Old stuff

Jo here. My husband and I took a short break over into Dorset to visit  the coastal visit of Charmouth on the JuraQ3458t Ammonite, c50mm, C-beachssic Coast. This stretch of coastal cliffs  shed rocks under the influence of the sea, revealing fossils from the Triassic, Jurassic and Cretaceous periods, so we thought we'd go fossil hunting. We didn't find a great deal, but it's always pleasant to wander about at the sea edge.

Charmouth We realized we were almost half way to Stonehenge, so we decided to leave early on the third day and go there. The delights of living in a small country with a lot of interesting old stuff.

For one reason or another, we'd never been, which was a shame as people used to be able to wander about the stones at will. However, we were curious about the new set up there and it was only about 90 minutes further. There's a new visitor center over a mile from the stones, and shuttle buses running continuously to take visitors there.

Q3537w Jo at StonehengeIn my opinion, the trouble with really famous places is a) that there are always a lot of other people there, but b) that we see and know so much about them that we don't get the impact that others did in the past. However, the organization is now very smooth, and the stones are impressive, no matter how you look at it. Of course, people are fascinated by how prehistoric people moved such stones from far away and arranged them in a purposeful design. I'm more interested in why, especially with a place like Stonehenge, where people went to great effort to create structures over millennia. The stones are only the last of many effortful layers.

I believe that all such sites are in places of powerful earth energy that draw people to them for spiritual purposes, and that the energy can be tapped into. We humans react very well to reward!

Another place with powerful earth energy is Whitby in Yorkshire, where we lived for a year. It's dominated by the ruins of a very old monastery, and there's energy up there, but the place simply has a vibe.  Bram Stoker was inspired there to write Dracula, and it's in Whitby bay that Dracula's boat is wrecked.Whitby

I find that most very old places of worship have the vibe. There was a reason they were built just there.

I used this concept in To Rescue a Rogue, the book where Dare Debenham finally overcomes his opium addiction with some help from Mara's St. Bride's home, Brideswell. Everyone accepts that the St. Brides are a particularly happy, contented family and Dare has pleasant memories of visiting there in the past. But in the present, struggling with addiction, he has this conversation with Mara, who says, "Father thinks there some sort of ancient temple beneath the ruins of St. Bride's monastery."
   "I wouldn't be surprised."
   At his tone, she glanced at him. "Why?"
   "There's something special about the place."
   "It's a rambling hodge-podge of a house."
   "I don't mean Brideswell, though that has a sort of magic, but the area. The house, the church, the village. It's all built within the bounds of the old monastery. If that had been built on some pagan site, it would explain a lot."

TrarwwmjToward the end, they use the energy at the Brideswell church to help Dare regain his strength.

She led the way in, finding the church eerie in the light of the one small lamp before the altar. Dare sat in the nearest pew, looking exhausted.
   Ruyuan said, "Ah, yes," and sat in the center of the aisle, cross legged.
   After a few moments, Dare struggled to his feet and leaned on Salter to walk down the aisle. He found a spot and lay down, spreadeagled on his back.
   Salter took a seat in a nearby pew. Mara sat beside him.
   "Do you feel anything?" she asked the man quietly.
   "Can't say as I do, milady, though I'm not one to deny what others find beneficial."
   Something of the peace of the place was soothing her. "Will you stay with Lord Darius?" she asked softly.
   "No, milady. I've found this satisfying work, however, so I may try to find another with the same trouble, and perhaps persuade him or her to seek Mr. Feng's help. Though people can be very fearful of anything that seems strange."
   Mara turned her mind to prayer, trying to blend her Christian beliefs with what she'd learned of other ways. No one with an open mind could deny that something special flowed around the site of the old monastery, or that Ruyuan's chi had spiritual power. God works in mysterious ways.

If there is earth energy it won't just be in Britain. Have you visited such places around the world? Do you have a favorite?

