Of Schools and rules and uniforms…

Anne here, talking about schools and rules and uniforms.I've always worn a uniform to school, ever since my first year at school. It's standard practice here — and in the UK. That's me in the group on the right, the year we lived in Scotland. I was eight. (I'm in the middle of the second front row, next to the girl in the dark tunic.)Annescotland

A friend of mine has been discussing school rules with her young teen daughter. She (the daughter) recently received a detention because… well, this is how she answered the punishment sheet when asked, Which rule did you break? 
She answered: I was wearing two small parts of my hair out.

 Why did you choose to disregard the school rule?
I don't know, really.

We have school rules so the school community will operate smoothly.
Yes we do need rules but some of them are too strict. I don't think they should have the rule in the first place – how is wearing my hair in the way I want it going to disrupt my learning?

What changes will people around you start to notice if you abide by rules?
That my hair is off my face

Mum@school I had to laugh.  It seems very little has changed since I was a schoolgirl many years ago. Or indeed, since my mother was a schoolgirl — that's her on the left with the long plaits.

The two high schools I attended had the same very strict rules about hair and uniforms. Most schools in Australia — government and private —have uniforms, and one of the rules at my school — and that of my friend's daughter — was that if hair (for girls or boys) touched the collar, it was to be tied back. So all the girls had tiny pigtails, some really tiny — an inch or so long.
And we all thought it was ridiculous.

Uniform rules were also strict. I got busted once in year eight for being out of uniform — I was spending the night at my married sister's house and had gone straight from my suburban high school to the central city library where she worked and was helping out in the library until she finished work. They needed milk for coffee, so I ran around the corner to buy some and was caught — at 6.15 pm — in uniform but not wearing my hat and gloves. So the next week I had detention.

And when we moved to the city and I went to a different school, I used to meet my brother after school at the university across the road so we could drive home together and he used to tell me to "lose the lid" — ie take off my bottle green school hat, which was mega uncool. I did, but I kept a wary eye out in case I was caught.

At various times in various schools, there are debates about the wearing of school uniforms — occasionally about whether school uniform should be compulsory or not, but mostly the debate is about how strictly the uniform rules should be enforced. 

As a young teacher at inner suburban government high schools I was supposed to discipline  students for not wearing full uniform, sending boys home for not wearing a tie in summer, and girls for wearing white socks with their summer uniform instead of the official  brown ones. I never could see the point in sending children home because of their socks or ties.

It took me a while, as a young teacher, to understand that strict uniform rules were not so much valuable in themselves and were not even really about the uniform, but were more a symbol of school discipline. If uniform rules were strictly enforced, the school had a reputation as "a good school."  But it still went against the grain to me to be spending so much time fussing over petty rules and regulations.

Eton1937Uniforms have long been a way of identifying the students who go to a particular school.  Here are schoolboys heading off by train to attend Eton school in England in 1937. Very much being branded as young gentlemen.

And these days here and in the UK and in many parts of the world, a school uniform is standard wear for all school children. I well remember seeing the kids in Malaysia emerging from poor kampongs (villages) with limited facilities yet proudly dressed for school in gleaming, beautifully pressed white uniforms. And I love the look of Japanese schoolchildren in their cute sailor suits. Japaneseuniforms

So I must admit, it was rather a nice surprise to see that some things hadn't changed all that much, that my friend's young daughter is being disciplined for the exact same sort of infringements as I was as a girl — and for that matter, my mother — that no matter how much we think the world has changed, some things haven't — not the schools who enforce the rules, nor the kids who mutter about them. 

What about you? Did you ever wear a uniform to school? Ever get busted? Do your kids wear uniforms? Do you like the idea of school uniforms or not? And what rules did you break when you were at school?

 

210 thoughts on “Of Schools and rules and uniforms…”

  1. Oh, sure, I wore a uniform all the way through grammar school and high school. Catholic schools were like that then.
    Yes, I got yelled at once because I wasn’t wearing the standard uniform white blouse. The uniform blouse was expensive and we didn’t have much money. Mine had literally shredded from multiple washings. So, one day I wore a different white blouse. This one was nylon (nylon was great back then because it didn’t wear out), and it had a little bit of fake lace decoration on the short sleeves. After I got yelled at, I went back to the shredding uniform blouse. When that blouse finally died, I wore another, but plainer, non-standard blouse.

    Reply
  2. Oh, sure, I wore a uniform all the way through grammar school and high school. Catholic schools were like that then.
    Yes, I got yelled at once because I wasn’t wearing the standard uniform white blouse. The uniform blouse was expensive and we didn’t have much money. Mine had literally shredded from multiple washings. So, one day I wore a different white blouse. This one was nylon (nylon was great back then because it didn’t wear out), and it had a little bit of fake lace decoration on the short sleeves. After I got yelled at, I went back to the shredding uniform blouse. When that blouse finally died, I wore another, but plainer, non-standard blouse.

    Reply
  3. Oh, sure, I wore a uniform all the way through grammar school and high school. Catholic schools were like that then.
    Yes, I got yelled at once because I wasn’t wearing the standard uniform white blouse. The uniform blouse was expensive and we didn’t have much money. Mine had literally shredded from multiple washings. So, one day I wore a different white blouse. This one was nylon (nylon was great back then because it didn’t wear out), and it had a little bit of fake lace decoration on the short sleeves. After I got yelled at, I went back to the shredding uniform blouse. When that blouse finally died, I wore another, but plainer, non-standard blouse.

    Reply
  4. Oh, sure, I wore a uniform all the way through grammar school and high school. Catholic schools were like that then.
    Yes, I got yelled at once because I wasn’t wearing the standard uniform white blouse. The uniform blouse was expensive and we didn’t have much money. Mine had literally shredded from multiple washings. So, one day I wore a different white blouse. This one was nylon (nylon was great back then because it didn’t wear out), and it had a little bit of fake lace decoration on the short sleeves. After I got yelled at, I went back to the shredding uniform blouse. When that blouse finally died, I wore another, but plainer, non-standard blouse.

    Reply
  5. Oh, sure, I wore a uniform all the way through grammar school and high school. Catholic schools were like that then.
    Yes, I got yelled at once because I wasn’t wearing the standard uniform white blouse. The uniform blouse was expensive and we didn’t have much money. Mine had literally shredded from multiple washings. So, one day I wore a different white blouse. This one was nylon (nylon was great back then because it didn’t wear out), and it had a little bit of fake lace decoration on the short sleeves. After I got yelled at, I went back to the shredding uniform blouse. When that blouse finally died, I wore another, but plainer, non-standard blouse.

    Reply
  6. Anne, this is a fascinating look at one of those below-the-radar differences in culture. Having been raised in the American public school system, which pretty much always means no uniforms, I would have trouble enforcing rules about socks and hair touching the collar. Yet I do understand the value of teaching discipline, and how that helps with education. There are some American public schools that have gone to uniforms, usually one is difficult neighborhoods where making it clear that the school has standards is a plus.
    The parochial schools have uniforms, too, and these schools also tend to be known as disciplined and good solid teaching.
    I can definitely see the case for discipline and strong teaching–but detention for not wearing hat and gloves at 6:30 pm?????? Hard to take that part seriously!

    Reply
  7. Anne, this is a fascinating look at one of those below-the-radar differences in culture. Having been raised in the American public school system, which pretty much always means no uniforms, I would have trouble enforcing rules about socks and hair touching the collar. Yet I do understand the value of teaching discipline, and how that helps with education. There are some American public schools that have gone to uniforms, usually one is difficult neighborhoods where making it clear that the school has standards is a plus.
    The parochial schools have uniforms, too, and these schools also tend to be known as disciplined and good solid teaching.
    I can definitely see the case for discipline and strong teaching–but detention for not wearing hat and gloves at 6:30 pm?????? Hard to take that part seriously!

    Reply
  8. Anne, this is a fascinating look at one of those below-the-radar differences in culture. Having been raised in the American public school system, which pretty much always means no uniforms, I would have trouble enforcing rules about socks and hair touching the collar. Yet I do understand the value of teaching discipline, and how that helps with education. There are some American public schools that have gone to uniforms, usually one is difficult neighborhoods where making it clear that the school has standards is a plus.
    The parochial schools have uniforms, too, and these schools also tend to be known as disciplined and good solid teaching.
    I can definitely see the case for discipline and strong teaching–but detention for not wearing hat and gloves at 6:30 pm?????? Hard to take that part seriously!

    Reply
  9. Anne, this is a fascinating look at one of those below-the-radar differences in culture. Having been raised in the American public school system, which pretty much always means no uniforms, I would have trouble enforcing rules about socks and hair touching the collar. Yet I do understand the value of teaching discipline, and how that helps with education. There are some American public schools that have gone to uniforms, usually one is difficult neighborhoods where making it clear that the school has standards is a plus.
    The parochial schools have uniforms, too, and these schools also tend to be known as disciplined and good solid teaching.
    I can definitely see the case for discipline and strong teaching–but detention for not wearing hat and gloves at 6:30 pm?????? Hard to take that part seriously!

    Reply
  10. Anne, this is a fascinating look at one of those below-the-radar differences in culture. Having been raised in the American public school system, which pretty much always means no uniforms, I would have trouble enforcing rules about socks and hair touching the collar. Yet I do understand the value of teaching discipline, and how that helps with education. There are some American public schools that have gone to uniforms, usually one is difficult neighborhoods where making it clear that the school has standards is a plus.
    The parochial schools have uniforms, too, and these schools also tend to be known as disciplined and good solid teaching.
    I can definitely see the case for discipline and strong teaching–but detention for not wearing hat and gloves at 6:30 pm?????? Hard to take that part seriously!

    Reply
  11. Oh, Linda, yes, I can just see that kind of rigidity in the variations of the blouse. Lace? You baaad girl! 😉
    In general I approve of uniforms but the pettiness of their rigid enforcement… sigh.

    Reply
  12. Oh, Linda, yes, I can just see that kind of rigidity in the variations of the blouse. Lace? You baaad girl! 😉
    In general I approve of uniforms but the pettiness of their rigid enforcement… sigh.

    Reply
  13. Oh, Linda, yes, I can just see that kind of rigidity in the variations of the blouse. Lace? You baaad girl! 😉
    In general I approve of uniforms but the pettiness of their rigid enforcement… sigh.

    Reply
  14. Oh, Linda, yes, I can just see that kind of rigidity in the variations of the blouse. Lace? You baaad girl! 😉
    In general I approve of uniforms but the pettiness of their rigid enforcement… sigh.

    Reply
  15. Oh, Linda, yes, I can just see that kind of rigidity in the variations of the blouse. Lace? You baaad girl! 😉
    In general I approve of uniforms but the pettiness of their rigid enforcement… sigh.

    Reply
  16. Mary Jo, as it was explained to me that time, the uniform was the uniform, not to be worn partially, but to be worn complete or not at all.
    And as I said, uniforms are symbolic of discipline. A school that can be bothered chasing up all kinds of petty uniform infractions obviously isn’t going to turn a blind eye to bigger, more important things.
    And you know, in one way it makes things so much simpler — no worrying about what to wear every day.

    Reply
  17. Mary Jo, as it was explained to me that time, the uniform was the uniform, not to be worn partially, but to be worn complete or not at all.
    And as I said, uniforms are symbolic of discipline. A school that can be bothered chasing up all kinds of petty uniform infractions obviously isn’t going to turn a blind eye to bigger, more important things.
    And you know, in one way it makes things so much simpler — no worrying about what to wear every day.

    Reply
  18. Mary Jo, as it was explained to me that time, the uniform was the uniform, not to be worn partially, but to be worn complete or not at all.
    And as I said, uniforms are symbolic of discipline. A school that can be bothered chasing up all kinds of petty uniform infractions obviously isn’t going to turn a blind eye to bigger, more important things.
    And you know, in one way it makes things so much simpler — no worrying about what to wear every day.

