Old Books Revisited

KeatsNicola here. Today I’m celebrating the “birthday” of one of my older traditional Regencies, Miss Verey’s Proposal. Today, 20th January, is the Eve of Saint Agnes and it was the legend of St Agnes that inspired the book.

I first came across the tradition of St Agnes Eve when I was in my teens and studying Keats’ poetry:

“St Agnes Eve, ah bitter chill it was! The owl, for all his feathers was a-cold; the hare limped trembling through the frozen grass, and silent was the flock in woolly fold…”

I should say at this point that I absolutely love Keats’ writing for the way he creates such beautiful images with such elegant language. I always feel cold when I read those lines! The poem goes on to tell of an ancient tradition that a girl would dream of her future husband if she went to bed without any supper and did not look behind her. In the poem the lover who appears in Madeline’s bedchamber that night is certainly more than a dream. Apparently Keats had to tone down the poem for his publishers because they felt that the first version was too erotic! Madeline and her lover, who is the sworn enemy of her family, run away together. It’s a classic historical romance.

The idea of St Agnes Eve inspired another poem, by Tennyson, and a number of the Pre-Raphaelite St Agnes eve painters. The painting in this picture is by Millais. When I first read the poem as a teenager I suspect there was a moment when I was tempted to try out the superstition for myself but for the stumbling block was going to bed without supper. I just wasn’t able to do that! My inability to fast is actually a character trait I have given to several of my heroines down the years, including Jane in Miss Verey’s Proposal.

The tradition of St Agnes Eve was the starting point for Miss Verey’s Proposal. Jane and her friend Sophia read about the customs associated with St Agnes Eve in an old book and are keen to try them out for themselves. Jane manages to go to bed without supper but wakes up in the middle of the night so hungry that she creeps downstairs to find some food. It is then she sees a tall, dark and handsome stranger – or did she dream it?

Miss vereyNaturally the course of true love does not run smooth for Jane but I did love writing the book and was totally inspired by the legend of the Eve of Saint Agnes. Miss Verey’s Proposal was published in 2000 in the UK and 2002 in the US and these days is available as an e-book. I suppose it would be considered quite an old-fashioned story these days, a traditional Regency that I hope is sweet and charming.

As a reader I do enjoy “themed” books that are based around a time of year or a tradition or custom, and as a writer I’ve written my fair share of stories that feature something traditional. As well as St Agnes Eve I’ve also written the Somerset Cider Wassail in True Colours. Christmas is the most obvious theme but Valentine’s Day and Mother’s Day are also popular. Which led me to wonder whether there were any times of the year that you particularly enjoy reading about in a book? Is there anything unusual you have come across – Scottish customs or traditions associated with Guy Fawkes Night or Midsummer Day, for example? Is there is a time of year or a tradition or custom you would especially like to see featured in a book?

115 thoughts on “Old Books Revisited”

  1. Not answering your question but just saying how lovely it is to see that Lords & Ladies cover! I discovered quite a few of my favourite authors (including you) from that and similar series.

    Reply
  2. Not answering your question but just saying how lovely it is to see that Lords & Ladies cover! I discovered quite a few of my favourite authors (including you) from that and similar series.

    Reply
  3. Not answering your question but just saying how lovely it is to see that Lords & Ladies cover! I discovered quite a few of my favourite authors (including you) from that and similar series.

    Reply
  4. Not answering your question but just saying how lovely it is to see that Lords & Ladies cover! I discovered quite a few of my favourite authors (including you) from that and similar series.

    Reply
  5. Not answering your question but just saying how lovely it is to see that Lords & Ladies cover! I discovered quite a few of my favourite authors (including you) from that and similar series.

    Reply
  6. I don’t have a particular time I like to read about, but I did read a novella about Hogmanay the other week, and I really enjoyed it. It helped that the (Scottish) author knew so much about the traditions.
    My Hogmanay experience in Edinburgh in 2000-2001 was a little different!

    Reply
  7. I don’t have a particular time I like to read about, but I did read a novella about Hogmanay the other week, and I really enjoyed it. It helped that the (Scottish) author knew so much about the traditions.
    My Hogmanay experience in Edinburgh in 2000-2001 was a little different!

    Reply
  8. I don’t have a particular time I like to read about, but I did read a novella about Hogmanay the other week, and I really enjoyed it. It helped that the (Scottish) author knew so much about the traditions.
    My Hogmanay experience in Edinburgh in 2000-2001 was a little different!

