Off the grid!!!

Cat 243 Doverby Mary Jo

It's a wired, wired world!  Communications have changed amazingly in a double handful of years.  

It started with e-mail as the "killer app" of the world wide web.  Then wireless communications came in.  Several years back, when Blackberries were state of the art, the satellites that carried them (I think that's what it was) went down, and a mighty howl of horror and anguish was heard from users across the land.



These days, it's all about mobile devices–cell phones that are really tiny, incredibly powerful computers.  For younger users, texting is the "killer app."  Some kids send more texts per months than I can even imagine.

Drowned jungleBUT–what happens when we're cut off?  Not everyone is addicted to being connected, but there are certainly plenty of people who are.  (I was amazed that my state felt the need to pass a law making it illegal to text and drive at the same time.  To me, it seems insane to even think of texting when driving a massive and murderous machine.)

But this isn't a rant about the evils of cell phones, but rather thoughts on being disconnected.  I knew before we cruised the upper Amazon that we couldn't expect any kind of wifi or cell phone service.  I was prepared and thought it would be interesting to be off the grid.

And so it was.  Relaxing, too.  More like being in one of my historicals, where the world is what's here, now.  It didn't hurt that I knew that after a week, we'd be back in Lima in a nice modern hotel with wifi.

It has been very different when I've traveled to a place where internet connection was theoretically possible, but for some reason I haven't been able to sign on.  THEN the addiction and withdrawal blaze forth. 

One of the worst place was the middle of the Atlantic Ocean on the Queen Mary II.  It 2012-08-04 09.51.55was a great trip, but I didn't realize that a moving target in the middle of an ocean does not have good connectivity.  In fact, it was sporadic to non existent.  Not fun.  (Don't even mention of power outages!!! Or the times the cable broadband goes down. <shudder>)  

On the plus side, after crossing the ocean we went to Ireland, and I was able to read and reply to email while cruising Irish highways. (Not driving, I might add!)

I can rationalize the need for connection by the fact that I run a business and staying in touch with editor, agent, et al is important.  The world is now used to very fast communication, and if you don't reply quickly, others get worried that you've been eaten by alligators or some such. 

There are any number of small but legitimate business matters that buzz by regularly and need to be dealt with.  Questions from my editor or other people at the publisher.  Offers for foreign rights sales that I need to approve.  Questions relating to my indie publishing of my backlist.  

All those things are real and must be dealt with, but the fact remains that I'm an addict and e-mail is my drug of choice.  Not texting or various other forms of communication or social media.  Just old fashioned email.(Well, I do write historical novels, and these days e-mail looks fairly historic. <G>)

OutbackSo what about you?  How wired are you? If you're reading this blog, you clearly have some degree of electronic dexterity.  How much do you depend on the web of connectivity that spins around the world?  Do you check your Facebook page before you brush your teeth?  Are you getting joint problems in your thumbs from texting? Do you rely on Skype to keep in touch with distant relatives, and would you freak if you couldn't do it? 

Most of all, how do you feel when that communication is cut off?  Have you had spells when you were off the grid?  In the desert, or the jungle, or at sea?  

Do you voluntarily cut yourself off for periods of time?  If not, would you like to?  I'm Jungle 2interested in how other people connect to the connectivity.  So please share. I suspect I'm not the only addict here!

Mary Jo

95 thoughts on “Off the grid!!!”

  1. I love modern technology and “connectedness”, but I believe it is a curse as well as a blessing. Those who work in any service industry come under pressure from clients and bosses to be available almost 24 hours a day, with a detrimental effect on their private and family lives. In many (most?) cases, things really could wait until the next working day. And it seems to be more and more difficult to be able to take a true holiday; people are expected to check their email and to respond while they’re away.
    I question whether this is necessary; I find it hard to believe that so many people are indispensable. It looks like poor or lazy management to me; it always used to be possible to organise cover for people’s absences, so why isn’t it now?
    I think it is bad for the health to never be off duty, to never have a break. Many of the professions which behave like this are the high-pressure ones from which it is essential to have a proper and complete break. I understand that if you’re self-employed you may choose to to have a break, or feel it is impossible, but I doubt if it really is impossible for any normal-sized business to organise itself so that everyone has proper breaks, covered by their colleagues.
    In private life, I find ease of contact invaluable. However, I have to admit to a liking for places where there is no coverage and I can relax completely. Do I search them out? That would be telling!

    Reply
  2. I love modern technology and “connectedness”, but I believe it is a curse as well as a blessing. Those who work in any service industry come under pressure from clients and bosses to be available almost 24 hours a day, with a detrimental effect on their private and family lives. In many (most?) cases, things really could wait until the next working day. And it seems to be more and more difficult to be able to take a true holiday; people are expected to check their email and to respond while they’re away.
    I question whether this is necessary; I find it hard to believe that so many people are indispensable. It looks like poor or lazy management to me; it always used to be possible to organise cover for people’s absences, so why isn’t it now?
    I think it is bad for the health to never be off duty, to never have a break. Many of the professions which behave like this are the high-pressure ones from which it is essential to have a proper and complete break. I understand that if you’re self-employed you may choose to to have a break, or feel it is impossible, but I doubt if it really is impossible for any normal-sized business to organise itself so that everyone has proper breaks, covered by their colleagues.
    In private life, I find ease of contact invaluable. However, I have to admit to a liking for places where there is no coverage and I can relax completely. Do I search them out? That would be telling!

    Reply
  3. I love modern technology and “connectedness”, but I believe it is a curse as well as a blessing. Those who work in any service industry come under pressure from clients and bosses to be available almost 24 hours a day, with a detrimental effect on their private and family lives. In many (most?) cases, things really could wait until the next working day. And it seems to be more and more difficult to be able to take a true holiday; people are expected to check their email and to respond while they’re away.
    I question whether this is necessary; I find it hard to believe that so many people are indispensable. It looks like poor or lazy management to me; it always used to be possible to organise cover for people’s absences, so why isn’t it now?
    I think it is bad for the health to never be off duty, to never have a break. Many of the professions which behave like this are the high-pressure ones from which it is essential to have a proper and complete break. I understand that if you’re self-employed you may choose to to have a break, or feel it is impossible, but I doubt if it really is impossible for any normal-sized business to organise itself so that everyone has proper breaks, covered by their colleagues.
    In private life, I find ease of contact invaluable. However, I have to admit to a liking for places where there is no coverage and I can relax completely. Do I search them out? That would be telling!

