Of Shells and other Garden Decorations

Forest 1A few months ago we visited Hatfield Forest, which is a rare survival of a medieval royal hunting forest. I love woods and forests because they so often have a real sense of history; the ancient trees like living sculptures, the sense of timelessness that you get when you walk between them.

Hatfield Forest was in existence at the time of the Domesday Book in 1086. It belonged to King Harold and passed to William of Normandy at the time of the Conquest. A forest in those days was a mixture of woodland and open spaces for grazing. Fallow deer were introduced in 1100 from Sicily and their descendants still roam the woods today. Rabbits were another “foreign” introduction and a warren was set up in the woods to provide meat and fur. In keeping with may other medieval hunting grounds, including Ashdown Park, Hatfield had a lodge that was the residence of the Head Keeper. The current lodge, dating from 1570, is still standing and originally had a tower at one end from which spectators could watch the progress of the hunt.

In the 18th century the forest was sold to the Houblon family, wealthy merchants and financiers from the City of London. In keeping Hatfield Forest Lake with the fashions of the day, Jacob Houblon had a part of the forest landscaped. He built the Georgian Shell House and the lake, surrounding it with exotic, non-native trees. Capability Brown landscaped the grounds around this sublimely pretty spot. It was known as  "detached pleasure ground" separate from the Houblon's grand house at Hallingbury Hall. Part of the fun of owning the forest was riding or driving out to enjoy these grounds. There was a cottage beside the lake where the poulterer lived. She kept chicken and peacocks for the table. Hatfield Forest has wild peacocks to this day.

The Shell House is now the exhibition centre for the estate. It was originally built as a picnic house overlooking the lake and was decorated with flints and with British and tropical shells. Most of the shells were from the West Indies as these were used as ballast in the holds of slave ships. The decoration includes a bird sculpted out of oyster shells and blue glass, coral and coloured sands.

Shell houseAt this time there was a craze for collecting and purchasing shells and using them to decorate grottoes and garden features. The building of a picnic house was also a part of the 18th century fashion for elaborate buildings in the landscape whether they were fishing temples, cold plunge baths, pavilions or grand arches. In the summer the Shell House provided a wonderful place for the family to picnic, fish and go boating. Grand parties were also held there with dancing beside the lake in the lantern-light. It offers an insight into the leisured lifestyle of the Georgian upper classes. It is rumoured that the ghost of Laeticia Houblon, who decorated the Shell House, can sometimes be seen in and around the property!

There isn't really space in my garden for a shell house or grotto and although we have a couple of Periwinkle small ponds, a plunge pool would probably be out of the question. However I do like decorating the flowerbeds and rockery with unusual rocks and stones collected on our travels or the huge sarsen rocks that you find in the fields around here, and illuminating them at night with little solar-powered battery lights! Now that spring is finally on the way here it does look very pretty! That is my contribution to garden decoration; what about you?

70 thoughts on “Of Shells and other Garden Decorations”

  1. As you might guess, trees and forests are in limited supply here in the Sonoran desert of Phoenix. I don’t miss them as much as I thought I would when I moved here 30 years ago. But I always enjoy them in my travels (especially to England). And if I’m really yearning for woods, I just have to drive a couple of hours north. Being high desert, northern Arizona’s trees tend toward pines more than deciduous trees, but they’re woods nonetheless. There are fall colors and (shudder) snow, but fortunately, I don’t have to shovel it. My two mottoes are, “But it’s a dry heat!” and “I never had to shovel any sunshine yet!” Definitely with the exclamation points.

    Reply
  2. As you might guess, trees and forests are in limited supply here in the Sonoran desert of Phoenix. I don’t miss them as much as I thought I would when I moved here 30 years ago. But I always enjoy them in my travels (especially to England). And if I’m really yearning for woods, I just have to drive a couple of hours north. Being high desert, northern Arizona’s trees tend toward pines more than deciduous trees, but they’re woods nonetheless. There are fall colors and (shudder) snow, but fortunately, I don’t have to shovel it. My two mottoes are, “But it’s a dry heat!” and “I never had to shovel any sunshine yet!” Definitely with the exclamation points.

