Of Libraries and Love Poems

AccWeddBookmark Anne here. I love libraries. For me, there's nothing better than being let loose in a building full of books. It's my idea of heaven and it has been since I was a small child. A library made me the writer I am today — it was a small regional library where at the age of 11 I borrowed my first Georgette Heyer. Or maybe it was the remote little country school library where, in grade 5 and 6, a friend and I competed to read the most books, and the librarian "tested" us to make sure we really had read them. Made me a fast reader. Yep, I've never met a library I didn't love.

I've been seeing a lot of the State Library of Victoria lately — that's it in the picture below. It's in Melbourne, my home city and it's an absolute treasure of a place.
Library2
Quick detour into history: the State Library of Victoria is one of the oldest cultural institutions in Australia (which, remember is very young as modern nations go.)
The "village" of Melbourne began in 1835, with a handful of free British settlers. The village grew steadily but in 1851, it received a huge boost when gold was discovered in Ballarat and other regions and the gold rush began. Fortunes were dug out of the ground and people came in their thousands. In a decade the population of Victoria increased sevenfold.

In 1854, just three years after Victoria was declared a state (the same year as gold was discovered) the State Library of Victoria was founded. It's hard to imagine the forward-thinkingness (is that a word?) of the original founders, but just consider this: In 1854, this was the part of the city nearest the port.
Canvas_town_south_melbourne_victoria_1850s

In 1855, this was the city of Melbourne. (Goodman Teale, engraved by Nathaniel Whitlock,
Melb1850s
And yet, with more than half the population transient and living in tents, this is what they planned — see the architect's vision below—an enormous library, that would be free to all people, regardless of birth, income or education.
1860
A magnificent, forward-looking vision, is it not? In 1853, they decided to build the library and they didn't wait around; by 1854 they had the plan and the foundation stone laid, and in 1856 the library opened with a collection of 3,800 books. All done without convict labor (Victoria was a free colony) and in a time when workmen were in drastically short supply because of the gold rush.
See the dome in the architect's drawing above? This is it now.

Reading_room
This is the reading room where I first got the idea for An Honorable Thief. It's also where I read the journals that I based so many details of the journey in Tallie's Knight.

    And here's the Queen's Hall. Can't you just imagine a fabulous Regency event here?

Queenshall-420x0-1
 So you can understand why I'm proud to be a member of this library. It's also a fabulous research resource for my books — still free, and with brilliant on-line resources as well,  but I digress. 
Library&Baill  

The reason I was there last week was for the announcement of an exhibition coming in 2012 — Love and Devotion – from Persia and Beyond. It's a collection of stunning illustrated manuscripts dating from the 13th-18th centuries, on loan from the Bodleian Library at Oxford University, with the theme of Love and Devotion.

Love&devotion1
We're talking love poetry, and more.  I'm no expert, and I don't intend to go on about the history of Persian writing, except to say that Persian art and literature extended far beyond Persia and had a powerful effect on European culture as well. At the announcement event, they had on display a collection of rare and beautiful books, all influenced by Persian literature. 

RelatedBooks
 Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet was influenced by it, Chaucer, Dante, Kit Marlowe, Byron, all read and studied Persian literature. And I'm sure we all know a line or two from one of the many translations of the Rubaiyat of Omar Kayyam: A jug of wine, a book of verse – and thou.

RomandelaRose  I'm so eager for this exhibition to come here, but I'll have to be patient, because it's a year away. In the meantime, I'm delving into Persian love poetry. While I was writing The Perfect Kiss, I developed a taste for some of the Arabic poetry that flourished in Ottoman Spain in the middle ages — also strongly influenced by Persian culture. Those of you who've read the book will remember my heroine, Grace, reading this from the poem, Night of Love by the Poet of Andalusia, Ibn Safr al-Marini:

And she came like bright dawn
opening a path through the night
or like the wind
skimming the surface of a river.

The horizon all around me
breathed out perfume
announcing her arrival
as the fragrance precedes a flower.

And here's part of a lovely poem written by Khusrau in Persian in 12th century India. 
Do not overlook my misery by blandishing your eyes,
and weaving tales; My patience has over-brimmed,
O sweetheart, why do you not take me to your bosom.
Long like curls in the night of separation,
short like life on the day of our union;
My dear, how will I pass the dark dungeon night
without your face before.
(trans. M. Rehman)

I could go on — but I won't. Do you enjoy poetry?  Here's a task for you: share with us a few lines of a favorite poem from any culture or any era. Or else tell us about your favorite library and why you love it.

