Of shopping centers and chocolate

Anne here. A few weeks ago I visited Sydney, and spent a few hours wandering through the Queen Victoria Building (known to Sydneysiders as the QVB.) QVBLookingDown

Situated in the heart of Sydney, it's a large ornate Victorian-era building, filled with upmarket shops and cafes and boutique stores of various kinds — and was one of the earliest "trading halls" of its kind, certainly in Australia.

Building commenced in 1893 as a government project, and, as there was a depression at the time, there was a deliberate choice to make the building grand and ornate — partly to express confidence in the future, and partly to employ large numbers of unemployed craftsmen and workers — stonemasons, plasterers, tilers, stained glass artists, metal workers and many more.

SunnyExteriorYou can see from my photos how elaborate and heavily decorated it is, in the best Victorian-era fashion, with decorative tilework, intricate stone carving, elaborate plaster work, great copper domes, stained glass windows and fanciful wrought iron. It took four and a half years to construct and was opened with great ceremony in 1898 and was named The Queen Victoria Market Buildings in commemoration of her Diamond Jubilee. See the invitation to the opening and grand ball below.


Stone carving

"In the first few decades the QVB had the atmosphere of an oriental bazaar, and the earliest tenants conducted a mixture of commerce, crafts and skills. There were shops, studios, offices and workrooms for some two hundred traders, dealers and artisans. Housed within the upper galleries were more studious and scholarly tenancies, such as bookshops, sheet music shops, piano-sellers and piano-tuners, as well as the salons of private teachers of music, dancing, singing, elocution, painting, sculpting, drawing and dressmaking. There were also more decorous sports including a billiards saloon, a gymnasium for ladies and a table tennis hall." (From Wikipedia) Invitation_to_QVB_opening_(1898)

Inevitably, over time, the building (and the quality of occupants) went gradually downhill. Later, municipal "renovations and upgrades" destroyed much of the architectural magnificence of the building and by 1959, there were calls to demolish the "white elephant" and replace it with a "more useful" public square, underground carpark and fountain. Luckily, however, these plans were never carried out, and when in the 1970's the National Trust declared it an an "A" classified building in urgent need of acquisition and preservation, it was a turning point. In the mid 1980's the building was renovated and restored to its original magnificence, while keeping in place the modern innovations, such as lifts, escalators and air conditioning, etc. CatInHatStatue

I was filling in time with a friend before my plane left, and we had a lovely time wandering up and down the various levels, browsing and window shopping. They were just decorating the place for Christmas and there was a giant Christmas tree towering over several levels of the building. We had fun in the Dr Seuss shop, recalling various tales from childhood. We ogled the jewellery, and the clothes and shoes and handbags — but all we bought was . . . chocolate.

Haigh's is a fabulous chocolate shop, and even though we have Haigh's shops in Melbourne, I always visit the one at the QVB — usually to buy some chocolates for the friends who've watered my garden and collected my mail while I've been away. This time, I had made my selection and was waiting in line to be served, when my attention was caught by a very elegantly-dressed old lady. She stood at the counter gazing at all the individually hand-made chocolates, choosing the ones she wanted.

HaighsChocolates"I'll have. . . um. . .  one of those." And she'd point.
The young assistant would lift it out with tongs and place it on a tray.
"And oh . . . what are those ones?"
"Peppermint creams."
"Yes, I'll have one of them. And what are these?" She'd point.
"Tawny fig liqueur." The assistant was very polite but her expression was showing signs of being weary of this lengthy deliberation over every single chocolate.

But I was smiling, remembering when I was a kid, the delights of deliberating over just which sweets I was going to spend my money on. My grandfather would occasionally give my cousin and me (we were the youngest in the family) the largest coin he had in his pocket and send us off to buy sweets.

I made my purchase and was ready to leave, but the old lady was still going, slowly choosing one by one. It wasn't the money — she was clearly very well off — but the selection was so wide, it was difficult to choose. And she was clearly enjoying herself.

I stopped beside her and said, "You've reminded me of going to the sweetshop when I was a little girl, taking ages to choose, deciding on this one or that — and the choosing was as much fun as the eating afterwards."

She laughed and said, "Well, that wasn't me — my parents owned the shop, so I lived in the sweetshop." And then she glanced at the young assistant and added with a wry grin, "But I suppose I'm making up for it now, aren't I, dear?" And the young assistant laughed.

Do you have a special shopping location you like to visit? Do you remember choosing sweets (or some other treat) when you were a child? Did you agonize over choosing candy and chocolates? Or were you all "grab 'em and go?  What were your favorites?

190 thoughts on “Of shopping centers and chocolate”

  1. Wonderful post and chocolate yet again.
    I do love these old ornate shopping arcades, the GUM in Moscow, the Burlington Arcade in London or the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II in Milan immediately spring to my mind. How lucky that the QVB does still exist.
    As for shopping as a child or even a teenager, I never could make up my mind 😉 Sweet selection for 10 Pfennig (very small amount of German money) could very well take me 30 minutes or more.
    But my favourite present for birthdays and christmas was from my godmother, who would take me on a clothes shopping trip. Her poor patient husband (my uncle) would have to carry virtually all clothes in my size to and from the changing rooms, so I could try them on and finally after a lot of deliberation might make a choice. The shop assistants tended to hide after the first 30 minutes 😉
    Usually took me a whole day and a fair amount of shops to make up my mind, but oh the bliss, when I modeled the final selection to my mother afterwards to be admired.
    These days I try to be a very patient aunt for my nieces and return the favour.

    Reply
  2. Wonderful post and chocolate yet again.
    I do love these old ornate shopping arcades, the GUM in Moscow, the Burlington Arcade in London or the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II in Milan immediately spring to my mind. How lucky that the QVB does still exist.
    As for shopping as a child or even a teenager, I never could make up my mind 😉 Sweet selection for 10 Pfennig (very small amount of German money) could very well take me 30 minutes or more.
    But my favourite present for birthdays and christmas was from my godmother, who would take me on a clothes shopping trip. Her poor patient husband (my uncle) would have to carry virtually all clothes in my size to and from the changing rooms, so I could try them on and finally after a lot of deliberation might make a choice. The shop assistants tended to hide after the first 30 minutes 😉
    Usually took me a whole day and a fair amount of shops to make up my mind, but oh the bliss, when I modeled the final selection to my mother afterwards to be admired.
    These days I try to be a very patient aunt for my nieces and return the favour.

    Reply
  3. Wonderful post and chocolate yet again.
    I do love these old ornate shopping arcades, the GUM in Moscow, the Burlington Arcade in London or the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II in Milan immediately spring to my mind. How lucky that the QVB does still exist.
    As for shopping as a child or even a teenager, I never could make up my mind 😉 Sweet selection for 10 Pfennig (very small amount of German money) could very well take me 30 minutes or more.
    But my favourite present for birthdays and christmas was from my godmother, who would take me on a clothes shopping trip. Her poor patient husband (my uncle) would have to carry virtually all clothes in my size to and from the changing rooms, so I could try them on and finally after a lot of deliberation might make a choice. The shop assistants tended to hide after the first 30 minutes 😉
    Usually took me a whole day and a fair amount of shops to make up my mind, but oh the bliss, when I modeled the final selection to my mother afterwards to be admired.
    These days I try to be a very patient aunt for my nieces and return the favour.

    Reply
  4. Wonderful post and chocolate yet again.
    I do love these old ornate shopping arcades, the GUM in Moscow, the Burlington Arcade in London or the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II in Milan immediately spring to my mind. How lucky that the QVB does still exist.
    As for shopping as a child or even a teenager, I never could make up my mind 😉 Sweet selection for 10 Pfennig (very small amount of German money) could very well take me 30 minutes or more.
    But my favourite present for birthdays and christmas was from my godmother, who would take me on a clothes shopping trip. Her poor patient husband (my uncle) would have to carry virtually all clothes in my size to and from the changing rooms, so I could try them on and finally after a lot of deliberation might make a choice. The shop assistants tended to hide after the first 30 minutes 😉
    Usually took me a whole day and a fair amount of shops to make up my mind, but oh the bliss, when I modeled the final selection to my mother afterwards to be admired.
    These days I try to be a very patient aunt for my nieces and return the favour.