    Reply
  3. As you might guess, trees and forests are in limited supply here in the Sonoran desert of Phoenix. I don’t miss them as much as I thought I would when I moved here 30 years ago. But I always enjoy them in my travels (especially to England). And if I’m really yearning for woods, I just have to drive a couple of hours north. Being high desert, northern Arizona’s trees tend toward pines more than deciduous trees, but they’re woods nonetheless. There are fall colors and (shudder) snow, but fortunately, I don’t have to shovel it. My two mottoes are, “But it’s a dry heat!” and “I never had to shovel any sunshine yet!” Definitely with the exclamation points.

    Reply
  4. As you might guess, trees and forests are in limited supply here in the Sonoran desert of Phoenix. I don’t miss them as much as I thought I would when I moved here 30 years ago. But I always enjoy them in my travels (especially to England). And if I’m really yearning for woods, I just have to drive a couple of hours north. Being high desert, northern Arizona’s trees tend toward pines more than deciduous trees, but they’re woods nonetheless. There are fall colors and (shudder) snow, but fortunately, I don’t have to shovel it. My two mottoes are, “But it’s a dry heat!” and “I never had to shovel any sunshine yet!” Definitely with the exclamation points.

    Reply
  5. As you might guess, trees and forests are in limited supply here in the Sonoran desert of Phoenix. I don’t miss them as much as I thought I would when I moved here 30 years ago. But I always enjoy them in my travels (especially to England). And if I’m really yearning for woods, I just have to drive a couple of hours north. Being high desert, northern Arizona’s trees tend toward pines more than deciduous trees, but they’re woods nonetheless. There are fall colors and (shudder) snow, but fortunately, I don’t have to shovel it. My two mottoes are, “But it’s a dry heat!” and “I never had to shovel any sunshine yet!” Definitely with the exclamation points.

    Reply
  6. LOL, Mary! There are definite benefits to dry heat and no snow, IMO. I imagine creating a garden in desert conditions is a whole different challenge. Your comment about missing trees reminded me of trips to Shetland. It’s a vastly different climate from Arizona of course but there are very few trees. I would definitely miss them if I lived there.

    Reply
  7. LOL, Mary! There are definite benefits to dry heat and no snow, IMO. I imagine creating a garden in desert conditions is a whole different challenge. Your comment about missing trees reminded me of trips to Shetland. It’s a vastly different climate from Arizona of course but there are very few trees. I would definitely miss them if I lived there.

    Reply
  8. LOL, Mary! There are definite benefits to dry heat and no snow, IMO. I imagine creating a garden in desert conditions is a whole different challenge. Your comment about missing trees reminded me of trips to Shetland. It’s a vastly different climate from Arizona of course but there are very few trees. I would definitely miss them if I lived there.

    Reply
  9. LOL, Mary! There are definite benefits to dry heat and no snow, IMO. I imagine creating a garden in desert conditions is a whole different challenge. Your comment about missing trees reminded me of trips to Shetland. It’s a vastly different climate from Arizona of course but there are very few trees. I would definitely miss them if I lived there.

    Reply
  10. LOL, Mary! There are definite benefits to dry heat and no snow, IMO. I imagine creating a garden in desert conditions is a whole different challenge. Your comment about missing trees reminded me of trips to Shetland. It’s a vastly different climate from Arizona of course but there are very few trees. I would definitely miss them if I lived there.

    Reply
  11. At 88, I no longer garden. My gardening has always been rather utilitarian, so I never really got into landscaping ideas, although I enjoy landscaping when others do it.
    I DO have a lovely spread of African Violets in my dining room. I put the three small commercial plants into big pots and the spread of the violets is wonderful to see. But they sit in large clay pots with frozen food trays to hold the water as i water them from below, so there is no decorating even for houseplants.
    I guess I’m esthetically challenged.

    Reply
  12. At 88, I no longer garden. My gardening has always been rather utilitarian, so I never really got into landscaping ideas, although I enjoy landscaping when others do it.
    I DO have a lovely spread of African Violets in my dining room. I put the three small commercial plants into big pots and the spread of the violets is wonderful to see. But they sit in large clay pots with frozen food trays to hold the water as i water them from below, so there is no decorating even for houseplants.
    I guess I’m esthetically challenged.

    Reply
  13. At 88, I no longer garden. My gardening has always been rather utilitarian, so I never really got into landscaping ideas, although I enjoy landscaping when others do it.
    I DO have a lovely spread of African Violets in my dining room. I put the three small commercial plants into big pots and the spread of the violets is wonderful to see. But they sit in large clay pots with frozen food trays to hold the water as i water them from below, so there is no decorating even for houseplants.
    I guess I’m esthetically challenged.