125 thoughts on “Of Libraries and Love Poems”

  1. Can’t say I like poetry. I think I’m too impatient to read it. But I love libraries! I have since I was a kid. I’m always taking out a pile of books. I would take out the whole library if I could. Inter-library loans just increased my pleasure. Now, my local library system just has to get ebooks.

    Reply
  2. Can’t say I like poetry. I think I’m too impatient to read it. But I love libraries! I have since I was a kid. I’m always taking out a pile of books. I would take out the whole library if I could. Inter-library loans just increased my pleasure. Now, my local library system just has to get ebooks.

    Reply
  3. Can’t say I like poetry. I think I’m too impatient to read it. But I love libraries! I have since I was a kid. I’m always taking out a pile of books. I would take out the whole library if I could. Inter-library loans just increased my pleasure. Now, my local library system just has to get ebooks.

    Reply
  4. Can’t say I like poetry. I think I’m too impatient to read it. But I love libraries! I have since I was a kid. I’m always taking out a pile of books. I would take out the whole library if I could. Inter-library loans just increased my pleasure. Now, my local library system just has to get ebooks.

    Reply
  5. Can’t say I like poetry. I think I’m too impatient to read it. But I love libraries! I have since I was a kid. I’m always taking out a pile of books. I would take out the whole library if I could. Inter-library loans just increased my pleasure. Now, my local library system just has to get ebooks.

    Reply
  6. Linda, that’s an interesting thought about e-books. I wonder if we’ll ever see e-libraries. Meaning the whole library is on-line. Wouldn’t that be a fun idea?
    Actually I can see a benefit of that. Strangely it’s hard for people in places like Australia, NZ, etc to get e-editions, as publishers have put geographical restrictions on selling them. I’ve been getting emails from readers complaining amazon won’t let them buy the e-versions of my latest books, for instance. So maybe an e-library would overcome that.

    Reply
  7. Linda, that’s an interesting thought about e-books. I wonder if we’ll ever see e-libraries. Meaning the whole library is on-line. Wouldn’t that be a fun idea?
    Actually I can see a benefit of that. Strangely it’s hard for people in places like Australia, NZ, etc to get e-editions, as publishers have put geographical restrictions on selling them. I’ve been getting emails from readers complaining amazon won’t let them buy the e-versions of my latest books, for instance. So maybe an e-library would overcome that.

    Reply
  8. Linda, that’s an interesting thought about e-books. I wonder if we’ll ever see e-libraries. Meaning the whole library is on-line. Wouldn’t that be a fun idea?
    Actually I can see a benefit of that. Strangely it’s hard for people in places like Australia, NZ, etc to get e-editions, as publishers have put geographical restrictions on selling them. I’ve been getting emails from readers complaining amazon won’t let them buy the e-versions of my latest books, for instance. So maybe an e-library would overcome that.

    Reply
  9. Linda, that’s an interesting thought about e-books. I wonder if we’ll ever see e-libraries. Meaning the whole library is on-line. Wouldn’t that be a fun idea?
    Actually I can see a benefit of that. Strangely it’s hard for people in places like Australia, NZ, etc to get e-editions, as publishers have put geographical restrictions on selling them. I’ve been getting emails from readers complaining amazon won’t let them buy the e-versions of my latest books, for instance. So maybe an e-library would overcome that.

    Reply
  10. Linda, that’s an interesting thought about e-books. I wonder if we’ll ever see e-libraries. Meaning the whole library is on-line. Wouldn’t that be a fun idea?
    Actually I can see a benefit of that. Strangely it’s hard for people in places like Australia, NZ, etc to get e-editions, as publishers have put geographical restrictions on selling them. I’ve been getting emails from readers complaining amazon won’t let them buy the e-versions of my latest books, for instance. So maybe an e-library would overcome that.

    Reply
  11. Thanks, Lilian, you would have loved the display of books they put out to demonstrate the links English literature had with ancient Persian manuscripts. Beautiful. I felt very privileged.
    Trish, thanks. The library is well worth a visit to anyone coming to Melbourne. They often have some exhibition on as well — at the moment it’s illustrations of children’s books, and that’s such a treat. Free, of course.