    Reply
  4. I love modern technology and “connectedness”, but I believe it is a curse as well as a blessing. Those who work in any service industry come under pressure from clients and bosses to be available almost 24 hours a day, with a detrimental effect on their private and family lives. In many (most?) cases, things really could wait until the next working day. And it seems to be more and more difficult to be able to take a true holiday; people are expected to check their email and to respond while they’re away.
    I question whether this is necessary; I find it hard to believe that so many people are indispensable. It looks like poor or lazy management to me; it always used to be possible to organise cover for people’s absences, so why isn’t it now?
    I think it is bad for the health to never be off duty, to never have a break. Many of the professions which behave like this are the high-pressure ones from which it is essential to have a proper and complete break. I understand that if you’re self-employed you may choose to to have a break, or feel it is impossible, but I doubt if it really is impossible for any normal-sized business to organise itself so that everyone has proper breaks, covered by their colleagues.
    In private life, I find ease of contact invaluable. However, I have to admit to a liking for places where there is no coverage and I can relax completely. Do I search them out? That would be telling!

    Reply
  5. I love modern technology and “connectedness”, but I believe it is a curse as well as a blessing. Those who work in any service industry come under pressure from clients and bosses to be available almost 24 hours a day, with a detrimental effect on their private and family lives. In many (most?) cases, things really could wait until the next working day. And it seems to be more and more difficult to be able to take a true holiday; people are expected to check their email and to respond while they’re away.
    I question whether this is necessary; I find it hard to believe that so many people are indispensable. It looks like poor or lazy management to me; it always used to be possible to organise cover for people’s absences, so why isn’t it now?
    I think it is bad for the health to never be off duty, to never have a break. Many of the professions which behave like this are the high-pressure ones from which it is essential to have a proper and complete break. I understand that if you’re self-employed you may choose to to have a break, or feel it is impossible, but I doubt if it really is impossible for any normal-sized business to organise itself so that everyone has proper breaks, covered by their colleagues.
    In private life, I find ease of contact invaluable. However, I have to admit to a liking for places where there is no coverage and I can relax completely. Do I search them out? That would be telling!

    Reply
  6. I’m not very connected. My work building has no wi-fi so no email on the smart phone. My office has us put our phones into shielded lockboxes. They recently blocked accessing our mail servers on the internet because of an influx of worms and viruses from people downloading things from email. I find that I just live without connectedness from the time I get on the bus until I’m on the bus home. Then I start on my texts. Evenings are my time for email. Because I’m disconnected so much and value my periods of text and email, I don’t think I’d like being cut off totally.

    Reply
  7. I’m not very connected. My work building has no wi-fi so no email on the smart phone. My office has us put our phones into shielded lockboxes. They recently blocked accessing our mail servers on the internet because of an influx of worms and viruses from people downloading things from email. I find that I just live without connectedness from the time I get on the bus until I’m on the bus home. Then I start on my texts. Evenings are my time for email. Because I’m disconnected so much and value my periods of text and email, I don’t think I’d like being cut off totally.

    Reply
  8. I’m not very connected. My work building has no wi-fi so no email on the smart phone. My office has us put our phones into shielded lockboxes. They recently blocked accessing our mail servers on the internet because of an influx of worms and viruses from people downloading things from email. I find that I just live without connectedness from the time I get on the bus until I’m on the bus home. Then I start on my texts. Evenings are my time for email. Because I’m disconnected so much and value my periods of text and email, I don’t think I’d like being cut off totally.

    Reply
  9. I’m not very connected. My work building has no wi-fi so no email on the smart phone. My office has us put our phones into shielded lockboxes. They recently blocked accessing our mail servers on the internet because of an influx of worms and viruses from people downloading things from email. I find that I just live without connectedness from the time I get on the bus until I’m on the bus home. Then I start on my texts. Evenings are my time for email. Because I’m disconnected so much and value my periods of text and email, I don’t think I’d like being cut off totally.

    Reply
  10. I’m not very connected. My work building has no wi-fi so no email on the smart phone. My office has us put our phones into shielded lockboxes. They recently blocked accessing our mail servers on the internet because of an influx of worms and viruses from people downloading things from email. I find that I just live without connectedness from the time I get on the bus until I’m on the bus home. Then I start on my texts. Evenings are my time for email. Because I’m disconnected so much and value my periods of text and email, I don’t think I’d like being cut off totally.

    Reply
  11. You know, I was at a restaurant on Saturday and I thought it was really sad and a bit pathetic how many people at surrounding tables spent the entire time texting. There was one couple where the man brought his tablet and spent the entire meal looking at stuff on the screen!
    I use the internet a lot, but I don’t *have* to. I’ve pretty much given up on Facebook (people I hadn’t seen – or liked – for fifteen years tracking me down and knowing everything I said or did was just too creepy). I don’t really text at all.
    I use the internet a lot on a day to day basis, but there have been extended periods of time when I’ve been travelling where I haven’t had it – and have hardly missed it.

    Reply
  12. You know, I was at a restaurant on Saturday and I thought it was really sad and a bit pathetic how many people at surrounding tables spent the entire time texting. There was one couple where the man brought his tablet and spent the entire meal looking at stuff on the screen!
    I use the internet a lot, but I don’t *have* to. I’ve pretty much given up on Facebook (people I hadn’t seen – or liked – for fifteen years tracking me down and knowing everything I said or did was just too creepy). I don’t really text at all.
    I use the internet a lot on a day to day basis, but there have been extended periods of time when I’ve been travelling where I haven’t had it – and have hardly missed it.

    Reply
  13. You know, I was at a restaurant on Saturday and I thought it was really sad and a bit pathetic how many people at surrounding tables spent the entire time texting. There was one couple where the man brought his tablet and spent the entire meal looking at stuff on the screen!
    I use the internet a lot, but I don’t *have* to. I’ve pretty much given up on Facebook (people I hadn’t seen – or liked – for fifteen years tracking me down and knowing everything I said or did was just too creepy). I don’t really text at all.
    I use the internet a lot on a day to day basis, but there have been extended periods of time when I’ve been travelling where I haven’t had it – and have hardly missed it.