    Reply
  9. I don’t have a particular time I like to read about, but I did read a novella about Hogmanay the other week, and I really enjoyed it. It helped that the (Scottish) author knew so much about the traditions.
    My Hogmanay experience in Edinburgh in 2000-2001 was a little different!

    Reply
  10. I don’t have a particular time I like to read about, but I did read a novella about Hogmanay the other week, and I really enjoyed it. It helped that the (Scottish) author knew so much about the traditions.
    My Hogmanay experience in Edinburgh in 2000-2001 was a little different!

    Reply
  11. That sounds intriguing about your Hogmanay experience, Sonya! I hear a lot of stuff about it from family who live in Scotland but I’ve never experienced a Scottish Hogmanay for myself. It’s a great occasion to include in a book, though – so many wonderful traditions.

    Reply
  12. That sounds intriguing about your Hogmanay experience, Sonya! I hear a lot of stuff about it from family who live in Scotland but I’ve never experienced a Scottish Hogmanay for myself. It’s a great occasion to include in a book, though – so many wonderful traditions.

    Reply
  13. That sounds intriguing about your Hogmanay experience, Sonya! I hear a lot of stuff about it from family who live in Scotland but I’ve never experienced a Scottish Hogmanay for myself. It’s a great occasion to include in a book, though – so many wonderful traditions.

    Reply
  14. That sounds intriguing about your Hogmanay experience, Sonya! I hear a lot of stuff about it from family who live in Scotland but I’ve never experienced a Scottish Hogmanay for myself. It’s a great occasion to include in a book, though – so many wonderful traditions.

    Reply
  15. That sounds intriguing about your Hogmanay experience, Sonya! I hear a lot of stuff about it from family who live in Scotland but I’ve never experienced a Scottish Hogmanay for myself. It’s a great occasion to include in a book, though – so many wonderful traditions.

    Reply
  16. Egypt has a non-political holiday call Sham al-Nessim. It falls the Monday after Coptic Easter. It means smell the breezes day. And that’s that Egyptian do. The old women still cut an onion open an sniff it first thing in the morning. They then pack a picnic lunch of salted fish, onions or scallions, and color boiled eggs and head down to the Nile. You can go to any park but most Egyptians believe its especially good to go to the Nile. It has its roots in a harvest festival in Egyptian times. A day to relax, and one that the women don’t have to cook.

    Reply
  17. Egypt has a non-political holiday call Sham al-Nessim. It falls the Monday after Coptic Easter. It means smell the breezes day. And that’s that Egyptian do. The old women still cut an onion open an sniff it first thing in the morning. They then pack a picnic lunch of salted fish, onions or scallions, and color boiled eggs and head down to the Nile. You can go to any park but most Egyptians believe its especially good to go to the Nile. It has its roots in a harvest festival in Egyptian times. A day to relax, and one that the women don’t have to cook.

    Reply
  18. Egypt has a non-political holiday call Sham al-Nessim. It falls the Monday after Coptic Easter. It means smell the breezes day. And that’s that Egyptian do. The old women still cut an onion open an sniff it first thing in the morning. They then pack a picnic lunch of salted fish, onions or scallions, and color boiled eggs and head down to the Nile. You can go to any park but most Egyptians believe its especially good to go to the Nile. It has its roots in a harvest festival in Egyptian times. A day to relax, and one that the women don’t have to cook.

    Reply
  19. Egypt has a non-political holiday call Sham al-Nessim. It falls the Monday after Coptic Easter. It means smell the breezes day. And that’s that Egyptian do. The old women still cut an onion open an sniff it first thing in the morning. They then pack a picnic lunch of salted fish, onions or scallions, and color boiled eggs and head down to the Nile. You can go to any park but most Egyptians believe its especially good to go to the Nile. It has its roots in a harvest festival in Egyptian times. A day to relax, and one that the women don’t have to cook.

    Reply
  20. Egypt has a non-political holiday call Sham al-Nessim. It falls the Monday after Coptic Easter. It means smell the breezes day. And that’s that Egyptian do. The old women still cut an onion open an sniff it first thing in the morning. They then pack a picnic lunch of salted fish, onions or scallions, and color boiled eggs and head down to the Nile. You can go to any park but most Egyptians believe its especially good to go to the Nile. It has its roots in a harvest festival in Egyptian times. A day to relax, and one that the women don’t have to cook.