    Reply
  12. Thanks, Lilian, you would have loved the display of books they put out to demonstrate the links English literature had with ancient Persian manuscripts. Beautiful. I felt very privileged.
    Trish, thanks. The library is well worth a visit to anyone coming to Melbourne. They often have some exhibition on as well — at the moment it’s illustrations of children’s books, and that’s such a treat. Free, of course.

    Reply
  13. Thanks, Lilian, you would have loved the display of books they put out to demonstrate the links English literature had with ancient Persian manuscripts. Beautiful. I felt very privileged.
    Trish, thanks. The library is well worth a visit to anyone coming to Melbourne. They often have some exhibition on as well — at the moment it’s illustrations of children’s books, and that’s such a treat. Free, of course.

    Reply
  14. Thanks, Lilian, you would have loved the display of books they put out to demonstrate the links English literature had with ancient Persian manuscripts. Beautiful. I felt very privileged.
    Trish, thanks. The library is well worth a visit to anyone coming to Melbourne. They often have some exhibition on as well — at the moment it’s illustrations of children’s books, and that’s such a treat. Free, of course.

    Reply
  15. Thanks, Lilian, you would have loved the display of books they put out to demonstrate the links English literature had with ancient Persian manuscripts. Beautiful. I felt very privileged.
    Trish, thanks. The library is well worth a visit to anyone coming to Melbourne. They often have some exhibition on as well — at the moment it’s illustrations of children’s books, and that’s such a treat. Free, of course.

    Reply
  16. “From the desert I come to thee
    On a stallion shod with fire;
    And the winds are left behind
    In the speed of my desire.”
    First 4 lines of a poem by Bayard Taylor entitled Bedouin Song. I think it’s swooningly romantic.
    I love poetry and dabble in it myself. Your post was fantastic, Anne. The pictures made me drool.

    Reply
  17. “From the desert I come to thee
    On a stallion shod with fire;
    And the winds are left behind
    In the speed of my desire.”
    First 4 lines of a poem by Bayard Taylor entitled Bedouin Song. I think it’s swooningly romantic.
    I love poetry and dabble in it myself. Your post was fantastic, Anne. The pictures made me drool.

    Reply
  18. “From the desert I come to thee
    On a stallion shod with fire;
    And the winds are left behind
    In the speed of my desire.”
    First 4 lines of a poem by Bayard Taylor entitled Bedouin Song. I think it’s swooningly romantic.
    I love poetry and dabble in it myself. Your post was fantastic, Anne. The pictures made me drool.

    Reply
  19. “From the desert I come to thee
    On a stallion shod with fire;
    And the winds are left behind
    In the speed of my desire.”
    First 4 lines of a poem by Bayard Taylor entitled Bedouin Song. I think it’s swooningly romantic.
    I love poetry and dabble in it myself. Your post was fantastic, Anne. The pictures made me drool.

    Reply
  20. “From the desert I come to thee
    On a stallion shod with fire;
    And the winds are left behind
    In the speed of my desire.”
    First 4 lines of a poem by Bayard Taylor entitled Bedouin Song. I think it’s swooningly romantic.
    I love poetry and dabble in it myself. Your post was fantastic, Anne. The pictures made me drool.

    Reply
  21. What a fantastic blog, Anne. I loved your diversions into history and the pictures of the fabulous State Library. I’m a massive fan of both libraries and poetry. Here in the UK we have a big fight on our hands at present to preserve the library system at a time of economic crisis and library cuts. There are library closures going on all over the country which to me feels like a dreadful retrograde step. At this rate we will have to go back to Regency methods and open our own subscription circulating libraries!
    As for the poetry – Well, Young Lochinvar by Sir Walter Scott always gives me the goosebumps with the beautiful Ellen all set to marry another man and Lord Lochinvar walking into her father’s hall to claim a dance with the bride and then eloping with her:
    “One touch to her hand, and one word in her ear,
    When they reach’d the hall-door, and the charger stood near;
    So light to the croupe the fair lady he swung,
    So light to the saddle before her he sprung!
    “There was racing and chasing on Cannobie Lee,
    But the lost bride of Netherby ne’er did they see.
    So daring in love, and so dauntless in war,
    Have ye e’er heard of gallant like young Lochinvar?”