    Reply
  14. You know, I was at a restaurant on Saturday and I thought it was really sad and a bit pathetic how many people at surrounding tables spent the entire time texting. There was one couple where the man brought his tablet and spent the entire meal looking at stuff on the screen!
    I use the internet a lot, but I don’t *have* to. I’ve pretty much given up on Facebook (people I hadn’t seen – or liked – for fifteen years tracking me down and knowing everything I said or did was just too creepy). I don’t really text at all.
    I use the internet a lot on a day to day basis, but there have been extended periods of time when I’ve been travelling where I haven’t had it – and have hardly missed it.

    Reply
  15. You know, I was at a restaurant on Saturday and I thought it was really sad and a bit pathetic how many people at surrounding tables spent the entire time texting. There was one couple where the man brought his tablet and spent the entire meal looking at stuff on the screen!
    I use the internet a lot, but I don’t *have* to. I’ve pretty much given up on Facebook (people I hadn’t seen – or liked – for fifteen years tracking me down and knowing everything I said or did was just too creepy). I don’t really text at all.
    I use the internet a lot on a day to day basis, but there have been extended periods of time when I’ve been travelling where I haven’t had it – and have hardly missed it.

    Reply
  16. LOL on whether you seek out places with no coverage. *G* But I agree with all you’ve said. It’s not healthy to be always available, though a shadow side of that is that it can be addictive to feel indispensible, which plays into the equation.
    To write, one must be in one’s head, and that is not easy in a clamoring world.

    Reply
  17. LOL on whether you seek out places with no coverage. *G* But I agree with all you’ve said. It’s not healthy to be always available, though a shadow side of that is that it can be addictive to feel indispensible, which plays into the equation.
    To write, one must be in one’s head, and that is not easy in a clamoring world.

    Reply
  18. LOL on whether you seek out places with no coverage. *G* But I agree with all you’ve said. It’s not healthy to be always available, though a shadow side of that is that it can be addictive to feel indispensible, which plays into the equation.
    To write, one must be in one’s head, and that is not easy in a clamoring world.

    Reply
  19. LOL on whether you seek out places with no coverage. *G* But I agree with all you’ve said. It’s not healthy to be always available, though a shadow side of that is that it can be addictive to feel indispensible, which plays into the equation.
    To write, one must be in one’s head, and that is not easy in a clamoring world.

    Reply
  20. LOL on whether you seek out places with no coverage. *G* But I agree with all you’ve said. It’s not healthy to be always available, though a shadow side of that is that it can be addictive to feel indispensible, which plays into the equation.
    To write, one must be in one’s head, and that is not easy in a clamoring world.

    Reply
  21. Shannon–
    It sound like you’re well adapted to not having that connection during the day, which is healthy, because you can’t. (A true addict would leave the building on her breaks so she could connect.) But it makes sense that you really value that evening connection time because it -is- limited. The icing on the cupcake.

    Reply
  22. Shannon–
    It sound like you’re well adapted to not having that connection during the day, which is healthy, because you can’t. (A true addict would leave the building on her breaks so she could connect.) But it makes sense that you really value that evening connection time because it -is- limited. The icing on the cupcake.

    Reply
  23. Shannon–
    It sound like you’re well adapted to not having that connection during the day, which is healthy, because you can’t. (A true addict would leave the building on her breaks so she could connect.) But it makes sense that you really value that evening connection time because it -is- limited. The icing on the cupcake.

    Reply
  24. Shannon–
    It sound like you’re well adapted to not having that connection during the day, which is healthy, because you can’t. (A true addict would leave the building on her breaks so she could connect.) But it makes sense that you really value that evening connection time because it -is- limited. The icing on the cupcake.

    Reply
  25. Shannon–
    It sound like you’re well adapted to not having that connection during the day, which is healthy, because you can’t. (A true addict would leave the building on her breaks so she could connect.) But it makes sense that you really value that evening connection time because it -is- limited. The icing on the cupcake.

    Reply
  26. Sonya–
    You seem to have a really healthy relationship with the wired world–you use what you need and like, and can walk away when you want. It is sad to see people going out to eat or whatever and not being present with their companions. I envision that as the soul on long tether, floating far away from the actual body and the real world.

    Reply
  27. Sonya–
    You seem to have a really healthy relationship with the wired world–you use what you need and like, and can walk away when you want. It is sad to see people going out to eat or whatever and not being present with their companions. I envision that as the soul on long tether, floating far away from the actual body and the real world.

    Reply
  28. Sonya–
    You seem to have a really healthy relationship with the wired world–you use what you need and like, and can walk away when you want. It is sad to see people going out to eat or whatever and not being present with their companions. I envision that as the soul on long tether, floating far away from the actual body and the real world.

    Reply
  29. Sonya–
    You seem to have a really healthy relationship with the wired world–you use what you need and like, and can walk away when you want. It is sad to see people going out to eat or whatever and not being present with their companions. I envision that as the soul on long tether, floating far away from the actual body and the real world.

    Reply
  30. Sonya–
    You seem to have a really healthy relationship with the wired world–you use what you need and like, and can walk away when you want. It is sad to see people going out to eat or whatever and not being present with their companions. I envision that as the soul on long tether, floating far away from the actual body and the real world.

    Reply
  31. I must say I don’t rely on the web much. Having said that I am at the moment replying to this blog so I do use it. Actually its the only one I keep reading, all others I have managed to lose the address. Facebook has gone by the way side, and twitter I have absolutely no idea how to use. I think there are others as well, but I can’t name them at the moment. I do use sms to get messages to my son, mainly to ask him to ring back when he gets the time, i.e. immediately if not sooner!!
    That’s a good picture of Mt Connor, Central Australia for those who wonder what the large mountain is. However, I think it is probably possible to get some kind of connection there, via satellite. If you really want to lose all communication, come to the West coast of Tasmania where it is really patchy. That is, or was, one of their selling points for holidays – No Internet or Mobile Phone Connection. Its amazing what sells in the tourist industry.