    Reply
  21. I like the Christmas and Valentine set stories but only if they fit the seasonOne I read was better suited toa Saturnalia than Christmas.I read one many years ago with the whole of the plot taking oplace in Japan during the cherry blossom festival. Stories based on fairytales are fairly common though I prefer Beauty and the beast to Cinderella. One doesn’t always know if a story is based ona poem, an incident, or a news story unlesss told.

    Reply
  22. I like the Christmas and Valentine set stories but only if they fit the seasonOne I read was better suited toa Saturnalia than Christmas.I read one many years ago with the whole of the plot taking oplace in Japan during the cherry blossom festival. Stories based on fairytales are fairly common though I prefer Beauty and the beast to Cinderella. One doesn’t always know if a story is based ona poem, an incident, or a news story unlesss told.

    Reply
  23. I like the Christmas and Valentine set stories but only if they fit the seasonOne I read was better suited toa Saturnalia than Christmas.I read one many years ago with the whole of the plot taking oplace in Japan during the cherry blossom festival. Stories based on fairytales are fairly common though I prefer Beauty and the beast to Cinderella. One doesn’t always know if a story is based ona poem, an incident, or a news story unlesss told.

    Reply
  24. I like the Christmas and Valentine set stories but only if they fit the seasonOne I read was better suited toa Saturnalia than Christmas.I read one many years ago with the whole of the plot taking oplace in Japan during the cherry blossom festival. Stories based on fairytales are fairly common though I prefer Beauty and the beast to Cinderella. One doesn’t always know if a story is based ona poem, an incident, or a news story unlesss told.

    Reply
  25. I like the Christmas and Valentine set stories but only if they fit the seasonOne I read was better suited toa Saturnalia than Christmas.I read one many years ago with the whole of the plot taking oplace in Japan during the cherry blossom festival. Stories based on fairytales are fairly common though I prefer Beauty and the beast to Cinderella. One doesn’t always know if a story is based ona poem, an incident, or a news story unlesss told.

    Reply
  26. When I first started reading romance novels about five years ago, I was surprised to discover that I am a sucker for romances set during the Christmas season. I guess there’s just something magical about that holiday and time of year, so Christmas novels automatically seem embued with that feeling. Having said that, if a romance novel is well-written, it could take place on a Tuesday in March and I would feel transported!

    Reply
  27. When I first started reading romance novels about five years ago, I was surprised to discover that I am a sucker for romances set during the Christmas season. I guess there’s just something magical about that holiday and time of year, so Christmas novels automatically seem embued with that feeling. Having said that, if a romance novel is well-written, it could take place on a Tuesday in March and I would feel transported!

    Reply
  28. When I first started reading romance novels about five years ago, I was surprised to discover that I am a sucker for romances set during the Christmas season. I guess there’s just something magical about that holiday and time of year, so Christmas novels automatically seem embued with that feeling. Having said that, if a romance novel is well-written, it could take place on a Tuesday in March and I would feel transported!

    Reply
  29. When I first started reading romance novels about five years ago, I was surprised to discover that I am a sucker for romances set during the Christmas season. I guess there’s just something magical about that holiday and time of year, so Christmas novels automatically seem embued with that feeling. Having said that, if a romance novel is well-written, it could take place on a Tuesday in March and I would feel transported!

    Reply
  30. When I first started reading romance novels about five years ago, I was surprised to discover that I am a sucker for romances set during the Christmas season. I guess there’s just something magical about that holiday and time of year, so Christmas novels automatically seem embued with that feeling. Having said that, if a romance novel is well-written, it could take place on a Tuesday in March and I would feel transported!

    Reply
  31. I love the sound of the Japanese cherry blossom festival, Nancy! I enjoy learning about different traditions and customs I haven’t come across before. It’s an added bonus when you pick up the book!

    Reply
  32. I love the sound of the Japanese cherry blossom festival, Nancy! I enjoy learning about different traditions and customs I haven’t come across before. It’s an added bonus when you pick up the book!

    Reply
  33. I love the sound of the Japanese cherry blossom festival, Nancy! I enjoy learning about different traditions and customs I haven’t come across before. It’s an added bonus when you pick up the book!

    Reply
  34. I love the sound of the Japanese cherry blossom festival, Nancy! I enjoy learning about different traditions and customs I haven’t come across before. It’s an added bonus when you pick up the book!