    Reply
  19. Mary Jo, as it was explained to me that time, the uniform was the uniform, not to be worn partially, but to be worn complete or not at all.
    And as I said, uniforms are symbolic of discipline. A school that can be bothered chasing up all kinds of petty uniform infractions obviously isn’t going to turn a blind eye to bigger, more important things.
    And you know, in one way it makes things so much simpler — no worrying about what to wear every day.

    Reply
  20. Mary Jo, as it was explained to me that time, the uniform was the uniform, not to be worn partially, but to be worn complete or not at all.
    And as I said, uniforms are symbolic of discipline. A school that can be bothered chasing up all kinds of petty uniform infractions obviously isn’t going to turn a blind eye to bigger, more important things.
    And you know, in one way it makes things so much simpler — no worrying about what to wear every day.

    Reply
  21. No uniforms, as I went to public school, but I do remember that the dress code was strictly enforced for kids in the remedial and regular tracks, but not for those of us in the gifted track. Our teachers simply didn’t care what we wore. They treated it more like we were in college. My purple mohawk would have got me sent to the office every day if I hadn’t been in the gifted track. My much younger siblings went to a public school that had a uniform policy, but it had to allow parents to opt out. My parents did for my sister who objected to being forced to dress like a preppie, but not for my brother didn’t care at all.
    My favorite rule was “no clothing which may be used as a weapon”. I know they meant spiked cuffs and chain belts (it was the 80s), but I made a very good case for bras being useful as a garrote.

    Reply
  22. No uniforms, as I went to public school, but I do remember that the dress code was strictly enforced for kids in the remedial and regular tracks, but not for those of us in the gifted track. Our teachers simply didn’t care what we wore. They treated it more like we were in college. My purple mohawk would have got me sent to the office every day if I hadn’t been in the gifted track. My much younger siblings went to a public school that had a uniform policy, but it had to allow parents to opt out. My parents did for my sister who objected to being forced to dress like a preppie, but not for my brother didn’t care at all.
    My favorite rule was “no clothing which may be used as a weapon”. I know they meant spiked cuffs and chain belts (it was the 80s), but I made a very good case for bras being useful as a garrote.

    Reply
  23. No uniforms, as I went to public school, but I do remember that the dress code was strictly enforced for kids in the remedial and regular tracks, but not for those of us in the gifted track. Our teachers simply didn’t care what we wore. They treated it more like we were in college. My purple mohawk would have got me sent to the office every day if I hadn’t been in the gifted track. My much younger siblings went to a public school that had a uniform policy, but it had to allow parents to opt out. My parents did for my sister who objected to being forced to dress like a preppie, but not for my brother didn’t care at all.
    My favorite rule was “no clothing which may be used as a weapon”. I know they meant spiked cuffs and chain belts (it was the 80s), but I made a very good case for bras being useful as a garrote.

    Reply
  24. No uniforms, as I went to public school, but I do remember that the dress code was strictly enforced for kids in the remedial and regular tracks, but not for those of us in the gifted track. Our teachers simply didn’t care what we wore. They treated it more like we were in college. My purple mohawk would have got me sent to the office every day if I hadn’t been in the gifted track. My much younger siblings went to a public school that had a uniform policy, but it had to allow parents to opt out. My parents did for my sister who objected to being forced to dress like a preppie, but not for my brother didn’t care at all.
    My favorite rule was “no clothing which may be used as a weapon”. I know they meant spiked cuffs and chain belts (it was the 80s), but I made a very good case for bras being useful as a garrote.

    Reply
  25. No uniforms, as I went to public school, but I do remember that the dress code was strictly enforced for kids in the remedial and regular tracks, but not for those of us in the gifted track. Our teachers simply didn’t care what we wore. They treated it more like we were in college. My purple mohawk would have got me sent to the office every day if I hadn’t been in the gifted track. My much younger siblings went to a public school that had a uniform policy, but it had to allow parents to opt out. My parents did for my sister who objected to being forced to dress like a preppie, but not for my brother didn’t care at all.
    My favorite rule was “no clothing which may be used as a weapon”. I know they meant spiked cuffs and chain belts (it was the 80s), but I made a very good case for bras being useful as a garrote.

    Reply
  26. I too went to public school so no uniform for me. But, I truly believe uniforms are the right thing to do be it public or private. It levels the playing field. No one stands out as rich or poor (and yes, I am well aware that gossip abounds) or of fashionista and color blindness, but with uniforms, the kids aren’t focusing on who can outdo who.
    I had one daughter in a private school and one in a public school and by far, the private school attitude was so much better than the petty bickering and clothes stealing/ruining that went on in the public school.

    Reply
  27. I too went to public school so no uniform for me. But, I truly believe uniforms are the right thing to do be it public or private. It levels the playing field. No one stands out as rich or poor (and yes, I am well aware that gossip abounds) or of fashionista and color blindness, but with uniforms, the kids aren’t focusing on who can outdo who.
    I had one daughter in a private school and one in a public school and by far, the private school attitude was so much better than the petty bickering and clothes stealing/ruining that went on in the public school.

    Reply
  28. I too went to public school so no uniform for me. But, I truly believe uniforms are the right thing to do be it public or private. It levels the playing field. No one stands out as rich or poor (and yes, I am well aware that gossip abounds) or of fashionista and color blindness, but with uniforms, the kids aren’t focusing on who can outdo who.
    I had one daughter in a private school and one in a public school and by far, the private school attitude was so much better than the petty bickering and clothes stealing/ruining that went on in the public school.

    Reply
  29. I too went to public school so no uniform for me. But, I truly believe uniforms are the right thing to do be it public or private. It levels the playing field. No one stands out as rich or poor (and yes, I am well aware that gossip abounds) or of fashionista and color blindness, but with uniforms, the kids aren’t focusing on who can outdo who.
    I had one daughter in a private school and one in a public school and by far, the private school attitude was so much better than the petty bickering and clothes stealing/ruining that went on in the public school.

    Reply
  30. I too went to public school so no uniform for me. But, I truly believe uniforms are the right thing to do be it public or private. It levels the playing field. No one stands out as rich or poor (and yes, I am well aware that gossip abounds) or of fashionista and color blindness, but with uniforms, the kids aren’t focusing on who can outdo who.
    I had one daughter in a private school and one in a public school and by far, the private school attitude was so much better than the petty bickering and clothes stealing/ruining that went on in the public school.

    Reply
  31. I went to public school in the US so no uniform, but there were rules. One of those rules was that girls’ skirts had to touch the ground if they knelt. My sister got sent home because her dress touched the ground but it had a one inch slit on the side that did not.
    As a corollary, I always used to wonder why Catholic girls’ schools had uniforms with such short skirts. Only years later did I find out that the skirts were generally knee-length but that the girls would roll them up at the waist on their way to/from school, which is why when I saw them the skirts were always mid- to upper-thigh.

    Reply
  32. I went to public school in the US so no uniform, but there were rules. One of those rules was that girls’ skirts had to touch the ground if they knelt. My sister got sent home because her dress touched the ground but it had a one inch slit on the side that did not.
    As a corollary, I always used to wonder why Catholic girls’ schools had uniforms with such short skirts. Only years later did I find out that the skirts were generally knee-length but that the girls would roll them up at the waist on their way to/from school, which is why when I saw them the skirts were always mid- to upper-thigh.

    Reply
  33. I went to public school in the US so no uniform, but there were rules. One of those rules was that girls’ skirts had to touch the ground if they knelt. My sister got sent home because her dress touched the ground but it had a one inch slit on the side that did not.
    As a corollary, I always used to wonder why Catholic girls’ schools had uniforms with such short skirts. Only years later did I find out that the skirts were generally knee-length but that the girls would roll them up at the waist on their way to/from school, which is why when I saw them the skirts were always mid- to upper-thigh.

    Reply
  34. I went to public school in the US so no uniform, but there were rules. One of those rules was that girls’ skirts had to touch the ground if they knelt. My sister got sent home because her dress touched the ground but it had a one inch slit on the side that did not.
    As a corollary, I always used to wonder why Catholic girls’ schools had uniforms with such short skirts. Only years later did I find out that the skirts were generally knee-length but that the girls would roll them up at the waist on their way to/from school, which is why when I saw them the skirts were always mid- to upper-thigh.

    Reply
  35. I went to public school in the US so no uniform, but there were rules. One of those rules was that girls’ skirts had to touch the ground if they knelt. My sister got sent home because her dress touched the ground but it had a one inch slit on the side that did not.
    As a corollary, I always used to wonder why Catholic girls’ schools had uniforms with such short skirts. Only years later did I find out that the skirts were generally knee-length but that the girls would roll them up at the waist on their way to/from school, which is why when I saw them the skirts were always mid- to upper-thigh.

    Reply
  36. I went to a public school in a small South Australian town in the 70’s and 80’s, and we had the grey pinafore uniform, worn with white shirt, navy blue tie and blazer. Long white socks and black shoes.
    In summer girls were allowed to wear shorter navy blue skirts and white blouses. When we reached year 12, as prefects, we had a sudden fling with wide straw hats with navy ribbon.
    The summer skirts were short short and you had to wear black PE knickers if you wanted to be ‘in’. Never could understand how they let us get away with that!

    Reply
  37. I went to a public school in a small South Australian town in the 70’s and 80’s, and we had the grey pinafore uniform, worn with white shirt, navy blue tie and blazer. Long white socks and black shoes.
    In summer girls were allowed to wear shorter navy blue skirts and white blouses. When we reached year 12, as prefects, we had a sudden fling with wide straw hats with navy ribbon.
    The summer skirts were short short and you had to wear black PE knickers if you wanted to be ‘in’. Never could understand how they let us get away with that!

    Reply
  38. I went to a public school in a small South Australian town in the 70’s and 80’s, and we had the grey pinafore uniform, worn with white shirt, navy blue tie and blazer. Long white socks and black shoes.
    In summer girls were allowed to wear shorter navy blue skirts and white blouses. When we reached year 12, as prefects, we had a sudden fling with wide straw hats with navy ribbon.
    The summer skirts were short short and you had to wear black PE knickers if you wanted to be ‘in’. Never could understand how they let us get away with that!

    Reply
  39. I went to a public school in a small South Australian town in the 70’s and 80’s, and we had the grey pinafore uniform, worn with white shirt, navy blue tie and blazer. Long white socks and black shoes.
    In summer girls were allowed to wear shorter navy blue skirts and white blouses. When we reached year 12, as prefects, we had a sudden fling with wide straw hats with navy ribbon.
    The summer skirts were short short and you had to wear black PE knickers if you wanted to be ‘in’. Never could understand how they let us get away with that!

    Reply
  40. I went to a public school in a small South Australian town in the 70’s and 80’s, and we had the grey pinafore uniform, worn with white shirt, navy blue tie and blazer. Long white socks and black shoes.
    In summer girls were allowed to wear shorter navy blue skirts and white blouses. When we reached year 12, as prefects, we had a sudden fling with wide straw hats with navy ribbon.
    The summer skirts were short short and you had to wear black PE knickers if you wanted to be ‘in’. Never could understand how they let us get away with that!

    Reply
  41. @Theo: I had plenty of friends who went to schools with uniform policies and IME the uniforms did nothing to level the playing field. It merely shifted it to shoes, jewelry, backpacks, etc. It was still crystal clear who the rich kids were.

    Reply
  42. @Theo: I had plenty of friends who went to schools with uniform policies and IME the uniforms did nothing to level the playing field. It merely shifted it to shoes, jewelry, backpacks, etc. It was still crystal clear who the rich kids were.

    Reply
  43. @Theo: I had plenty of friends who went to schools with uniform policies and IME the uniforms did nothing to level the playing field. It merely shifted it to shoes, jewelry, backpacks, etc. It was still crystal clear who the rich kids were.

    Reply
  44. @Theo: I had plenty of friends who went to schools with uniform policies and IME the uniforms did nothing to level the playing field. It merely shifted it to shoes, jewelry, backpacks, etc. It was still crystal clear who the rich kids were.