Jo

90 thoughts on “Old stuff”

  1. Once anyone has stood in even one of these places, which exist all over the world, they never doubt again. Even a short visit can change lives dramatically.
    This is one of my favorite subjects! Even the water in such sites has “the vibe” in my experience. There are plenty in the US and Canada as well, and Australia has one of the most powerful in Uluru (Ayers Rock). Of course there are sites, natural and human-made, on every continent, from Iguazu Falls to Mt. Fujiyama to the pyramids at Giza, temples in Japan, and stone circles in Mongolia.
    Thanks for writing about this, Jo.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  2. Once anyone has stood in even one of these places, which exist all over the world, they never doubt again. Even a short visit can change lives dramatically.
    This is one of my favorite subjects! Even the water in such sites has “the vibe” in my experience. There are plenty in the US and Canada as well, and Australia has one of the most powerful in Uluru (Ayers Rock). Of course there are sites, natural and human-made, on every continent, from Iguazu Falls to Mt. Fujiyama to the pyramids at Giza, temples in Japan, and stone circles in Mongolia.
    Thanks for writing about this, Jo.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  3. Once anyone has stood in even one of these places, which exist all over the world, they never doubt again. Even a short visit can change lives dramatically.
    This is one of my favorite subjects! Even the water in such sites has “the vibe” in my experience. There are plenty in the US and Canada as well, and Australia has one of the most powerful in Uluru (Ayers Rock). Of course there are sites, natural and human-made, on every continent, from Iguazu Falls to Mt. Fujiyama to the pyramids at Giza, temples in Japan, and stone circles in Mongolia.
    Thanks for writing about this, Jo.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  4. Once anyone has stood in even one of these places, which exist all over the world, they never doubt again. Even a short visit can change lives dramatically.
    This is one of my favorite subjects! Even the water in such sites has “the vibe” in my experience. There are plenty in the US and Canada as well, and Australia has one of the most powerful in Uluru (Ayers Rock). Of course there are sites, natural and human-made, on every continent, from Iguazu Falls to Mt. Fujiyama to the pyramids at Giza, temples in Japan, and stone circles in Mongolia.
    Thanks for writing about this, Jo.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  5. Once anyone has stood in even one of these places, which exist all over the world, they never doubt again. Even a short visit can change lives dramatically.
    This is one of my favorite subjects! Even the water in such sites has “the vibe” in my experience. There are plenty in the US and Canada as well, and Australia has one of the most powerful in Uluru (Ayers Rock). Of course there are sites, natural and human-made, on every continent, from Iguazu Falls to Mt. Fujiyama to the pyramids at Giza, temples in Japan, and stone circles in Mongolia.
    Thanks for writing about this, Jo.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  6. The abbey ruins in Glastonbury, which struck me as surprising because the town seemed so dreadfully artsy-craftsy. (This was years ago,in the early ’80s, so the town has doubtless changed.)
    Two other places where the vibe was decidedly negative: Gettysburg and Harpers Ferry.

    Reply
  7. The abbey ruins in Glastonbury, which struck me as surprising because the town seemed so dreadfully artsy-craftsy. (This was years ago,in the early ’80s, so the town has doubtless changed.)
    Two other places where the vibe was decidedly negative: Gettysburg and Harpers Ferry.

    Reply
  8. The abbey ruins in Glastonbury, which struck me as surprising because the town seemed so dreadfully artsy-craftsy. (This was years ago,in the early ’80s, so the town has doubtless changed.)
    Two other places where the vibe was decidedly negative: Gettysburg and Harpers Ferry.

    Reply
  9. The abbey ruins in Glastonbury, which struck me as surprising because the town seemed so dreadfully artsy-craftsy. (This was years ago,in the early ’80s, so the town has doubtless changed.)
    Two other places where the vibe was decidedly negative: Gettysburg and Harpers Ferry.

    Reply
  10. The abbey ruins in Glastonbury, which struck me as surprising because the town seemed so dreadfully artsy-craftsy. (This was years ago,in the early ’80s, so the town has doubtless changed.)
    Two other places where the vibe was decidedly negative: Gettysburg and Harpers Ferry.

