of a small town.
    I’ll meet you there and buy you an ice cream cone in the little ice cream shop. We can wander in and out of all the quaint little shops and museums, pretending we are two *young* Regency women taking an airing, looking for bonnets and ribbons. *g*

    Reply
  17. *wave back* Hi, Susan! Yes,I’m quite near Seattle–in the tiny podunk backwater town of Olalla, which is so small that we seldom get a dot on a map. You must come to Gig Harbor sometime this summer and enjoy the very Regencyish feel of a small town.
    I’ll meet you there and buy you an ice cream cone in the little ice cream shop. We can wander in and out of all the quaint little shops and museums, pretending we are two *young* Regency women taking an airing, looking for bonnets and ribbons. *g*

    Reply
  18. *wave back* Hi, Susan! Yes,I’m quite near Seattle–in the tiny podunk backwater town of Olalla, which is so small that we seldom get a dot on a map. You must come to Gig Harbor sometime this summer and enjoy the very Regencyish feel of a small town.
    I’ll meet you there and buy you an ice cream cone in the little ice cream shop. We can wander in and out of all the quaint little shops and museums, pretending we are two *young* Regency women taking an airing, looking for bonnets and ribbons. *g*

    Reply
  19. *wave back* Hi, Susan! Yes,I’m quite near Seattle–in the tiny podunk backwater town of Olalla, which is so small that we seldom get a dot on a map. You must come to Gig Harbor sometime this summer and enjoy the very Regencyish feel of a small town.
    I’ll meet you there and buy you an ice cream cone in the little ice cream shop. We can wander in and out of all the quaint little shops and museums, pretending we are two *young* Regency women taking an airing, looking for bonnets and ribbons. *g*

    Reply
  20. *wave back* Hi, Susan! Yes,I’m quite near Seattle–in the tiny podunk backwater town of Olalla, which is so small that we seldom get a dot on a map. You must come to Gig Harbor sometime this summer and enjoy the very Regencyish feel of a small town.
    I’ll meet you there and buy you an ice cream cone in the little ice cream shop. We can wander in and out of all the quaint little shops and museums, pretending we are two *young* Regency women taking an airing, looking for bonnets and ribbons. *g*

    Reply
  21. Sorry, I’m just too modern (and possibly unromantic ) to find any advantage in hoping I’ll get a bouquet after a ball. I’d rather buy my own than risk being the wallflower who no one speaks to. And even if I were wealthy, having servants watching everything I do would give me creeps. I can walk now. I’ve lived in small towns and enjoyed small town life and a slower lifestyle. I’m not fond of stress. But managing rags and chamberpots by candlelight on a freezing cold night holds no appeal whatsoever!

    Reply
  22. Sorry, I’m just too modern (and possibly unromantic ) to find any advantage in hoping I’ll get a bouquet after a ball. I’d rather buy my own than risk being the wallflower who no one speaks to. And even if I were wealthy, having servants watching everything I do would give me creeps. I can walk now. I’ve lived in small towns and enjoyed small town life and a slower lifestyle. I’m not fond of stress. But managing rags and chamberpots by candlelight on a freezing cold night holds no appeal whatsoever!

    Reply
  23. Sorry, I’m just too modern (and possibly unromantic ) to find any advantage in hoping I’ll get a bouquet after a ball. I’d rather buy my own than risk being the wallflower who no one speaks to. And even if I were wealthy, having servants watching everything I do would give me creeps. I can walk now. I’ve lived in small towns and enjoyed small town life and a slower lifestyle. I’m not fond of stress. But managing rags and chamberpots by candlelight on a freezing cold night holds no appeal whatsoever!

    Reply
  24. Sorry, I’m just too modern (and possibly unromantic ) to find any advantage in hoping I’ll get a bouquet after a ball. I’d rather buy my own than risk being the wallflower who no one speaks to. And even if I were wealthy, having servants watching everything I do would give me creeps. I can walk now. I’ve lived in small towns and enjoyed small town life and a slower lifestyle. I’m not fond of stress. But managing rags and chamberpots by candlelight on a freezing cold night holds no appeal whatsoever!

    Reply
  25. Sorry, I’m just too modern (and possibly unromantic ) to find any advantage in hoping I’ll get a bouquet after a ball. I’d rather buy my own than risk being the wallflower who no one speaks to. And even if I were wealthy, having servants watching everything I do would give me creeps. I can walk now. I’ve lived in small towns and enjoyed small town life and a slower lifestyle. I’m not fond of stress. But managing rags and chamberpots by candlelight on a freezing cold night holds no appeal whatsoever!

    Reply
  26. “I’ll meet you there and buy you an ice cream cone in the little ice cream shop. We can wander in and out of all the quaint little shops and museums, pretending we are two *young* Regency women taking an airing, looking for bonnets and ribbons.”
    Sounds like a great afternoon to me! Every once in awhile I fantasize about moving someplace like Whidbey Island or Sequim if my husband and I are ever in a position where we can both work from home.

    Reply
  27. “I’ll meet you there and buy you an ice cream cone in the little ice cream shop. We can wander in and out of all the quaint little shops and museums, pretending we are two *young* Regency women taking an airing, looking for bonnets and ribbons.”
    Sounds like a great afternoon to me! Every once in awhile I fantasize about moving someplace like Whidbey Island or Sequim if my husband and I are ever in a position where we can both work from home.

    Reply
  28. “I’ll meet you there and buy you an ice cream cone in the little ice cream shop. We can wander in and out of all the quaint little shops and museums, pretending we are two *young* Regency women taking an airing, looking for bonnets and ribbons.”
    Sounds like a great afternoon to me! Every once in awhile I fantasize about moving someplace like Whidbey Island or Sequim if my husband and I are ever in a position where we can both work from home.