    Reply
  5. Wonderful post and chocolate yet again.
    I do love these old ornate shopping arcades, the GUM in Moscow, the Burlington Arcade in London or the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II in Milan immediately spring to my mind. How lucky that the QVB does still exist.
    As for shopping as a child or even a teenager, I never could make up my mind 😉 Sweet selection for 10 Pfennig (very small amount of German money) could very well take me 30 minutes or more.
    But my favourite present for birthdays and christmas was from my godmother, who would take me on a clothes shopping trip. Her poor patient husband (my uncle) would have to carry virtually all clothes in my size to and from the changing rooms, so I could try them on and finally after a lot of deliberation might make a choice. The shop assistants tended to hide after the first 30 minutes 😉
    Usually took me a whole day and a fair amount of shops to make up my mind, but oh the bliss, when I modeled the final selection to my mother afterwards to be admired.
    These days I try to be a very patient aunt for my nieces and return the favour.

    Reply
  6. This post took me back to my own childhood. I remember the BIG Christmas treat was going downtown to the big department stores and gawking at all of the Christmas displays. Going to see the big man (Santa) himself, and being so scared and shy that I couldn’t utter a word when I sat on his lap.
    It also reminded me of a common treat that was available all year round when I was a kid. Penny candy. There was a convenience store close by that had a glass case full of all kinds of penny candy. For ten cents you could walk out of that store with a little brown bag full of treats. Some of them were 2 for a penny!
    Thanks for a post that took me down a sweet memory lane.

    Reply
  7. This post took me back to my own childhood. I remember the BIG Christmas treat was going downtown to the big department stores and gawking at all of the Christmas displays. Going to see the big man (Santa) himself, and being so scared and shy that I couldn’t utter a word when I sat on his lap.
    It also reminded me of a common treat that was available all year round when I was a kid. Penny candy. There was a convenience store close by that had a glass case full of all kinds of penny candy. For ten cents you could walk out of that store with a little brown bag full of treats. Some of them were 2 for a penny!
    Thanks for a post that took me down a sweet memory lane.

    Reply
  8. This post took me back to my own childhood. I remember the BIG Christmas treat was going downtown to the big department stores and gawking at all of the Christmas displays. Going to see the big man (Santa) himself, and being so scared and shy that I couldn’t utter a word when I sat on his lap.
    It also reminded me of a common treat that was available all year round when I was a kid. Penny candy. There was a convenience store close by that had a glass case full of all kinds of penny candy. For ten cents you could walk out of that store with a little brown bag full of treats. Some of them were 2 for a penny!
    Thanks for a post that took me down a sweet memory lane.

    Reply
  9. This post took me back to my own childhood. I remember the BIG Christmas treat was going downtown to the big department stores and gawking at all of the Christmas displays. Going to see the big man (Santa) himself, and being so scared and shy that I couldn’t utter a word when I sat on his lap.
    It also reminded me of a common treat that was available all year round when I was a kid. Penny candy. There was a convenience store close by that had a glass case full of all kinds of penny candy. For ten cents you could walk out of that store with a little brown bag full of treats. Some of them were 2 for a penny!
    Thanks for a post that took me down a sweet memory lane.

    Reply
  10. This post took me back to my own childhood. I remember the BIG Christmas treat was going downtown to the big department stores and gawking at all of the Christmas displays. Going to see the big man (Santa) himself, and being so scared and shy that I couldn’t utter a word when I sat on his lap.
    It also reminded me of a common treat that was available all year round when I was a kid. Penny candy. There was a convenience store close by that had a glass case full of all kinds of penny candy. For ten cents you could walk out of that store with a little brown bag full of treats. Some of them were 2 for a penny!
    Thanks for a post that took me down a sweet memory lane.

    Reply
  11. I hope that this doesn’t show up twice. The first time I entered it, it disappeared into the ether.
    When I was a kid the big Christmas treat was going downtown to visit all the big department stores. We would walk around gawking at all the Christmas displays and then visit the big man himself. I remember sitting on Santa’s lap and being so scared and shy I was afraid to utter a word.
    Your post also reminded me of a treat that was available all year round. Penny candy. There was a convenience store close by that had a whole glass case full of different kinds of penny candy – some were two for a penny. For ten cents you could walk out of that store with a whole bag full of treats.
    Thanks for the sweet memories.

    Reply
  12. I hope that this doesn’t show up twice. The first time I entered it, it disappeared into the ether.
    When I was a kid the big Christmas treat was going downtown to visit all the big department stores. We would walk around gawking at all the Christmas displays and then visit the big man himself. I remember sitting on Santa’s lap and being so scared and shy I was afraid to utter a word.
    Your post also reminded me of a treat that was available all year round. Penny candy. There was a convenience store close by that had a whole glass case full of different kinds of penny candy – some were two for a penny. For ten cents you could walk out of that store with a whole bag full of treats.
    Thanks for the sweet memories.

    Reply
  13. I hope that this doesn’t show up twice. The first time I entered it, it disappeared into the ether.
    When I was a kid the big Christmas treat was going downtown to visit all the big department stores. We would walk around gawking at all the Christmas displays and then visit the big man himself. I remember sitting on Santa’s lap and being so scared and shy I was afraid to utter a word.
    Your post also reminded me of a treat that was available all year round. Penny candy. There was a convenience store close by that had a whole glass case full of different kinds of penny candy – some were two for a penny. For ten cents you could walk out of that store with a whole bag full of treats.
    Thanks for the sweet memories.

    Reply
  14. I hope that this doesn’t show up twice. The first time I entered it, it disappeared into the ether.
    When I was a kid the big Christmas treat was going downtown to visit all the big department stores. We would walk around gawking at all the Christmas displays and then visit the big man himself. I remember sitting on Santa’s lap and being so scared and shy I was afraid to utter a word.
    Your post also reminded me of a treat that was available all year round. Penny candy. There was a convenience store close by that had a whole glass case full of different kinds of penny candy – some were two for a penny. For ten cents you could walk out of that store with a whole bag full of treats.
    Thanks for the sweet memories.

    Reply
  15. I hope that this doesn’t show up twice. The first time I entered it, it disappeared into the ether.
    When I was a kid the big Christmas treat was going downtown to visit all the big department stores. We would walk around gawking at all the Christmas displays and then visit the big man himself. I remember sitting on Santa’s lap and being so scared and shy I was afraid to utter a word.
    Your post also reminded me of a treat that was available all year round. Penny candy. There was a convenience store close by that had a whole glass case full of different kinds of penny candy – some were two for a penny. For ten cents you could walk out of that store with a whole bag full of treats.
    Thanks for the sweet memories.

    Reply
  16. What a wonderful post, Anne! I’ve always loved these old shopping arcades–the first malls so one could shop without weather–but I’ve never seen one so grand as this. So fortunate that it was saved from the wrecking ball!

    Reply
  17. What a wonderful post, Anne! I’ve always loved these old shopping arcades–the first malls so one could shop without weather–but I’ve never seen one so grand as this. So fortunate that it was saved from the wrecking ball!

    Reply
  18. What a wonderful post, Anne! I’ve always loved these old shopping arcades–the first malls so one could shop without weather–but I’ve never seen one so grand as this. So fortunate that it was saved from the wrecking ball!

    Reply
  19. What a wonderful post, Anne! I’ve always loved these old shopping arcades–the first malls so one could shop without weather–but I’ve never seen one so grand as this. So fortunate that it was saved from the wrecking ball!