    Reply
  11. I agree that psychic energy can be almost palpable in some of these ancient places, particularly where spiritual activity has been present over long periods.
    I haven’t been to Stonehenge recently but some years ago I remember taking a pendulum to try dowsing for earth energies, as the henge is at the center of a network of Ley Lines. Unfortunately the wind was strong enough to blow the pendulum to a near horizontal position, making detection near impossible. I must have another go sometime!
    I was recently sitting among the ruins of Riveaux Abbey (Yorkshire) allowing my mind to wander while enjoying the peace and serenity of the place. One can readily become overawed with feelings of wonder when surrounded with such relics of the past. Not sure whether the energy of such places derives from the spirits of the many monks and worshipers or from the earth energies that inspired the early building.
    Away from Britain I found the relics of the Minoans on Crete particularly inspiring, but I think it would be necessary to avoid the tourist crowds to get the most from the ruins.
    Must try your book Jo. For quite a long time I have been interested in energy healing which tries to exploit the ‘life force energy’ to accelerate the body’s natural healing processes. The exploits of certain ‘medical intuitives’ are pretty impressive, especially for remote healing. This stuff is however outside of mainstream science as the ‘vital forces’ of Henri Bergson have long been rejected. But if we consider that most of the universe is now considered to be dark matter or dark energy and not understood at all, I don’t think that should discourage enthusiasts!

    Reply
  12. I agree that psychic energy can be almost palpable in some of these ancient places, particularly where spiritual activity has been present over long periods.
    I haven’t been to Stonehenge recently but some years ago I remember taking a pendulum to try dowsing for earth energies, as the henge is at the center of a network of Ley Lines. Unfortunately the wind was strong enough to blow the pendulum to a near horizontal position, making detection near impossible. I must have another go sometime!
    I was recently sitting among the ruins of Riveaux Abbey (Yorkshire) allowing my mind to wander while enjoying the peace and serenity of the place. One can readily become overawed with feelings of wonder when surrounded with such relics of the past. Not sure whether the energy of such places derives from the spirits of the many monks and worshipers or from the earth energies that inspired the early building.
    Away from Britain I found the relics of the Minoans on Crete particularly inspiring, but I think it would be necessary to avoid the tourist crowds to get the most from the ruins.
    Must try your book Jo. For quite a long time I have been interested in energy healing which tries to exploit the ‘life force energy’ to accelerate the body’s natural healing processes. The exploits of certain ‘medical intuitives’ are pretty impressive, especially for remote healing. This stuff is however outside of mainstream science as the ‘vital forces’ of Henri Bergson have long been rejected. But if we consider that most of the universe is now considered to be dark matter or dark energy and not understood at all, I don’t think that should discourage enthusiasts!

    Reply
  13. I agree that psychic energy can be almost palpable in some of these ancient places, particularly where spiritual activity has been present over long periods.
    I haven’t been to Stonehenge recently but some years ago I remember taking a pendulum to try dowsing for earth energies, as the henge is at the center of a network of Ley Lines. Unfortunately the wind was strong enough to blow the pendulum to a near horizontal position, making detection near impossible. I must have another go sometime!
    I was recently sitting among the ruins of Riveaux Abbey (Yorkshire) allowing my mind to wander while enjoying the peace and serenity of the place. One can readily become overawed with feelings of wonder when surrounded with such relics of the past. Not sure whether the energy of such places derives from the spirits of the many monks and worshipers or from the earth energies that inspired the early building.
    Away from Britain I found the relics of the Minoans on Crete particularly inspiring, but I think it would be necessary to avoid the tourist crowds to get the most from the ruins.
    Must try your book Jo. For quite a long time I have been interested in energy healing which tries to exploit the ‘life force energy’ to accelerate the body’s natural healing processes. The exploits of certain ‘medical intuitives’ are pretty impressive, especially for remote healing. This stuff is however outside of mainstream science as the ‘vital forces’ of Henri Bergson have long been rejected. But if we consider that most of the universe is now considered to be dark matter or dark energy and not understood at all, I don’t think that should discourage enthusiasts!

    Reply
  14. I agree that psychic energy can be almost palpable in some of these ancient places, particularly where spiritual activity has been present over long periods.
    I haven’t been to Stonehenge recently but some years ago I remember taking a pendulum to try dowsing for earth energies, as the henge is at the center of a network of Ley Lines. Unfortunately the wind was strong enough to blow the pendulum to a near horizontal position, making detection near impossible. I must have another go sometime!
    I was recently sitting among the ruins of Riveaux Abbey (Yorkshire) allowing my mind to wander while enjoying the peace and serenity of the place. One can readily become overawed with feelings of wonder when surrounded with such relics of the past. Not sure whether the energy of such places derives from the spirits of the many monks and worshipers or from the earth energies that inspired the early building.
    Away from Britain I found the relics of the Minoans on Crete particularly inspiring, but I think it would be necessary to avoid the tourist crowds to get the most from the ruins.
    Must try your book Jo. For quite a long time I have been interested in energy healing which tries to exploit the ‘life force energy’ to accelerate the body’s natural healing processes. The exploits of certain ‘medical intuitives’ are pretty impressive, especially for remote healing. This stuff is however outside of mainstream science as the ‘vital forces’ of Henri Bergson have long been rejected. But if we consider that most of the universe is now considered to be dark matter or dark energy and not understood at all, I don’t think that should discourage enthusiasts!