    Reply
  14. At 88, I no longer garden. My gardening has always been rather utilitarian, so I never really got into landscaping ideas, although I enjoy landscaping when others do it.
    I DO have a lovely spread of African Violets in my dining room. I put the three small commercial plants into big pots and the spread of the violets is wonderful to see. But they sit in large clay pots with frozen food trays to hold the water as i water them from below, so there is no decorating even for houseplants.
    I guess I’m esthetically challenged.

    Reply
  15. At 88, I no longer garden. My gardening has always been rather utilitarian, so I never really got into landscaping ideas, although I enjoy landscaping when others do it.
    I DO have a lovely spread of African Violets in my dining room. I put the three small commercial plants into big pots and the spread of the violets is wonderful to see. But they sit in large clay pots with frozen food trays to hold the water as i water them from below, so there is no decorating even for houseplants.
    I guess I’m esthetically challenged.

    Reply
  16. I don’t think I could ever get used to no trees; they’re really important to me. From my window I can see a large, old oak tree, and I love seeing how it changes with the seasons. It hosts birds galore, including thrushes, blackbird, and owls, and grey squirrels.
    I didn’t know that shells were used as ballast; I’d always thought that the various shell buildings were made using prized shells! I’ve just checked one which I’ve actually seen, the Shell House at Sherborne, and that one is said to be “decorated with shells which are all believed to be native to the British Isles, with the majority from the Dorset coast.”.
    I was looking at a book about shell houses and grottos and was captivated by this: “It all started with the hurricane of 1987 when a fallen tree uncovered a long-lost eighteenth century grotto in my local park, Marble Hill Park in Twickenham.”

    Reply
  17. I don’t think I could ever get used to no trees; they’re really important to me. From my window I can see a large, old oak tree, and I love seeing how it changes with the seasons. It hosts birds galore, including thrushes, blackbird, and owls, and grey squirrels.
    I didn’t know that shells were used as ballast; I’d always thought that the various shell buildings were made using prized shells! I’ve just checked one which I’ve actually seen, the Shell House at Sherborne, and that one is said to be “decorated with shells which are all believed to be native to the British Isles, with the majority from the Dorset coast.”.
    I was looking at a book about shell houses and grottos and was captivated by this: “It all started with the hurricane of 1987 when a fallen tree uncovered a long-lost eighteenth century grotto in my local park, Marble Hill Park in Twickenham.”

    Reply
  18. I don’t think I could ever get used to no trees; they’re really important to me. From my window I can see a large, old oak tree, and I love seeing how it changes with the seasons. It hosts birds galore, including thrushes, blackbird, and owls, and grey squirrels.
    I didn’t know that shells were used as ballast; I’d always thought that the various shell buildings were made using prized shells! I’ve just checked one which I’ve actually seen, the Shell House at Sherborne, and that one is said to be “decorated with shells which are all believed to be native to the British Isles, with the majority from the Dorset coast.”.
    I was looking at a book about shell houses and grottos and was captivated by this: “It all started with the hurricane of 1987 when a fallen tree uncovered a long-lost eighteenth century grotto in my local park, Marble Hill Park in Twickenham.”

    Reply
  19. I don’t think I could ever get used to no trees; they’re really important to me. From my window I can see a large, old oak tree, and I love seeing how it changes with the seasons. It hosts birds galore, including thrushes, blackbird, and owls, and grey squirrels.
    I didn’t know that shells were used as ballast; I’d always thought that the various shell buildings were made using prized shells! I’ve just checked one which I’ve actually seen, the Shell House at Sherborne, and that one is said to be “decorated with shells which are all believed to be native to the British Isles, with the majority from the Dorset coast.”.
    I was looking at a book about shell houses and grottos and was captivated by this: “It all started with the hurricane of 1987 when a fallen tree uncovered a long-lost eighteenth century grotto in my local park, Marble Hill Park in Twickenham.”

    Reply
  20. I don’t think I could ever get used to no trees; they’re really important to me. From my window I can see a large, old oak tree, and I love seeing how it changes with the seasons. It hosts birds galore, including thrushes, blackbird, and owls, and grey squirrels.
    I didn’t know that shells were used as ballast; I’d always thought that the various shell buildings were made using prized shells! I’ve just checked one which I’ve actually seen, the Shell House at Sherborne, and that one is said to be “decorated with shells which are all believed to be native to the British Isles, with the majority from the Dorset coast.”.
    I was looking at a book about shell houses and grottos and was captivated by this: “It all started with the hurricane of 1987 when a fallen tree uncovered a long-lost eighteenth century grotto in my local park, Marble Hill Park in Twickenham.”