    Reply
  20. What a wonderful post, Anne! I’ve always loved these old shopping arcades–the first malls so one could shop without weather–but I’ve never seen one so grand as this. So fortunate that it was saved from the wrecking ball!

    Reply
  21. Your QVB is so gorgeous that I suspect just being there would tempt me to spend more than I ought. It’s sort of the opposite of grungy bargain-basement type stores where you spend more than you ought because you assume that anything there must be a bargain.
    I can remember in my youth, when people still wore nylon stocking, buying mine at Saks Fifth Avenue because it was such a gorgeous store and the brand I bought cost the same no matter where I bought them.

    Reply
  22. Your QVB is so gorgeous that I suspect just being there would tempt me to spend more than I ought. It’s sort of the opposite of grungy bargain-basement type stores where you spend more than you ought because you assume that anything there must be a bargain.
    I can remember in my youth, when people still wore nylon stocking, buying mine at Saks Fifth Avenue because it was such a gorgeous store and the brand I bought cost the same no matter where I bought them.

    Reply
  23. Your QVB is so gorgeous that I suspect just being there would tempt me to spend more than I ought. It’s sort of the opposite of grungy bargain-basement type stores where you spend more than you ought because you assume that anything there must be a bargain.
    I can remember in my youth, when people still wore nylon stocking, buying mine at Saks Fifth Avenue because it was such a gorgeous store and the brand I bought cost the same no matter where I bought them.

    Reply
  24. Your QVB is so gorgeous that I suspect just being there would tempt me to spend more than I ought. It’s sort of the opposite of grungy bargain-basement type stores where you spend more than you ought because you assume that anything there must be a bargain.
    I can remember in my youth, when people still wore nylon stocking, buying mine at Saks Fifth Avenue because it was such a gorgeous store and the brand I bought cost the same no matter where I bought them.

    Reply
  25. Your QVB is so gorgeous that I suspect just being there would tempt me to spend more than I ought. It’s sort of the opposite of grungy bargain-basement type stores where you spend more than you ought because you assume that anything there must be a bargain.
    I can remember in my youth, when people still wore nylon stocking, buying mine at Saks Fifth Avenue because it was such a gorgeous store and the brand I bought cost the same no matter where I bought them.

    Reply
  26. Anne, thank you for the tour! I LOVE the Victorian shopping arcades–the first malls where you could shop without weather. *G* I’m so glad that this one was saved from the wrecking ball. If I visit Sydney again, I’ll have to visit this one!

    Reply
  27. Anne, thank you for the tour! I LOVE the Victorian shopping arcades–the first malls where you could shop without weather. *G* I’m so glad that this one was saved from the wrecking ball. If I visit Sydney again, I’ll have to visit this one!

    Reply
  28. Anne, thank you for the tour! I LOVE the Victorian shopping arcades–the first malls where you could shop without weather. *G* I’m so glad that this one was saved from the wrecking ball. If I visit Sydney again, I’ll have to visit this one!

    Reply
  29. Anne, thank you for the tour! I LOVE the Victorian shopping arcades–the first malls where you could shop without weather. *G* I’m so glad that this one was saved from the wrecking ball. If I visit Sydney again, I’ll have to visit this one!

    Reply
  30. Anne, thank you for the tour! I LOVE the Victorian shopping arcades–the first malls where you could shop without weather. *G* I’m so glad that this one was saved from the wrecking ball. If I visit Sydney again, I’ll have to visit this one!

    Reply
  31. When faced with a display case like the one in your picture, I am definitely the person pointing that one, and that one, and that one…
    When I was a kid my dad would take us to the gas station and we’d get those two tone smartie-flavored lollipops. I’m not sure why that was a special treat, but it was. There’s no way I’d eat one now when I can get chocolate instead.

    Reply
  32. When faced with a display case like the one in your picture, I am definitely the person pointing that one, and that one, and that one…
    When I was a kid my dad would take us to the gas station and we’d get those two tone smartie-flavored lollipops. I’m not sure why that was a special treat, but it was. There’s no way I’d eat one now when I can get chocolate instead.

    Reply
  33. When faced with a display case like the one in your picture, I am definitely the person pointing that one, and that one, and that one…
    When I was a kid my dad would take us to the gas station and we’d get those two tone smartie-flavored lollipops. I’m not sure why that was a special treat, but it was. There’s no way I’d eat one now when I can get chocolate instead.

    Reply
  34. When faced with a display case like the one in your picture, I am definitely the person pointing that one, and that one, and that one…
    When I was a kid my dad would take us to the gas station and we’d get those two tone smartie-flavored lollipops. I’m not sure why that was a special treat, but it was. There’s no way I’d eat one now when I can get chocolate instead.

    Reply
  35. When faced with a display case like the one in your picture, I am definitely the person pointing that one, and that one, and that one…
    When I was a kid my dad would take us to the gas station and we’d get those two tone smartie-flavored lollipops. I’m not sure why that was a special treat, but it was. There’s no way I’d eat one now when I can get chocolate instead.

    Reply
  36. What a lovely story, Katja. I love how patient your uncle was — I’m sure he enjoyed it too, and so nice not to be hurried in your purchases. Your aunt sounds lovely.
    I’ve been to the Burlington Arcade — I really love those old Victorian-era arcades. We have several in Melbourne. Moscow and Milan are on the bucket list. Thanks for joining in the conversation.

    Reply
  37. What a lovely story, Katja. I love how patient your uncle was — I’m sure he enjoyed it too, and so nice not to be hurried in your purchases. Your aunt sounds lovely.
    I’ve been to the Burlington Arcade — I really love those old Victorian-era arcades. We have several in Melbourne. Moscow and Milan are on the bucket list. Thanks for joining in the conversation.

    Reply
  38. What a lovely story, Katja. I love how patient your uncle was — I’m sure he enjoyed it too, and so nice not to be hurried in your purchases. Your aunt sounds lovely.
    I’ve been to the Burlington Arcade — I really love those old Victorian-era arcades. We have several in Melbourne. Moscow and Milan are on the bucket list. Thanks for joining in the conversation.

    Reply
  39. What a lovely story, Katja. I love how patient your uncle was — I’m sure he enjoyed it too, and so nice not to be hurried in your purchases. Your aunt sounds lovely.
    I’ve been to the Burlington Arcade — I really love those old Victorian-era arcades. We have several in Melbourne. Moscow and Milan are on the bucket list. Thanks for joining in the conversation.

    Reply
  40. What a lovely story, Katja. I love how patient your uncle was — I’m sure he enjoyed it too, and so nice not to be hurried in your purchases. Your aunt sounds lovely.
    I’ve been to the Burlington Arcade — I really love those old Victorian-era arcades. We have several in Melbourne. Moscow and Milan are on the bucket list. Thanks for joining in the conversation.

    Reply
  41. Mary, some writer friends of mine (childrens’ books) made an appearance at a bookstore the other day with Santa, who helped them read their book. I was surprised how so many kids were thrilled and excited to see him, and at the same time too shy to speak to him and maybe a bit frightened as well. It was very sweet to watch.
    That penny candy was very much like my experience. We had lots of small neighborhood shops that carried a bit of everything, and every one had a sweet display that tempted us all. Some were 4 for a penny, others 2, and the really expensive ones were a whole penny each!

    Reply
  42. Mary, some writer friends of mine (childrens’ books) made an appearance at a bookstore the other day with Santa, who helped them read their book. I was surprised how so many kids were thrilled and excited to see him, and at the same time too shy to speak to him and maybe a bit frightened as well. It was very sweet to watch.
    That penny candy was very much like my experience. We had lots of small neighborhood shops that carried a bit of everything, and every one had a sweet display that tempted us all. Some were 4 for a penny, others 2, and the really expensive ones were a whole penny each!