    Reply
  15. I agree that psychic energy can be almost palpable in some of these ancient places, particularly where spiritual activity has been present over long periods.
    I haven’t been to Stonehenge recently but some years ago I remember taking a pendulum to try dowsing for earth energies, as the henge is at the center of a network of Ley Lines. Unfortunately the wind was strong enough to blow the pendulum to a near horizontal position, making detection near impossible. I must have another go sometime!
    I was recently sitting among the ruins of Riveaux Abbey (Yorkshire) allowing my mind to wander while enjoying the peace and serenity of the place. One can readily become overawed with feelings of wonder when surrounded with such relics of the past. Not sure whether the energy of such places derives from the spirits of the many monks and worshipers or from the earth energies that inspired the early building.
    Away from Britain I found the relics of the Minoans on Crete particularly inspiring, but I think it would be necessary to avoid the tourist crowds to get the most from the ruins.
    Must try your book Jo. For quite a long time I have been interested in energy healing which tries to exploit the ‘life force energy’ to accelerate the body’s natural healing processes. The exploits of certain ‘medical intuitives’ are pretty impressive, especially for remote healing. This stuff is however outside of mainstream science as the ‘vital forces’ of Henri Bergson have long been rejected. But if we consider that most of the universe is now considered to be dark matter or dark energy and not understood at all, I don’t think that should discourage enthusiasts!

    Reply
  16. “Thin” places. Suddenly you’re away from your form of reality and into something else altogether.
    We went to Stonehenge last year with my middle daughter, her husband and their little boy, who was 4 at the time. Even he was impressed! (I remember the days when you could walk among the stones. Ryder just ran around the whole huge path, only stopping to look at the sheep on the other side of the fence. Actually, come to think of it, he probably preferred the sheep to the stones.) The display in the visitors’ center was excellent, but I found the architecture of the buildings very peculiar. Probably just me.
    Dare is my favorite of your heroes!

    Reply
  17. “Thin” places. Suddenly you’re away from your form of reality and into something else altogether.
    We went to Stonehenge last year with my middle daughter, her husband and their little boy, who was 4 at the time. Even he was impressed! (I remember the days when you could walk among the stones. Ryder just ran around the whole huge path, only stopping to look at the sheep on the other side of the fence. Actually, come to think of it, he probably preferred the sheep to the stones.) The display in the visitors’ center was excellent, but I found the architecture of the buildings very peculiar. Probably just me.
    Dare is my favorite of your heroes!

    Reply
  18. “Thin” places. Suddenly you’re away from your form of reality and into something else altogether.
    We went to Stonehenge last year with my middle daughter, her husband and their little boy, who was 4 at the time. Even he was impressed! (I remember the days when you could walk among the stones. Ryder just ran around the whole huge path, only stopping to look at the sheep on the other side of the fence. Actually, come to think of it, he probably preferred the sheep to the stones.) The display in the visitors’ center was excellent, but I found the architecture of the buildings very peculiar. Probably just me.
    Dare is my favorite of your heroes!

    Reply
  19. “Thin” places. Suddenly you’re away from your form of reality and into something else altogether.
    We went to Stonehenge last year with my middle daughter, her husband and their little boy, who was 4 at the time. Even he was impressed! (I remember the days when you could walk among the stones. Ryder just ran around the whole huge path, only stopping to look at the sheep on the other side of the fence. Actually, come to think of it, he probably preferred the sheep to the stones.) The display in the visitors’ center was excellent, but I found the architecture of the buildings very peculiar. Probably just me.
    Dare is my favorite of your heroes!