    Reply
  29. “I’ll meet you there and buy you an ice cream cone in the little ice cream shop. We can wander in and out of all the quaint little shops and museums, pretending we are two *young* Regency women taking an airing, looking for bonnets and ribbons.”
    Sounds like a great afternoon to me! Every once in awhile I fantasize about moving someplace like Whidbey Island or Sequim if my husband and I are ever in a position where we can both work from home.

    Reply
  30. “I’ll meet you there and buy you an ice cream cone in the little ice cream shop. We can wander in and out of all the quaint little shops and museums, pretending we are two *young* Regency women taking an airing, looking for bonnets and ribbons.”
    Sounds like a great afternoon to me! Every once in awhile I fantasize about moving someplace like Whidbey Island or Sequim if my husband and I are ever in a position where we can both work from home.

    Reply
  31. Setting aside the fact that I would not have survived my birth, nor would my mother, or if I had, I would have had several prime opportunities to die in the course of my life to date, what I like most is the letter writing. Of course, I would have to assume I was a gentleman’s daughter (but this is all What If anyway). Reading Byron’s letters reminded me what an important part of life that was for those who didn’t have to work for a living. Email is nothing like it.
    Oh, and I do agree with Kalen that Regency House Party cheated on so many counts. And in addition to an incompetent hostess and the resulting boredom, the group comprised a number of smokers, all of whom were suffering from nicotine withdrawal. Yikes!

    Reply
  32. Setting aside the fact that I would not have survived my birth, nor would my mother, or if I had, I would have had several prime opportunities to die in the course of my life to date, what I like most is the letter writing. Of course, I would have to assume I was a gentleman’s daughter (but this is all What If anyway). Reading Byron’s letters reminded me what an important part of life that was for those who didn’t have to work for a living. Email is nothing like it.
    Oh, and I do agree with Kalen that Regency House Party cheated on so many counts. And in addition to an incompetent hostess and the resulting boredom, the group comprised a number of smokers, all of whom were suffering from nicotine withdrawal. Yikes!

    Reply
  33. Setting aside the fact that I would not have survived my birth, nor would my mother, or if I had, I would have had several prime opportunities to die in the course of my life to date, what I like most is the letter writing. Of course, I would have to assume I was a gentleman’s daughter (but this is all What If anyway). Reading Byron’s letters reminded me what an important part of life that was for those who didn’t have to work for a living. Email is nothing like it.
    Oh, and I do agree with Kalen that Regency House Party cheated on so many counts. And in addition to an incompetent hostess and the resulting boredom, the group comprised a number of smokers, all of whom were suffering from nicotine withdrawal. Yikes!

    Reply
  34. Setting aside the fact that I would not have survived my birth, nor would my mother, or if I had, I would have had several prime opportunities to die in the course of my life to date, what I like most is the letter writing. Of course, I would have to assume I was a gentleman’s daughter (but this is all What If anyway). Reading Byron’s letters reminded me what an important part of life that was for those who didn’t have to work for a living. Email is nothing like it.
    Oh, and I do agree with Kalen that Regency House Party cheated on so many counts. And in addition to an incompetent hostess and the resulting boredom, the group comprised a number of smokers, all of whom were suffering from nicotine withdrawal. Yikes!

    Reply
  35. Setting aside the fact that I would not have survived my birth, nor would my mother, or if I had, I would have had several prime opportunities to die in the course of my life to date, what I like most is the letter writing. Of course, I would have to assume I was a gentleman’s daughter (but this is all What If anyway). Reading Byron’s letters reminded me what an important part of life that was for those who didn’t have to work for a living. Email is nothing like it.
    Oh, and I do agree with Kalen that Regency House Party cheated on so many counts. And in addition to an incompetent hostess and the resulting boredom, the group comprised a number of smokers, all of whom were suffering from nicotine withdrawal. Yikes!

    Reply
  36. OK, two things spring to mind that I would really love. 1) NO TV!!! No radio, no video games, none of that electronic *stuff* that eats up such a huge amount of people’s time without giving them any real interaction. It seems really DIRE to me that a lot of households have one TV set per person, thus obviating any necessity for conversation!
    Second, and sort of related, I would love the communities. A person might have four or five of them; her town, her family, her church, her school friends. Unless one lives in a small town, the only real communities left seem to be *offices* and even those fluctuate a lot more than a town population would have 200 years ago.

    Reply
  37. OK, two things spring to mind that I would really love. 1) NO TV!!! No radio, no video games, none of that electronic *stuff* that eats up such a huge amount of people’s time without giving them any real interaction. It seems really DIRE to me that a lot of households have one TV set per person, thus obviating any necessity for conversation!
    Second, and sort of related, I would love the communities. A person might have four or five of them; her town, her family, her church, her school friends. Unless one lives in a small town, the only real communities left seem to be *offices* and even those fluctuate a lot more than a town population would have 200 years ago.

    Reply
  38. OK, two things spring to mind that I would really love. 1) NO TV!!! No radio, no video games, none of that electronic *stuff* that eats up such a huge amount of people’s time without giving them any real interaction. It seems really DIRE to me that a lot of households have one TV set per person, thus obviating any necessity for conversation!
    Second, and sort of related, I would love the communities. A person might have four or five of them; her town, her family, her church, her school friends. Unless one lives in a small town, the only real communities left seem to be *offices* and even those fluctuate a lot more than a town population would have 200 years ago.

    Reply
  39. OK, two things spring to mind that I would really love. 1) NO TV!!! No radio, no video games, none of that electronic *stuff* that eats up such a huge amount of people’s time without giving them any real interaction. It seems really DIRE to me that a lot of households have one TV set per person, thus obviating any necessity for conversation!
    Second, and sort of related, I would love the communities. A person might have four or five of them; her town, her family, her church, her school friends. Unless one lives in a small town, the only real communities left seem to be *offices* and even those fluctuate a lot more than a town population would have 200 years ago.