    Reply
  43. Mary, some writer friends of mine (childrens’ books) made an appearance at a bookstore the other day with Santa, who helped them read their book. I was surprised how so many kids were thrilled and excited to see him, and at the same time too shy to speak to him and maybe a bit frightened as well. It was very sweet to watch.
    That penny candy was very much like my experience. We had lots of small neighborhood shops that carried a bit of everything, and every one had a sweet display that tempted us all. Some were 4 for a penny, others 2, and the really expensive ones were a whole penny each!

    Reply
  44. Mary, some writer friends of mine (childrens’ books) made an appearance at a bookstore the other day with Santa, who helped them read their book. I was surprised how so many kids were thrilled and excited to see him, and at the same time too shy to speak to him and maybe a bit frightened as well. It was very sweet to watch.
    That penny candy was very much like my experience. We had lots of small neighborhood shops that carried a bit of everything, and every one had a sweet display that tempted us all. Some were 4 for a penny, others 2, and the really expensive ones were a whole penny each!

    Reply
  45. Mary, some writer friends of mine (childrens’ books) made an appearance at a bookstore the other day with Santa, who helped them read their book. I was surprised how so many kids were thrilled and excited to see him, and at the same time too shy to speak to him and maybe a bit frightened as well. It was very sweet to watch.
    That penny candy was very much like my experience. We had lots of small neighborhood shops that carried a bit of everything, and every one had a sweet display that tempted us all. Some were 4 for a penny, others 2, and the really expensive ones were a whole penny each!

    Reply
  46. Yes, Mary Jo — it went from being regarded as a “white elephant” to being one of Sydney’s must see locations. And luckily, placed where it is, it’s very easily accessible by train (the underground goes beneath it) or bus.

    Reply
  47. Yes, Mary Jo — it went from being regarded as a “white elephant” to being one of Sydney’s must see locations. And luckily, placed where it is, it’s very easily accessible by train (the underground goes beneath it) or bus.

    Reply
  48. Yes, Mary Jo — it went from being regarded as a “white elephant” to being one of Sydney’s must see locations. And luckily, placed where it is, it’s very easily accessible by train (the underground goes beneath it) or bus.

    Reply
  49. Yes, Mary Jo — it went from being regarded as a “white elephant” to being one of Sydney’s must see locations. And luckily, placed where it is, it’s very easily accessible by train (the underground goes beneath it) or bus.

    Reply
  50. Yes, Mary Jo — it went from being regarded as a “white elephant” to being one of Sydney’s must see locations. And luckily, placed where it is, it’s very easily accessible by train (the underground goes beneath it) or bus.

    Reply
  51. Yes, that display of hand made chocolates is pretty stunning, isn’t it, Misti? Mind you I’d want to taste before I bought. 😉 You can also just choose already made up packets of chocolate. For my friends I bought a packet of dark chocolate “bullets” (licorice covered in dark chocolate) and some milk chocolate orange pastilles – milk chocolate with a hint of orange.

    Reply
  52. Yes, that display of hand made chocolates is pretty stunning, isn’t it, Misti? Mind you I’d want to taste before I bought. 😉 You can also just choose already made up packets of chocolate. For my friends I bought a packet of dark chocolate “bullets” (licorice covered in dark chocolate) and some milk chocolate orange pastilles – milk chocolate with a hint of orange.

    Reply
  53. Yes, that display of hand made chocolates is pretty stunning, isn’t it, Misti? Mind you I’d want to taste before I bought. 😉 You can also just choose already made up packets of chocolate. For my friends I bought a packet of dark chocolate “bullets” (licorice covered in dark chocolate) and some milk chocolate orange pastilles – milk chocolate with a hint of orange.

    Reply
  54. Yes, that display of hand made chocolates is pretty stunning, isn’t it, Misti? Mind you I’d want to taste before I bought. 😉 You can also just choose already made up packets of chocolate. For my friends I bought a packet of dark chocolate “bullets” (licorice covered in dark chocolate) and some milk chocolate orange pastilles – milk chocolate with a hint of orange.

    Reply
  55. Yes, that display of hand made chocolates is pretty stunning, isn’t it, Misti? Mind you I’d want to taste before I bought. 😉 You can also just choose already made up packets of chocolate. For my friends I bought a packet of dark chocolate “bullets” (licorice covered in dark chocolate) and some milk chocolate orange pastilles – milk chocolate with a hint of orange.

    Reply
  56. Lil, it would have been easy to spend a lot, but we were being frugal, and had a lovely time window shopping instead. And then we stopped for a lovely brunch and watched everyone else spending money.

    Reply
  57. Lil, it would have been easy to spend a lot, but we were being frugal, and had a lovely time window shopping instead. And then we stopped for a lovely brunch and watched everyone else spending money.

    Reply
  58. Lil, it would have been easy to spend a lot, but we were being frugal, and had a lovely time window shopping instead. And then we stopped for a lovely brunch and watched everyone else spending money.

    Reply
  59. Lil, it would have been easy to spend a lot, but we were being frugal, and had a lovely time window shopping instead. And then we stopped for a lovely brunch and watched everyone else spending money.

    Reply
  60. Lil, it would have been easy to spend a lot, but we were being frugal, and had a lovely time window shopping instead. And then we stopped for a lovely brunch and watched everyone else spending money.

    Reply
  61. I love shopping at the Lindt chocolate store on 34th Street, between 5th and 6th Avenue. I can still get them just about anywhere, but the store beautifully presents the stacked chocolates. I love the truffles as well as the petite desserts in dark, milk and white chocolate.
    I also love chocolate from a company called, Seroogy, in Wisconsin, making chocolate since 1899. I love the soft centers. They also make oreo cookies covered with dark or milk chocolate with a design on top for either, Christmas or Easter.
    Growing up I liked Mounds candy with dark chocolate and coconut. That was always my favorite go to chocolate snack.

    Reply
  62. I love shopping at the Lindt chocolate store on 34th Street, between 5th and 6th Avenue. I can still get them just about anywhere, but the store beautifully presents the stacked chocolates. I love the truffles as well as the petite desserts in dark, milk and white chocolate.
    I also love chocolate from a company called, Seroogy, in Wisconsin, making chocolate since 1899. I love the soft centers. They also make oreo cookies covered with dark or milk chocolate with a design on top for either, Christmas or Easter.
    Growing up I liked Mounds candy with dark chocolate and coconut. That was always my favorite go to chocolate snack.

    Reply
  63. I love shopping at the Lindt chocolate store on 34th Street, between 5th and 6th Avenue. I can still get them just about anywhere, but the store beautifully presents the stacked chocolates. I love the truffles as well as the petite desserts in dark, milk and white chocolate.
    I also love chocolate from a company called, Seroogy, in Wisconsin, making chocolate since 1899. I love the soft centers. They also make oreo cookies covered with dark or milk chocolate with a design on top for either, Christmas or Easter.
    Growing up I liked Mounds candy with dark chocolate and coconut. That was always my favorite go to chocolate snack.

    Reply
  64. I love shopping at the Lindt chocolate store on 34th Street, between 5th and 6th Avenue. I can still get them just about anywhere, but the store beautifully presents the stacked chocolates. I love the truffles as well as the petite desserts in dark, milk and white chocolate.
    I also love chocolate from a company called, Seroogy, in Wisconsin, making chocolate since 1899. I love the soft centers. They also make oreo cookies covered with dark or milk chocolate with a design on top for either, Christmas or Easter.
    Growing up I liked Mounds candy with dark chocolate and coconut. That was always my favorite go to chocolate snack.

    Reply
  65. I love shopping at the Lindt chocolate store on 34th Street, between 5th and 6th Avenue. I can still get them just about anywhere, but the store beautifully presents the stacked chocolates. I love the truffles as well as the petite desserts in dark, milk and white chocolate.
    I also love chocolate from a company called, Seroogy, in Wisconsin, making chocolate since 1899. I love the soft centers. They also make oreo cookies covered with dark or milk chocolate with a design on top for either, Christmas or Easter.
    Growing up I liked Mounds candy with dark chocolate and coconut. That was always my favorite go to chocolate snack.