    Reply
  20. “Thin” places. Suddenly you’re away from your form of reality and into something else altogether.
    We went to Stonehenge last year with my middle daughter, her husband and their little boy, who was 4 at the time. Even he was impressed! (I remember the days when you could walk among the stones. Ryder just ran around the whole huge path, only stopping to look at the sheep on the other side of the fence. Actually, come to think of it, he probably preferred the sheep to the stones.) The display in the visitors’ center was excellent, but I found the architecture of the buildings very peculiar. Probably just me.
    Dare is my favorite of your heroes!

    Reply
  21. Oh, Yorkshire! It’s on my list to return there on my next trip. Such a lovely part of Britain.
    My first trip to Stonehenge was on the 26th or 27th of December, 2000. There was almost a metre of snow covering the place! Having just recently moved to England from Australia, it was magical to see.
    You’re right how overly touristy it is now, and you can’t get very close. Back when my mother first went in the 70s you could walk around and touch the stones and be photographed sitting on them! I have no idea why, but I’ve been there a gazillion times. I guess we were always on that road for some reason…

    Reply
  22. Oh, Yorkshire! It’s on my list to return there on my next trip. Such a lovely part of Britain.
    My first trip to Stonehenge was on the 26th or 27th of December, 2000. There was almost a metre of snow covering the place! Having just recently moved to England from Australia, it was magical to see.
    You’re right how overly touristy it is now, and you can’t get very close. Back when my mother first went in the 70s you could walk around and touch the stones and be photographed sitting on them! I have no idea why, but I’ve been there a gazillion times. I guess we were always on that road for some reason…

    Reply
  23. Oh, Yorkshire! It’s on my list to return there on my next trip. Such a lovely part of Britain.
    My first trip to Stonehenge was on the 26th or 27th of December, 2000. There was almost a metre of snow covering the place! Having just recently moved to England from Australia, it was magical to see.
    You’re right how overly touristy it is now, and you can’t get very close. Back when my mother first went in the 70s you could walk around and touch the stones and be photographed sitting on them! I have no idea why, but I’ve been there a gazillion times. I guess we were always on that road for some reason…

    Reply
  24. Oh, Yorkshire! It’s on my list to return there on my next trip. Such a lovely part of Britain.
    My first trip to Stonehenge was on the 26th or 27th of December, 2000. There was almost a metre of snow covering the place! Having just recently moved to England from Australia, it was magical to see.
    You’re right how overly touristy it is now, and you can’t get very close. Back when my mother first went in the 70s you could walk around and touch the stones and be photographed sitting on them! I have no idea why, but I’ve been there a gazillion times. I guess we were always on that road for some reason…

    Reply
  25. Oh, Yorkshire! It’s on my list to return there on my next trip. Such a lovely part of Britain.
    My first trip to Stonehenge was on the 26th or 27th of December, 2000. There was almost a metre of snow covering the place! Having just recently moved to England from Australia, it was magical to see.
    You’re right how overly touristy it is now, and you can’t get very close. Back when my mother first went in the 70s you could walk around and touch the stones and be photographed sitting on them! I have no idea why, but I’ve been there a gazillion times. I guess we were always on that road for some reason…

    Reply
  26. Glastonbury is still pretty much the same (probably more like that now than then!). I actually enjoy it there, but I can see why some might not. It’s a very friendly town, but be prepared for fairy shops and glitter and gardens with elves and frolicking ladies in long dresses!

    Reply
  27. Glastonbury is still pretty much the same (probably more like that now than then!). I actually enjoy it there, but I can see why some might not. It’s a very friendly town, but be prepared for fairy shops and glitter and gardens with elves and frolicking ladies in long dresses!

    Reply
  28. Glastonbury is still pretty much the same (probably more like that now than then!). I actually enjoy it there, but I can see why some might not. It’s a very friendly town, but be prepared for fairy shops and glitter and gardens with elves and frolicking ladies in long dresses!

    Reply
  29. Glastonbury is still pretty much the same (probably more like that now than then!). I actually enjoy it there, but I can see why some might not. It’s a very friendly town, but be prepared for fairy shops and glitter and gardens with elves and frolicking ladies in long dresses!

    Reply
  30. Glastonbury is still pretty much the same (probably more like that now than then!). I actually enjoy it there, but I can see why some might not. It’s a very friendly town, but be prepared for fairy shops and glitter and gardens with elves and frolicking ladies in long dresses!