    Reply
  35. I love the sound of the Japanese cherry blossom festival, Nancy! I enjoy learning about different traditions and customs I haven’t come across before. It’s an added bonus when you pick up the book!

    Reply
  36. I guess that magical feeling is part of the popularity of the Christmas set books, isn’t it, Pattie. They really capture the spirit of the season.
    “Having said that, if a romance novel is well-written, it could take place on a Tuesday in March and I would feel transported!” – I think that’s great!

    Reply
  37. I guess that magical feeling is part of the popularity of the Christmas set books, isn’t it, Pattie. They really capture the spirit of the season.
    “Having said that, if a romance novel is well-written, it could take place on a Tuesday in March and I would feel transported!” – I think that’s great!

    Reply
  38. I guess that magical feeling is part of the popularity of the Christmas set books, isn’t it, Pattie. They really capture the spirit of the season.
    “Having said that, if a romance novel is well-written, it could take place on a Tuesday in March and I would feel transported!” – I think that’s great!

    Reply
  39. I guess that magical feeling is part of the popularity of the Christmas set books, isn’t it, Pattie. They really capture the spirit of the season.
    “Having said that, if a romance novel is well-written, it could take place on a Tuesday in March and I would feel transported!” – I think that’s great!

    Reply
  40. I guess that magical feeling is part of the popularity of the Christmas set books, isn’t it, Pattie. They really capture the spirit of the season.
    “Having said that, if a romance novel is well-written, it could take place on a Tuesday in March and I would feel transported!” – I think that’s great!

    Reply
  41. I do love historical romance written around the Christmas holidays. I have a collection of them and I drag them out every year to read between Thanksgiving and Christmas. They keep my Christmas spirit up in spite of my working in retail !!
    I especially love the length of the celebration of Christmas in Regency England. It isn’t just one day and I do love that.

    Reply
  42. I do love historical romance written around the Christmas holidays. I have a collection of them and I drag them out every year to read between Thanksgiving and Christmas. They keep my Christmas spirit up in spite of my working in retail !!
    I especially love the length of the celebration of Christmas in Regency England. It isn’t just one day and I do love that.

    Reply
  43. I do love historical romance written around the Christmas holidays. I have a collection of them and I drag them out every year to read between Thanksgiving and Christmas. They keep my Christmas spirit up in spite of my working in retail !!
    I especially love the length of the celebration of Christmas in Regency England. It isn’t just one day and I do love that.

    Reply
  44. I do love historical romance written around the Christmas holidays. I have a collection of them and I drag them out every year to read between Thanksgiving and Christmas. They keep my Christmas spirit up in spite of my working in retail !!
    I especially love the length of the celebration of Christmas in Regency England. It isn’t just one day and I do love that.

    Reply
  45. I do love historical romance written around the Christmas holidays. I have a collection of them and I drag them out every year to read between Thanksgiving and Christmas. They keep my Christmas spirit up in spite of my working in retail !!
    I especially love the length of the celebration of Christmas in Regency England. It isn’t just one day and I do love that.

    Reply
  46. We were in the city centre. Snow, kilts, so much music and noise! I think I missed most of the actual traditions, but standing at the base of the castle at midnight made up for it. 🙂

    Reply
  47. We were in the city centre. Snow, kilts, so much music and noise! I think I missed most of the actual traditions, but standing at the base of the castle at midnight made up for it. 🙂

    Reply
  48. We were in the city centre. Snow, kilts, so much music and noise! I think I missed most of the actual traditions, but standing at the base of the castle at midnight made up for it. 🙂

    Reply
  49. We were in the city centre. Snow, kilts, so much music and noise! I think I missed most of the actual traditions, but standing at the base of the castle at midnight made up for it. 🙂

    Reply
  50. We were in the city centre. Snow, kilts, so much music and noise! I think I missed most of the actual traditions, but standing at the base of the castle at midnight made up for it. 🙂

    Reply
  51. You know, I was going to mention Easter, but it isn’t much of a big deal in most places. Where my family is from (Ukraine) it’s a HUGE holiday, ten times bigger than Christmas, but I guess it wouldn’t work for books set in most countries.

    Reply
  52. You know, I was going to mention Easter, but it isn’t much of a big deal in most places. Where my family is from (Ukraine) it’s a HUGE holiday, ten times bigger than Christmas, but I guess it wouldn’t work for books set in most countries.