    Reply
  66. I love going to the Lindt store on 34th Street, between 5th and 6th Avenue in NYC. I can get their chocolates anywhere, but the store beautifully presents stacks of chocolate in a sumptuous design.
    I also like to send away for chocolate from a company called Seroogy, in Wisconsin, making chocolate since 1899. I love their soft centers. They also make oreo cookies covered in dark or milk chocolate with a design for Christmas or Easter on top of the cookie.
    Growing up I always enjoyed Mounds candy with dark chocolate and coconut. It was my favorite chocolate snack.

    Reply
  67. I love going to the Lindt store on 34th Street, between 5th and 6th Avenue in NYC. I can get their chocolates anywhere, but the store beautifully presents stacks of chocolate in a sumptuous design.
    I also like to send away for chocolate from a company called Seroogy, in Wisconsin, making chocolate since 1899. I love their soft centers. They also make oreo cookies covered in dark or milk chocolate with a design for Christmas or Easter on top of the cookie.
    Growing up I always enjoyed Mounds candy with dark chocolate and coconut. It was my favorite chocolate snack.

    Reply
  68. I love going to the Lindt store on 34th Street, between 5th and 6th Avenue in NYC. I can get their chocolates anywhere, but the store beautifully presents stacks of chocolate in a sumptuous design.
    I also like to send away for chocolate from a company called Seroogy, in Wisconsin, making chocolate since 1899. I love their soft centers. They also make oreo cookies covered in dark or milk chocolate with a design for Christmas or Easter on top of the cookie.
    Growing up I always enjoyed Mounds candy with dark chocolate and coconut. It was my favorite chocolate snack.

    Reply
  69. I love going to the Lindt store on 34th Street, between 5th and 6th Avenue in NYC. I can get their chocolates anywhere, but the store beautifully presents stacks of chocolate in a sumptuous design.
    I also like to send away for chocolate from a company called Seroogy, in Wisconsin, making chocolate since 1899. I love their soft centers. They also make oreo cookies covered in dark or milk chocolate with a design for Christmas or Easter on top of the cookie.
    Growing up I always enjoyed Mounds candy with dark chocolate and coconut. It was my favorite chocolate snack.

    Reply
  70. I love going to the Lindt store on 34th Street, between 5th and 6th Avenue in NYC. I can get their chocolates anywhere, but the store beautifully presents stacks of chocolate in a sumptuous design.
    I also like to send away for chocolate from a company called Seroogy, in Wisconsin, making chocolate since 1899. I love their soft centers. They also make oreo cookies covered in dark or milk chocolate with a design for Christmas or Easter on top of the cookie.
    Growing up I always enjoyed Mounds candy with dark chocolate and coconut. It was my favorite chocolate snack.

    Reply
  71. I love going to the Lindt store on 34th Street, between 5th and 6th Avenue in NYC. I can get their chocolate anywhere, but the store beautifully presents boxes of my favorites like truffles and petite desserts.
    I like to send away for chocolate from Seroogy, in Wisconsin, making chocolate since 1899. I love their soft centers. They make oreo cookies covered with milk or dark chocolate with a design on top for Christmas or Easter.
    Growing up I always liked Mounds candy with dark chocolate and coconut.

    Reply
  72. I love going to the Lindt store on 34th Street, between 5th and 6th Avenue in NYC. I can get their chocolate anywhere, but the store beautifully presents boxes of my favorites like truffles and petite desserts.
    I like to send away for chocolate from Seroogy, in Wisconsin, making chocolate since 1899. I love their soft centers. They make oreo cookies covered with milk or dark chocolate with a design on top for Christmas or Easter.
    Growing up I always liked Mounds candy with dark chocolate and coconut.

    Reply
  73. I love going to the Lindt store on 34th Street, between 5th and 6th Avenue in NYC. I can get their chocolate anywhere, but the store beautifully presents boxes of my favorites like truffles and petite desserts.
    I like to send away for chocolate from Seroogy, in Wisconsin, making chocolate since 1899. I love their soft centers. They make oreo cookies covered with milk or dark chocolate with a design on top for Christmas or Easter.
    Growing up I always liked Mounds candy with dark chocolate and coconut.

    Reply
  74. I love going to the Lindt store on 34th Street, between 5th and 6th Avenue in NYC. I can get their chocolate anywhere, but the store beautifully presents boxes of my favorites like truffles and petite desserts.
    I like to send away for chocolate from Seroogy, in Wisconsin, making chocolate since 1899. I love their soft centers. They make oreo cookies covered with milk or dark chocolate with a design on top for Christmas or Easter.
    Growing up I always liked Mounds candy with dark chocolate and coconut.

    Reply
  75. I love going to the Lindt store on 34th Street, between 5th and 6th Avenue in NYC. I can get their chocolate anywhere, but the store beautifully presents boxes of my favorites like truffles and petite desserts.
    I like to send away for chocolate from Seroogy, in Wisconsin, making chocolate since 1899. I love their soft centers. They make oreo cookies covered with milk or dark chocolate with a design on top for Christmas or Easter.
    Growing up I always liked Mounds candy with dark chocolate and coconut.

    Reply
  76. My favorite shopping place is no more: Famous Barr in St. Louis, the home store of the May company stores. In the 30s it had a children’s play room, three restaurants, a bookstore, and the clothing and shoes my mother bought for me. (Unknown to me at the time, it also had lectures and authors introducing their books. My aunt bought the first commercial edition of Joy of Cooking after hearing Irma Starkey Rombauer discuss the book. I inherited that book from my aunt.) In the 40s it was still a great place to go for clothing of all levels of quality, a bargain jewelry counter (where the same aunt unearthed the most spectacular cosume jewelry – I still have some of those also), book, plus yarn and other materials for stitchery projects and the same wonderful restaurants.
    In this century May company was sold to Macy’s. Famous Barr is no more!

    Reply
  77. My favorite shopping place is no more: Famous Barr in St. Louis, the home store of the May company stores. In the 30s it had a children’s play room, three restaurants, a bookstore, and the clothing and shoes my mother bought for me. (Unknown to me at the time, it also had lectures and authors introducing their books. My aunt bought the first commercial edition of Joy of Cooking after hearing Irma Starkey Rombauer discuss the book. I inherited that book from my aunt.) In the 40s it was still a great place to go for clothing of all levels of quality, a bargain jewelry counter (where the same aunt unearthed the most spectacular cosume jewelry – I still have some of those also), book, plus yarn and other materials for stitchery projects and the same wonderful restaurants.
    In this century May company was sold to Macy’s. Famous Barr is no more!

    Reply
  78. My favorite shopping place is no more: Famous Barr in St. Louis, the home store of the May company stores. In the 30s it had a children’s play room, three restaurants, a bookstore, and the clothing and shoes my mother bought for me. (Unknown to me at the time, it also had lectures and authors introducing their books. My aunt bought the first commercial edition of Joy of Cooking after hearing Irma Starkey Rombauer discuss the book. I inherited that book from my aunt.) In the 40s it was still a great place to go for clothing of all levels of quality, a bargain jewelry counter (where the same aunt unearthed the most spectacular cosume jewelry – I still have some of those also), book, plus yarn and other materials for stitchery projects and the same wonderful restaurants.
    In this century May company was sold to Macy’s. Famous Barr is no more!

    Reply
  79. My favorite shopping place is no more: Famous Barr in St. Louis, the home store of the May company stores. In the 30s it had a children’s play room, three restaurants, a bookstore, and the clothing and shoes my mother bought for me. (Unknown to me at the time, it also had lectures and authors introducing their books. My aunt bought the first commercial edition of Joy of Cooking after hearing Irma Starkey Rombauer discuss the book. I inherited that book from my aunt.) In the 40s it was still a great place to go for clothing of all levels of quality, a bargain jewelry counter (where the same aunt unearthed the most spectacular cosume jewelry – I still have some of those also), book, plus yarn and other materials for stitchery projects and the same wonderful restaurants.
    In this century May company was sold to Macy’s. Famous Barr is no more!