    Reply
  22. What a fantastic blog, Anne. I loved your diversions into history and the pictures of the fabulous State Library. I’m a massive fan of both libraries and poetry. Here in the UK we have a big fight on our hands at present to preserve the library system at a time of economic crisis and library cuts. There are library closures going on all over the country which to me feels like a dreadful retrograde step. At this rate we will have to go back to Regency methods and open our own subscription circulating libraries!
    As for the poetry – Well, Young Lochinvar by Sir Walter Scott always gives me the goosebumps with the beautiful Ellen all set to marry another man and Lord Lochinvar walking into her father’s hall to claim a dance with the bride and then eloping with her:
    “One touch to her hand, and one word in her ear,
    When they reach’d the hall-door, and the charger stood near;
    So light to the croupe the fair lady he swung,
    So light to the saddle before her he sprung!
    “There was racing and chasing on Cannobie Lee,
    But the lost bride of Netherby ne’er did they see.
    So daring in love, and so dauntless in war,
    Have ye e’er heard of gallant like young Lochinvar?”

    Reply
  23. What a fantastic blog, Anne. I loved your diversions into history and the pictures of the fabulous State Library. I’m a massive fan of both libraries and poetry. Here in the UK we have a big fight on our hands at present to preserve the library system at a time of economic crisis and library cuts. There are library closures going on all over the country which to me feels like a dreadful retrograde step. At this rate we will have to go back to Regency methods and open our own subscription circulating libraries!
    As for the poetry – Well, Young Lochinvar by Sir Walter Scott always gives me the goosebumps with the beautiful Ellen all set to marry another man and Lord Lochinvar walking into her father’s hall to claim a dance with the bride and then eloping with her:
    “One touch to her hand, and one word in her ear,
    When they reach’d the hall-door, and the charger stood near;
    So light to the croupe the fair lady he swung,
    So light to the saddle before her he sprung!
    “There was racing and chasing on Cannobie Lee,
    But the lost bride of Netherby ne’er did they see.
    So daring in love, and so dauntless in war,
    Have ye e’er heard of gallant like young Lochinvar?”

    Reply
  24. What a fantastic blog, Anne. I loved your diversions into history and the pictures of the fabulous State Library. I’m a massive fan of both libraries and poetry. Here in the UK we have a big fight on our hands at present to preserve the library system at a time of economic crisis and library cuts. There are library closures going on all over the country which to me feels like a dreadful retrograde step. At this rate we will have to go back to Regency methods and open our own subscription circulating libraries!
    As for the poetry – Well, Young Lochinvar by Sir Walter Scott always gives me the goosebumps with the beautiful Ellen all set to marry another man and Lord Lochinvar walking into her father’s hall to claim a dance with the bride and then eloping with her:
    “One touch to her hand, and one word in her ear,
    When they reach’d the hall-door, and the charger stood near;
    So light to the croupe the fair lady he swung,
    So light to the saddle before her he sprung!
    “There was racing and chasing on Cannobie Lee,
    But the lost bride of Netherby ne’er did they see.
    So daring in love, and so dauntless in war,
    Have ye e’er heard of gallant like young Lochinvar?”

    Reply
  25. What a fantastic blog, Anne. I loved your diversions into history and the pictures of the fabulous State Library. I’m a massive fan of both libraries and poetry. Here in the UK we have a big fight on our hands at present to preserve the library system at a time of economic crisis and library cuts. There are library closures going on all over the country which to me feels like a dreadful retrograde step. At this rate we will have to go back to Regency methods and open our own subscription circulating libraries!
    As for the poetry – Well, Young Lochinvar by Sir Walter Scott always gives me the goosebumps with the beautiful Ellen all set to marry another man and Lord Lochinvar walking into her father’s hall to claim a dance with the bride and then eloping with her:
    “One touch to her hand, and one word in her ear,
    When they reach’d the hall-door, and the charger stood near;
    So light to the croupe the fair lady he swung,
    So light to the saddle before her he sprung!
    “There was racing and chasing on Cannobie Lee,
    But the lost bride of Netherby ne’er did they see.
    So daring in love, and so dauntless in war,
    Have ye e’er heard of gallant like young Lochinvar?”