    Reply
  40. OK, two things spring to mind that I would really love. 1) NO TV!!! No radio, no video games, none of that electronic *stuff* that eats up such a huge amount of people’s time without giving them any real interaction. It seems really DIRE to me that a lot of households have one TV set per person, thus obviating any necessity for conversation!
    Second, and sort of related, I would love the communities. A person might have four or five of them; her town, her family, her church, her school friends. Unless one lives in a small town, the only real communities left seem to be *offices* and even those fluctuate a lot more than a town population would have 200 years ago.

    Reply
  41. I think I would have liked the fact that a woman didn’t have to try to do everything. There is no guilt over choices made because your choices were very limited.

    Reply
  42. I think I would have liked the fact that a woman didn’t have to try to do everything. There is no guilt over choices made because your choices were very limited.

    Reply
  43. I think I would have liked the fact that a woman didn’t have to try to do everything. There is no guilt over choices made because your choices were very limited.

    Reply
  44. I think I would have liked the fact that a woman didn’t have to try to do everything. There is no guilt over choices made because your choices were very limited.

    Reply
  45. I think I would have liked the fact that a woman didn’t have to try to do everything. There is no guilt over choices made because your choices were very limited.

    Reply
  46. I’d love to go for a walk a la Elizabeth Bennet and not see any wires anywhere. No cars, ditto.
    I love how the tables were set and meals laid. I have nowhere near the time, patience or inclination to live like that, but such niceties would be nice (for a while) if done by others. (I’m making a big assumption here as to class.)

    Reply
  47. I’d love to go for a walk a la Elizabeth Bennet and not see any wires anywhere. No cars, ditto.
    I love how the tables were set and meals laid. I have nowhere near the time, patience or inclination to live like that, but such niceties would be nice (for a while) if done by others. (I’m making a big assumption here as to class.)

    Reply
  48. I’d love to go for a walk a la Elizabeth Bennet and not see any wires anywhere. No cars, ditto.
    I love how the tables were set and meals laid. I have nowhere near the time, patience or inclination to live like that, but such niceties would be nice (for a while) if done by others. (I’m making a big assumption here as to class.)

    Reply
  49. I’d love to go for a walk a la Elizabeth Bennet and not see any wires anywhere. No cars, ditto.
    I love how the tables were set and meals laid. I have nowhere near the time, patience or inclination to live like that, but such niceties would be nice (for a while) if done by others. (I’m making a big assumption here as to class.)

    Reply
  50. I’d love to go for a walk a la Elizabeth Bennet and not see any wires anywhere. No cars, ditto.
    I love how the tables were set and meals laid. I have nowhere near the time, patience or inclination to live like that, but such niceties would be nice (for a while) if done by others. (I’m making a big assumption here as to class.)

    Reply
  51. When I was teaching at NMU in Marquette, MI, I used to attend the Episcopal church there. Along one side there was a series of In Memoriam stained-glass windows, all memorializing members of one family, mostly children–I think there were at least a dozen in all–all of whom died within a few days of each other, in the 1918 flu pandemic.
    I have this nasty feeling that if I WERE a Regency woman, I’d be Mary Bennett, which is not a consummation devoutly to be wished. I’d much prefer to be a Regency MAN–all that good conversation in clubs and coffeehouses. Let’s go whole hog and assume I’m an aristocrat: I could ride to hounds, race curricles, take my seat in the House of Lords and make policy for the nation, buy masterpieces by Turner and Constable before the paint was quite dry….
    Or if I were a Cit, I could make a fortune in commerce or manufacturing (decent pay and conditions in MY mills, of course) or apprentice myself to Isambard Kingdom Brunel and build masterpieces of engineering.
    And of course, once I was wealthy (or if I was a lord), take my choice of all the rest of you young buds when I chose to set up my nursery…

    Reply
  52. When I was teaching at NMU in Marquette, MI, I used to attend the Episcopal church there. Along one side there was a series of In Memoriam stained-glass windows, all memorializing members of one family, mostly children–I think there were at least a dozen in all–all of whom died within a few days of each other, in the 1918 flu pandemic.
    I have this nasty feeling that if I WERE a Regency woman, I’d be Mary Bennett, which is not a consummation devoutly to be wished. I’d much prefer to be a Regency MAN–all that good conversation in clubs and coffeehouses. Let’s go whole hog and assume I’m an aristocrat: I could ride to hounds, race curricles, take my seat in the House of Lords and make policy for the nation, buy masterpieces by Turner and Constable before the paint was quite dry….
    Or if I were a Cit, I could make a fortune in commerce or manufacturing (decent pay and conditions in MY mills, of course) or apprentice myself to Isambard Kingdom Brunel and build masterpieces of engineering.
    And of course, once I was wealthy (or if I was a lord), take my choice of all the rest of you young buds when I chose to set up my nursery…

    Reply
  53. When I was teaching at NMU in Marquette, MI, I used to attend the Episcopal church there. Along one side there was a series of In Memoriam stained-glass windows, all memorializing members of one family, mostly children–I think there were at least a dozen in all–all of whom died within a few days of each other, in the 1918 flu pandemic.
    I have this nasty feeling that if I WERE a Regency woman, I’d be Mary Bennett, which is not a consummation devoutly to be wished. I’d much prefer to be a Regency MAN–all that good conversation in clubs and coffeehouses. Let’s go whole hog and assume I’m an aristocrat: I could ride to hounds, race curricles, take my seat in the House of Lords and make policy for the nation, buy masterpieces by Turner and Constable before the paint was quite dry….
    Or if I were a Cit, I could make a fortune in commerce or manufacturing (decent pay and conditions in MY mills, of course) or apprentice myself to Isambard Kingdom Brunel and build masterpieces of engineering.
    And of course, once I was wealthy (or if I was a lord), take my choice of all the rest of you young buds when I chose to set up my nursery…