    Reply
  80. My favorite shopping place is no more: Famous Barr in St. Louis, the home store of the May company stores. In the 30s it had a children’s play room, three restaurants, a bookstore, and the clothing and shoes my mother bought for me. (Unknown to me at the time, it also had lectures and authors introducing their books. My aunt bought the first commercial edition of Joy of Cooking after hearing Irma Starkey Rombauer discuss the book. I inherited that book from my aunt.) In the 40s it was still a great place to go for clothing of all levels of quality, a bargain jewelry counter (where the same aunt unearthed the most spectacular cosume jewelry – I still have some of those also), book, plus yarn and other materials for stitchery projects and the same wonderful restaurants.
    In this century May company was sold to Macy’s. Famous Barr is no more!

    Reply
  81. Patricia, I’m sorry about the way Typepad is being so frustrating lately. If it’s any consolation, it’s also tossing me into the spam trap. Also Mary Jo.
    Thank you for your patience and persistence.

    Reply
  82. Patricia, I’m sorry about the way Typepad is being so frustrating lately. If it’s any consolation, it’s also tossing me into the spam trap. Also Mary Jo.
    Thank you for your patience and persistence.

    Reply
  83. Patricia, I’m sorry about the way Typepad is being so frustrating lately. If it’s any consolation, it’s also tossing me into the spam trap. Also Mary Jo.
    Thank you for your patience and persistence.

    Reply
  84. Patricia, I’m sorry about the way Typepad is being so frustrating lately. If it’s any consolation, it’s also tossing me into the spam trap. Also Mary Jo.
    Thank you for your patience and persistence.

    Reply
  85. Patricia, I’m sorry about the way Typepad is being so frustrating lately. If it’s any consolation, it’s also tossing me into the spam trap. Also Mary Jo.
    Thank you for your patience and persistence.

    Reply
  86. The Strand Arcade just down from the QVB is another special place with the architecture and a chocolate shop as well!

    Reply
  87. The Strand Arcade just down from the QVB is another special place with the architecture and a chocolate shop as well!

    Reply
  88. The Strand Arcade just down from the QVB is another special place with the architecture and a chocolate shop as well!

    Reply
  89. The Strand Arcade just down from the QVB is another special place with the architecture and a chocolate shop as well!

    Reply
  90. The Strand Arcade just down from the QVB is another special place with the architecture and a chocolate shop as well!

    Reply
  91. Sue, it’s sad when beloved old stores that used to offer something unique and special, get sold off to some other company, or simply closed down.
    Famous Barr sounds wonderful — I love the idea of a store that regularly features author talks. And how wonderful to have a first edition of The Joy Of Cooking.

    Reply
  92. Sue, it’s sad when beloved old stores that used to offer something unique and special, get sold off to some other company, or simply closed down.
    Famous Barr sounds wonderful — I love the idea of a store that regularly features author talks. And how wonderful to have a first edition of The Joy Of Cooking.

    Reply
  93. Sue, it’s sad when beloved old stores that used to offer something unique and special, get sold off to some other company, or simply closed down.
    Famous Barr sounds wonderful — I love the idea of a store that regularly features author talks. And how wonderful to have a first edition of The Joy Of Cooking.

    Reply
  94. Sue, it’s sad when beloved old stores that used to offer something unique and special, get sold off to some other company, or simply closed down.
    Famous Barr sounds wonderful — I love the idea of a store that regularly features author talks. And how wonderful to have a first edition of The Joy Of Cooking.

    Reply
  95. Sue, it’s sad when beloved old stores that used to offer something unique and special, get sold off to some other company, or simply closed down.
    Famous Barr sounds wonderful — I love the idea of a store that regularly features author talks. And how wonderful to have a first edition of The Joy Of Cooking.

    Reply
  96. Lovely post, I have visited the QVB and it was wonderful. My childhood memories of Christmas include going to Wanamakers in Philadelphia with Mother and siblings. Seven floors of shopping heaven, the largest functioning pipe organ in the world accompanying a fantastic light show. We are talking about the 1950s-60s so no computers to program the lights, and incandescent bulbs but still mesmerizing! And stopping for non-pareils at the chocolate counter on the way out. Another special memory was my Father worked for LifeSavers, a hard candy company here in the US. When my children were in elementary school he would supply the Principal with enough Sweet Story Books (an assortment of LifeSavers in different flavors in a Christmas themed package) for each child on St. Nicholas Day. It was fun to see them leaving school smiling and Story Books in hand. Dad got a kick out of my own kids delight in their haul.

    Reply
  97. Lovely post, I have visited the QVB and it was wonderful. My childhood memories of Christmas include going to Wanamakers in Philadelphia with Mother and siblings. Seven floors of shopping heaven, the largest functioning pipe organ in the world accompanying a fantastic light show. We are talking about the 1950s-60s so no computers to program the lights, and incandescent bulbs but still mesmerizing! And stopping for non-pareils at the chocolate counter on the way out. Another special memory was my Father worked for LifeSavers, a hard candy company here in the US. When my children were in elementary school he would supply the Principal with enough Sweet Story Books (an assortment of LifeSavers in different flavors in a Christmas themed package) for each child on St. Nicholas Day. It was fun to see them leaving school smiling and Story Books in hand. Dad got a kick out of my own kids delight in their haul.

    Reply
  98. Lovely post, I have visited the QVB and it was wonderful. My childhood memories of Christmas include going to Wanamakers in Philadelphia with Mother and siblings. Seven floors of shopping heaven, the largest functioning pipe organ in the world accompanying a fantastic light show. We are talking about the 1950s-60s so no computers to program the lights, and incandescent bulbs but still mesmerizing! And stopping for non-pareils at the chocolate counter on the way out. Another special memory was my Father worked for LifeSavers, a hard candy company here in the US. When my children were in elementary school he would supply the Principal with enough Sweet Story Books (an assortment of LifeSavers in different flavors in a Christmas themed package) for each child on St. Nicholas Day. It was fun to see them leaving school smiling and Story Books in hand. Dad got a kick out of my own kids delight in their haul.

    Reply
  99. Lovely post, I have visited the QVB and it was wonderful. My childhood memories of Christmas include going to Wanamakers in Philadelphia with Mother and siblings. Seven floors of shopping heaven, the largest functioning pipe organ in the world accompanying a fantastic light show. We are talking about the 1950s-60s so no computers to program the lights, and incandescent bulbs but still mesmerizing! And stopping for non-pareils at the chocolate counter on the way out. Another special memory was my Father worked for LifeSavers, a hard candy company here in the US. When my children were in elementary school he would supply the Principal with enough Sweet Story Books (an assortment of LifeSavers in different flavors in a Christmas themed package) for each child on St. Nicholas Day. It was fun to see them leaving school smiling and Story Books in hand. Dad got a kick out of my own kids delight in their haul.

    Reply
  100. Lovely post, I have visited the QVB and it was wonderful. My childhood memories of Christmas include going to Wanamakers in Philadelphia with Mother and siblings. Seven floors of shopping heaven, the largest functioning pipe organ in the world accompanying a fantastic light show. We are talking about the 1950s-60s so no computers to program the lights, and incandescent bulbs but still mesmerizing! And stopping for non-pareils at the chocolate counter on the way out. Another special memory was my Father worked for LifeSavers, a hard candy company here in the US. When my children were in elementary school he would supply the Principal with enough Sweet Story Books (an assortment of LifeSavers in different flavors in a Christmas themed package) for each child on St. Nicholas Day. It was fun to see them leaving school smiling and Story Books in hand. Dad got a kick out of my own kids delight in their haul.