    Reply
  26. I love libraries – old and modern. Many, many times I have taken my computer to write in the lovely, relative silence – and what better for research than to get up and wander and pull out a book.
    They truly are special.
    cx

    Reply
  27. I love libraries – old and modern. Many, many times I have taken my computer to write in the lovely, relative silence – and what better for research than to get up and wander and pull out a book.
    They truly are special.
    cx

    Reply
  28. I love libraries – old and modern. Many, many times I have taken my computer to write in the lovely, relative silence – and what better for research than to get up and wander and pull out a book.
    They truly are special.
    cx

    Reply
  29. I love libraries – old and modern. Many, many times I have taken my computer to write in the lovely, relative silence – and what better for research than to get up and wander and pull out a book.
    They truly are special.
    cx

    Reply
  30. I love libraries – old and modern. Many, many times I have taken my computer to write in the lovely, relative silence – and what better for research than to get up and wander and pull out a book.
    They truly are special.
    cx

    Reply
  31. “Come away, O human child/To the waters and the wild/With a faerie hand in hand/For the world’s more full of weeping than you can understand.”
    That’s from “The Stolen Child” by W.B. Yeats, my favorite poet of all time. It’s based on the Irish legend of the changeling, and it’s always touched me deeply, perhaps because as I child, I wondered what it would be like to run away and live among the fairy folk.
    I had the absolute thrill of a lifetime when, in 2009, I went to Ireland and visited Thoor Ballylee, where Yeats lived, and Coole Park, where he and so many of the Irish literati visited.

    Reply
  32. “Come away, O human child/To the waters and the wild/With a faerie hand in hand/For the world’s more full of weeping than you can understand.”
    That’s from “The Stolen Child” by W.B. Yeats, my favorite poet of all time. It’s based on the Irish legend of the changeling, and it’s always touched me deeply, perhaps because as I child, I wondered what it would be like to run away and live among the fairy folk.
    I had the absolute thrill of a lifetime when, in 2009, I went to Ireland and visited Thoor Ballylee, where Yeats lived, and Coole Park, where he and so many of the Irish literati visited.

    Reply
  33. “Come away, O human child/To the waters and the wild/With a faerie hand in hand/For the world’s more full of weeping than you can understand.”
    That’s from “The Stolen Child” by W.B. Yeats, my favorite poet of all time. It’s based on the Irish legend of the changeling, and it’s always touched me deeply, perhaps because as I child, I wondered what it would be like to run away and live among the fairy folk.
    I had the absolute thrill of a lifetime when, in 2009, I went to Ireland and visited Thoor Ballylee, where Yeats lived, and Coole Park, where he and so many of the Irish literati visited.

    Reply
  34. “Come away, O human child/To the waters and the wild/With a faerie hand in hand/For the world’s more full of weeping than you can understand.”
    That’s from “The Stolen Child” by W.B. Yeats, my favorite poet of all time. It’s based on the Irish legend of the changeling, and it’s always touched me deeply, perhaps because as I child, I wondered what it would be like to run away and live among the fairy folk.
    I had the absolute thrill of a lifetime when, in 2009, I went to Ireland and visited Thoor Ballylee, where Yeats lived, and Coole Park, where he and so many of the Irish literati visited.

    Reply
  35. “Come away, O human child/To the waters and the wild/With a faerie hand in hand/For the world’s more full of weeping than you can understand.”
    That’s from “The Stolen Child” by W.B. Yeats, my favorite poet of all time. It’s based on the Irish legend of the changeling, and it’s always touched me deeply, perhaps because as I child, I wondered what it would be like to run away and live among the fairy folk.
    I had the absolute thrill of a lifetime when, in 2009, I went to Ireland and visited Thoor Ballylee, where Yeats lived, and Coole Park, where he and so many of the Irish literati visited.

    Reply
  36. I love libraries. I have another site to add to my Australia list. I once got lost in NYC and went to the lovely library with the lions. Research Librarians are so helpful. I am lucky I live 60 miles from Washington DC and can visit the Folger Shakespeare Library and Library of Congress. Folger recently had a Henry the 8th exibit. Saw his copy of Erasmus with a childish scrawl “this book by mine, Prince Henry”. If you are into iPads, the Library of Congress has an app. Most of their resources are also online.
    Library of Congress–Virtual Tour provides not only photos of the Library’s historic rooms, but historical background on them, paired with related links for further investigation and audio podcasts about items or features in each room.
    http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/library-of-congress-virtual/id380309745?mt=8
    See you at libraries or just virtually.