    Reply
  54. When I was teaching at NMU in Marquette, MI, I used to attend the Episcopal church there. Along one side there was a series of In Memoriam stained-glass windows, all memorializing members of one family, mostly children–I think there were at least a dozen in all–all of whom died within a few days of each other, in the 1918 flu pandemic.
    I have this nasty feeling that if I WERE a Regency woman, I’d be Mary Bennett, which is not a consummation devoutly to be wished. I’d much prefer to be a Regency MAN–all that good conversation in clubs and coffeehouses. Let’s go whole hog and assume I’m an aristocrat: I could ride to hounds, race curricles, take my seat in the House of Lords and make policy for the nation, buy masterpieces by Turner and Constable before the paint was quite dry….
    Or if I were a Cit, I could make a fortune in commerce or manufacturing (decent pay and conditions in MY mills, of course) or apprentice myself to Isambard Kingdom Brunel and build masterpieces of engineering.
    And of course, once I was wealthy (or if I was a lord), take my choice of all the rest of you young buds when I chose to set up my nursery…

    Reply
  55. When I was teaching at NMU in Marquette, MI, I used to attend the Episcopal church there. Along one side there was a series of In Memoriam stained-glass windows, all memorializing members of one family, mostly children–I think there were at least a dozen in all–all of whom died within a few days of each other, in the 1918 flu pandemic.
    I have this nasty feeling that if I WERE a Regency woman, I’d be Mary Bennett, which is not a consummation devoutly to be wished. I’d much prefer to be a Regency MAN–all that good conversation in clubs and coffeehouses. Let’s go whole hog and assume I’m an aristocrat: I could ride to hounds, race curricles, take my seat in the House of Lords and make policy for the nation, buy masterpieces by Turner and Constable before the paint was quite dry….
    Or if I were a Cit, I could make a fortune in commerce or manufacturing (decent pay and conditions in MY mills, of course) or apprentice myself to Isambard Kingdom Brunel and build masterpieces of engineering.
    And of course, once I was wealthy (or if I was a lord), take my choice of all the rest of you young buds when I chose to set up my nursery…

    Reply
  56. During the regency — let’s think. On my father’s side, the women as well as the men were on the frontier, mostly, by the 1810-1820 period in Kentucky, soon to move on to Missouri by covered wagon. They were living in log cabins, cooking on open hearths, had a limited amount of furniture, and reading that was mostly limited to the bible and uplifting religious tracts. Entertainment consisted of attending the Baptist church.
    One branch of the family lived in Philadelphia. The men were artisans, mostly carpenters, and the families were much caught up in an ongoing dispute between Old Light Presbyterians and New Light Presbyterians.
    On my mother’s side they were — serfs in Polish Pomerania (serfdom was on its way out, but hadn’t gotten all the way there, yet). Entertainment consisted of attending the Lutheran church, which duly provided sermons in Kashubian as well as German so the parishioners could understand them.
    So I think I’ll take the modern world with all its ills.
    Virginia

    Reply
  57. During the regency — let’s think. On my father’s side, the women as well as the men were on the frontier, mostly, by the 1810-1820 period in Kentucky, soon to move on to Missouri by covered wagon. They were living in log cabins, cooking on open hearths, had a limited amount of furniture, and reading that was mostly limited to the bible and uplifting religious tracts. Entertainment consisted of attending the Baptist church.
    One branch of the family lived in Philadelphia. The men were artisans, mostly carpenters, and the families were much caught up in an ongoing dispute between Old Light Presbyterians and New Light Presbyterians.
    On my mother’s side they were — serfs in Polish Pomerania (serfdom was on its way out, but hadn’t gotten all the way there, yet). Entertainment consisted of attending the Lutheran church, which duly provided sermons in Kashubian as well as German so the parishioners could understand them.
    So I think I’ll take the modern world with all its ills.
    Virginia

    Reply
  58. During the regency — let’s think. On my father’s side, the women as well as the men were on the frontier, mostly, by the 1810-1820 period in Kentucky, soon to move on to Missouri by covered wagon. They were living in log cabins, cooking on open hearths, had a limited amount of furniture, and reading that was mostly limited to the bible and uplifting religious tracts. Entertainment consisted of attending the Baptist church.
    One branch of the family lived in Philadelphia. The men were artisans, mostly carpenters, and the families were much caught up in an ongoing dispute between Old Light Presbyterians and New Light Presbyterians.
    On my mother’s side they were — serfs in Polish Pomerania (serfdom was on its way out, but hadn’t gotten all the way there, yet). Entertainment consisted of attending the Lutheran church, which duly provided sermons in Kashubian as well as German so the parishioners could understand them.
    So I think I’ll take the modern world with all its ills.
    Virginia

    Reply
  59. During the regency — let’s think. On my father’s side, the women as well as the men were on the frontier, mostly, by the 1810-1820 period in Kentucky, soon to move on to Missouri by covered wagon. They were living in log cabins, cooking on open hearths, had a limited amount of furniture, and reading that was mostly limited to the bible and uplifting religious tracts. Entertainment consisted of attending the Baptist church.
    One branch of the family lived in Philadelphia. The men were artisans, mostly carpenters, and the families were much caught up in an ongoing dispute between Old Light Presbyterians and New Light Presbyterians.
    On my mother’s side they were — serfs in Polish Pomerania (serfdom was on its way out, but hadn’t gotten all the way there, yet). Entertainment consisted of attending the Lutheran church, which duly provided sermons in Kashubian as well as German so the parishioners could understand them.
    So I think I’ll take the modern world with all its ills.
    Virginia