    Reply
  45. @Theo: I had plenty of friends who went to schools with uniform policies and IME the uniforms did nothing to level the playing field. It merely shifted it to shoes, jewelry, backpacks, etc. It was still crystal clear who the rich kids were.

    Reply
  46. Isobel, I’m chuckling here. I suspect you were a handful at school. I think it makes for problems when the uniform policy is differently applied to different streams or types of students – unfair, IMO. The whole idea is that it should apply to one and all. At my high school, uniform became optional only in the final year.

    Reply
  47. Isobel, I’m chuckling here. I suspect you were a handful at school. I think it makes for problems when the uniform policy is differently applied to different streams or types of students – unfair, IMO. The whole idea is that it should apply to one and all. At my high school, uniform became optional only in the final year.

    Reply
  48. Isobel, I’m chuckling here. I suspect you were a handful at school. I think it makes for problems when the uniform policy is differently applied to different streams or types of students – unfair, IMO. The whole idea is that it should apply to one and all. At my high school, uniform became optional only in the final year.

    Reply
  49. Isobel, I’m chuckling here. I suspect you were a handful at school. I think it makes for problems when the uniform policy is differently applied to different streams or types of students – unfair, IMO. The whole idea is that it should apply to one and all. At my high school, uniform became optional only in the final year.

    Reply
  50. Isobel, I’m chuckling here. I suspect you were a handful at school. I think it makes for problems when the uniform policy is differently applied to different streams or types of students – unfair, IMO. The whole idea is that it should apply to one and all. At my high school, uniform became optional only in the final year.

    Reply
  51. Theo, somehow kids can always tweak the wearing of uniforms to reflect their own particular style, but it becomes very subtle. Some girls would roll up their skirts to make them really short, others would wear their ties loosely knotted and worn more like a bandana.
    And I think uniform does level the playing field between rich and poor somewhat, though not completely. The difference just becomes more subtle. But without a regular daily fashion parade kids soon focus less on what they’re wearing, which I think is a good thing.

    Reply
  52. Theo, somehow kids can always tweak the wearing of uniforms to reflect their own particular style, but it becomes very subtle. Some girls would roll up their skirts to make them really short, others would wear their ties loosely knotted and worn more like a bandana.
    And I think uniform does level the playing field between rich and poor somewhat, though not completely. The difference just becomes more subtle. But without a regular daily fashion parade kids soon focus less on what they’re wearing, which I think is a good thing.

    Reply
  53. Theo, somehow kids can always tweak the wearing of uniforms to reflect their own particular style, but it becomes very subtle. Some girls would roll up their skirts to make them really short, others would wear their ties loosely knotted and worn more like a bandana.
    And I think uniform does level the playing field between rich and poor somewhat, though not completely. The difference just becomes more subtle. But without a regular daily fashion parade kids soon focus less on what they’re wearing, which I think is a good thing.

    Reply
  54. Theo, somehow kids can always tweak the wearing of uniforms to reflect their own particular style, but it becomes very subtle. Some girls would roll up their skirts to make them really short, others would wear their ties loosely knotted and worn more like a bandana.
    And I think uniform does level the playing field between rich and poor somewhat, though not completely. The difference just becomes more subtle. But without a regular daily fashion parade kids soon focus less on what they’re wearing, which I think is a good thing.

    Reply
  55. Theo, somehow kids can always tweak the wearing of uniforms to reflect their own particular style, but it becomes very subtle. Some girls would roll up their skirts to make them really short, others would wear their ties loosely knotted and worn more like a bandana.
    And I think uniform does level the playing field between rich and poor somewhat, though not completely. The difference just becomes more subtle. But without a regular daily fashion parade kids soon focus less on what they’re wearing, which I think is a good thing.

    Reply
  56. Oh, Susan, I remember those kneel-and-measure inspections. And we used to roll the waistband of our skirts up to make them shorter, too.
    At one school the gloves were supposed to be beige, and yet they weren’t manufactured in that color. So along with the list of items of uniform, the school issued instructions for dyeing the gloves— with coffee. I remember my mother’s bemusement as we plunged a brand-new pair of white gloves into a bowl of coffee.
    But it came in useful eventually — I used it in Tallie’s Knight when the heroine concealed her stained white gloves by dying them with coffee.. 😉

    Reply
  57. Oh, Susan, I remember those kneel-and-measure inspections. And we used to roll the waistband of our skirts up to make them shorter, too.
    At one school the gloves were supposed to be beige, and yet they weren’t manufactured in that color. So along with the list of items of uniform, the school issued instructions for dyeing the gloves— with coffee. I remember my mother’s bemusement as we plunged a brand-new pair of white gloves into a bowl of coffee.
    But it came in useful eventually — I used it in Tallie’s Knight when the heroine concealed her stained white gloves by dying them with coffee.. 😉

    Reply
  58. Oh, Susan, I remember those kneel-and-measure inspections. And we used to roll the waistband of our skirts up to make them shorter, too.
    At one school the gloves were supposed to be beige, and yet they weren’t manufactured in that color. So along with the list of items of uniform, the school issued instructions for dyeing the gloves— with coffee. I remember my mother’s bemusement as we plunged a brand-new pair of white gloves into a bowl of coffee.
    But it came in useful eventually — I used it in Tallie’s Knight when the heroine concealed her stained white gloves by dying them with coffee.. 😉

    Reply
  59. Oh, Susan, I remember those kneel-and-measure inspections. And we used to roll the waistband of our skirts up to make them shorter, too.
    At one school the gloves were supposed to be beige, and yet they weren’t manufactured in that color. So along with the list of items of uniform, the school issued instructions for dyeing the gloves— with coffee. I remember my mother’s bemusement as we plunged a brand-new pair of white gloves into a bowl of coffee.
    But it came in useful eventually — I used it in Tallie’s Knight when the heroine concealed her stained white gloves by dying them with coffee.. 😉

    Reply
  60. Oh, Susan, I remember those kneel-and-measure inspections. And we used to roll the waistband of our skirts up to make them shorter, too.
    At one school the gloves were supposed to be beige, and yet they weren’t manufactured in that color. So along with the list of items of uniform, the school issued instructions for dyeing the gloves— with coffee. I remember my mother’s bemusement as we plunged a brand-new pair of white gloves into a bowl of coffee.
    But it came in useful eventually — I used it in Tallie’s Knight when the heroine concealed her stained white gloves by dying them with coffee.. 😉

    Reply
  61. Interesting, Tricia about the black PE knickers. The girls at a local high school often wear black lycra PE shorts under their short summer uniforms — you can see the legs sometimes, at hem length.
    We had to wear bottle green cottontails (big cotton knickers for US people) and we hated them. I remember years ago, finding my mother using a pair as a duster. LOL

    Reply
  62. Interesting, Tricia about the black PE knickers. The girls at a local high school often wear black lycra PE shorts under their short summer uniforms — you can see the legs sometimes, at hem length.
    We had to wear bottle green cottontails (big cotton knickers for US people) and we hated them. I remember years ago, finding my mother using a pair as a duster. LOL

    Reply
  63. Interesting, Tricia about the black PE knickers. The girls at a local high school often wear black lycra PE shorts under their short summer uniforms — you can see the legs sometimes, at hem length.
    We had to wear bottle green cottontails (big cotton knickers for US people) and we hated them. I remember years ago, finding my mother using a pair as a duster. LOL

    Reply
  64. Interesting, Tricia about the black PE knickers. The girls at a local high school often wear black lycra PE shorts under their short summer uniforms — you can see the legs sometimes, at hem length.
    We had to wear bottle green cottontails (big cotton knickers for US people) and we hated them. I remember years ago, finding my mother using a pair as a duster. LOL

    Reply
  65. Interesting, Tricia about the black PE knickers. The girls at a local high school often wear black lycra PE shorts under their short summer uniforms — you can see the legs sometimes, at hem length.
    We had to wear bottle green cottontails (big cotton knickers for US people) and we hated them. I remember years ago, finding my mother using a pair as a duster. LOL

    Reply
  66. They had approved shoes, slacks, skirts, shirts and sweaters. Even their backpacks had to be regulation size and color. Everyone wore the same thing except maybe for their underwear and socks. So I suppose it depends on the overall policy but I will always say that uniforms are better than non-uniforms.

    Reply
  67. They had approved shoes, slacks, skirts, shirts and sweaters. Even their backpacks had to be regulation size and color. Everyone wore the same thing except maybe for their underwear and socks. So I suppose it depends on the overall policy but I will always say that uniforms are better than non-uniforms.

    Reply
  68. They had approved shoes, slacks, skirts, shirts and sweaters. Even their backpacks had to be regulation size and color. Everyone wore the same thing except maybe for their underwear and socks. So I suppose it depends on the overall policy but I will always say that uniforms are better than non-uniforms.

    Reply
  69. They had approved shoes, slacks, skirts, shirts and sweaters. Even their backpacks had to be regulation size and color. Everyone wore the same thing except maybe for their underwear and socks. So I suppose it depends on the overall policy but I will always say that uniforms are better than non-uniforms.

    Reply
  70. They had approved shoes, slacks, skirts, shirts and sweaters. Even their backpacks had to be regulation size and color. Everyone wore the same thing except maybe for their underwear and socks. So I suppose it depends on the overall policy but I will always say that uniforms are better than non-uniforms.

    Reply
  71. Isobel, I do think even with uniform you can still tell who the rich kids are, but I also believe it makes it less something to focus on that if whatever you wear is different every day.
    But then no school I’ve been to or worked in focused on rich or poor as a basic for friendship or coolness — it’s always personality, which I think is a good thing.

    Reply
  72. Isobel, I do think even with uniform you can still tell who the rich kids are, but I also believe it makes it less something to focus on that if whatever you wear is different every day.
    But then no school I’ve been to or worked in focused on rich or poor as a basic for friendship or coolness — it’s always personality, which I think is a good thing.

    Reply
  73. Isobel, I do think even with uniform you can still tell who the rich kids are, but I also believe it makes it less something to focus on that if whatever you wear is different every day.
    But then no school I’ve been to or worked in focused on rich or poor as a basic for friendship or coolness — it’s always personality, which I think is a good thing.

    Reply
  74. Isobel, I do think even with uniform you can still tell who the rich kids are, but I also believe it makes it less something to focus on that if whatever you wear is different every day.
    But then no school I’ve been to or worked in focused on rich or poor as a basic for friendship or coolness — it’s always personality, which I think is a good thing.

    Reply
  75. Isobel, I do think even with uniform you can still tell who the rich kids are, but I also believe it makes it less something to focus on that if whatever you wear is different every day.
    But then no school I’ve been to or worked in focused on rich or poor as a basic for friendship or coolness — it’s always personality, which I think is a good thing.

    Reply
  76. Great post Anne. I wore school uniform and my children do too. I think it is easier than having to find other things to wear. I laughed at Tricia’s post because I remembered we were supposed to wear the big navy school knickers but I don’t think it was enforced by then Carol x

    Reply
  77. Great post Anne. I wore school uniform and my children do too. I think it is easier than having to find other things to wear. I laughed at Tricia’s post because I remembered we were supposed to wear the big navy school knickers but I don’t think it was enforced by then Carol x

    Reply
  78. Great post Anne. I wore school uniform and my children do too. I think it is easier than having to find other things to wear. I laughed at Tricia’s post because I remembered we were supposed to wear the big navy school knickers but I don’t think it was enforced by then Carol x

    Reply
  79. Great post Anne. I wore school uniform and my children do too. I think it is easier than having to find other things to wear. I laughed at Tricia’s post because I remembered we were supposed to wear the big navy school knickers but I don’t think it was enforced by then Carol x

    Reply
  80. Great post Anne. I wore school uniform and my children do too. I think it is easier than having to find other things to wear. I laughed at Tricia’s post because I remembered we were supposed to wear the big navy school knickers but I don’t think it was enforced by then Carol x

    Reply
  81. Carol, I only remember a few knicker inspections — I suspect it was a bit embarrassing for most of the teachers — only the old battleaxes used to do it. Some kids kept a spare pair of the bottle green big knickers in their bags or lockers and put them on over their other undies before the inspection.