    Reply
  32. I must say I don’t rely on the web much. Having said that I am at the moment replying to this blog so I do use it. Actually its the only one I keep reading, all others I have managed to lose the address. Facebook has gone by the way side, and twitter I have absolutely no idea how to use. I think there are others as well, but I can’t name them at the moment. I do use sms to get messages to my son, mainly to ask him to ring back when he gets the time, i.e. immediately if not sooner!!
    That’s a good picture of Mt Connor, Central Australia for those who wonder what the large mountain is. However, I think it is probably possible to get some kind of connection there, via satellite. If you really want to lose all communication, come to the West coast of Tasmania where it is really patchy. That is, or was, one of their selling points for holidays – No Internet or Mobile Phone Connection. Its amazing what sells in the tourist industry.

    Reply
  33. I must say I don’t rely on the web much. Having said that I am at the moment replying to this blog so I do use it. Actually its the only one I keep reading, all others I have managed to lose the address. Facebook has gone by the way side, and twitter I have absolutely no idea how to use. I think there are others as well, but I can’t name them at the moment. I do use sms to get messages to my son, mainly to ask him to ring back when he gets the time, i.e. immediately if not sooner!!
    That’s a good picture of Mt Connor, Central Australia for those who wonder what the large mountain is. However, I think it is probably possible to get some kind of connection there, via satellite. If you really want to lose all communication, come to the West coast of Tasmania where it is really patchy. That is, or was, one of their selling points for holidays – No Internet or Mobile Phone Connection. Its amazing what sells in the tourist industry.

    Reply
  34. I must say I don’t rely on the web much. Having said that I am at the moment replying to this blog so I do use it. Actually its the only one I keep reading, all others I have managed to lose the address. Facebook has gone by the way side, and twitter I have absolutely no idea how to use. I think there are others as well, but I can’t name them at the moment. I do use sms to get messages to my son, mainly to ask him to ring back when he gets the time, i.e. immediately if not sooner!!
    That’s a good picture of Mt Connor, Central Australia for those who wonder what the large mountain is. However, I think it is probably possible to get some kind of connection there, via satellite. If you really want to lose all communication, come to the West coast of Tasmania where it is really patchy. That is, or was, one of their selling points for holidays – No Internet or Mobile Phone Connection. Its amazing what sells in the tourist industry.

    Reply
  35. I must say I don’t rely on the web much. Having said that I am at the moment replying to this blog so I do use it. Actually its the only one I keep reading, all others I have managed to lose the address. Facebook has gone by the way side, and twitter I have absolutely no idea how to use. I think there are others as well, but I can’t name them at the moment. I do use sms to get messages to my son, mainly to ask him to ring back when he gets the time, i.e. immediately if not sooner!!
    That’s a good picture of Mt Connor, Central Australia for those who wonder what the large mountain is. However, I think it is probably possible to get some kind of connection there, via satellite. If you really want to lose all communication, come to the West coast of Tasmania where it is really patchy. That is, or was, one of their selling points for holidays – No Internet or Mobile Phone Connection. Its amazing what sells in the tourist industry.

    Reply
  36. Jenny–
    So true what sells in the tourism business! Really, I can see that being unplugged is a good sales point. I didn’t know what mountain the image was (I got it from Wikipedia and it wasn’t named), though it has a look like Southwest US tablelands.
    One Australian friend told me she and her husband were traveling in remote Queensland and out of touch for quite some time. I think Australia has more off the grid areas than some parts of the world! And I would LOVE to come to Tasmania to check it out! With or without wifi. *G*

    Reply
  37. Jenny–
    So true what sells in the tourism business! Really, I can see that being unplugged is a good sales point. I didn’t know what mountain the image was (I got it from Wikipedia and it wasn’t named), though it has a look like Southwest US tablelands.
    One Australian friend told me she and her husband were traveling in remote Queensland and out of touch for quite some time. I think Australia has more off the grid areas than some parts of the world! And I would LOVE to come to Tasmania to check it out! With or without wifi. *G*

    Reply
  38. Jenny–
    So true what sells in the tourism business! Really, I can see that being unplugged is a good sales point. I didn’t know what mountain the image was (I got it from Wikipedia and it wasn’t named), though it has a look like Southwest US tablelands.
    One Australian friend told me she and her husband were traveling in remote Queensland and out of touch for quite some time. I think Australia has more off the grid areas than some parts of the world! And I would LOVE to come to Tasmania to check it out! With or without wifi. *G*

    Reply
  39. Jenny–
    So true what sells in the tourism business! Really, I can see that being unplugged is a good sales point. I didn’t know what mountain the image was (I got it from Wikipedia and it wasn’t named), though it has a look like Southwest US tablelands.
    One Australian friend told me she and her husband were traveling in remote Queensland and out of touch for quite some time. I think Australia has more off the grid areas than some parts of the world! And I would LOVE to come to Tasmania to check it out! With or without wifi. *G*

    Reply
  40. Jenny–
    So true what sells in the tourism business! Really, I can see that being unplugged is a good sales point. I didn’t know what mountain the image was (I got it from Wikipedia and it wasn’t named), though it has a look like Southwest US tablelands.
    One Australian friend told me she and her husband were traveling in remote Queensland and out of touch for quite some time. I think Australia has more off the grid areas than some parts of the world! And I would LOVE to come to Tasmania to check it out! With or without wifi. *G*

    Reply
  41. I am an admitted addict. I have 2 emails connected to my smart phone – yes one of them is work. I also text coworkers, friends and most importantly family.
    Right now my college aged son’s phone is not working, so we are relying on emails instead of texts. He doesn’t have a phone in his apartment – who needs one? They all have phones and computers. So I’m slightly worried about him not having a working phone….
    Also, my husband is in another state a few hours behind us. I can text him, but since he is at a business dinner I don’t want to bother him. He’s the primary person on our phone service, so if college boy needs a new phone we have to get him involved. I laugh about being stressed over this, but we have gotten so used to instant communication… or nearly instant that when something goes wrong we don’t know how to handle it.
    Of course, there is the co-worker who keeps wanting to IM/Chat with me on the computer at home. She doesn’t get that I really don’t want to Chat on the computer. Call, text, or email please. 😉 Heck, I rejected my husband’s chat request.
    All my whining aside. I have been able to set aside constant access to the web and texting — When I Plan For It. I do get stressed when I return to 50 or more unread emails and feel obligated to read them all. But at least I can plan for the down time. 🙂