    Reply
  37. I love libraries. I have another site to add to my Australia list. I once got lost in NYC and went to the lovely library with the lions. Research Librarians are so helpful. I am lucky I live 60 miles from Washington DC and can visit the Folger Shakespeare Library and Library of Congress. Folger recently had a Henry the 8th exibit. Saw his copy of Erasmus with a childish scrawl “this book by mine, Prince Henry”. If you are into iPads, the Library of Congress has an app. Most of their resources are also online.
    Library of Congress–Virtual Tour provides not only photos of the Library’s historic rooms, but historical background on them, paired with related links for further investigation and audio podcasts about items or features in each room.
    http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/library-of-congress-virtual/id380309745?mt=8
    See you at libraries or just virtually.

    Reply
  38. I love libraries. I have another site to add to my Australia list. I once got lost in NYC and went to the lovely library with the lions. Research Librarians are so helpful. I am lucky I live 60 miles from Washington DC and can visit the Folger Shakespeare Library and Library of Congress. Folger recently had a Henry the 8th exibit. Saw his copy of Erasmus with a childish scrawl “this book by mine, Prince Henry”. If you are into iPads, the Library of Congress has an app. Most of their resources are also online.
    Library of Congress–Virtual Tour provides not only photos of the Library’s historic rooms, but historical background on them, paired with related links for further investigation and audio podcasts about items or features in each room.
    http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/library-of-congress-virtual/id380309745?mt=8
    See you at libraries or just virtually.

    Reply
  39. I love libraries. I have another site to add to my Australia list. I once got lost in NYC and went to the lovely library with the lions. Research Librarians are so helpful. I am lucky I live 60 miles from Washington DC and can visit the Folger Shakespeare Library and Library of Congress. Folger recently had a Henry the 8th exibit. Saw his copy of Erasmus with a childish scrawl “this book by mine, Prince Henry”. If you are into iPads, the Library of Congress has an app. Most of their resources are also online.
    Library of Congress–Virtual Tour provides not only photos of the Library’s historic rooms, but historical background on them, paired with related links for further investigation and audio podcasts about items or features in each room.
    http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/library-of-congress-virtual/id380309745?mt=8
    See you at libraries or just virtually.

    Reply
  40. I love libraries. I have another site to add to my Australia list. I once got lost in NYC and went to the lovely library with the lions. Research Librarians are so helpful. I am lucky I live 60 miles from Washington DC and can visit the Folger Shakespeare Library and Library of Congress. Folger recently had a Henry the 8th exibit. Saw his copy of Erasmus with a childish scrawl “this book by mine, Prince Henry”. If you are into iPads, the Library of Congress has an app. Most of their resources are also online.
    Library of Congress–Virtual Tour provides not only photos of the Library’s historic rooms, but historical background on them, paired with related links for further investigation and audio podcasts about items or features in each room.
    http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/library-of-congress-virtual/id380309745?mt=8
    See you at libraries or just virtually.

    Reply
  41. I love libraries, too, and yours in Melbourne is a magnificent example, Anne. How splendid.
    Whenever I visit places for research, I always head for the library, because they have local history sections and much good stuff.
    Alas, I do find quite a few in England have been relocated from the heart of town to a modern building on the edge. Doubtless efficient, but so much is lost. A local library should be in the heart of things.
    I don’t read poetry as much as I’d like, and I can only write doggerel. I, too, thrilled to Lochinvar — do they teach such luscious stuff at school anymore? — and Yeats, absolutely. I can’t quote any off the top of my head, but his Leda and the Swan is quite erotic, which was exciting in the 6th form.
    Looked it up.
    A sudden blow: the great wings beating still
    Above the staggering girl, her thighs caressed
    By the dark webs, her nape caught in his bill,
    He holds her helpless breast upon his breast.
    How can those terrified vague fingers push
    The feathered glory from her loosening thighs?
    And how can body, laid in that white rush,
    But feel the strange heart beating where it lies?
    A shudder in the loins engenders there
    The broken wall, the burning roof and tower
    And Agamemnon dead. Being so caught up,
    So mastered by the brute blood of the air,
    Did she put on his knowledge with his power
    Before the indifferent beak could let her drop?
    Jo