    Reply
  82. Carol, I only remember a few knicker inspections — I suspect it was a bit embarrassing for most of the teachers — only the old battleaxes used to do it. Some kids kept a spare pair of the bottle green big knickers in their bags or lockers and put them on over their other undies before the inspection.

    Reply
  83. Carol, I only remember a few knicker inspections — I suspect it was a bit embarrassing for most of the teachers — only the old battleaxes used to do it. Some kids kept a spare pair of the bottle green big knickers in their bags or lockers and put them on over their other undies before the inspection.

    Reply
  84. Carol, I only remember a few knicker inspections — I suspect it was a bit embarrassing for most of the teachers — only the old battleaxes used to do it. Some kids kept a spare pair of the bottle green big knickers in their bags or lockers and put them on over their other undies before the inspection.

    Reply
  85. Carol, I only remember a few knicker inspections — I suspect it was a bit embarrassing for most of the teachers — only the old battleaxes used to do it. Some kids kept a spare pair of the bottle green big knickers in their bags or lockers and put them on over their other undies before the inspection.

    Reply
  86. Oddly enough, a friend and I were commenting on having worn uniforms throughout our school years. No problem with uniforms, per se, but to upbraid a child for being out of uniform without asking why is senseless. Uniforms are indeed expensive, but, from what friends with school age children tell me, so are civilian clothes.

    Reply
  87. Oddly enough, a friend and I were commenting on having worn uniforms throughout our school years. No problem with uniforms, per se, but to upbraid a child for being out of uniform without asking why is senseless. Uniforms are indeed expensive, but, from what friends with school age children tell me, so are civilian clothes.

    Reply
  88. Oddly enough, a friend and I were commenting on having worn uniforms throughout our school years. No problem with uniforms, per se, but to upbraid a child for being out of uniform without asking why is senseless. Uniforms are indeed expensive, but, from what friends with school age children tell me, so are civilian clothes.

    Reply
  89. Oddly enough, a friend and I were commenting on having worn uniforms throughout our school years. No problem with uniforms, per se, but to upbraid a child for being out of uniform without asking why is senseless. Uniforms are indeed expensive, but, from what friends with school age children tell me, so are civilian clothes.

    Reply
  90. Oddly enough, a friend and I were commenting on having worn uniforms throughout our school years. No problem with uniforms, per se, but to upbraid a child for being out of uniform without asking why is senseless. Uniforms are indeed expensive, but, from what friends with school age children tell me, so are civilian clothes.

    Reply
  91. I agree about the level playing field. The uniform at my children’s high school has become stricter during the nine years we’ve been there, and I think it does take away one source of bullying, peer pressure, gossip and unkindness.
    There is such a thing as too strict, though! At my school, mmhm-mumble years ago, we had to wear gloves as soon as we were beyond the school gates, and to have the badge taken off one’s hat-band was a punishment second only to being expelled.
    Anne, do you know much about what girls’ uniforms were like during the same period as that Eton photo? I’m trying to remember if Charlotte Bronte described uniforms in Jane Eyre.

    Reply
  92. I agree about the level playing field. The uniform at my children’s high school has become stricter during the nine years we’ve been there, and I think it does take away one source of bullying, peer pressure, gossip and unkindness.
    There is such a thing as too strict, though! At my school, mmhm-mumble years ago, we had to wear gloves as soon as we were beyond the school gates, and to have the badge taken off one’s hat-band was a punishment second only to being expelled.
    Anne, do you know much about what girls’ uniforms were like during the same period as that Eton photo? I’m trying to remember if Charlotte Bronte described uniforms in Jane Eyre.

    Reply
  93. I agree about the level playing field. The uniform at my children’s high school has become stricter during the nine years we’ve been there, and I think it does take away one source of bullying, peer pressure, gossip and unkindness.
    There is such a thing as too strict, though! At my school, mmhm-mumble years ago, we had to wear gloves as soon as we were beyond the school gates, and to have the badge taken off one’s hat-band was a punishment second only to being expelled.
    Anne, do you know much about what girls’ uniforms were like during the same period as that Eton photo? I’m trying to remember if Charlotte Bronte described uniforms in Jane Eyre.

    Reply
  94. I agree about the level playing field. The uniform at my children’s high school has become stricter during the nine years we’ve been there, and I think it does take away one source of bullying, peer pressure, gossip and unkindness.
    There is such a thing as too strict, though! At my school, mmhm-mumble years ago, we had to wear gloves as soon as we were beyond the school gates, and to have the badge taken off one’s hat-band was a punishment second only to being expelled.
    Anne, do you know much about what girls’ uniforms were like during the same period as that Eton photo? I’m trying to remember if Charlotte Bronte described uniforms in Jane Eyre.

    Reply
  95. I agree about the level playing field. The uniform at my children’s high school has become stricter during the nine years we’ve been there, and I think it does take away one source of bullying, peer pressure, gossip and unkindness.
    There is such a thing as too strict, though! At my school, mmhm-mumble years ago, we had to wear gloves as soon as we were beyond the school gates, and to have the badge taken off one’s hat-band was a punishment second only to being expelled.
    Anne, do you know much about what girls’ uniforms were like during the same period as that Eton photo? I’m trying to remember if Charlotte Bronte described uniforms in Jane Eyre.

    Reply
  96. I went to a Catholic girls school where we had a green and white check summer uniform with a gathered skirt that was 6 feet around when stretched out. We had a nun who took great pleasure in ripping down hems if the skirt was too short. Then we had the straw hat which unlike other hats was ridgid and made us look like daleks. Shudder. Horrible experiences!

    Reply
  97. I went to a Catholic girls school where we had a green and white check summer uniform with a gathered skirt that was 6 feet around when stretched out. We had a nun who took great pleasure in ripping down hems if the skirt was too short. Then we had the straw hat which unlike other hats was ridgid and made us look like daleks. Shudder. Horrible experiences!

    Reply
  98. I went to a Catholic girls school where we had a green and white check summer uniform with a gathered skirt that was 6 feet around when stretched out. We had a nun who took great pleasure in ripping down hems if the skirt was too short. Then we had the straw hat which unlike other hats was ridgid and made us look like daleks. Shudder. Horrible experiences!

    Reply
  99. I went to a Catholic girls school where we had a green and white check summer uniform with a gathered skirt that was 6 feet around when stretched out. We had a nun who took great pleasure in ripping down hems if the skirt was too short. Then we had the straw hat which unlike other hats was ridgid and made us look like daleks. Shudder. Horrible experiences!

    Reply
  100. I went to a Catholic girls school where we had a green and white check summer uniform with a gathered skirt that was 6 feet around when stretched out. We had a nun who took great pleasure in ripping down hems if the skirt was too short. Then we had the straw hat which unlike other hats was ridgid and made us look like daleks. Shudder. Horrible experiences!

    Reply
  101. I went to public school here in in New York, so no uniform for me, except gym class. We either wore blue shirts and a gold t-shirt or a gold t-shirt and black sweatpants with the school’s name on it.
    My mother grew up in Japan and wore a uniform to school everyday. She loved not having to think about what to wear or even what her backpack would look like.
    I have cousins who go to Catholic school, so they wear uniforms. I’m not sure how strict their schools are about
    rules. The perception is that schools with uniforms are more disciplined, but my cousin’s Catholic school was not that way at all. In fact, it seemed like they had more disciplinary issues at his school than at my large, overcrowded high school.

    Reply
  102. I went to public school here in in New York, so no uniform for me, except gym class. We either wore blue shirts and a gold t-shirt or a gold t-shirt and black sweatpants with the school’s name on it.
    My mother grew up in Japan and wore a uniform to school everyday. She loved not having to think about what to wear or even what her backpack would look like.
    I have cousins who go to Catholic school, so they wear uniforms. I’m not sure how strict their schools are about
    rules. The perception is that schools with uniforms are more disciplined, but my cousin’s Catholic school was not that way at all. In fact, it seemed like they had more disciplinary issues at his school than at my large, overcrowded high school.

    Reply
  103. I went to public school here in in New York, so no uniform for me, except gym class. We either wore blue shirts and a gold t-shirt or a gold t-shirt and black sweatpants with the school’s name on it.
    My mother grew up in Japan and wore a uniform to school everyday. She loved not having to think about what to wear or even what her backpack would look like.
    I have cousins who go to Catholic school, so they wear uniforms. I’m not sure how strict their schools are about
    rules. The perception is that schools with uniforms are more disciplined, but my cousin’s Catholic school was not that way at all. In fact, it seemed like they had more disciplinary issues at his school than at my large, overcrowded high school.

    Reply
  104. I went to public school here in in New York, so no uniform for me, except gym class. We either wore blue shirts and a gold t-shirt or a gold t-shirt and black sweatpants with the school’s name on it.
    My mother grew up in Japan and wore a uniform to school everyday. She loved not having to think about what to wear or even what her backpack would look like.
    I have cousins who go to Catholic school, so they wear uniforms. I’m not sure how strict their schools are about
    rules. The perception is that schools with uniforms are more disciplined, but my cousin’s Catholic school was not that way at all. In fact, it seemed like they had more disciplinary issues at his school than at my large, overcrowded high school.

    Reply
  105. I went to public school here in in New York, so no uniform for me, except gym class. We either wore blue shirts and a gold t-shirt or a gold t-shirt and black sweatpants with the school’s name on it.
    My mother grew up in Japan and wore a uniform to school everyday. She loved not having to think about what to wear or even what her backpack would look like.
    I have cousins who go to Catholic school, so they wear uniforms. I’m not sure how strict their schools are about
    rules. The perception is that schools with uniforms are more disciplined, but my cousin’s Catholic school was not that way at all. In fact, it seemed like they had more disciplinary issues at his school than at my large, overcrowded high school.

    Reply
  106. Liz, I agree. Some teachers positively relishes chasing up uniform issues in a rigid manner and others were more understanding.
    I’d say Keziah’s hem-ripping nun was one of the latter. 😉

    Reply
  107. Liz, I agree. Some teachers positively relishes chasing up uniform issues in a rigid manner and others were more understanding.
    I’d say Keziah’s hem-ripping nun was one of the latter. 😉

    Reply
  108. Liz, I agree. Some teachers positively relishes chasing up uniform issues in a rigid manner and others were more understanding.
    I’d say Keziah’s hem-ripping nun was one of the latter. 😉

    Reply
  109. Liz, I agree. Some teachers positively relishes chasing up uniform issues in a rigid manner and others were more understanding.
    I’d say Keziah’s hem-ripping nun was one of the latter. 😉

    Reply
  110. Liz, I agree. Some teachers positively relishes chasing up uniform issues in a rigid manner and others were more understanding.
    I’d say Keziah’s hem-ripping nun was one of the latter. 😉

    Reply
  111. Lilian I agree with you that it tends to lessen peer pressure, bullying and unkindness — about clothing at any rate.
    As for what uniforms girls wore, I’m not sure what it was like in the UK in the 19th century. (That Eton photo is 1937.) I’m sure a charity school, such as Jane Eyre’s would have a kind of uniform, if only because of practicality and the economies of scale — they had to provide clothing for all the children, so I image they would have ordered them in bulk. And they would have worn pinafores to protect their clothes.

    Reply
  112. Lilian I agree with you that it tends to lessen peer pressure, bullying and unkindness — about clothing at any rate.
    As for what uniforms girls wore, I’m not sure what it was like in the UK in the 19th century. (That Eton photo is 1937.) I’m sure a charity school, such as Jane Eyre’s would have a kind of uniform, if only because of practicality and the economies of scale — they had to provide clothing for all the children, so I image they would have ordered them in bulk. And they would have worn pinafores to protect their clothes.