    Reply
  31. Maggie, I didn’t like the design of the visitors’ center. For one thing, it formed a kind of wind tunnel, which was unpleasant. Thanks about Dare. I like him a lot, too.

    Reply
  32. Maggie, I didn’t like the design of the visitors’ center. For one thing, it formed a kind of wind tunnel, which was unpleasant. Thanks about Dare. I like him a lot, too.

    Reply
  33. Maggie, I didn’t like the design of the visitors’ center. For one thing, it formed a kind of wind tunnel, which was unpleasant. Thanks about Dare. I like him a lot, too.

    Reply
  34. Maggie, I didn’t like the design of the visitors’ center. For one thing, it formed a kind of wind tunnel, which was unpleasant. Thanks about Dare. I like him a lot, too.

    Reply
  35. Maggie, I didn’t like the design of the visitors’ center. For one thing, it formed a kind of wind tunnel, which was unpleasant. Thanks about Dare. I like him a lot, too.

    Reply
  36. Oh yes. The Old City in Jerusalem has strong vines even for a person who is not particularly spiritual, you can’t help feeling it.

    Reply
  37. Oh yes. The Old City in Jerusalem has strong vines even for a person who is not particularly spiritual, you can’t help feeling it.

    Reply
  38. Oh yes. The Old City in Jerusalem has strong vines even for a person who is not particularly spiritual, you can’t help feeling it.

    Reply
  39. Oh yes. The Old City in Jerusalem has strong vines even for a person who is not particularly spiritual, you can’t help feeling it.

    Reply
  40. Oh yes. The Old City in Jerusalem has strong vines even for a person who is not particularly spiritual, you can’t help feeling it.

    Reply
  41. Oh yes. The Old City in Jerusalem has strong vines even for a person who is not particularly spiritual, you can’t help feeling it.

    Reply
  42. Oh yes. The Old City in Jerusalem has strong vines even for a person who is not particularly spiritual, you can’t help feeling it.

    Reply
  43. Oh yes. The Old City in Jerusalem has strong vines even for a person who is not particularly spiritual, you can’t help feeling it.

    Reply
  44. Oh yes. The Old City in Jerusalem has strong vines even for a person who is not particularly spiritual, you can’t help feeling it.

    Reply
  45. Oh yes. The Old City in Jerusalem has strong vines even for a person who is not particularly spiritual, you can’t help feeling it.

    Reply
  46. When we toured the island of Great Britain, we went to Stonehenge, but I was ill and stayed in the visitor’s center. I did get a distance view of the henge, but would have loved to have gone closer as my husband and daughter did.
    We moved on to the town of Salisbury — I felt that connection in the town (we didn’t go to the cathedral). Earlier we had been in Bath and I felt the connection in the Roman ruins.
    I’m not sure I have met any of those places in the United States, unless it was a New York State waterfall at the foot of Lake Cayuga on the western shore, near to Ithaca. I think this may be Watkins Glen, but I’ve never returned so can’t be sure. We had just been to Niagara, which is awe inspiring, but I found something VERY special about those smaller falls. This was 74 years ago, but I still remember!

    Reply
  47. When we toured the island of Great Britain, we went to Stonehenge, but I was ill and stayed in the visitor’s center. I did get a distance view of the henge, but would have loved to have gone closer as my husband and daughter did.
    We moved on to the town of Salisbury — I felt that connection in the town (we didn’t go to the cathedral). Earlier we had been in Bath and I felt the connection in the Roman ruins.
    I’m not sure I have met any of those places in the United States, unless it was a New York State waterfall at the foot of Lake Cayuga on the western shore, near to Ithaca. I think this may be Watkins Glen, but I’ve never returned so can’t be sure. We had just been to Niagara, which is awe inspiring, but I found something VERY special about those smaller falls. This was 74 years ago, but I still remember!

    Reply
  48. When we toured the island of Great Britain, we went to Stonehenge, but I was ill and stayed in the visitor’s center. I did get a distance view of the henge, but would have loved to have gone closer as my husband and daughter did.
    We moved on to the town of Salisbury — I felt that connection in the town (we didn’t go to the cathedral). Earlier we had been in Bath and I felt the connection in the Roman ruins.
    I’m not sure I have met any of those places in the United States, unless it was a New York State waterfall at the foot of Lake Cayuga on the western shore, near to Ithaca. I think this may be Watkins Glen, but I’ve never returned so can’t be sure. We had just been to Niagara, which is awe inspiring, but I found something VERY special about those smaller falls. This was 74 years ago, but I still remember!