    Reply
  21. Lovely post, Nicola. I have a habit of collecting pretty or interesting rocks from my various travels. In fact I remember once, when I returned to Australia after being away for almost a year, and the customs man heaved my backpack up to be inspected, nd gowned “What’ve you got in here? Rocks?” “Yes, I said, and books.”

    Reply
  22. Lovely post, Nicola. I have a habit of collecting pretty or interesting rocks from my various travels. In fact I remember once, when I returned to Australia after being away for almost a year, and the customs man heaved my backpack up to be inspected, nd gowned “What’ve you got in here? Rocks?” “Yes, I said, and books.”

    Reply
  23. Lovely post, Nicola. I have a habit of collecting pretty or interesting rocks from my various travels. In fact I remember once, when I returned to Australia after being away for almost a year, and the customs man heaved my backpack up to be inspected, nd gowned “What’ve you got in here? Rocks?” “Yes, I said, and books.”

    Reply
  24. Lovely post, Nicola. I have a habit of collecting pretty or interesting rocks from my various travels. In fact I remember once, when I returned to Australia after being away for almost a year, and the customs man heaved my backpack up to be inspected, nd gowned “What’ve you got in here? Rocks?” “Yes, I said, and books.”

    Reply
  25. Lovely post, Nicola. I have a habit of collecting pretty or interesting rocks from my various travels. In fact I remember once, when I returned to Australia after being away for almost a year, and the customs man heaved my backpack up to be inspected, nd gowned “What’ve you got in here? Rocks?” “Yes, I said, and books.”

    Reply
  26. Hi HJ. I’m with you on feeling the lack if I see no trees. I find them very special.
    I expect in Dorset it would be easier to collect native shells for decoration. It hadn’t occurred to me that inland this would be a challenge and so you could but “foreign” shells from the slavers. Another bit of profiteering!
    That is indeed an intriguing line about discovering the long-lost grotto.

    Reply
  27. Hi HJ. I’m with you on feeling the lack if I see no trees. I find them very special.
    I expect in Dorset it would be easier to collect native shells for decoration. It hadn’t occurred to me that inland this would be a challenge and so you could but “foreign” shells from the slavers. Another bit of profiteering!
    That is indeed an intriguing line about discovering the long-lost grotto.

    Reply
  28. Hi HJ. I’m with you on feeling the lack if I see no trees. I find them very special.
    I expect in Dorset it would be easier to collect native shells for decoration. It hadn’t occurred to me that inland this would be a challenge and so you could but “foreign” shells from the slavers. Another bit of profiteering!
    That is indeed an intriguing line about discovering the long-lost grotto.

    Reply
  29. Hi HJ. I’m with you on feeling the lack if I see no trees. I find them very special.
    I expect in Dorset it would be easier to collect native shells for decoration. It hadn’t occurred to me that inland this would be a challenge and so you could but “foreign” shells from the slavers. Another bit of profiteering!
    That is indeed an intriguing line about discovering the long-lost grotto.

    Reply
  30. Hi HJ. I’m with you on feeling the lack if I see no trees. I find them very special.
    I expect in Dorset it would be easier to collect native shells for decoration. It hadn’t occurred to me that inland this would be a challenge and so you could but “foreign” shells from the slavers. Another bit of profiteering!
    That is indeed an intriguing line about discovering the long-lost grotto.

    Reply
  31. I love my garden. I’m not very experienced at it, I just like setting whatever I fancy and see how it goes. I also set vegetables and we’ve had a few successful years with this. However, so far this year it’s been a wash out. It’s been raining here since last October. The ground is just pure muck so alas no setting yet this year. It’s very frustrating as normally I would have the potatoes down by now and some nice flowers up. Depressing is the only word I can use right now to depict the sight of my garden from the kitchen window.

    Reply
  32. I love my garden. I’m not very experienced at it, I just like setting whatever I fancy and see how it goes. I also set vegetables and we’ve had a few successful years with this. However, so far this year it’s been a wash out. It’s been raining here since last October. The ground is just pure muck so alas no setting yet this year. It’s very frustrating as normally I would have the potatoes down by now and some nice flowers up. Depressing is the only word I can use right now to depict the sight of my garden from the kitchen window.