    Reply
  53. You know, I was going to mention Easter, but it isn’t much of a big deal in most places. Where my family is from (Ukraine) it’s a HUGE holiday, ten times bigger than Christmas, but I guess it wouldn’t work for books set in most countries.

    Reply
  54. You know, I was going to mention Easter, but it isn’t much of a big deal in most places. Where my family is from (Ukraine) it’s a HUGE holiday, ten times bigger than Christmas, but I guess it wouldn’t work for books set in most countries.

    Reply
  55. You know, I was going to mention Easter, but it isn’t much of a big deal in most places. Where my family is from (Ukraine) it’s a HUGE holiday, ten times bigger than Christmas, but I guess it wouldn’t work for books set in most countries.

    Reply
  56. Honestly, I like reading about most holidays in historical novels (romances or other). I especially enjoy when at least part of the story revolves around traditions or holidays that we do not observe anymore — I like learning more about the ‘lost’ holidays and traditions. 🙂

    Reply
  57. Honestly, I like reading about most holidays in historical novels (romances or other). I especially enjoy when at least part of the story revolves around traditions or holidays that we do not observe anymore — I like learning more about the ‘lost’ holidays and traditions. 🙂

    Reply
  58. Honestly, I like reading about most holidays in historical novels (romances or other). I especially enjoy when at least part of the story revolves around traditions or holidays that we do not observe anymore — I like learning more about the ‘lost’ holidays and traditions. 🙂

    Reply
  59. Honestly, I like reading about most holidays in historical novels (romances or other). I especially enjoy when at least part of the story revolves around traditions or holidays that we do not observe anymore — I like learning more about the ‘lost’ holidays and traditions. 🙂

    Reply
  60. Honestly, I like reading about most holidays in historical novels (romances or other). I especially enjoy when at least part of the story revolves around traditions or holidays that we do not observe anymore — I like learning more about the ‘lost’ holidays and traditions. 🙂

    Reply
  61. I haven’t read any Eater themed stories but I do like the idea of them. It’s fascinating that different festivals have prominence in different countries. We tend to learn lots about our own traditions but it’s always so interesting to hear what happens elsewhere.

    Reply
  62. I haven’t read any Eater themed stories but I do like the idea of them. It’s fascinating that different festivals have prominence in different countries. We tend to learn lots about our own traditions but it’s always so interesting to hear what happens elsewhere.

    Reply
  63. I haven’t read any Eater themed stories but I do like the idea of them. It’s fascinating that different festivals have prominence in different countries. We tend to learn lots about our own traditions but it’s always so interesting to hear what happens elsewhere.

    Reply
  64. I haven’t read any Eater themed stories but I do like the idea of them. It’s fascinating that different festivals have prominence in different countries. We tend to learn lots about our own traditions but it’s always so interesting to hear what happens elsewhere.

    Reply
  65. I haven’t read any Eater themed stories but I do like the idea of them. It’s fascinating that different festivals have prominence in different countries. We tend to learn lots about our own traditions but it’s always so interesting to hear what happens elsewhere.

    Reply
  66. I like the idea of “lost” holidays and traditions too, Glenda. They are talking about Guy Fawkes Night dying out here, or being taken over by Halloween and I think that would be such a pity as the history behind it is so interesting. On the other hand, they have re-introduced Apple Day…

    Reply
  67. I like the idea of “lost” holidays and traditions too, Glenda. They are talking about Guy Fawkes Night dying out here, or being taken over by Halloween and I think that would be such a pity as the history behind it is so interesting. On the other hand, they have re-introduced Apple Day…

    Reply
  68. I like the idea of “lost” holidays and traditions too, Glenda. They are talking about Guy Fawkes Night dying out here, or being taken over by Halloween and I think that would be such a pity as the history behind it is so interesting. On the other hand, they have re-introduced Apple Day…

    Reply
  69. I like the idea of “lost” holidays and traditions too, Glenda. They are talking about Guy Fawkes Night dying out here, or being taken over by Halloween and I think that would be such a pity as the history behind it is so interesting. On the other hand, they have re-introduced Apple Day…

    Reply
  70. I like the idea of “lost” holidays and traditions too, Glenda. They are talking about Guy Fawkes Night dying out here, or being taken over by Halloween and I think that would be such a pity as the history behind it is so interesting. On the other hand, they have re-introduced Apple Day…

    Reply
  71. I heard “Penny for the Guy” in the Sherlock episode that aired in the US Sunday (The Empty Hearse), and Watson nearly got toasted in a Guy Fawkes bonfire, so apparently the holiday is still popular or Steven Moffat would likely have found some other way to almost off poor Watson.
    I like holiday stories, especially Christmas, which seems particularly suited to Regency and Victorian stories. I used to really look forward to those Signets and Zebras with their bright holiday covers. They were as much a part of my Christmas as candles and trees and presents to wrap. I wish we still had new ones every year. Ebooks are no fun in that way.