    Reply
  60. During the regency — let’s think. On my father’s side, the women as well as the men were on the frontier, mostly, by the 1810-1820 period in Kentucky, soon to move on to Missouri by covered wagon. They were living in log cabins, cooking on open hearths, had a limited amount of furniture, and reading that was mostly limited to the bible and uplifting religious tracts. Entertainment consisted of attending the Baptist church.
    One branch of the family lived in Philadelphia. The men were artisans, mostly carpenters, and the families were much caught up in an ongoing dispute between Old Light Presbyterians and New Light Presbyterians.
    On my mother’s side they were — serfs in Polish Pomerania (serfdom was on its way out, but hadn’t gotten all the way there, yet). Entertainment consisted of attending the Lutheran church, which duly provided sermons in Kashubian as well as German so the parishioners could understand them.
    So I think I’ll take the modern world with all its ills.
    Virginia

    Reply
  61. My first thought was seeing all of the men in tight buckskins and then that was followed very quickly with: you know, seriously, I would imagine men in the regency time period looked a lot like the men that I work with and all of my previous excitement went right out the window.

    Reply
  62. My first thought was seeing all of the men in tight buckskins and then that was followed very quickly with: you know, seriously, I would imagine men in the regency time period looked a lot like the men that I work with and all of my previous excitement went right out the window.

    Reply
  63. My first thought was seeing all of the men in tight buckskins and then that was followed very quickly with: you know, seriously, I would imagine men in the regency time period looked a lot like the men that I work with and all of my previous excitement went right out the window.

    Reply
  64. My first thought was seeing all of the men in tight buckskins and then that was followed very quickly with: you know, seriously, I would imagine men in the regency time period looked a lot like the men that I work with and all of my previous excitement went right out the window.

    Reply
  65. My first thought was seeing all of the men in tight buckskins and then that was followed very quickly with: you know, seriously, I would imagine men in the regency time period looked a lot like the men that I work with and all of my previous excitement went right out the window.

    Reply
  66. From MJP:
    This is a fun fantasy, isn’t it? Loretta, a good point about how correspondence became such an important part of life. It was the telephone and internet of its day, and if the rewards weren’t as instant, there was time for the carefully considered thoughts and words.
    Elaine, you make a good point about communities. But one was also trapped in the local community, and if it was a poor fit for one’s nature, or there were truly awful people that couldn’t be avoided–not so much fun. I’m guessing people maybe were more patient about their neighbors.
    Virginia, what a great set of ancestors! THey represent both the early settlers, and the more recent immigrants, all of them looking for new opportunies. I’ve never heard of Kashubian, but I’m guessing it’s a Polish dialect.
    Kay, that’s a sobering thought. 🙂 But I think that men in that era were probably overall in better shape than now. Not only was it a more physical lifestyle (riding a horse is more physically demanding than a car), but they didn’t work in offices with cakes and cookies and candy put out every day. Still, it’s a safe guess that few of them were a match for Colin Firth.
    Gig Harbor sounds like fun!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  67. From MJP:
    This is a fun fantasy, isn’t it? Loretta, a good point about how correspondence became such an important part of life. It was the telephone and internet of its day, and if the rewards weren’t as instant, there was time for the carefully considered thoughts and words.
    Elaine, you make a good point about communities. But one was also trapped in the local community, and if it was a poor fit for one’s nature, or there were truly awful people that couldn’t be avoided–not so much fun. I’m guessing people maybe were more patient about their neighbors.
    Virginia, what a great set of ancestors! THey represent both the early settlers, and the more recent immigrants, all of them looking for new opportunies. I’ve never heard of Kashubian, but I’m guessing it’s a Polish dialect.
    Kay, that’s a sobering thought. 🙂 But I think that men in that era were probably overall in better shape than now. Not only was it a more physical lifestyle (riding a horse is more physically demanding than a car), but they didn’t work in offices with cakes and cookies and candy put out every day. Still, it’s a safe guess that few of them were a match for Colin Firth.
    Gig Harbor sounds like fun!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  68. From MJP:
    This is a fun fantasy, isn’t it? Loretta, a good point about how correspondence became such an important part of life. It was the telephone and internet of its day, and if the rewards weren’t as instant, there was time for the carefully considered thoughts and words.
    Elaine, you make a good point about communities. But one was also trapped in the local community, and if it was a poor fit for one’s nature, or there were truly awful people that couldn’t be avoided–not so much fun. I’m guessing people maybe were more patient about their neighbors.
    Virginia, what a great set of ancestors! THey represent both the early settlers, and the more recent immigrants, all of them looking for new opportunies. I’ve never heard of Kashubian, but I’m guessing it’s a Polish dialect.
    Kay, that’s a sobering thought. 🙂 But I think that men in that era were probably overall in better shape than now. Not only was it a more physical lifestyle (riding a horse is more physically demanding than a car), but they didn’t work in offices with cakes and cookies and candy put out every day. Still, it’s a safe guess that few of them were a match for Colin Firth.
    Gig Harbor sounds like fun!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  69. From MJP:
    This is a fun fantasy, isn’t it? Loretta, a good point about how correspondence became such an important part of life. It was the telephone and internet of its day, and if the rewards weren’t as instant, there was time for the carefully considered thoughts and words.
    Elaine, you make a good point about communities. But one was also trapped in the local community, and if it was a poor fit for one’s nature, or there were truly awful people that couldn’t be avoided–not so much fun. I’m guessing people maybe were more patient about their neighbors.
    Virginia, what a great set of ancestors! THey represent both the early settlers, and the more recent immigrants, all of them looking for new opportunies. I’ve never heard of Kashubian, but I’m guessing it’s a Polish dialect.
    Kay, that’s a sobering thought. 🙂 But I think that men in that era were probably overall in better shape than now. Not only was it a more physical lifestyle (riding a horse is more physically demanding than a car), but they didn’t work in offices with cakes and cookies and candy put out every day. Still, it’s a safe guess that few of them were a match for Colin Firth.
    Gig Harbor sounds like fun!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  70. From MJP:
    This is a fun fantasy, isn’t it? Loretta, a good point about how correspondence became such an important part of life. It was the telephone and internet of its day, and if the rewards weren’t as instant, there was time for the carefully considered thoughts and words.
    Elaine, you make a good point about communities. But one was also trapped in the local community, and if it was a poor fit for one’s nature, or there were truly awful people that couldn’t be avoided–not so much fun. I’m guessing people maybe were more patient about their neighbors.
    Virginia, what a great set of ancestors! THey represent both the early settlers, and the more recent immigrants, all of them looking for new opportunies. I’ve never heard of Kashubian, but I’m guessing it’s a Polish dialect.
    Kay, that’s a sobering thought. 🙂 But I think that men in that era were probably overall in better shape than now. Not only was it a more physical lifestyle (riding a horse is more physically demanding than a car), but they didn’t work in offices with cakes and cookies and candy put out every day. Still, it’s a safe guess that few of them were a match for Colin Firth.
    Gig Harbor sounds like fun!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  71. Mary Jo… I suspect the health benefits of a more physical lifestyle were offset by the lack of modern healthcare, or indeed, in many cases, ANY healthcare. Herniated disk? Live with it! Scoliosis? Badly set broken bone? Calcium deficiency? And their teeth: ugh. Also, considering the amount they habitually drank… well, I could go on and on… and on!
    Here’s what I’ve always wondered: what counterpart to TP did they have? Actually, I’m not so sure I want to KNOW.