    Reply
  42. I am an admitted addict. I have 2 emails connected to my smart phone – yes one of them is work. I also text coworkers, friends and most importantly family.
    Right now my college aged son’s phone is not working, so we are relying on emails instead of texts. He doesn’t have a phone in his apartment – who needs one? They all have phones and computers. So I’m slightly worried about him not having a working phone….
    Also, my husband is in another state a few hours behind us. I can text him, but since he is at a business dinner I don’t want to bother him. He’s the primary person on our phone service, so if college boy needs a new phone we have to get him involved. I laugh about being stressed over this, but we have gotten so used to instant communication… or nearly instant that when something goes wrong we don’t know how to handle it.
    Of course, there is the co-worker who keeps wanting to IM/Chat with me on the computer at home. She doesn’t get that I really don’t want to Chat on the computer. Call, text, or email please. 😉 Heck, I rejected my husband’s chat request.
    All my whining aside. I have been able to set aside constant access to the web and texting — When I Plan For It. I do get stressed when I return to 50 or more unread emails and feel obligated to read them all. But at least I can plan for the down time. 🙂

    Reply
  43. I am an admitted addict. I have 2 emails connected to my smart phone – yes one of them is work. I also text coworkers, friends and most importantly family.
    Right now my college aged son’s phone is not working, so we are relying on emails instead of texts. He doesn’t have a phone in his apartment – who needs one? They all have phones and computers. So I’m slightly worried about him not having a working phone….
    Also, my husband is in another state a few hours behind us. I can text him, but since he is at a business dinner I don’t want to bother him. He’s the primary person on our phone service, so if college boy needs a new phone we have to get him involved. I laugh about being stressed over this, but we have gotten so used to instant communication… or nearly instant that when something goes wrong we don’t know how to handle it.
    Of course, there is the co-worker who keeps wanting to IM/Chat with me on the computer at home. She doesn’t get that I really don’t want to Chat on the computer. Call, text, or email please. 😉 Heck, I rejected my husband’s chat request.
    All my whining aside. I have been able to set aside constant access to the web and texting — When I Plan For It. I do get stressed when I return to 50 or more unread emails and feel obligated to read them all. But at least I can plan for the down time. 🙂

    Reply
  44. I am an admitted addict. I have 2 emails connected to my smart phone – yes one of them is work. I also text coworkers, friends and most importantly family.
    Right now my college aged son’s phone is not working, so we are relying on emails instead of texts. He doesn’t have a phone in his apartment – who needs one? They all have phones and computers. So I’m slightly worried about him not having a working phone….
    Also, my husband is in another state a few hours behind us. I can text him, but since he is at a business dinner I don’t want to bother him. He’s the primary person on our phone service, so if college boy needs a new phone we have to get him involved. I laugh about being stressed over this, but we have gotten so used to instant communication… or nearly instant that when something goes wrong we don’t know how to handle it.
    Of course, there is the co-worker who keeps wanting to IM/Chat with me on the computer at home. She doesn’t get that I really don’t want to Chat on the computer. Call, text, or email please. 😉 Heck, I rejected my husband’s chat request.
    All my whining aside. I have been able to set aside constant access to the web and texting — When I Plan For It. I do get stressed when I return to 50 or more unread emails and feel obligated to read them all. But at least I can plan for the down time. 🙂

    Reply
  45. I am an admitted addict. I have 2 emails connected to my smart phone – yes one of them is work. I also text coworkers, friends and most importantly family.
    Right now my college aged son’s phone is not working, so we are relying on emails instead of texts. He doesn’t have a phone in his apartment – who needs one? They all have phones and computers. So I’m slightly worried about him not having a working phone….
    Also, my husband is in another state a few hours behind us. I can text him, but since he is at a business dinner I don’t want to bother him. He’s the primary person on our phone service, so if college boy needs a new phone we have to get him involved. I laugh about being stressed over this, but we have gotten so used to instant communication… or nearly instant that when something goes wrong we don’t know how to handle it.
    Of course, there is the co-worker who keeps wanting to IM/Chat with me on the computer at home. She doesn’t get that I really don’t want to Chat on the computer. Call, text, or email please. 😉 Heck, I rejected my husband’s chat request.
    All my whining aside. I have been able to set aside constant access to the web and texting — When I Plan For It. I do get stressed when I return to 50 or more unread emails and feel obligated to read them all. But at least I can plan for the down time. 🙂

    Reply
  46. Re Sonya’s post – I think it’s so bad mannered to read and send texts when you’re with someone else, unless it is truly urgent. Ditto phone calls. Why would someone you’re not with take priority over the person you are with? Some of us who grew up when phone calls were landline-based and cost money have a tendency to think every phone call could be important, but ironically the availability of texts makes me think now: they’ll text if its really urgent. I can glance quickly and ignore until I’m free.

    Reply
  47. Re Sonya’s post – I think it’s so bad mannered to read and send texts when you’re with someone else, unless it is truly urgent. Ditto phone calls. Why would someone you’re not with take priority over the person you are with? Some of us who grew up when phone calls were landline-based and cost money have a tendency to think every phone call could be important, but ironically the availability of texts makes me think now: they’ll text if its really urgent. I can glance quickly and ignore until I’m free.

    Reply
  48. Re Sonya’s post – I think it’s so bad mannered to read and send texts when you’re with someone else, unless it is truly urgent. Ditto phone calls. Why would someone you’re not with take priority over the person you are with? Some of us who grew up when phone calls were landline-based and cost money have a tendency to think every phone call could be important, but ironically the availability of texts makes me think now: they’ll text if its really urgent. I can glance quickly and ignore until I’m free.

    Reply
  49. Re Sonya’s post – I think it’s so bad mannered to read and send texts when you’re with someone else, unless it is truly urgent. Ditto phone calls. Why would someone you’re not with take priority over the person you are with? Some of us who grew up when phone calls were landline-based and cost money have a tendency to think every phone call could be important, but ironically the availability of texts makes me think now: they’ll text if its really urgent. I can glance quickly and ignore until I’m free.

    Reply
  50. Re Sonya’s post – I think it’s so bad mannered to read and send texts when you’re with someone else, unless it is truly urgent. Ditto phone calls. Why would someone you’re not with take priority over the person you are with? Some of us who grew up when phone calls were landline-based and cost money have a tendency to think every phone call could be important, but ironically the availability of texts makes me think now: they’ll text if its really urgent. I can glance quickly and ignore until I’m free.