    Reply
  113. Lilian I agree with you that it tends to lessen peer pressure, bullying and unkindness — about clothing at any rate.
    As for what uniforms girls wore, I’m not sure what it was like in the UK in the 19th century. (That Eton photo is 1937.) I’m sure a charity school, such as Jane Eyre’s would have a kind of uniform, if only because of practicality and the economies of scale — they had to provide clothing for all the children, so I image they would have ordered them in bulk. And they would have worn pinafores to protect their clothes.

    Reply
  114. Lilian I agree with you that it tends to lessen peer pressure, bullying and unkindness — about clothing at any rate.
    As for what uniforms girls wore, I’m not sure what it was like in the UK in the 19th century. (That Eton photo is 1937.) I’m sure a charity school, such as Jane Eyre’s would have a kind of uniform, if only because of practicality and the economies of scale — they had to provide clothing for all the children, so I image they would have ordered them in bulk. And they would have worn pinafores to protect their clothes.

    Reply
  115. Lilian I agree with you that it tends to lessen peer pressure, bullying and unkindness — about clothing at any rate.
    As for what uniforms girls wore, I’m not sure what it was like in the UK in the 19th century. (That Eton photo is 1937.) I’m sure a charity school, such as Jane Eyre’s would have a kind of uniform, if only because of practicality and the economies of scale — they had to provide clothing for all the children, so I image they would have ordered them in bulk. And they would have worn pinafores to protect their clothes.

    Reply
  116. Anrei, yes, the strict uniform policy gives a public image of good discipline and possibly also good academic results, but it’s just that — an image.
    It’s as my friend’s daughter says — how she wears her hair has no bearing on her learning.

    Reply
  117. Anrei, yes, the strict uniform policy gives a public image of good discipline and possibly also good academic results, but it’s just that — an image.
    It’s as my friend’s daughter says — how she wears her hair has no bearing on her learning.

    Reply
  118. Anrei, yes, the strict uniform policy gives a public image of good discipline and possibly also good academic results, but it’s just that — an image.
    It’s as my friend’s daughter says — how she wears her hair has no bearing on her learning.

    Reply
  119. Anrei, yes, the strict uniform policy gives a public image of good discipline and possibly also good academic results, but it’s just that — an image.
    It’s as my friend’s daughter says — how she wears her hair has no bearing on her learning.

    Reply
  120. Anrei, yes, the strict uniform policy gives a public image of good discipline and possibly also good academic results, but it’s just that — an image.
    It’s as my friend’s daughter says — how she wears her hair has no bearing on her learning.

    Reply
  121. Such a fun post, Anne. Your mother looks very chic with her “lid’! And that gorgeous hair!
    I never had to wear a school uniform, but in grade school, girls weren’t allowed to wear pants. I was a tomboy, so I hated that rule. Once I got to high school and we could wear—gasp—jeans, I never wore a skirt again to school. I still don’t favor skirts and dresses except for “dressing up.”
    But I do like the idea of uniforms (with some choice of variations, and lax on the hair!) I think it helps instill a sense of purpose and discipline. I consider myself very laid-back about dress, but when I see kids at the bus stop wearing ripped t-shirts and basketball shorts to class, it just doesn’t feel like they are in the right mindset for studying. Maybe I’ve become stodgy, but it seems to me that dressing “smart” would have a good effect.

    Reply
  122. Such a fun post, Anne. Your mother looks very chic with her “lid’! And that gorgeous hair!
    I never had to wear a school uniform, but in grade school, girls weren’t allowed to wear pants. I was a tomboy, so I hated that rule. Once I got to high school and we could wear—gasp—jeans, I never wore a skirt again to school. I still don’t favor skirts and dresses except for “dressing up.”
    But I do like the idea of uniforms (with some choice of variations, and lax on the hair!) I think it helps instill a sense of purpose and discipline. I consider myself very laid-back about dress, but when I see kids at the bus stop wearing ripped t-shirts and basketball shorts to class, it just doesn’t feel like they are in the right mindset for studying. Maybe I’ve become stodgy, but it seems to me that dressing “smart” would have a good effect.

    Reply
  123. Such a fun post, Anne. Your mother looks very chic with her “lid’! And that gorgeous hair!
    I never had to wear a school uniform, but in grade school, girls weren’t allowed to wear pants. I was a tomboy, so I hated that rule. Once I got to high school and we could wear—gasp—jeans, I never wore a skirt again to school. I still don’t favor skirts and dresses except for “dressing up.”
    But I do like the idea of uniforms (with some choice of variations, and lax on the hair!) I think it helps instill a sense of purpose and discipline. I consider myself very laid-back about dress, but when I see kids at the bus stop wearing ripped t-shirts and basketball shorts to class, it just doesn’t feel like they are in the right mindset for studying. Maybe I’ve become stodgy, but it seems to me that dressing “smart” would have a good effect.

    Reply
  124. Such a fun post, Anne. Your mother looks very chic with her “lid’! And that gorgeous hair!
    I never had to wear a school uniform, but in grade school, girls weren’t allowed to wear pants. I was a tomboy, so I hated that rule. Once I got to high school and we could wear—gasp—jeans, I never wore a skirt again to school. I still don’t favor skirts and dresses except for “dressing up.”
    But I do like the idea of uniforms (with some choice of variations, and lax on the hair!) I think it helps instill a sense of purpose and discipline. I consider myself very laid-back about dress, but when I see kids at the bus stop wearing ripped t-shirts and basketball shorts to class, it just doesn’t feel like they are in the right mindset for studying. Maybe I’ve become stodgy, but it seems to me that dressing “smart” would have a good effect.

    Reply
  125. Such a fun post, Anne. Your mother looks very chic with her “lid’! And that gorgeous hair!
    I never had to wear a school uniform, but in grade school, girls weren’t allowed to wear pants. I was a tomboy, so I hated that rule. Once I got to high school and we could wear—gasp—jeans, I never wore a skirt again to school. I still don’t favor skirts and dresses except for “dressing up.”
    But I do like the idea of uniforms (with some choice of variations, and lax on the hair!) I think it helps instill a sense of purpose and discipline. I consider myself very laid-back about dress, but when I see kids at the bus stop wearing ripped t-shirts and basketball shorts to class, it just doesn’t feel like they are in the right mindset for studying. Maybe I’ve become stodgy, but it seems to me that dressing “smart” would have a good effect.

    Reply
  126. Cara, these days a lot of high schools allow girls to wear pants in the winter, but it’s rarely jeans, I’m afraid. Usually it’s smart but warm pants or a skirt. And a few schools allow the girls to wear shorts in summer, too — long shorts rather than short shorts, and again, they’re regulation shorts.
    Primary (ie elementary schools) now have hats as compulsory outdoor wear for boys and girls in summer because of the danger of skin damage from the hole in the Ozone layer, which affects us in this part of the world. But I doubt they could make teenage boys wear sun-safe hats. Baseball-style caps, maybe.

    Reply
  127. Cara, these days a lot of high schools allow girls to wear pants in the winter, but it’s rarely jeans, I’m afraid. Usually it’s smart but warm pants or a skirt. And a few schools allow the girls to wear shorts in summer, too — long shorts rather than short shorts, and again, they’re regulation shorts.
    Primary (ie elementary schools) now have hats as compulsory outdoor wear for boys and girls in summer because of the danger of skin damage from the hole in the Ozone layer, which affects us in this part of the world. But I doubt they could make teenage boys wear sun-safe hats. Baseball-style caps, maybe.

    Reply
  128. Cara, these days a lot of high schools allow girls to wear pants in the winter, but it’s rarely jeans, I’m afraid. Usually it’s smart but warm pants or a skirt. And a few schools allow the girls to wear shorts in summer, too — long shorts rather than short shorts, and again, they’re regulation shorts.
    Primary (ie elementary schools) now have hats as compulsory outdoor wear for boys and girls in summer because of the danger of skin damage from the hole in the Ozone layer, which affects us in this part of the world. But I doubt they could make teenage boys wear sun-safe hats. Baseball-style caps, maybe.

    Reply
  129. Cara, these days a lot of high schools allow girls to wear pants in the winter, but it’s rarely jeans, I’m afraid. Usually it’s smart but warm pants or a skirt. And a few schools allow the girls to wear shorts in summer, too — long shorts rather than short shorts, and again, they’re regulation shorts.
    Primary (ie elementary schools) now have hats as compulsory outdoor wear for boys and girls in summer because of the danger of skin damage from the hole in the Ozone layer, which affects us in this part of the world. But I doubt they could make teenage boys wear sun-safe hats. Baseball-style caps, maybe.

    Reply
  130. Cara, these days a lot of high schools allow girls to wear pants in the winter, but it’s rarely jeans, I’m afraid. Usually it’s smart but warm pants or a skirt. And a few schools allow the girls to wear shorts in summer, too — long shorts rather than short shorts, and again, they’re regulation shorts.
    Primary (ie elementary schools) now have hats as compulsory outdoor wear for boys and girls in summer because of the danger of skin damage from the hole in the Ozone layer, which affects us in this part of the world. But I doubt they could make teenage boys wear sun-safe hats. Baseball-style caps, maybe.

    Reply
  131. My children attend a private school in Australia and I am all for a strict uniform policy. My kids don’t have any problems with it and thankfully the school doesn’t seem to go over the top with uniform violations. I like that the kids have learned some respect for the rules and take pride in how they appear. With all the children having the same uniform, school bag etc it eliminates some of the peer pressure with who is wearing what and if you don’t have the right label or the latest fashion it doesn’t matter.

    Reply
  132. My children attend a private school in Australia and I am all for a strict uniform policy. My kids don’t have any problems with it and thankfully the school doesn’t seem to go over the top with uniform violations. I like that the kids have learned some respect for the rules and take pride in how they appear. With all the children having the same uniform, school bag etc it eliminates some of the peer pressure with who is wearing what and if you don’t have the right label or the latest fashion it doesn’t matter.

    Reply
  133. My children attend a private school in Australia and I am all for a strict uniform policy. My kids don’t have any problems with it and thankfully the school doesn’t seem to go over the top with uniform violations. I like that the kids have learned some respect for the rules and take pride in how they appear. With all the children having the same uniform, school bag etc it eliminates some of the peer pressure with who is wearing what and if you don’t have the right label or the latest fashion it doesn’t matter.

    Reply
  134. My children attend a private school in Australia and I am all for a strict uniform policy. My kids don’t have any problems with it and thankfully the school doesn’t seem to go over the top with uniform violations. I like that the kids have learned some respect for the rules and take pride in how they appear. With all the children having the same uniform, school bag etc it eliminates some of the peer pressure with who is wearing what and if you don’t have the right label or the latest fashion it doesn’t matter.

    Reply
  135. My children attend a private school in Australia and I am all for a strict uniform policy. My kids don’t have any problems with it and thankfully the school doesn’t seem to go over the top with uniform violations. I like that the kids have learned some respect for the rules and take pride in how they appear. With all the children having the same uniform, school bag etc it eliminates some of the peer pressure with who is wearing what and if you don’t have the right label or the latest fashion it doesn’t matter.

    Reply
  136. I wore a school uniform throughout elementary and high school. A tunic which was navy with a white blouse, navy socks and oxfords. For gym navy bloomers and white blouse. A unifrom is smart and better discipline, but at that time we all behaved well.

    Reply
  137. I wore a school uniform throughout elementary and high school. A tunic which was navy with a white blouse, navy socks and oxfords. For gym navy bloomers and white blouse. A unifrom is smart and better discipline, but at that time we all behaved well.

    Reply
  138. I wore a school uniform throughout elementary and high school. A tunic which was navy with a white blouse, navy socks and oxfords. For gym navy bloomers and white blouse. A unifrom is smart and better discipline, but at that time we all behaved well.

    Reply
  139. I wore a school uniform throughout elementary and high school. A tunic which was navy with a white blouse, navy socks and oxfords. For gym navy bloomers and white blouse. A unifrom is smart and better discipline, but at that time we all behaved well.

    Reply
  140. I wore a school uniform throughout elementary and high school. A tunic which was navy with a white blouse, navy socks and oxfords. For gym navy bloomers and white blouse. A unifrom is smart and better discipline, but at that time we all behaved well.