    Reply
  33. I love my garden. I’m not very experienced at it, I just like setting whatever I fancy and see how it goes. I also set vegetables and we’ve had a few successful years with this. However, so far this year it’s been a wash out. It’s been raining here since last October. The ground is just pure muck so alas no setting yet this year. It’s very frustrating as normally I would have the potatoes down by now and some nice flowers up. Depressing is the only word I can use right now to depict the sight of my garden from the kitchen window.

    Reply
  34. I love my garden. I’m not very experienced at it, I just like setting whatever I fancy and see how it goes. I also set vegetables and we’ve had a few successful years with this. However, so far this year it’s been a wash out. It’s been raining here since last October. The ground is just pure muck so alas no setting yet this year. It’s very frustrating as normally I would have the potatoes down by now and some nice flowers up. Depressing is the only word I can use right now to depict the sight of my garden from the kitchen window.

    Reply
  35. I love my garden. I’m not very experienced at it, I just like setting whatever I fancy and see how it goes. I also set vegetables and we’ve had a few successful years with this. However, so far this year it’s been a wash out. It’s been raining here since last October. The ground is just pure muck so alas no setting yet this year. It’s very frustrating as normally I would have the potatoes down by now and some nice flowers up. Depressing is the only word I can use right now to depict the sight of my garden from the kitchen window.

    Reply
  36. My rocks and shells are all displayed on a shelf indoors. Unfortunately I never wrote down where I got them from, and sometimes memory fails me(did that shell come from the Red Sea or the Caribbean or Pacific?).
    I just got through reading a book where a lost grotto that gets rediscovered plays a big part(It Takes a Scandal, Caroline Linden). It’s amazing how few generations it takes for something to be lost from memory.

    Reply
  37. My rocks and shells are all displayed on a shelf indoors. Unfortunately I never wrote down where I got them from, and sometimes memory fails me(did that shell come from the Red Sea or the Caribbean or Pacific?).
    I just got through reading a book where a lost grotto that gets rediscovered plays a big part(It Takes a Scandal, Caroline Linden). It’s amazing how few generations it takes for something to be lost from memory.

    Reply
  38. My rocks and shells are all displayed on a shelf indoors. Unfortunately I never wrote down where I got them from, and sometimes memory fails me(did that shell come from the Red Sea or the Caribbean or Pacific?).
    I just got through reading a book where a lost grotto that gets rediscovered plays a big part(It Takes a Scandal, Caroline Linden). It’s amazing how few generations it takes for something to be lost from memory.

    Reply
  39. My rocks and shells are all displayed on a shelf indoors. Unfortunately I never wrote down where I got them from, and sometimes memory fails me(did that shell come from the Red Sea or the Caribbean or Pacific?).
    I just got through reading a book where a lost grotto that gets rediscovered plays a big part(It Takes a Scandal, Caroline Linden). It’s amazing how few generations it takes for something to be lost from memory.

    Reply
  40. My rocks and shells are all displayed on a shelf indoors. Unfortunately I never wrote down where I got them from, and sometimes memory fails me(did that shell come from the Red Sea or the Caribbean or Pacific?).
    I just got through reading a book where a lost grotto that gets rediscovered plays a big part(It Takes a Scandal, Caroline Linden). It’s amazing how few generations it takes for something to be lost from memory.

    Reply
  41. I grew up until I was 12 in Indiana. Few shells there, although I did find a shell fossil. In spite of that, I was a shell collector as a kid, and my all-time favorite present was an abalone, filled with other shells. When we came to RI, I was outraged to see shell driveways (instead of gravel), made from discarded clam shells. What a desecration!

    Reply
  42. I grew up until I was 12 in Indiana. Few shells there, although I did find a shell fossil. In spite of that, I was a shell collector as a kid, and my all-time favorite present was an abalone, filled with other shells. When we came to RI, I was outraged to see shell driveways (instead of gravel), made from discarded clam shells. What a desecration!

    Reply
  43. I grew up until I was 12 in Indiana. Few shells there, although I did find a shell fossil. In spite of that, I was a shell collector as a kid, and my all-time favorite present was an abalone, filled with other shells. When we came to RI, I was outraged to see shell driveways (instead of gravel), made from discarded clam shells. What a desecration!