    Reply
  101. Sounds wonderful, Denise. That lightshow sounds wonderful. I think we’re spoiled today getting such amazing computer generated extravaganzas. We also ate LifeSavers in Australia candy with a hole in the middle. I’m not sure, but I think they still make them..

    Reply
  102. Sounds wonderful, Denise. That lightshow sounds wonderful. I think we’re spoiled today getting such amazing computer generated extravaganzas. We also ate LifeSavers in Australia candy with a hole in the middle. I’m not sure, but I think they still make them..

    Reply
  103. Sounds wonderful, Denise. That lightshow sounds wonderful. I think we’re spoiled today getting such amazing computer generated extravaganzas. We also ate LifeSavers in Australia candy with a hole in the middle. I’m not sure, but I think they still make them..

    Reply
  104. Sounds wonderful, Denise. That lightshow sounds wonderful. I think we’re spoiled today getting such amazing computer generated extravaganzas. We also ate LifeSavers in Australia candy with a hole in the middle. I’m not sure, but I think they still make them..

    Reply
  105. Sounds wonderful, Denise. That lightshow sounds wonderful. I think we’re spoiled today getting such amazing computer generated extravaganzas. We also ate LifeSavers in Australia candy with a hole in the middle. I’m not sure, but I think they still make them..

    Reply
  106. I would love to visit the QVB! The photos are amazing! I remember shopping at J C Penney and staring at their candy counter. I think I choose dark chocolate with peanuts. It is so nice reminiscing!! Thanks for a great post!

    Reply
  107. I would love to visit the QVB! The photos are amazing! I remember shopping at J C Penney and staring at their candy counter. I think I choose dark chocolate with peanuts. It is so nice reminiscing!! Thanks for a great post!

    Reply
  108. I would love to visit the QVB! The photos are amazing! I remember shopping at J C Penney and staring at their candy counter. I think I choose dark chocolate with peanuts. It is so nice reminiscing!! Thanks for a great post!

    Reply
  109. I would love to visit the QVB! The photos are amazing! I remember shopping at J C Penney and staring at their candy counter. I think I choose dark chocolate with peanuts. It is so nice reminiscing!! Thanks for a great post!

    Reply
  110. I would love to visit the QVB! The photos are amazing! I remember shopping at J C Penney and staring at their candy counter. I think I choose dark chocolate with peanuts. It is so nice reminiscing!! Thanks for a great post!

    Reply
  111. I was working in Dallas, and within walking distance of the office where I worked, were Titches, Sanger-Harris and Neimans. I waited for sales. In fact in Titches, the lady in the children’s department would point out things I could get for my little girls. For me, it was the House of Nine – they had clothes which actually fit me (oh for the days of no chest when everything hung beautifully) and during their sales, I found things for work.
    The only place better than the House of Nine – were shoe stores….I was a shoe junkie…but I digress.
    As to the candy – when I was little we lived in the country, and one of my uncles owned a grocery store. The penny candy display case was right at the front door. With a few cents, I became wealthy. I could stand there, blocking the door, for a very long time. I loved mary-janes – peanut buttery and very chewy. They made me happy.
    Isn’t it wonderful to think of a time when a certain kind of sweet could make a person that happy?

    Reply
  112. I was working in Dallas, and within walking distance of the office where I worked, were Titches, Sanger-Harris and Neimans. I waited for sales. In fact in Titches, the lady in the children’s department would point out things I could get for my little girls. For me, it was the House of Nine – they had clothes which actually fit me (oh for the days of no chest when everything hung beautifully) and during their sales, I found things for work.
    The only place better than the House of Nine – were shoe stores….I was a shoe junkie…but I digress.
    As to the candy – when I was little we lived in the country, and one of my uncles owned a grocery store. The penny candy display case was right at the front door. With a few cents, I became wealthy. I could stand there, blocking the door, for a very long time. I loved mary-janes – peanut buttery and very chewy. They made me happy.
    Isn’t it wonderful to think of a time when a certain kind of sweet could make a person that happy?

    Reply
  113. I was working in Dallas, and within walking distance of the office where I worked, were Titches, Sanger-Harris and Neimans. I waited for sales. In fact in Titches, the lady in the children’s department would point out things I could get for my little girls. For me, it was the House of Nine – they had clothes which actually fit me (oh for the days of no chest when everything hung beautifully) and during their sales, I found things for work.
    The only place better than the House of Nine – were shoe stores….I was a shoe junkie…but I digress.
    As to the candy – when I was little we lived in the country, and one of my uncles owned a grocery store. The penny candy display case was right at the front door. With a few cents, I became wealthy. I could stand there, blocking the door, for a very long time. I loved mary-janes – peanut buttery and very chewy. They made me happy.
    Isn’t it wonderful to think of a time when a certain kind of sweet could make a person that happy?

    Reply
  114. I was working in Dallas, and within walking distance of the office where I worked, were Titches, Sanger-Harris and Neimans. I waited for sales. In fact in Titches, the lady in the children’s department would point out things I could get for my little girls. For me, it was the House of Nine – they had clothes which actually fit me (oh for the days of no chest when everything hung beautifully) and during their sales, I found things for work.
    The only place better than the House of Nine – were shoe stores….I was a shoe junkie…but I digress.
    As to the candy – when I was little we lived in the country, and one of my uncles owned a grocery store. The penny candy display case was right at the front door. With a few cents, I became wealthy. I could stand there, blocking the door, for a very long time. I loved mary-janes – peanut buttery and very chewy. They made me happy.
    Isn’t it wonderful to think of a time when a certain kind of sweet could make a person that happy?

    Reply
  115. I was working in Dallas, and within walking distance of the office where I worked, were Titches, Sanger-Harris and Neimans. I waited for sales. In fact in Titches, the lady in the children’s department would point out things I could get for my little girls. For me, it was the House of Nine – they had clothes which actually fit me (oh for the days of no chest when everything hung beautifully) and during their sales, I found things for work.
    The only place better than the House of Nine – were shoe stores….I was a shoe junkie…but I digress.
    As to the candy – when I was little we lived in the country, and one of my uncles owned a grocery store. The penny candy display case was right at the front door. With a few cents, I became wealthy. I could stand there, blocking the door, for a very long time. I loved mary-janes – peanut buttery and very chewy. They made me happy.
    Isn’t it wonderful to think of a time when a certain kind of sweet could make a person that happy?

    Reply
  116. LOL Annette, sounds like your workplace was in a dangerous location. That House of Nine sounds amazing.
    And yes, is there a more perfect combination than nuts and chocolate?
    I’ve been thinking about the days of my childhood when Pop could make two little girls happy with the biggest coin in his pocket. Simple pleasures twice over — the anticipation and choosing, and the running off with our small white paper bags to eat the sweets.

    Reply
  117. LOL Annette, sounds like your workplace was in a dangerous location. That House of Nine sounds amazing.
    And yes, is there a more perfect combination than nuts and chocolate?
    I’ve been thinking about the days of my childhood when Pop could make two little girls happy with the biggest coin in his pocket. Simple pleasures twice over — the anticipation and choosing, and the running off with our small white paper bags to eat the sweets.

    Reply
  118. LOL Annette, sounds like your workplace was in a dangerous location. That House of Nine sounds amazing.
    And yes, is there a more perfect combination than nuts and chocolate?
    I’ve been thinking about the days of my childhood when Pop could make two little girls happy with the biggest coin in his pocket. Simple pleasures twice over — the anticipation and choosing, and the running off with our small white paper bags to eat the sweets.

    Reply
  119. LOL Annette, sounds like your workplace was in a dangerous location. That House of Nine sounds amazing.
    And yes, is there a more perfect combination than nuts and chocolate?
    I’ve been thinking about the days of my childhood when Pop could make two little girls happy with the biggest coin in his pocket. Simple pleasures twice over — the anticipation and choosing, and the running off with our small white paper bags to eat the sweets.