    Reply
  141. Love the blog, Anne!
    I went to Catholic grammar school and high school and wore a uniform. Wasn’t too thrilled with it at the time but now as a mom I wish my kids had one. They go to public school in the United States and there are no uniform rules. In fact, my daughter was complaining at the beginning of this school year that they were going to ban yoga pants for the girls because it distracts the boys! Sheesh, ya think!
    I agree with Karen B. I think uniforms would level the playing field a lot when it comes to who can afford the best name brands and who can’t. I know I’m really going to sound like my mother saying this but I think it’s good for kids to do something they really don’t want to just because it’s a rule. It teaches them discipline and I think these days they could use a little more of that.

    Reply
  142. Love the blog, Anne!
    I went to Catholic grammar school and high school and wore a uniform. Wasn’t too thrilled with it at the time but now as a mom I wish my kids had one. They go to public school in the United States and there are no uniform rules. In fact, my daughter was complaining at the beginning of this school year that they were going to ban yoga pants for the girls because it distracts the boys! Sheesh, ya think!
    I agree with Karen B. I think uniforms would level the playing field a lot when it comes to who can afford the best name brands and who can’t. I know I’m really going to sound like my mother saying this but I think it’s good for kids to do something they really don’t want to just because it’s a rule. It teaches them discipline and I think these days they could use a little more of that.

    Reply
  143. Love the blog, Anne!
    I went to Catholic grammar school and high school and wore a uniform. Wasn’t too thrilled with it at the time but now as a mom I wish my kids had one. They go to public school in the United States and there are no uniform rules. In fact, my daughter was complaining at the beginning of this school year that they were going to ban yoga pants for the girls because it distracts the boys! Sheesh, ya think!
    I agree with Karen B. I think uniforms would level the playing field a lot when it comes to who can afford the best name brands and who can’t. I know I’m really going to sound like my mother saying this but I think it’s good for kids to do something they really don’t want to just because it’s a rule. It teaches them discipline and I think these days they could use a little more of that.

    Reply
  144. Love the blog, Anne!
    I went to Catholic grammar school and high school and wore a uniform. Wasn’t too thrilled with it at the time but now as a mom I wish my kids had one. They go to public school in the United States and there are no uniform rules. In fact, my daughter was complaining at the beginning of this school year that they were going to ban yoga pants for the girls because it distracts the boys! Sheesh, ya think!
    I agree with Karen B. I think uniforms would level the playing field a lot when it comes to who can afford the best name brands and who can’t. I know I’m really going to sound like my mother saying this but I think it’s good for kids to do something they really don’t want to just because it’s a rule. It teaches them discipline and I think these days they could use a little more of that.

    Reply
  145. Love the blog, Anne!
    I went to Catholic grammar school and high school and wore a uniform. Wasn’t too thrilled with it at the time but now as a mom I wish my kids had one. They go to public school in the United States and there are no uniform rules. In fact, my daughter was complaining at the beginning of this school year that they were going to ban yoga pants for the girls because it distracts the boys! Sheesh, ya think!
    I agree with Karen B. I think uniforms would level the playing field a lot when it comes to who can afford the best name brands and who can’t. I know I’m really going to sound like my mother saying this but I think it’s good for kids to do something they really don’t want to just because it’s a rule. It teaches them discipline and I think these days they could use a little more of that.

    Reply
  146. Irisheyes, I love the “I’m going to sound like my mother, but” 😉
    I remember having a discussion with a group of kids arguing passionately that uniform should not be compulsory. Even though I hated the petty discipline involving the color of socks and ties, I think uniform is a good thing.
    I remember one teenager passionately declaring, “This uniform isn’t *me* — I want to dress like me!”
    And I said something along the lines of, “If you can only define who you are by wearing certain clothes, that’s a bit sad, isn’t it? I would have thought there was a lot more to you than that.”
    Teachers are mean, aren’t they? 😉

    Reply
  147. Irisheyes, I love the “I’m going to sound like my mother, but” 😉
    I remember having a discussion with a group of kids arguing passionately that uniform should not be compulsory. Even though I hated the petty discipline involving the color of socks and ties, I think uniform is a good thing.
    I remember one teenager passionately declaring, “This uniform isn’t *me* — I want to dress like me!”
    And I said something along the lines of, “If you can only define who you are by wearing certain clothes, that’s a bit sad, isn’t it? I would have thought there was a lot more to you than that.”
    Teachers are mean, aren’t they? 😉

    Reply
  148. Irisheyes, I love the “I’m going to sound like my mother, but” 😉
    I remember having a discussion with a group of kids arguing passionately that uniform should not be compulsory. Even though I hated the petty discipline involving the color of socks and ties, I think uniform is a good thing.
    I remember one teenager passionately declaring, “This uniform isn’t *me* — I want to dress like me!”
    And I said something along the lines of, “If you can only define who you are by wearing certain clothes, that’s a bit sad, isn’t it? I would have thought there was a lot more to you than that.”
    Teachers are mean, aren’t they? 😉

    Reply
  149. Irisheyes, I love the “I’m going to sound like my mother, but” 😉
    I remember having a discussion with a group of kids arguing passionately that uniform should not be compulsory. Even though I hated the petty discipline involving the color of socks and ties, I think uniform is a good thing.
    I remember one teenager passionately declaring, “This uniform isn’t *me* — I want to dress like me!”
    And I said something along the lines of, “If you can only define who you are by wearing certain clothes, that’s a bit sad, isn’t it? I would have thought there was a lot more to you than that.”
    Teachers are mean, aren’t they? 😉

    Reply
  150. Irisheyes, I love the “I’m going to sound like my mother, but” 😉
    I remember having a discussion with a group of kids arguing passionately that uniform should not be compulsory. Even though I hated the petty discipline involving the color of socks and ties, I think uniform is a good thing.
    I remember one teenager passionately declaring, “This uniform isn’t *me* — I want to dress like me!”
    And I said something along the lines of, “If you can only define who you are by wearing certain clothes, that’s a bit sad, isn’t it? I would have thought there was a lot more to you than that.”
    Teachers are mean, aren’t they? 😉

    Reply
  151. I never went to a private school, where in the US kids might have uniforms; I went to California public schools. In my schools there were no uniforms, but there was a dress code; girls weren’t allowed to wear pants, had to wear socks with their shoes, and extreme styles or excessive jewelry or makeup weren’t allowed (they called your mom). The rich kids in my schools were only comparatively rich; they had more and newer clothes of better quality than the poorer kids, but they were the same sorts of clothes.
    The only thing we had approaching a uniform was that in the twelfth grade in high school you could get a class sweater in your class colors and other things like class rings. Only a handful of kids didn’t find the money for those sweaters. One or two had parents who didn’t believe in class sweaters etc. for whatever reason, and our class counselor had a sort of slush fund to help out kids who would have bought one but for the cost.
    We used to debate whether uniforms like those the Catholic and private school kids wore were a good idea or not. We liked choosing our own clothes and not wearing the same thing every day (not counting the uniform gym outfit everyone had to use), but we could see the bad aspects of some girls competing and showing off. But I don’t remember anybody thinking it was a big problem one way or the other.
    But it was a long time ago, during a more conformist era. My grandniece and grandnephew go to Catholic school and they like their uniforms; they think the uniforms show they’re serious and they belong.

    Reply
  152. I never went to a private school, where in the US kids might have uniforms; I went to California public schools. In my schools there were no uniforms, but there was a dress code; girls weren’t allowed to wear pants, had to wear socks with their shoes, and extreme styles or excessive jewelry or makeup weren’t allowed (they called your mom). The rich kids in my schools were only comparatively rich; they had more and newer clothes of better quality than the poorer kids, but they were the same sorts of clothes.
    The only thing we had approaching a uniform was that in the twelfth grade in high school you could get a class sweater in your class colors and other things like class rings. Only a handful of kids didn’t find the money for those sweaters. One or two had parents who didn’t believe in class sweaters etc. for whatever reason, and our class counselor had a sort of slush fund to help out kids who would have bought one but for the cost.
    We used to debate whether uniforms like those the Catholic and private school kids wore were a good idea or not. We liked choosing our own clothes and not wearing the same thing every day (not counting the uniform gym outfit everyone had to use), but we could see the bad aspects of some girls competing and showing off. But I don’t remember anybody thinking it was a big problem one way or the other.
    But it was a long time ago, during a more conformist era. My grandniece and grandnephew go to Catholic school and they like their uniforms; they think the uniforms show they’re serious and they belong.

    Reply
  153. I never went to a private school, where in the US kids might have uniforms; I went to California public schools. In my schools there were no uniforms, but there was a dress code; girls weren’t allowed to wear pants, had to wear socks with their shoes, and extreme styles or excessive jewelry or makeup weren’t allowed (they called your mom). The rich kids in my schools were only comparatively rich; they had more and newer clothes of better quality than the poorer kids, but they were the same sorts of clothes.
    The only thing we had approaching a uniform was that in the twelfth grade in high school you could get a class sweater in your class colors and other things like class rings. Only a handful of kids didn’t find the money for those sweaters. One or two had parents who didn’t believe in class sweaters etc. for whatever reason, and our class counselor had a sort of slush fund to help out kids who would have bought one but for the cost.
    We used to debate whether uniforms like those the Catholic and private school kids wore were a good idea or not. We liked choosing our own clothes and not wearing the same thing every day (not counting the uniform gym outfit everyone had to use), but we could see the bad aspects of some girls competing and showing off. But I don’t remember anybody thinking it was a big problem one way or the other.
    But it was a long time ago, during a more conformist era. My grandniece and grandnephew go to Catholic school and they like their uniforms; they think the uniforms show they’re serious and they belong.

    Reply
  154. I never went to a private school, where in the US kids might have uniforms; I went to California public schools. In my schools there were no uniforms, but there was a dress code; girls weren’t allowed to wear pants, had to wear socks with their shoes, and extreme styles or excessive jewelry or makeup weren’t allowed (they called your mom). The rich kids in my schools were only comparatively rich; they had more and newer clothes of better quality than the poorer kids, but they were the same sorts of clothes.
    The only thing we had approaching a uniform was that in the twelfth grade in high school you could get a class sweater in your class colors and other things like class rings. Only a handful of kids didn’t find the money for those sweaters. One or two had parents who didn’t believe in class sweaters etc. for whatever reason, and our class counselor had a sort of slush fund to help out kids who would have bought one but for the cost.
    We used to debate whether uniforms like those the Catholic and private school kids wore were a good idea or not. We liked choosing our own clothes and not wearing the same thing every day (not counting the uniform gym outfit everyone had to use), but we could see the bad aspects of some girls competing and showing off. But I don’t remember anybody thinking it was a big problem one way or the other.
    But it was a long time ago, during a more conformist era. My grandniece and grandnephew go to Catholic school and they like their uniforms; they think the uniforms show they’re serious and they belong.

    Reply
  155. I never went to a private school, where in the US kids might have uniforms; I went to California public schools. In my schools there were no uniforms, but there was a dress code; girls weren’t allowed to wear pants, had to wear socks with their shoes, and extreme styles or excessive jewelry or makeup weren’t allowed (they called your mom). The rich kids in my schools were only comparatively rich; they had more and newer clothes of better quality than the poorer kids, but they were the same sorts of clothes.
    The only thing we had approaching a uniform was that in the twelfth grade in high school you could get a class sweater in your class colors and other things like class rings. Only a handful of kids didn’t find the money for those sweaters. One or two had parents who didn’t believe in class sweaters etc. for whatever reason, and our class counselor had a sort of slush fund to help out kids who would have bought one but for the cost.
    We used to debate whether uniforms like those the Catholic and private school kids wore were a good idea or not. We liked choosing our own clothes and not wearing the same thing every day (not counting the uniform gym outfit everyone had to use), but we could see the bad aspects of some girls competing and showing off. But I don’t remember anybody thinking it was a big problem one way or the other.
    But it was a long time ago, during a more conformist era. My grandniece and grandnephew go to Catholic school and they like their uniforms; they think the uniforms show they’re serious and they belong.