    Reply
  72. Mary Jo… I suspect the health benefits of a more physical lifestyle were offset by the lack of modern healthcare, or indeed, in many cases, ANY healthcare. Herniated disk? Live with it! Scoliosis? Badly set broken bone? Calcium deficiency? And their teeth: ugh. Also, considering the amount they habitually drank… well, I could go on and on… and on!
    Here’s what I’ve always wondered: what counterpart to TP did they have? Actually, I’m not so sure I want to KNOW.

    Reply
  73. Mary Jo… I suspect the health benefits of a more physical lifestyle were offset by the lack of modern healthcare, or indeed, in many cases, ANY healthcare. Herniated disk? Live with it! Scoliosis? Badly set broken bone? Calcium deficiency? And their teeth: ugh. Also, considering the amount they habitually drank… well, I could go on and on… and on!
    Here’s what I’ve always wondered: what counterpart to TP did they have? Actually, I’m not so sure I want to KNOW.

    Reply
  74. Mary Jo… I suspect the health benefits of a more physical lifestyle were offset by the lack of modern healthcare, or indeed, in many cases, ANY healthcare. Herniated disk? Live with it! Scoliosis? Badly set broken bone? Calcium deficiency? And their teeth: ugh. Also, considering the amount they habitually drank… well, I could go on and on… and on!
    Here’s what I’ve always wondered: what counterpart to TP did they have? Actually, I’m not so sure I want to KNOW.

    Reply
  75. Mary Jo… I suspect the health benefits of a more physical lifestyle were offset by the lack of modern healthcare, or indeed, in many cases, ANY healthcare. Herniated disk? Live with it! Scoliosis? Badly set broken bone? Calcium deficiency? And their teeth: ugh. Also, considering the amount they habitually drank… well, I could go on and on… and on!
    Here’s what I’ve always wondered: what counterpart to TP did they have? Actually, I’m not so sure I want to KNOW.

    Reply
  76. I would like knowing my neighbors and not being afraid to let my children run the fields and go explore. i would like to have my address be that people knew my name. “Oh, you’re looking for Kate’s house? Right down the lane don’t ya know?”
    I am very tired of reading about the doom and gloom of our society. It just doesn’t need to be so dismal.
    Take care!

    Reply
  77. I would like knowing my neighbors and not being afraid to let my children run the fields and go explore. i would like to have my address be that people knew my name. “Oh, you’re looking for Kate’s house? Right down the lane don’t ya know?”
    I am very tired of reading about the doom and gloom of our society. It just doesn’t need to be so dismal.
    Take care!

    Reply
  78. I would like knowing my neighbors and not being afraid to let my children run the fields and go explore. i would like to have my address be that people knew my name. “Oh, you’re looking for Kate’s house? Right down the lane don’t ya know?”
    I am very tired of reading about the doom and gloom of our society. It just doesn’t need to be so dismal.
    Take care!

    Reply
  79. I would like knowing my neighbors and not being afraid to let my children run the fields and go explore. i would like to have my address be that people knew my name. “Oh, you’re looking for Kate’s house? Right down the lane don’t ya know?”
    I am very tired of reading about the doom and gloom of our society. It just doesn’t need to be so dismal.
    Take care!

    Reply
  80. I would like knowing my neighbors and not being afraid to let my children run the fields and go explore. i would like to have my address be that people knew my name. “Oh, you’re looking for Kate’s house? Right down the lane don’t ya know?”
    I am very tired of reading about the doom and gloom of our society. It just doesn’t need to be so dismal.
    Take care!

    Reply
  81. While I don’t think for a moment it was a perfcet world back then I think it would be nice to live in an age where people were content to live by the *spirit* of the law rather than the *letter* of the law so a handshake meant a great deal more than it does nowadays. Where people were politer and in general had more respect for each other, including privacy and property, and where people were more inclined to look upon a stranger with trust rather than suspicion. And where the mantra of competition was not *to win at all costs* and you respected your opposition.