    Reply
  42. I love libraries, too, and yours in Melbourne is a magnificent example, Anne. How splendid.
    Whenever I visit places for research, I always head for the library, because they have local history sections and much good stuff.
    Alas, I do find quite a few in England have been relocated from the heart of town to a modern building on the edge. Doubtless efficient, but so much is lost. A local library should be in the heart of things.
    I don’t read poetry as much as I’d like, and I can only write doggerel. I, too, thrilled to Lochinvar — do they teach such luscious stuff at school anymore? — and Yeats, absolutely. I can’t quote any off the top of my head, but his Leda and the Swan is quite erotic, which was exciting in the 6th form.
    Looked it up.
    A sudden blow: the great wings beating still
    Above the staggering girl, her thighs caressed
    By the dark webs, her nape caught in his bill,
    He holds her helpless breast upon his breast.
    How can those terrified vague fingers push
    The feathered glory from her loosening thighs?
    And how can body, laid in that white rush,
    But feel the strange heart beating where it lies?
    A shudder in the loins engenders there
    The broken wall, the burning roof and tower
    And Agamemnon dead. Being so caught up,
    So mastered by the brute blood of the air,
    Did she put on his knowledge with his power
    Before the indifferent beak could let her drop?
    Jo

    Reply
  43. I love libraries, too, and yours in Melbourne is a magnificent example, Anne. How splendid.
    Whenever I visit places for research, I always head for the library, because they have local history sections and much good stuff.
    Alas, I do find quite a few in England have been relocated from the heart of town to a modern building on the edge. Doubtless efficient, but so much is lost. A local library should be in the heart of things.
    I don’t read poetry as much as I’d like, and I can only write doggerel. I, too, thrilled to Lochinvar — do they teach such luscious stuff at school anymore? — and Yeats, absolutely. I can’t quote any off the top of my head, but his Leda and the Swan is quite erotic, which was exciting in the 6th form.
    Looked it up.
    A sudden blow: the great wings beating still
    Above the staggering girl, her thighs caressed
    By the dark webs, her nape caught in his bill,
    He holds her helpless breast upon his breast.
    How can those terrified vague fingers push
    The feathered glory from her loosening thighs?
    And how can body, laid in that white rush,
    But feel the strange heart beating where it lies?
    A shudder in the loins engenders there
    The broken wall, the burning roof and tower
    And Agamemnon dead. Being so caught up,
    So mastered by the brute blood of the air,
    Did she put on his knowledge with his power
    Before the indifferent beak could let her drop?
    Jo

    Reply
  44. I love libraries, too, and yours in Melbourne is a magnificent example, Anne. How splendid.
    Whenever I visit places for research, I always head for the library, because they have local history sections and much good stuff.
    Alas, I do find quite a few in England have been relocated from the heart of town to a modern building on the edge. Doubtless efficient, but so much is lost. A local library should be in the heart of things.
    I don’t read poetry as much as I’d like, and I can only write doggerel. I, too, thrilled to Lochinvar — do they teach such luscious stuff at school anymore? — and Yeats, absolutely. I can’t quote any off the top of my head, but his Leda and the Swan is quite erotic, which was exciting in the 6th form.
    Looked it up.
    A sudden blow: the great wings beating still
    Above the staggering girl, her thighs caressed
    By the dark webs, her nape caught in his bill,
    He holds her helpless breast upon his breast.
    How can those terrified vague fingers push
    The feathered glory from her loosening thighs?
    And how can body, laid in that white rush,
    But feel the strange heart beating where it lies?
    A shudder in the loins engenders there
    The broken wall, the burning roof and tower
    And Agamemnon dead. Being so caught up,
    So mastered by the brute blood of the air,
    Did she put on his knowledge with his power
    Before the indifferent beak could let her drop?
    Jo