    Reply
  51. I am not as connected as some. I used to be connected 24 hours a day. Sadly, I believe we are becoming people who feel much more comfortable being disconnected from actual human beings and connected to electronics. I wonder who children will become when their interactions are not with other people? I realize it makes me very old fashioned to have cut myself back on being available at all hours of the day and night, but amazingly, I have survived.
    I am online a great deal. I love the immediacy of being able to find information so quickly. I love much of what technology offers me, but I also like the sunrise and hearing leaves in a breeze, and the doves who coo outside my house, and when I am with humans, I am fully engaged in being with them. I will now return to my cave.

    Reply
  52. I am not as connected as some. I used to be connected 24 hours a day. Sadly, I believe we are becoming people who feel much more comfortable being disconnected from actual human beings and connected to electronics. I wonder who children will become when their interactions are not with other people? I realize it makes me very old fashioned to have cut myself back on being available at all hours of the day and night, but amazingly, I have survived.
    I am online a great deal. I love the immediacy of being able to find information so quickly. I love much of what technology offers me, but I also like the sunrise and hearing leaves in a breeze, and the doves who coo outside my house, and when I am with humans, I am fully engaged in being with them. I will now return to my cave.

    Reply
  53. I am not as connected as some. I used to be connected 24 hours a day. Sadly, I believe we are becoming people who feel much more comfortable being disconnected from actual human beings and connected to electronics. I wonder who children will become when their interactions are not with other people? I realize it makes me very old fashioned to have cut myself back on being available at all hours of the day and night, but amazingly, I have survived.
    I am online a great deal. I love the immediacy of being able to find information so quickly. I love much of what technology offers me, but I also like the sunrise and hearing leaves in a breeze, and the doves who coo outside my house, and when I am with humans, I am fully engaged in being with them. I will now return to my cave.

    Reply
  54. I am not as connected as some. I used to be connected 24 hours a day. Sadly, I believe we are becoming people who feel much more comfortable being disconnected from actual human beings and connected to electronics. I wonder who children will become when their interactions are not with other people? I realize it makes me very old fashioned to have cut myself back on being available at all hours of the day and night, but amazingly, I have survived.
    I am online a great deal. I love the immediacy of being able to find information so quickly. I love much of what technology offers me, but I also like the sunrise and hearing leaves in a breeze, and the doves who coo outside my house, and when I am with humans, I am fully engaged in being with them. I will now return to my cave.

    Reply
  55. I am not as connected as some. I used to be connected 24 hours a day. Sadly, I believe we are becoming people who feel much more comfortable being disconnected from actual human beings and connected to electronics. I wonder who children will become when their interactions are not with other people? I realize it makes me very old fashioned to have cut myself back on being available at all hours of the day and night, but amazingly, I have survived.
    I am online a great deal. I love the immediacy of being able to find information so quickly. I love much of what technology offers me, but I also like the sunrise and hearing leaves in a breeze, and the doves who coo outside my house, and when I am with humans, I am fully engaged in being with them. I will now return to my cave.

    Reply
  56. Glenda–
    Your relationship with communications sounds pretty normal to me. You appreciate the convenient stuff, don’t like when it’s not working, and you can set it aside–briefly!
    As for IM Chatting–I HATE that. It’s so slow and the content tends to be really slow. I’ve blocked it in my email program so no one knows I’m there to chat with. You might check if your server allows that?

    Reply
  57. Glenda–
    Your relationship with communications sounds pretty normal to me. You appreciate the convenient stuff, don’t like when it’s not working, and you can set it aside–briefly!
    As for IM Chatting–I HATE that. It’s so slow and the content tends to be really slow. I’ve blocked it in my email program so no one knows I’m there to chat with. You might check if your server allows that?

    Reply
  58. Glenda–
    Your relationship with communications sounds pretty normal to me. You appreciate the convenient stuff, don’t like when it’s not working, and you can set it aside–briefly!
    As for IM Chatting–I HATE that. It’s so slow and the content tends to be really slow. I’ve blocked it in my email program so no one knows I’m there to chat with. You might check if your server allows that?

    Reply
  59. Glenda–
    Your relationship with communications sounds pretty normal to me. You appreciate the convenient stuff, don’t like when it’s not working, and you can set it aside–briefly!
    As for IM Chatting–I HATE that. It’s so slow and the content tends to be really slow. I’ve blocked it in my email program so no one knows I’m there to chat with. You might check if your server allows that?

    Reply
  60. Glenda–
    Your relationship with communications sounds pretty normal to me. You appreciate the convenient stuff, don’t like when it’s not working, and you can set it aside–briefly!
    As for IM Chatting–I HATE that. It’s so slow and the content tends to be really slow. I’ve blocked it in my email program so no one knows I’m there to chat with. You might check if your server allows that?

    Reply
  61. HJ–I think it’s HORRIBLE manners to give all one’s attention to an electronic device when in theory one is socializing. Occasionally a lunch buddy will get a family call, apologize, and take it, but that’s the most that’s acceptable, I think. But I’m old school about this, I suspect.

    Reply
  62. HJ–I think it’s HORRIBLE manners to give all one’s attention to an electronic device when in theory one is socializing. Occasionally a lunch buddy will get a family call, apologize, and take it, but that’s the most that’s acceptable, I think. But I’m old school about this, I suspect.

    Reply
  63. HJ–I think it’s HORRIBLE manners to give all one’s attention to an electronic device when in theory one is socializing. Occasionally a lunch buddy will get a family call, apologize, and take it, but that’s the most that’s acceptable, I think. But I’m old school about this, I suspect.

    Reply
  64. HJ–I think it’s HORRIBLE manners to give all one’s attention to an electronic device when in theory one is socializing. Occasionally a lunch buddy will get a family call, apologize, and take it, but that’s the most that’s acceptable, I think. But I’m old school about this, I suspect.

    Reply
  65. HJ–I think it’s HORRIBLE manners to give all one’s attention to an electronic device when in theory one is socializing. Occasionally a lunch buddy will get a family call, apologize, and take it, but that’s the most that’s acceptable, I think. But I’m old school about this, I suspect.