    Reply
  82. While I don’t think for a moment it was a perfcet world back then I think it would be nice to live in an age where people were content to live by the *spirit* of the law rather than the *letter* of the law so a handshake meant a great deal more than it does nowadays. Where people were politer and in general had more respect for each other, including privacy and property, and where people were more inclined to look upon a stranger with trust rather than suspicion. And where the mantra of competition was not *to win at all costs* and you respected your opposition.

    Reply
  83. While I don’t think for a moment it was a perfcet world back then I think it would be nice to live in an age where people were content to live by the *spirit* of the law rather than the *letter* of the law so a handshake meant a great deal more than it does nowadays. Where people were politer and in general had more respect for each other, including privacy and property, and where people were more inclined to look upon a stranger with trust rather than suspicion. And where the mantra of competition was not *to win at all costs* and you respected your opposition.

    Reply
  84. While I don’t think for a moment it was a perfcet world back then I think it would be nice to live in an age where people were content to live by the *spirit* of the law rather than the *letter* of the law so a handshake meant a great deal more than it does nowadays. Where people were politer and in general had more respect for each other, including privacy and property, and where people were more inclined to look upon a stranger with trust rather than suspicion. And where the mantra of competition was not *to win at all costs* and you respected your opposition.

    Reply
  85. While I don’t think for a moment it was a perfcet world back then I think it would be nice to live in an age where people were content to live by the *spirit* of the law rather than the *letter* of the law so a handshake meant a great deal more than it does nowadays. Where people were politer and in general had more respect for each other, including privacy and property, and where people were more inclined to look upon a stranger with trust rather than suspicion. And where the mantra of competition was not *to win at all costs* and you respected your opposition.

    Reply
  86. I’d love being able to ride where I wanted to go (if I could afford a horse). Although I like driving, commuting is so unfun. Back in the Regency, riding out in the open and enjoying nature sounds great.
    I think I’d be less stressed because of fewer choices – it’s a double-edged sword having more freedom to choose careers and leisure activities when you don’t have a clear preference.
    I think I’d enjoy the dancing – I love nightclub dancing, but actually dancing the waltz or even country dances with a man who KNOWS how to dance, without trying to grind against me >.>, sounds fantastic!

    Reply
  87. I’d love being able to ride where I wanted to go (if I could afford a horse). Although I like driving, commuting is so unfun. Back in the Regency, riding out in the open and enjoying nature sounds great.
    I think I’d be less stressed because of fewer choices – it’s a double-edged sword having more freedom to choose careers and leisure activities when you don’t have a clear preference.
    I think I’d enjoy the dancing – I love nightclub dancing, but actually dancing the waltz or even country dances with a man who KNOWS how to dance, without trying to grind against me >.>, sounds fantastic!

    Reply
  88. I’d love being able to ride where I wanted to go (if I could afford a horse). Although I like driving, commuting is so unfun. Back in the Regency, riding out in the open and enjoying nature sounds great.
    I think I’d be less stressed because of fewer choices – it’s a double-edged sword having more freedom to choose careers and leisure activities when you don’t have a clear preference.
    I think I’d enjoy the dancing – I love nightclub dancing, but actually dancing the waltz or even country dances with a man who KNOWS how to dance, without trying to grind against me >.>, sounds fantastic!

    Reply
  89. I’d love being able to ride where I wanted to go (if I could afford a horse). Although I like driving, commuting is so unfun. Back in the Regency, riding out in the open and enjoying nature sounds great.
    I think I’d be less stressed because of fewer choices – it’s a double-edged sword having more freedom to choose careers and leisure activities when you don’t have a clear preference.
    I think I’d enjoy the dancing – I love nightclub dancing, but actually dancing the waltz or even country dances with a man who KNOWS how to dance, without trying to grind against me >.>, sounds fantastic!

    Reply
  90. I’d love being able to ride where I wanted to go (if I could afford a horse). Although I like driving, commuting is so unfun. Back in the Regency, riding out in the open and enjoying nature sounds great.
    I think I’d be less stressed because of fewer choices – it’s a double-edged sword having more freedom to choose careers and leisure activities when you don’t have a clear preference.
    I think I’d enjoy the dancing – I love nightclub dancing, but actually dancing the waltz or even country dances with a man who KNOWS how to dance, without trying to grind against me >.>, sounds fantastic!

    Reply
  91. This may be the wrong thing to pick up on in your post– but about saying no to sex– you never have to explain why. It’s one of the things I teach my clients. “I don’t want to” is enough of a reason. A woman’s body is her own. We don’t have to buy into the assumption that a man is entitled to an explanation– that has an underlying assumption that a woman’s body is not her own to make choices about. I know you share these values, Mary Jo, but since it’s something that comes up in my therapeutic work, I couldn’t let it pass without comment.
    Merry

    Reply
  92. This may be the wrong thing to pick up on in your post– but about saying no to sex– you never have to explain why. It’s one of the things I teach my clients. “I don’t want to” is enough of a reason. A woman’s body is her own. We don’t have to buy into the assumption that a man is entitled to an explanation– that has an underlying assumption that a woman’s body is not her own to make choices about. I know you share these values, Mary Jo, but since it’s something that comes up in my therapeutic work, I couldn’t let it pass without comment.
    Merry

    Reply
  93. This may be the wrong thing to pick up on in your post– but about saying no to sex– you never have to explain why. It’s one of the things I teach my clients. “I don’t want to” is enough of a reason. A woman’s body is her own. We don’t have to buy into the assumption that a man is entitled to an explanation– that has an underlying assumption that a woman’s body is not her own to make choices about. I know you share these values, Mary Jo, but since it’s something that comes up in my therapeutic work, I couldn’t let it pass without comment.
    Merry