    Reply
  49. When we toured the island of Great Britain, we went to Stonehenge, but I was ill and stayed in the visitor’s center. I did get a distance view of the henge, but would have loved to have gone closer as my husband and daughter did.
    We moved on to the town of Salisbury — I felt that connection in the town (we didn’t go to the cathedral). Earlier we had been in Bath and I felt the connection in the Roman ruins.
    I’m not sure I have met any of those places in the United States, unless it was a New York State waterfall at the foot of Lake Cayuga on the western shore, near to Ithaca. I think this may be Watkins Glen, but I’ve never returned so can’t be sure. We had just been to Niagara, which is awe inspiring, but I found something VERY special about those smaller falls. This was 74 years ago, but I still remember!

    Reply
  50. When we toured the island of Great Britain, we went to Stonehenge, but I was ill and stayed in the visitor’s center. I did get a distance view of the henge, but would have loved to have gone closer as my husband and daughter did.
    We moved on to the town of Salisbury — I felt that connection in the town (we didn’t go to the cathedral). Earlier we had been in Bath and I felt the connection in the Roman ruins.
    I’m not sure I have met any of those places in the United States, unless it was a New York State waterfall at the foot of Lake Cayuga on the western shore, near to Ithaca. I think this may be Watkins Glen, but I’ve never returned so can’t be sure. We had just been to Niagara, which is awe inspiring, but I found something VERY special about those smaller falls. This was 74 years ago, but I still remember!

    Reply
  51. I am from India and when I visit the 800+ year old temples I always feel the history along with the faith. In exactly the same spot that we stand and pray how many humans through the ages have stood and prayed for probably the exact same things that worry us. And then I am soothed by that thought that given the short span of our lives our individual problems are not that great after all.

    Reply
  52. I am from India and when I visit the 800+ year old temples I always feel the history along with the faith. In exactly the same spot that we stand and pray how many humans through the ages have stood and prayed for probably the exact same things that worry us. And then I am soothed by that thought that given the short span of our lives our individual problems are not that great after all.

    Reply
  53. I am from India and when I visit the 800+ year old temples I always feel the history along with the faith. In exactly the same spot that we stand and pray how many humans through the ages have stood and prayed for probably the exact same things that worry us. And then I am soothed by that thought that given the short span of our lives our individual problems are not that great after all.

    Reply
  54. I am from India and when I visit the 800+ year old temples I always feel the history along with the faith. In exactly the same spot that we stand and pray how many humans through the ages have stood and prayed for probably the exact same things that worry us. And then I am soothed by that thought that given the short span of our lives our individual problems are not that great after all.

    Reply
  55. I am from India and when I visit the 800+ year old temples I always feel the history along with the faith. In exactly the same spot that we stand and pray how many humans through the ages have stood and prayed for probably the exact same things that worry us. And then I am soothed by that thought that given the short span of our lives our individual problems are not that great after all.

    Reply
  56. I love Stonehenge and was lucky enough to visit many years ago when you could still go close to the stones – magical! There’s definitely a vibe there. I think most old ruins have a vibe too – like Raglan Castle for instance and also battlefields. Culloden is really eerie!

    Reply
  57. I love Stonehenge and was lucky enough to visit many years ago when you could still go close to the stones – magical! There’s definitely a vibe there. I think most old ruins have a vibe too – like Raglan Castle for instance and also battlefields. Culloden is really eerie!

    Reply
  58. I love Stonehenge and was lucky enough to visit many years ago when you could still go close to the stones – magical! There’s definitely a vibe there. I think most old ruins have a vibe too – like Raglan Castle for instance and also battlefields. Culloden is really eerie!

    Reply
  59. I love Stonehenge and was lucky enough to visit many years ago when you could still go close to the stones – magical! There’s definitely a vibe there. I think most old ruins have a vibe too – like Raglan Castle for instance and also battlefields. Culloden is really eerie!

    Reply
  60. I love Stonehenge and was lucky enough to visit many years ago when you could still go close to the stones – magical! There’s definitely a vibe there. I think most old ruins have a vibe too – like Raglan Castle for instance and also battlefields. Culloden is really eerie!

    Reply

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