    Reply
  66. ***I realize it makes me very old fashioned to have cut myself back on being available at all hours of the day and night, but amazingly, I have survived.***
    LOL! You’re a wise woman. I’m also at my computer a lot–doing email, research, and sometimes actually writing. But I also need silence in my mind in oreder to be able to write. Maintaining a balance is a constant challenge.
    Luckily, my cave is very comfortable. *G*

    Reply
  67. ***I realize it makes me very old fashioned to have cut myself back on being available at all hours of the day and night, but amazingly, I have survived.***
    LOL! You’re a wise woman. I’m also at my computer a lot–doing email, research, and sometimes actually writing. But I also need silence in my mind in oreder to be able to write. Maintaining a balance is a constant challenge.
    Luckily, my cave is very comfortable. *G*

    Reply
  68. ***I realize it makes me very old fashioned to have cut myself back on being available at all hours of the day and night, but amazingly, I have survived.***
    LOL! You’re a wise woman. I’m also at my computer a lot–doing email, research, and sometimes actually writing. But I also need silence in my mind in oreder to be able to write. Maintaining a balance is a constant challenge.
    Luckily, my cave is very comfortable. *G*

    Reply
  69. ***I realize it makes me very old fashioned to have cut myself back on being available at all hours of the day and night, but amazingly, I have survived.***
    LOL! You’re a wise woman. I’m also at my computer a lot–doing email, research, and sometimes actually writing. But I also need silence in my mind in oreder to be able to write. Maintaining a balance is a constant challenge.
    Luckily, my cave is very comfortable. *G*

    Reply
  70. ***I realize it makes me very old fashioned to have cut myself back on being available at all hours of the day and night, but amazingly, I have survived.***
    LOL! You’re a wise woman. I’m also at my computer a lot–doing email, research, and sometimes actually writing. But I also need silence in my mind in oreder to be able to write. Maintaining a balance is a constant challenge.
    Luckily, my cave is very comfortable. *G*

    Reply
  71. My purpose for my use of electronics is mainly to connect with other people, instead of not. While I don’t mind being disconnected for some time to enjoy nature or do something else (but I must have a book on hand), the truth is that there are important emails that require my response, and work to be submitted electronically. It also comes to be that at the moment, none of my friends are anywhere close to where I am, and so the only means of communicating with them is through email, social messaging. I dislike texting, though, for its limited form and required time to fully communicate a message.

    Reply
  72. My purpose for my use of electronics is mainly to connect with other people, instead of not. While I don’t mind being disconnected for some time to enjoy nature or do something else (but I must have a book on hand), the truth is that there are important emails that require my response, and work to be submitted electronically. It also comes to be that at the moment, none of my friends are anywhere close to where I am, and so the only means of communicating with them is through email, social messaging. I dislike texting, though, for its limited form and required time to fully communicate a message.

    Reply
  73. My purpose for my use of electronics is mainly to connect with other people, instead of not. While I don’t mind being disconnected for some time to enjoy nature or do something else (but I must have a book on hand), the truth is that there are important emails that require my response, and work to be submitted electronically. It also comes to be that at the moment, none of my friends are anywhere close to where I am, and so the only means of communicating with them is through email, social messaging. I dislike texting, though, for its limited form and required time to fully communicate a message.

    Reply
  74. My purpose for my use of electronics is mainly to connect with other people, instead of not. While I don’t mind being disconnected for some time to enjoy nature or do something else (but I must have a book on hand), the truth is that there are important emails that require my response, and work to be submitted electronically. It also comes to be that at the moment, none of my friends are anywhere close to where I am, and so the only means of communicating with them is through email, social messaging. I dislike texting, though, for its limited form and required time to fully communicate a message.

    Reply
  75. My purpose for my use of electronics is mainly to connect with other people, instead of not. While I don’t mind being disconnected for some time to enjoy nature or do something else (but I must have a book on hand), the truth is that there are important emails that require my response, and work to be submitted electronically. It also comes to be that at the moment, none of my friends are anywhere close to where I am, and so the only means of communicating with them is through email, social messaging. I dislike texting, though, for its limited form and required time to fully communicate a message.

    Reply
  76. I have to prepare myself, because I write the on-line version of the OED open, and must have access to Google books in order to look up phrases etc., that the OED doesn’t catch. But, I’ve learned that in Germany, no one knows why you need to have an internet connection while drinking a coffee or having a piece of torte. I do agree that when promised an internet connection that turns out to not be possible, I become quite irritated. We want to go off sailing, so I’m researching internet connections while on the boat. Tweeted.

    Reply
  77. I have to prepare myself, because I write the on-line version of the OED open, and must have access to Google books in order to look up phrases etc., that the OED doesn’t catch. But, I’ve learned that in Germany, no one knows why you need to have an internet connection while drinking a coffee or having a piece of torte. I do agree that when promised an internet connection that turns out to not be possible, I become quite irritated. We want to go off sailing, so I’m researching internet connections while on the boat. Tweeted.

    Reply
  78. I have to prepare myself, because I write the on-line version of the OED open, and must have access to Google books in order to look up phrases etc., that the OED doesn’t catch. But, I’ve learned that in Germany, no one knows why you need to have an internet connection while drinking a coffee or having a piece of torte. I do agree that when promised an internet connection that turns out to not be possible, I become quite irritated. We want to go off sailing, so I’m researching internet connections while on the boat. Tweeted.

    Reply
  79. I have to prepare myself, because I write the on-line version of the OED open, and must have access to Google books in order to look up phrases etc., that the OED doesn’t catch. But, I’ve learned that in Germany, no one knows why you need to have an internet connection while drinking a coffee or having a piece of torte. I do agree that when promised an internet connection that turns out to not be possible, I become quite irritated. We want to go off sailing, so I’m researching internet connections while on the boat. Tweeted.

    Reply
  80. I have to prepare myself, because I write the on-line version of the OED open, and must have access to Google books in order to look up phrases etc., that the OED doesn’t catch. But, I’ve learned that in Germany, no one knows why you need to have an internet connection while drinking a coffee or having a piece of torte. I do agree that when promised an internet connection that turns out to not be possible, I become quite irritated. We want to go off sailing, so I’m researching internet connections while on the boat. Tweeted.