    Reply
  94. This may be the wrong thing to pick up on in your post– but about saying no to sex– you never have to explain why. It’s one of the things I teach my clients. “I don’t want to” is enough of a reason. A woman’s body is her own. We don’t have to buy into the assumption that a man is entitled to an explanation– that has an underlying assumption that a woman’s body is not her own to make choices about. I know you share these values, Mary Jo, but since it’s something that comes up in my therapeutic work, I couldn’t let it pass without comment.
    Merry

    Reply
  95. This may be the wrong thing to pick up on in your post– but about saying no to sex– you never have to explain why. It’s one of the things I teach my clients. “I don’t want to” is enough of a reason. A woman’s body is her own. We don’t have to buy into the assumption that a man is entitled to an explanation– that has an underlying assumption that a woman’s body is not her own to make choices about. I know you share these values, Mary Jo, but since it’s something that comes up in my therapeutic work, I couldn’t let it pass without comment.
    Merry

    Reply
  96. I so totally agree with Patricia. Not to mention that at that time my home country Finland was ruled by Russia, you were really lucky if you lived past your 10th birthday and if the summers happened to be too cold, people died of hunger at winter. Even here in my home county there is a tiny statue in memory of people who died of famine in 19th century.

    Reply
  97. I so totally agree with Patricia. Not to mention that at that time my home country Finland was ruled by Russia, you were really lucky if you lived past your 10th birthday and if the summers happened to be too cold, people died of hunger at winter. Even here in my home county there is a tiny statue in memory of people who died of famine in 19th century.

    Reply
  98. I so totally agree with Patricia. Not to mention that at that time my home country Finland was ruled by Russia, you were really lucky if you lived past your 10th birthday and if the summers happened to be too cold, people died of hunger at winter. Even here in my home county there is a tiny statue in memory of people who died of famine in 19th century.

    Reply
  99. I so totally agree with Patricia. Not to mention that at that time my home country Finland was ruled by Russia, you were really lucky if you lived past your 10th birthday and if the summers happened to be too cold, people died of hunger at winter. Even here in my home county there is a tiny statue in memory of people who died of famine in 19th century.

    Reply
  100. I so totally agree with Patricia. Not to mention that at that time my home country Finland was ruled by Russia, you were really lucky if you lived past your 10th birthday and if the summers happened to be too cold, people died of hunger at winter. Even here in my home county there is a tiny statue in memory of people who died of famine in 19th century.

    Reply
  101. I think one of the things that attracts me most to Regency Romance is the idea that getting married and having babies was fully acceptable and wanted. Having a family was the most important thing in one’s life, not having a career. No one would look at me cross-eyed if I said that when I grow up I want to be a mommy. Not a lawyer or doctor or superwoman. Being a good wife and mother was something to aspire to. Sometimes I think we’ve lost something in our drive to do everything and everything well. My mother is a doctor, my girlfriends are lawyers and international security analysts and all sorts of high-powered things. I feel almost ashamed to say that I want to have a baby. I love it when the Regency hero imagines the heroine’s tummy large with his child and a fierce possessive pride fills him. Sigh.

    Reply
  102. I think one of the things that attracts me most to Regency Romance is the idea that getting married and having babies was fully acceptable and wanted. Having a family was the most important thing in one’s life, not having a career. No one would look at me cross-eyed if I said that when I grow up I want to be a mommy. Not a lawyer or doctor or superwoman. Being a good wife and mother was something to aspire to. Sometimes I think we’ve lost something in our drive to do everything and everything well. My mother is a doctor, my girlfriends are lawyers and international security analysts and all sorts of high-powered things. I feel almost ashamed to say that I want to have a baby. I love it when the Regency hero imagines the heroine’s tummy large with his child and a fierce possessive pride fills him. Sigh.

    Reply
  103. I think one of the things that attracts me most to Regency Romance is the idea that getting married and having babies was fully acceptable and wanted. Having a family was the most important thing in one’s life, not having a career. No one would look at me cross-eyed if I said that when I grow up I want to be a mommy. Not a lawyer or doctor or superwoman. Being a good wife and mother was something to aspire to. Sometimes I think we’ve lost something in our drive to do everything and everything well. My mother is a doctor, my girlfriends are lawyers and international security analysts and all sorts of high-powered things. I feel almost ashamed to say that I want to have a baby. I love it when the Regency hero imagines the heroine’s tummy large with his child and a fierce possessive pride fills him. Sigh.

    Reply
  104. I think one of the things that attracts me most to Regency Romance is the idea that getting married and having babies was fully acceptable and wanted. Having a family was the most important thing in one’s life, not having a career. No one would look at me cross-eyed if I said that when I grow up I want to be a mommy. Not a lawyer or doctor or superwoman. Being a good wife and mother was something to aspire to. Sometimes I think we’ve lost something in our drive to do everything and everything well. My mother is a doctor, my girlfriends are lawyers and international security analysts and all sorts of high-powered things. I feel almost ashamed to say that I want to have a baby. I love it when the Regency hero imagines the heroine’s tummy large with his child and a fierce possessive pride fills him. Sigh.

    Reply
  105. I think one of the things that attracts me most to Regency Romance is the idea that getting married and having babies was fully acceptable and wanted. Having a family was the most important thing in one’s life, not having a career. No one would look at me cross-eyed if I said that when I grow up I want to be a mommy. Not a lawyer or doctor or superwoman. Being a good wife and mother was something to aspire to. Sometimes I think we’ve lost something in our drive to do everything and everything well. My mother is a doctor, my girlfriends are lawyers and international security analysts and all sorts of high-powered things. I feel almost ashamed to say that I want to have a baby. I love it when the Regency hero imagines the heroine’s tummy large with his child and a fierce possessive pride fills him. Sigh.

    Reply

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