    Reply
  156. I went to a Catholic boarding school for 3 yrs and our uni was a navy wool jumper and white blouse – short sleeve for every day and long sleeve for dress ie Sunday or Holy Day Mass. Basic purchase package was one long sleeve shirt and 4 short sleeve. If you wore the long sleeve shirt on a week-day for Mass, you went back to your room and changed to a short-sleeve shirt to save the dress shirt for another occasion. I think I had some extra short-sleeve shirts. When I went home on the weekend my Grandma washed and ironed five blouses. We had day girls and borders, and if you got caught short a day girl’s mother could help you out. And yes there was a hat. — What we could never figure out was that we were required to buy a heavy wool sweater. We were in the mountains of Pennsylvania and it was cold – that place had gale-force drafts! But heaven help you if you wore that sweater to class! The nuns were still in the full habit in those days of yore, and they had so many layers on they could not feel the cold air. – We were allowed out of uni after class; mostly we kept the blouse on and replaced the jumper with a skirt. (no slacks) We were required to wear a skirt over the PE outfit – a one-piece deal with a top like a blouse and short pants. The idea of the skirt was so the elderly nuns in retirement there would not be shocked by the sight of our bare legs. – By the time I got out of there the back of that wool jumper was worn to transparency. I think I left the hat and sweater behind to be re-sold to another student. – The school was a dinosaur and was forced to admit boys as day-trippers. It did not survive, but I think it is still used as a retirement center for the old nuns.

    Reply
  157. I went to a Catholic boarding school for 3 yrs and our uni was a navy wool jumper and white blouse – short sleeve for every day and long sleeve for dress ie Sunday or Holy Day Mass. Basic purchase package was one long sleeve shirt and 4 short sleeve. If you wore the long sleeve shirt on a week-day for Mass, you went back to your room and changed to a short-sleeve shirt to save the dress shirt for another occasion. I think I had some extra short-sleeve shirts. When I went home on the weekend my Grandma washed and ironed five blouses. We had day girls and borders, and if you got caught short a day girl’s mother could help you out. And yes there was a hat. — What we could never figure out was that we were required to buy a heavy wool sweater. We were in the mountains of Pennsylvania and it was cold – that place had gale-force drafts! But heaven help you if you wore that sweater to class! The nuns were still in the full habit in those days of yore, and they had so many layers on they could not feel the cold air. – We were allowed out of uni after class; mostly we kept the blouse on and replaced the jumper with a skirt. (no slacks) We were required to wear a skirt over the PE outfit – a one-piece deal with a top like a blouse and short pants. The idea of the skirt was so the elderly nuns in retirement there would not be shocked by the sight of our bare legs. – By the time I got out of there the back of that wool jumper was worn to transparency. I think I left the hat and sweater behind to be re-sold to another student. – The school was a dinosaur and was forced to admit boys as day-trippers. It did not survive, but I think it is still used as a retirement center for the old nuns.

    Reply
  158. I went to a Catholic boarding school for 3 yrs and our uni was a navy wool jumper and white blouse – short sleeve for every day and long sleeve for dress ie Sunday or Holy Day Mass. Basic purchase package was one long sleeve shirt and 4 short sleeve. If you wore the long sleeve shirt on a week-day for Mass, you went back to your room and changed to a short-sleeve shirt to save the dress shirt for another occasion. I think I had some extra short-sleeve shirts. When I went home on the weekend my Grandma washed and ironed five blouses. We had day girls and borders, and if you got caught short a day girl’s mother could help you out. And yes there was a hat. — What we could never figure out was that we were required to buy a heavy wool sweater. We were in the mountains of Pennsylvania and it was cold – that place had gale-force drafts! But heaven help you if you wore that sweater to class! The nuns were still in the full habit in those days of yore, and they had so many layers on they could not feel the cold air. – We were allowed out of uni after class; mostly we kept the blouse on and replaced the jumper with a skirt. (no slacks) We were required to wear a skirt over the PE outfit – a one-piece deal with a top like a blouse and short pants. The idea of the skirt was so the elderly nuns in retirement there would not be shocked by the sight of our bare legs. – By the time I got out of there the back of that wool jumper was worn to transparency. I think I left the hat and sweater behind to be re-sold to another student. – The school was a dinosaur and was forced to admit boys as day-trippers. It did not survive, but I think it is still used as a retirement center for the old nuns.

    Reply
  159. I went to a Catholic boarding school for 3 yrs and our uni was a navy wool jumper and white blouse – short sleeve for every day and long sleeve for dress ie Sunday or Holy Day Mass. Basic purchase package was one long sleeve shirt and 4 short sleeve. If you wore the long sleeve shirt on a week-day for Mass, you went back to your room and changed to a short-sleeve shirt to save the dress shirt for another occasion. I think I had some extra short-sleeve shirts. When I went home on the weekend my Grandma washed and ironed five blouses. We had day girls and borders, and if you got caught short a day girl’s mother could help you out. And yes there was a hat. — What we could never figure out was that we were required to buy a heavy wool sweater. We were in the mountains of Pennsylvania and it was cold – that place had gale-force drafts! But heaven help you if you wore that sweater to class! The nuns were still in the full habit in those days of yore, and they had so many layers on they could not feel the cold air. – We were allowed out of uni after class; mostly we kept the blouse on and replaced the jumper with a skirt. (no slacks) We were required to wear a skirt over the PE outfit – a one-piece deal with a top like a blouse and short pants. The idea of the skirt was so the elderly nuns in retirement there would not be shocked by the sight of our bare legs. – By the time I got out of there the back of that wool jumper was worn to transparency. I think I left the hat and sweater behind to be re-sold to another student. – The school was a dinosaur and was forced to admit boys as day-trippers. It did not survive, but I think it is still used as a retirement center for the old nuns.

    Reply
  160. I went to a Catholic boarding school for 3 yrs and our uni was a navy wool jumper and white blouse – short sleeve for every day and long sleeve for dress ie Sunday or Holy Day Mass. Basic purchase package was one long sleeve shirt and 4 short sleeve. If you wore the long sleeve shirt on a week-day for Mass, you went back to your room and changed to a short-sleeve shirt to save the dress shirt for another occasion. I think I had some extra short-sleeve shirts. When I went home on the weekend my Grandma washed and ironed five blouses. We had day girls and borders, and if you got caught short a day girl’s mother could help you out. And yes there was a hat. — What we could never figure out was that we were required to buy a heavy wool sweater. We were in the mountains of Pennsylvania and it was cold – that place had gale-force drafts! But heaven help you if you wore that sweater to class! The nuns were still in the full habit in those days of yore, and they had so many layers on they could not feel the cold air. – We were allowed out of uni after class; mostly we kept the blouse on and replaced the jumper with a skirt. (no slacks) We were required to wear a skirt over the PE outfit – a one-piece deal with a top like a blouse and short pants. The idea of the skirt was so the elderly nuns in retirement there would not be shocked by the sight of our bare legs. – By the time I got out of there the back of that wool jumper was worn to transparency. I think I left the hat and sweater behind to be re-sold to another student. – The school was a dinosaur and was forced to admit boys as day-trippers. It did not survive, but I think it is still used as a retirement center for the old nuns.

    Reply
  161. I’d like to add one more thing: in my last job for some reason we had an unofficial and accidental dept uniform: tan or khaki slacks and a black top (sweater, blouse, knit top). It became a dept joke. Never black pants with a tan top! When the weather turned chilly, at least three women would show up in black pants and a red,white,and black striped sweater or knit top. No previous planning – it just happened.

    Reply
  162. I’d like to add one more thing: in my last job for some reason we had an unofficial and accidental dept uniform: tan or khaki slacks and a black top (sweater, blouse, knit top). It became a dept joke. Never black pants with a tan top! When the weather turned chilly, at least three women would show up in black pants and a red,white,and black striped sweater or knit top. No previous planning – it just happened.

    Reply
  163. I’d like to add one more thing: in my last job for some reason we had an unofficial and accidental dept uniform: tan or khaki slacks and a black top (sweater, blouse, knit top). It became a dept joke. Never black pants with a tan top! When the weather turned chilly, at least three women would show up in black pants and a red,white,and black striped sweater or knit top. No previous planning – it just happened.

    Reply
  164. I’d like to add one more thing: in my last job for some reason we had an unofficial and accidental dept uniform: tan or khaki slacks and a black top (sweater, blouse, knit top). It became a dept joke. Never black pants with a tan top! When the weather turned chilly, at least three women would show up in black pants and a red,white,and black striped sweater or knit top. No previous planning – it just happened.

    Reply
  165. I’d like to add one more thing: in my last job for some reason we had an unofficial and accidental dept uniform: tan or khaki slacks and a black top (sweater, blouse, knit top). It became a dept joke. Never black pants with a tan top! When the weather turned chilly, at least three women would show up in black pants and a red,white,and black striped sweater or knit top. No previous planning – it just happened.

    Reply
  166. What a perfect post since I grew up during the era when school uniform’s were compulsory for all. It was a successful and good practice. I advocate it strongly. These were public schools and this norm was adhered to. I believe it is important since it influences learning and discipine.

    Reply
  167. What a perfect post since I grew up during the era when school uniform’s were compulsory for all. It was a successful and good practice. I advocate it strongly. These were public schools and this norm was adhered to. I believe it is important since it influences learning and discipine.

    Reply
  168. What a perfect post since I grew up during the era when school uniform’s were compulsory for all. It was a successful and good practice. I advocate it strongly. These were public schools and this norm was adhered to. I believe it is important since it influences learning and discipine.

    Reply
  169. What a perfect post since I grew up during the era when school uniform’s were compulsory for all. It was a successful and good practice. I advocate it strongly. These were public schools and this norm was adhered to. I believe it is important since it influences learning and discipine.

    Reply
  170. What a perfect post since I grew up during the era when school uniform’s were compulsory for all. It was a successful and good practice. I advocate it strongly. These were public schools and this norm was adhered to. I believe it is important since it influences learning and discipine.

    Reply
  171. I went to public schools when we were Stateside. When we lived in England I went to the base school, but my youngest brother went to the English public school and he wore a uniform. I must find some of those photos to post on Facebook!
    I went to a private all women’s college in Alabama for my undergrad work. The dress code was amazingly strict. No jeans, no shorts. To attend church you must wear both hat and gloves. You cannot leave campus wearing slacks. You must wear pantyhose with dresses and skirts. No tattoos. No piercings. We dressed for dinner on numerous occasions. You could wear sweats on campus but NOT to class and NOT to meals. I attended during the late seventies and those rules were strictly enforced. From what I hear, they are STILL strictly enforced! I think at this particular school, the dress code was a matter of discipline, but also something of a finishing school tradition. We were supposed to graduate with a superior education and all of the social graces.

    Reply
  172. I went to public schools when we were Stateside. When we lived in England I went to the base school, but my youngest brother went to the English public school and he wore a uniform. I must find some of those photos to post on Facebook!
    I went to a private all women’s college in Alabama for my undergrad work. The dress code was amazingly strict. No jeans, no shorts. To attend church you must wear both hat and gloves. You cannot leave campus wearing slacks. You must wear pantyhose with dresses and skirts. No tattoos. No piercings. We dressed for dinner on numerous occasions. You could wear sweats on campus but NOT to class and NOT to meals. I attended during the late seventies and those rules were strictly enforced. From what I hear, they are STILL strictly enforced! I think at this particular school, the dress code was a matter of discipline, but also something of a finishing school tradition. We were supposed to graduate with a superior education and all of the social graces.