    Reply
  81. Mary–
    We sound separated at birth. I also use the internet to connect with my widely scattered friends, and a lot of my business as a self employed writer is through email. And I’m awful with writing on a smartphone; I’m not even enabled to do texting, though I can receive texts if someon sends one. Luckily that isn’t often. But when one arrives, it sounds like Robin Hood’s hunting horn. *G*

    Reply
  82. Mary–
    We sound separated at birth. I also use the internet to connect with my widely scattered friends, and a lot of my business as a self employed writer is through email. And I’m awful with writing on a smartphone; I’m not even enabled to do texting, though I can receive texts if someon sends one. Luckily that isn’t often. But when one arrives, it sounds like Robin Hood’s hunting horn. *G*

    Reply
  83. Mary–
    We sound separated at birth. I also use the internet to connect with my widely scattered friends, and a lot of my business as a self employed writer is through email. And I’m awful with writing on a smartphone; I’m not even enabled to do texting, though I can receive texts if someon sends one. Luckily that isn’t often. But when one arrives, it sounds like Robin Hood’s hunting horn. *G*

    Reply
  84. Mary–
    We sound separated at birth. I also use the internet to connect with my widely scattered friends, and a lot of my business as a self employed writer is through email. And I’m awful with writing on a smartphone; I’m not even enabled to do texting, though I can receive texts if someon sends one. Luckily that isn’t often. But when one arrives, it sounds like Robin Hood’s hunting horn. *G*

    Reply
  85. Mary–
    We sound separated at birth. I also use the internet to connect with my widely scattered friends, and a lot of my business as a self employed writer is through email. And I’m awful with writing on a smartphone; I’m not even enabled to do texting, though I can receive texts if someon sends one. Luckily that isn’t often. But when one arrives, it sounds like Robin Hood’s hunting horn. *G*

    Reply
  86. Ella–
    The OED open is catnip to a writer! Civilized of the Germans not to feel thay must be wired to enjoy cake and coffee.
    Good luck with getting a connection when sailing. I’ve found that signals can be very chancy when at sea. But if you’re not far from land, maybe you’ll be able to connect. Otherwise, frustration will lurk!

    Reply
  87. Ella–
    The OED open is catnip to a writer! Civilized of the Germans not to feel thay must be wired to enjoy cake and coffee.
    Good luck with getting a connection when sailing. I’ve found that signals can be very chancy when at sea. But if you’re not far from land, maybe you’ll be able to connect. Otherwise, frustration will lurk!

    Reply
  88. Ella–
    The OED open is catnip to a writer! Civilized of the Germans not to feel thay must be wired to enjoy cake and coffee.
    Good luck with getting a connection when sailing. I’ve found that signals can be very chancy when at sea. But if you’re not far from land, maybe you’ll be able to connect. Otherwise, frustration will lurk!

    Reply
  89. Ella–
    The OED open is catnip to a writer! Civilized of the Germans not to feel thay must be wired to enjoy cake and coffee.
    Good luck with getting a connection when sailing. I’ve found that signals can be very chancy when at sea. But if you’re not far from land, maybe you’ll be able to connect. Otherwise, frustration will lurk!

    Reply
  90. Ella–
    The OED open is catnip to a writer! Civilized of the Germans not to feel thay must be wired to enjoy cake and coffee.
    Good luck with getting a connection when sailing. I’ve found that signals can be very chancy when at sea. But if you’re not far from land, maybe you’ll be able to connect. Otherwise, frustration will lurk!

    Reply
  91. Pretty much anyone over twenty-five would know what it’s like to not have mobile (cell) phones and the internet at their fingertips. Yet somehow so many people seem to get addicted to those things. 🙁 The man at the restaurant who was on his computer the whole dinner had grey hair…
    I’m in my thirties, so I’m pretty much the first generation who was “young” with all this technology. I’m also the only person my age I know of who doesn’t think it’s okay to text in a restaurant!
    I heard that there’re some restaurants in New York that have banned pone use. I don’t know if it’s true – when I was there we didn’t really eat in fancy places. I hope it is. Apparently people need to be taught manners, rather than just knowing how to be nice!

    Reply
  92. Pretty much anyone over twenty-five would know what it’s like to not have mobile (cell) phones and the internet at their fingertips. Yet somehow so many people seem to get addicted to those things. 🙁 The man at the restaurant who was on his computer the whole dinner had grey hair…
    I’m in my thirties, so I’m pretty much the first generation who was “young” with all this technology. I’m also the only person my age I know of who doesn’t think it’s okay to text in a restaurant!
    I heard that there’re some restaurants in New York that have banned pone use. I don’t know if it’s true – when I was there we didn’t really eat in fancy places. I hope it is. Apparently people need to be taught manners, rather than just knowing how to be nice!

    Reply
  93. Pretty much anyone over twenty-five would know what it’s like to not have mobile (cell) phones and the internet at their fingertips. Yet somehow so many people seem to get addicted to those things. 🙁 The man at the restaurant who was on his computer the whole dinner had grey hair…
    I’m in my thirties, so I’m pretty much the first generation who was “young” with all this technology. I’m also the only person my age I know of who doesn’t think it’s okay to text in a restaurant!
    I heard that there’re some restaurants in New York that have banned pone use. I don’t know if it’s true – when I was there we didn’t really eat in fancy places. I hope it is. Apparently people need to be taught manners, rather than just knowing how to be nice!

    Reply
  94. Pretty much anyone over twenty-five would know what it’s like to not have mobile (cell) phones and the internet at their fingertips. Yet somehow so many people seem to get addicted to those things. 🙁 The man at the restaurant who was on his computer the whole dinner had grey hair…
    I’m in my thirties, so I’m pretty much the first generation who was “young” with all this technology. I’m also the only person my age I know of who doesn’t think it’s okay to text in a restaurant!
    I heard that there’re some restaurants in New York that have banned pone use. I don’t know if it’s true – when I was there we didn’t really eat in fancy places. I hope it is. Apparently people need to be taught manners, rather than just knowing how to be nice!

    Reply
  95. Pretty much anyone over twenty-five would know what it’s like to not have mobile (cell) phones and the internet at their fingertips. Yet somehow so many people seem to get addicted to those things. 🙁 The man at the restaurant who was on his computer the whole dinner had grey hair…
    I’m in my thirties, so I’m pretty much the first generation who was “young” with all this technology. I’m also the only person my age I know of who doesn’t think it’s okay to text in a restaurant!
    I heard that there’re some restaurants in New York that have banned pone use. I don’t know if it’s true – when I was there we didn’t really eat in fancy places. I hope it is. Apparently people need to be taught manners, rather than just knowing how to be nice!

    Reply

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