    Reply
  120. LOL Annette, sounds like your workplace was in a dangerous location. That House of Nine sounds amazing.
    And yes, is there a more perfect combination than nuts and chocolate?
    I’ve been thinking about the days of my childhood when Pop could make two little girls happy with the biggest coin in his pocket. Simple pleasures twice over — the anticipation and choosing, and the running off with our small white paper bags to eat the sweets.

    Reply
  121. You’ve brought back great memories of shopping on 5th Avenue in New York with my mother, at all the old department stores that have gone out of business…Best & Co., B. Altman’s, Bergdorf Goodman, Sterns.

    Reply
  122. You’ve brought back great memories of shopping on 5th Avenue in New York with my mother, at all the old department stores that have gone out of business…Best & Co., B. Altman’s, Bergdorf Goodman, Sterns.

    Reply
  123. You’ve brought back great memories of shopping on 5th Avenue in New York with my mother, at all the old department stores that have gone out of business…Best & Co., B. Altman’s, Bergdorf Goodman, Sterns.

    Reply
  124. You’ve brought back great memories of shopping on 5th Avenue in New York with my mother, at all the old department stores that have gone out of business…Best & Co., B. Altman’s, Bergdorf Goodman, Sterns.

    Reply
  125. You’ve brought back great memories of shopping on 5th Avenue in New York with my mother, at all the old department stores that have gone out of business…Best & Co., B. Altman’s, Bergdorf Goodman, Sterns.

    Reply
  126. I lived in Australia in the sixties. Mostly we were in Canberra, Mt Isa, and Moorabbin. I know we spent some time in Sydney, so it’s possible that I went to the QVB in its white elephant era. I well remember that a small amount of pocket money could buy a goodly bag of sweets. I remember a toffee that would occasionally yield a prize of an encased two penny coin. I’m guessing that would be considered a choking hazard nowadays!
    Thanks for an enjoyable post, Anne.

    Reply
  127. I lived in Australia in the sixties. Mostly we were in Canberra, Mt Isa, and Moorabbin. I know we spent some time in Sydney, so it’s possible that I went to the QVB in its white elephant era. I well remember that a small amount of pocket money could buy a goodly bag of sweets. I remember a toffee that would occasionally yield a prize of an encased two penny coin. I’m guessing that would be considered a choking hazard nowadays!
    Thanks for an enjoyable post, Anne.

    Reply
  128. I lived in Australia in the sixties. Mostly we were in Canberra, Mt Isa, and Moorabbin. I know we spent some time in Sydney, so it’s possible that I went to the QVB in its white elephant era. I well remember that a small amount of pocket money could buy a goodly bag of sweets. I remember a toffee that would occasionally yield a prize of an encased two penny coin. I’m guessing that would be considered a choking hazard nowadays!
    Thanks for an enjoyable post, Anne.

    Reply
  129. I lived in Australia in the sixties. Mostly we were in Canberra, Mt Isa, and Moorabbin. I know we spent some time in Sydney, so it’s possible that I went to the QVB in its white elephant era. I well remember that a small amount of pocket money could buy a goodly bag of sweets. I remember a toffee that would occasionally yield a prize of an encased two penny coin. I’m guessing that would be considered a choking hazard nowadays!
    Thanks for an enjoyable post, Anne.

    Reply
  130. I lived in Australia in the sixties. Mostly we were in Canberra, Mt Isa, and Moorabbin. I know we spent some time in Sydney, so it’s possible that I went to the QVB in its white elephant era. I well remember that a small amount of pocket money could buy a goodly bag of sweets. I remember a toffee that would occasionally yield a prize of an encased two penny coin. I’m guessing that would be considered a choking hazard nowadays!
    Thanks for an enjoyable post, Anne.

    Reply
  131. I have fond memories of the QVB. When I visited it many years ago it had a shop selling wares from the Metropolitan Museum of Art. I’m still wearing the two sets of earrings I bought there – they’re both among my favourite earrings. (I also still wish I’d given into temptation even more and bought that third set!)

    Reply
  132. I have fond memories of the QVB. When I visited it many years ago it had a shop selling wares from the Metropolitan Museum of Art. I’m still wearing the two sets of earrings I bought there – they’re both among my favourite earrings. (I also still wish I’d given into temptation even more and bought that third set!)

    Reply
  133. I have fond memories of the QVB. When I visited it many years ago it had a shop selling wares from the Metropolitan Museum of Art. I’m still wearing the two sets of earrings I bought there – they’re both among my favourite earrings. (I also still wish I’d given into temptation even more and bought that third set!)

    Reply
  134. I have fond memories of the QVB. When I visited it many years ago it had a shop selling wares from the Metropolitan Museum of Art. I’m still wearing the two sets of earrings I bought there – they’re both among my favourite earrings. (I also still wish I’d given into temptation even more and bought that third set!)

    Reply
  135. I have fond memories of the QVB. When I visited it many years ago it had a shop selling wares from the Metropolitan Museum of Art. I’m still wearing the two sets of earrings I bought there – they’re both among my favourite earrings. (I also still wish I’d given into temptation even more and bought that third set!)

    Reply
  136. I never came across those toffees with a two penny coin, Kareni. Sounds like that would be after 1966 when decimal currency came in and a two cent coin was introduced. Before that there were pennies and half pennies, but no coin that was “tuppence”. Values have changed so much, and now the 5cent piece is the smallest coin we have.

    Reply
  137. I never came across those toffees with a two penny coin, Kareni. Sounds like that would be after 1966 when decimal currency came in and a two cent coin was introduced. Before that there were pennies and half pennies, but no coin that was “tuppence”. Values have changed so much, and now the 5cent piece is the smallest coin we have.

    Reply
  138. I never came across those toffees with a two penny coin, Kareni. Sounds like that would be after 1966 when decimal currency came in and a two cent coin was introduced. Before that there were pennies and half pennies, but no coin that was “tuppence”. Values have changed so much, and now the 5cent piece is the smallest coin we have.

    Reply
  139. I never came across those toffees with a two penny coin, Kareni. Sounds like that would be after 1966 when decimal currency came in and a two cent coin was introduced. Before that there were pennies and half pennies, but no coin that was “tuppence”. Values have changed so much, and now the 5cent piece is the smallest coin we have.

    Reply
  140. I never came across those toffees with a two penny coin, Kareni. Sounds like that would be after 1966 when decimal currency came in and a two cent coin was introduced. Before that there were pennies and half pennies, but no coin that was “tuppence”. Values have changed so much, and now the 5cent piece is the smallest coin we have.

    Reply
  141. That sounds lovely, Suzanna. That shop might still be there — I’m not sure. My visit was more of an unplanned wander.
    OK, I just did a quick google search and the Metropolitan Museum of Art shop is still in the QVB.
    I might have to have a look in there next time I’m in Sydney.

    Reply
  142. That sounds lovely, Suzanna. That shop might still be there — I’m not sure. My visit was more of an unplanned wander.
    OK, I just did a quick google search and the Metropolitan Museum of Art shop is still in the QVB.
    I might have to have a look in there next time I’m in Sydney.

    Reply
  143. That sounds lovely, Suzanna. That shop might still be there — I’m not sure. My visit was more of an unplanned wander.
    OK, I just did a quick google search and the Metropolitan Museum of Art shop is still in the QVB.
    I might have to have a look in there next time I’m in Sydney.

    Reply
  144. That sounds lovely, Suzanna. That shop might still be there — I’m not sure. My visit was more of an unplanned wander.
    OK, I just did a quick google search and the Metropolitan Museum of Art shop is still in the QVB.
    I might have to have a look in there next time I’m in Sydney.

    Reply
  145. That sounds lovely, Suzanna. That shop might still be there — I’m not sure. My visit was more of an unplanned wander.
    OK, I just did a quick google search and the Metropolitan Museum of Art shop is still in the QVB.
    I might have to have a look in there next time I’m in Sydney.

    Reply

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