    Reply
  173. I went to public schools when we were Stateside. When we lived in England I went to the base school, but my youngest brother went to the English public school and he wore a uniform. I must find some of those photos to post on Facebook!
    I went to a private all women’s college in Alabama for my undergrad work. The dress code was amazingly strict. No jeans, no shorts. To attend church you must wear both hat and gloves. You cannot leave campus wearing slacks. You must wear pantyhose with dresses and skirts. No tattoos. No piercings. We dressed for dinner on numerous occasions. You could wear sweats on campus but NOT to class and NOT to meals. I attended during the late seventies and those rules were strictly enforced. From what I hear, they are STILL strictly enforced! I think at this particular school, the dress code was a matter of discipline, but also something of a finishing school tradition. We were supposed to graduate with a superior education and all of the social graces.

    Reply
  174. I went to public schools when we were Stateside. When we lived in England I went to the base school, but my youngest brother went to the English public school and he wore a uniform. I must find some of those photos to post on Facebook!
    I went to a private all women’s college in Alabama for my undergrad work. The dress code was amazingly strict. No jeans, no shorts. To attend church you must wear both hat and gloves. You cannot leave campus wearing slacks. You must wear pantyhose with dresses and skirts. No tattoos. No piercings. We dressed for dinner on numerous occasions. You could wear sweats on campus but NOT to class and NOT to meals. I attended during the late seventies and those rules were strictly enforced. From what I hear, they are STILL strictly enforced! I think at this particular school, the dress code was a matter of discipline, but also something of a finishing school tradition. We were supposed to graduate with a superior education and all of the social graces.

    Reply
  175. I went to public schools when we were Stateside. When we lived in England I went to the base school, but my youngest brother went to the English public school and he wore a uniform. I must find some of those photos to post on Facebook!
    I went to a private all women’s college in Alabama for my undergrad work. The dress code was amazingly strict. No jeans, no shorts. To attend church you must wear both hat and gloves. You cannot leave campus wearing slacks. You must wear pantyhose with dresses and skirts. No tattoos. No piercings. We dressed for dinner on numerous occasions. You could wear sweats on campus but NOT to class and NOT to meals. I attended during the late seventies and those rules were strictly enforced. From what I hear, they are STILL strictly enforced! I think at this particular school, the dress code was a matter of discipline, but also something of a finishing school tradition. We were supposed to graduate with a superior education and all of the social graces.

    Reply
  176. I went to Wodonga High School in Victoria and we had a uniform and it didn’t worry me to wear it, no decisions to make, what’ll I wear today? A few kids did flaunt the rules and probably were punished but I guess I never created waves. My kids had a unifrom in Queensland and funnily enough at their primary school 25 years ago, the material of their uniform was the same as I had in high- school in the 1960’s. I feel the discipline of wearing a uniform helps the student in later life for all the rules and regulations they come across as they join the work force.

    Reply
  177. I went to Wodonga High School in Victoria and we had a uniform and it didn’t worry me to wear it, no decisions to make, what’ll I wear today? A few kids did flaunt the rules and probably were punished but I guess I never created waves. My kids had a unifrom in Queensland and funnily enough at their primary school 25 years ago, the material of their uniform was the same as I had in high- school in the 1960’s. I feel the discipline of wearing a uniform helps the student in later life for all the rules and regulations they come across as they join the work force.

    Reply
  178. I went to Wodonga High School in Victoria and we had a uniform and it didn’t worry me to wear it, no decisions to make, what’ll I wear today? A few kids did flaunt the rules and probably were punished but I guess I never created waves. My kids had a unifrom in Queensland and funnily enough at their primary school 25 years ago, the material of their uniform was the same as I had in high- school in the 1960’s. I feel the discipline of wearing a uniform helps the student in later life for all the rules and regulations they come across as they join the work force.

    Reply
  179. I went to Wodonga High School in Victoria and we had a uniform and it didn’t worry me to wear it, no decisions to make, what’ll I wear today? A few kids did flaunt the rules and probably were punished but I guess I never created waves. My kids had a unifrom in Queensland and funnily enough at their primary school 25 years ago, the material of their uniform was the same as I had in high- school in the 1960’s. I feel the discipline of wearing a uniform helps the student in later life for all the rules and regulations they come across as they join the work force.

    Reply
  180. I went to Wodonga High School in Victoria and we had a uniform and it didn’t worry me to wear it, no decisions to make, what’ll I wear today? A few kids did flaunt the rules and probably were punished but I guess I never created waves. My kids had a unifrom in Queensland and funnily enough at their primary school 25 years ago, the material of their uniform was the same as I had in high- school in the 1960’s. I feel the discipline of wearing a uniform helps the student in later life for all the rules and regulations they come across as they join the work force.

    Reply
  181. Janice I think you’re right — it sounds like these days the pressure to compete in what kids wear has grown. Your situation sounds quite civilized — I’m all for kids not worrying that much who wears what.
    Artemesia, thanks for that. Sounds like they were contradictory rules, all right. It’s terrible that you were cold — very Jane Eyre of them — no excuse for that. And interesting that the school eventually took in boys — and then faded away.
    I chuckled at your work “uniform” — I’ve been in situations like that, too, where a bunch of us turned up “matching.”

    Reply
  182. Janice I think you’re right — it sounds like these days the pressure to compete in what kids wear has grown. Your situation sounds quite civilized — I’m all for kids not worrying that much who wears what.
    Artemesia, thanks for that. Sounds like they were contradictory rules, all right. It’s terrible that you were cold — very Jane Eyre of them — no excuse for that. And interesting that the school eventually took in boys — and then faded away.
    I chuckled at your work “uniform” — I’ve been in situations like that, too, where a bunch of us turned up “matching.”

    Reply
  183. Janice I think you’re right — it sounds like these days the pressure to compete in what kids wear has grown. Your situation sounds quite civilized — I’m all for kids not worrying that much who wears what.
    Artemesia, thanks for that. Sounds like they were contradictory rules, all right. It’s terrible that you were cold — very Jane Eyre of them — no excuse for that. And interesting that the school eventually took in boys — and then faded away.
    I chuckled at your work “uniform” — I’ve been in situations like that, too, where a bunch of us turned up “matching.”

    Reply
  184. Janice I think you’re right — it sounds like these days the pressure to compete in what kids wear has grown. Your situation sounds quite civilized — I’m all for kids not worrying that much who wears what.
    Artemesia, thanks for that. Sounds like they were contradictory rules, all right. It’s terrible that you were cold — very Jane Eyre of them — no excuse for that. And interesting that the school eventually took in boys — and then faded away.
    I chuckled at your work “uniform” — I’ve been in situations like that, too, where a bunch of us turned up “matching.”

    Reply
  185. Janice I think you’re right — it sounds like these days the pressure to compete in what kids wear has grown. Your situation sounds quite civilized — I’m all for kids not worrying that much who wears what.
    Artemesia, thanks for that. Sounds like they were contradictory rules, all right. It’s terrible that you were cold — very Jane Eyre of them — no excuse for that. And interesting that the school eventually took in boys — and then faded away.
    I chuckled at your work “uniform” — I’ve been in situations like that, too, where a bunch of us turned up “matching.”

    Reply
  186. Ellie, thanks for dropping by. I think people often don’t realize the value and ease of a uniform (reasonably enforced) and that it can have a more disciplined effect, overall.
    Louisa, how interesting that a college acted as a finishing school. I suppose the girls who went there knew what to expect and the parents chose it for that reason. Were there any rebels, I wonder? university is a great time for rebelling against strictures like this.

    Reply
  187. Ellie, thanks for dropping by. I think people often don’t realize the value and ease of a uniform (reasonably enforced) and that it can have a more disciplined effect, overall.
    Louisa, how interesting that a college acted as a finishing school. I suppose the girls who went there knew what to expect and the parents chose it for that reason. Were there any rebels, I wonder? university is a great time for rebelling against strictures like this.

    Reply
  188. Ellie, thanks for dropping by. I think people often don’t realize the value and ease of a uniform (reasonably enforced) and that it can have a more disciplined effect, overall.
    Louisa, how interesting that a college acted as a finishing school. I suppose the girls who went there knew what to expect and the parents chose it for that reason. Were there any rebels, I wonder? university is a great time for rebelling against strictures like this.

    Reply
  189. Ellie, thanks for dropping by. I think people often don’t realize the value and ease of a uniform (reasonably enforced) and that it can have a more disciplined effect, overall.
    Louisa, how interesting that a college acted as a finishing school. I suppose the girls who went there knew what to expect and the parents chose it for that reason. Were there any rebels, I wonder? university is a great time for rebelling against strictures like this.

    Reply
  190. Ellie, thanks for dropping by. I think people often don’t realize the value and ease of a uniform (reasonably enforced) and that it can have a more disciplined effect, overall.
    Louisa, how interesting that a college acted as a finishing school. I suppose the girls who went there knew what to expect and the parents chose it for that reason. Were there any rebels, I wonder? university is a great time for rebelling against strictures like this.

    Reply
  191. Jan, how funny that your Wodonga High uniform was the same patten as your kids primary school one so many years later.
    It must have been a popular pattern because Mum cut down a couple of my older sisters’ Wodonga High school uniforms for me when we were in Portland and all the kids there thought I’d come from Heywood, 25 miles up the road.
    Thanks for dropping by, sis.

    Reply
  192. Jan, how funny that your Wodonga High uniform was the same patten as your kids primary school one so many years later.
    It must have been a popular pattern because Mum cut down a couple of my older sisters’ Wodonga High school uniforms for me when we were in Portland and all the kids there thought I’d come from Heywood, 25 miles up the road.
    Thanks for dropping by, sis.

    Reply
  193. Jan, how funny that your Wodonga High uniform was the same patten as your kids primary school one so many years later.
    It must have been a popular pattern because Mum cut down a couple of my older sisters’ Wodonga High school uniforms for me when we were in Portland and all the kids there thought I’d come from Heywood, 25 miles up the road.
    Thanks for dropping by, sis.

    Reply
  194. Jan, how funny that your Wodonga High uniform was the same patten as your kids primary school one so many years later.
    It must have been a popular pattern because Mum cut down a couple of my older sisters’ Wodonga High school uniforms for me when we were in Portland and all the kids there thought I’d come from Heywood, 25 miles up the road.
    Thanks for dropping by, sis.

    Reply
  195. Jan, how funny that your Wodonga High uniform was the same patten as your kids primary school one so many years later.
    It must have been a popular pattern because Mum cut down a couple of my older sisters’ Wodonga High school uniforms for me when we were in Portland and all the kids there thought I’d come from Heywood, 25 miles up the road.
    Thanks for dropping by, sis.

    Reply
  196. Does painting the military jet on the lawn of the military academy across town a lovely shade of bright pink in the middle of the night count as rebellious? Or shooting a fire extinguisher at the commandant of said academy from a moving car? Or raiding the barracks of said academy and demanding the cadets surrender their jock straps? Not that I would know ANYTHING about such activities. 🙂

    Reply
  197. Does painting the military jet on the lawn of the military academy across town a lovely shade of bright pink in the middle of the night count as rebellious? Or shooting a fire extinguisher at the commandant of said academy from a moving car? Or raiding the barracks of said academy and demanding the cadets surrender their jock straps? Not that I would know ANYTHING about such activities. 🙂

    Reply
  198. Does painting the military jet on the lawn of the military academy across town a lovely shade of bright pink in the middle of the night count as rebellious? Or shooting a fire extinguisher at the commandant of said academy from a moving car? Or raiding the barracks of said academy and demanding the cadets surrender their jock straps? Not that I would know ANYTHING about such activities. 🙂

    Reply
  199. Does painting the military jet on the lawn of the military academy across town a lovely shade of bright pink in the middle of the night count as rebellious? Or shooting a fire extinguisher at the commandant of said academy from a moving car? Or raiding the barracks of said academy and demanding the cadets surrender their jock straps? Not that I would know ANYTHING about such activities. 🙂

    Reply
  200. Does painting the military jet on the lawn of the military academy across town a lovely shade of bright pink in the middle of the night count as rebellious? Or shooting a fire extinguisher at the commandant of said academy from a moving car? Or raiding the barracks of said academy and demanding the cadets surrender their jock straps? Not that I would know ANYTHING about such activities. 🙂

    Reply

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