    Reply
  44. I grew up until I was 12 in Indiana. Few shells there, although I did find a shell fossil. In spite of that, I was a shell collector as a kid, and my all-time favorite present was an abalone, filled with other shells. When we came to RI, I was outraged to see shell driveways (instead of gravel), made from discarded clam shells. What a desecration!

    Reply
  45. I grew up until I was 12 in Indiana. Few shells there, although I did find a shell fossil. In spite of that, I was a shell collector as a kid, and my all-time favorite present was an abalone, filled with other shells. When we came to RI, I was outraged to see shell driveways (instead of gravel), made from discarded clam shells. What a desecration!

    Reply
  46. I’m so sorry to hear that Teresa. it can be so dispiriting for a gardener when everything gets washed away or turned to mud. it sounds as though you were really getting to grip with those vegetable too! That’s something I’ve never been able to do and wish I had. My grandfather had a wonderful kitchen garden.

    Reply
  47. I’m so sorry to hear that Teresa. it can be so dispiriting for a gardener when everything gets washed away or turned to mud. it sounds as though you were really getting to grip with those vegetable too! That’s something I’ve never been able to do and wish I had. My grandfather had a wonderful kitchen garden.

    Reply
  48. I’m so sorry to hear that Teresa. it can be so dispiriting for a gardener when everything gets washed away or turned to mud. it sounds as though you were really getting to grip with those vegetable too! That’s something I’ve never been able to do and wish I had. My grandfather had a wonderful kitchen garden.

    Reply
  49. I’m so sorry to hear that Teresa. it can be so dispiriting for a gardener when everything gets washed away or turned to mud. it sounds as though you were really getting to grip with those vegetable too! That’s something I’ve never been able to do and wish I had. My grandfather had a wonderful kitchen garden.

    Reply
  50. I’m so sorry to hear that Teresa. it can be so dispiriting for a gardener when everything gets washed away or turned to mud. it sounds as though you were really getting to grip with those vegetable too! That’s something I’ve never been able to do and wish I had. My grandfather had a wonderful kitchen garden.

    Reply
  51. That sounds an interesting book, Karin. I do love grottoes and shell houses. I suppose things get overgrown or fall down… Even so it is odd how they can be lost or forgotten so quickly.
    I used to collect British shells and I wish I had kept them. They were lovely. I like seeing shell collections.

    Reply
  52. That sounds an interesting book, Karin. I do love grottoes and shell houses. I suppose things get overgrown or fall down… Even so it is odd how they can be lost or forgotten so quickly.
    I used to collect British shells and I wish I had kept them. They were lovely. I like seeing shell collections.

    Reply
  53. That sounds an interesting book, Karin. I do love grottoes and shell houses. I suppose things get overgrown or fall down… Even so it is odd how they can be lost or forgotten so quickly.
    I used to collect British shells and I wish I had kept them. They were lovely. I like seeing shell collections.

    Reply
  54. That sounds an interesting book, Karin. I do love grottoes and shell houses. I suppose things get overgrown or fall down… Even so it is odd how they can be lost or forgotten so quickly.
    I used to collect British shells and I wish I had kept them. They were lovely. I like seeing shell collections.

    Reply
  55. That sounds an interesting book, Karin. I do love grottoes and shell houses. I suppose things get overgrown or fall down… Even so it is odd how they can be lost or forgotten so quickly.
    I used to collect British shells and I wish I had kept them. They were lovely. I like seeing shell collections.

    Reply
  56. Wow! A shell fossil would be a fabulous find! We have a few around here; people build them into walls sometimes. I had never heard of shell driveways and have learned something new!

    Reply
  57. Wow! A shell fossil would be a fabulous find! We have a few around here; people build them into walls sometimes. I had never heard of shell driveways and have learned something new!

    Reply
  58. Wow! A shell fossil would be a fabulous find! We have a few around here; people build them into walls sometimes. I had never heard of shell driveways and have learned something new!

    Reply
  59. Wow! A shell fossil would be a fabulous find! We have a few around here; people build them into walls sometimes. I had never heard of shell driveways and have learned something new!

    Reply
  60. Wow! A shell fossil would be a fabulous find! We have a few around here; people build them into walls sometimes. I had never heard of shell driveways and have learned something new!

    Reply

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