    Reply
  72. I heard “Penny for the Guy” in the Sherlock episode that aired in the US Sunday (The Empty Hearse), and Watson nearly got toasted in a Guy Fawkes bonfire, so apparently the holiday is still popular or Steven Moffat would likely have found some other way to almost off poor Watson.
    I like holiday stories, especially Christmas, which seems particularly suited to Regency and Victorian stories. I used to really look forward to those Signets and Zebras with their bright holiday covers. They were as much a part of my Christmas as candles and trees and presents to wrap. I wish we still had new ones every year. Ebooks are no fun in that way.

    Reply
  73. I heard “Penny for the Guy” in the Sherlock episode that aired in the US Sunday (The Empty Hearse), and Watson nearly got toasted in a Guy Fawkes bonfire, so apparently the holiday is still popular or Steven Moffat would likely have found some other way to almost off poor Watson.
    I like holiday stories, especially Christmas, which seems particularly suited to Regency and Victorian stories. I used to really look forward to those Signets and Zebras with their bright holiday covers. They were as much a part of my Christmas as candles and trees and presents to wrap. I wish we still had new ones every year. Ebooks are no fun in that way.

    Reply
  74. I heard “Penny for the Guy” in the Sherlock episode that aired in the US Sunday (The Empty Hearse), and Watson nearly got toasted in a Guy Fawkes bonfire, so apparently the holiday is still popular or Steven Moffat would likely have found some other way to almost off poor Watson.
    I like holiday stories, especially Christmas, which seems particularly suited to Regency and Victorian stories. I used to really look forward to those Signets and Zebras with their bright holiday covers. They were as much a part of my Christmas as candles and trees and presents to wrap. I wish we still had new ones every year. Ebooks are no fun in that way.

    Reply
  75. I heard “Penny for the Guy” in the Sherlock episode that aired in the US Sunday (The Empty Hearse), and Watson nearly got toasted in a Guy Fawkes bonfire, so apparently the holiday is still popular or Steven Moffat would likely have found some other way to almost off poor Watson.
    I like holiday stories, especially Christmas, which seems particularly suited to Regency and Victorian stories. I used to really look forward to those Signets and Zebras with their bright holiday covers. They were as much a part of my Christmas as candles and trees and presents to wrap. I wish we still had new ones every year. Ebooks are no fun in that way.

    Reply
  76. Meant to add that Shannon’s message about the Egyptian holiday and its colored eggs dating back to Ancient Egypt reminded me of something I once read somewhere – that on a certain day every year parents would give their children colorful painted wooden eggs, and that was the day they’d tell them about the birds and the bees.

    Reply
  77. Meant to add that Shannon’s message about the Egyptian holiday and its colored eggs dating back to Ancient Egypt reminded me of something I once read somewhere – that on a certain day every year parents would give their children colorful painted wooden eggs, and that was the day they’d tell them about the birds and the bees.

    Reply
  78. Meant to add that Shannon’s message about the Egyptian holiday and its colored eggs dating back to Ancient Egypt reminded me of something I once read somewhere – that on a certain day every year parents would give their children colorful painted wooden eggs, and that was the day they’d tell them about the birds and the bees.

    Reply
  79. Meant to add that Shannon’s message about the Egyptian holiday and its colored eggs dating back to Ancient Egypt reminded me of something I once read somewhere – that on a certain day every year parents would give their children colorful painted wooden eggs, and that was the day they’d tell them about the birds and the bees.

    Reply
  80. Meant to add that Shannon’s message about the Egyptian holiday and its colored eggs dating back to Ancient Egypt reminded me of something I once read somewhere – that on a certain day every year parents would give their children colorful painted wooden eggs, and that was the day they’d tell them about the birds and the bees.

    Reply

Leave a Comment