    Reply
  45. I love libraries, too, and yours in Melbourne is a magnificent example, Anne. How splendid.
    Whenever I visit places for research, I always head for the library, because they have local history sections and much good stuff.
    Alas, I do find quite a few in England have been relocated from the heart of town to a modern building on the edge. Doubtless efficient, but so much is lost. A local library should be in the heart of things.
    I don’t read poetry as much as I’d like, and I can only write doggerel. I, too, thrilled to Lochinvar — do they teach such luscious stuff at school anymore? — and Yeats, absolutely. I can’t quote any off the top of my head, but his Leda and the Swan is quite erotic, which was exciting in the 6th form.
    Looked it up.
    A sudden blow: the great wings beating still
    Above the staggering girl, her thighs caressed
    By the dark webs, her nape caught in his bill,
    He holds her helpless breast upon his breast.
    How can those terrified vague fingers push
    The feathered glory from her loosening thighs?
    And how can body, laid in that white rush,
    But feel the strange heart beating where it lies?
    A shudder in the loins engenders there
    The broken wall, the burning roof and tower
    And Agamemnon dead. Being so caught up,
    So mastered by the brute blood of the air,
    Did she put on his knowledge with his power
    Before the indifferent beak could let her drop?
    Jo

    Reply
  46. Aloha, Anne! Fabulous post! My college friends snicker that I spent no time in the unversity library … but now I blog about books?!? Redemption! I discovered romance in general (and historical romance in particular) while living in the Netherlands. I exhausted the paperback selection at the Stars and Stripes bookstore, including titles by Jo Beverley, Nicola Cornick, Andrea Pickens, and Patricia Rice. Then I ventured into the Army library at the NATO camp where I found harbacks by Jude Devereaux, Julie Garwood, Johanna Lindsey, and Mary Jo Putney. I now volunteer with the base library!

    Reply
  47. Aloha, Anne! Fabulous post! My college friends snicker that I spent no time in the unversity library … but now I blog about books?!? Redemption! I discovered romance in general (and historical romance in particular) while living in the Netherlands. I exhausted the paperback selection at the Stars and Stripes bookstore, including titles by Jo Beverley, Nicola Cornick, Andrea Pickens, and Patricia Rice. Then I ventured into the Army library at the NATO camp where I found harbacks by Jude Devereaux, Julie Garwood, Johanna Lindsey, and Mary Jo Putney. I now volunteer with the base library!

    Reply
  48. Aloha, Anne! Fabulous post! My college friends snicker that I spent no time in the unversity library … but now I blog about books?!? Redemption! I discovered romance in general (and historical romance in particular) while living in the Netherlands. I exhausted the paperback selection at the Stars and Stripes bookstore, including titles by Jo Beverley, Nicola Cornick, Andrea Pickens, and Patricia Rice. Then I ventured into the Army library at the NATO camp where I found harbacks by Jude Devereaux, Julie Garwood, Johanna Lindsey, and Mary Jo Putney. I now volunteer with the base library!

    Reply
  49. Aloha, Anne! Fabulous post! My college friends snicker that I spent no time in the unversity library … but now I blog about books?!? Redemption! I discovered romance in general (and historical romance in particular) while living in the Netherlands. I exhausted the paperback selection at the Stars and Stripes bookstore, including titles by Jo Beverley, Nicola Cornick, Andrea Pickens, and Patricia Rice. Then I ventured into the Army library at the NATO camp where I found harbacks by Jude Devereaux, Julie Garwood, Johanna Lindsey, and Mary Jo Putney. I now volunteer with the base library!

    Reply
  50. Aloha, Anne! Fabulous post! My college friends snicker that I spent no time in the unversity library … but now I blog about books?!? Redemption! I discovered romance in general (and historical romance in particular) while living in the Netherlands. I exhausted the paperback selection at the Stars and Stripes bookstore, including titles by Jo Beverley, Nicola Cornick, Andrea Pickens, and Patricia Rice. Then I ventured into the Army library at the NATO camp where I found harbacks by Jude Devereaux, Julie Garwood, Johanna Lindsey, and Mary Jo Putney. I now volunteer with the base library!

    Reply
  51. Aloha, again! Regarding poetry, the Hawaiians did not have a written language until the missionaries came to the islands in the 1800s and helped them create one (12 letters only – a, e, i, o, u, hk, l, m, n, p, w, all pronounced like German letters).
    For the preceeding 1000 years, the Hawaiians relied upon story telling, often part of the hula. Here’s a poem I found for you:
    Mele Ku-pe’e
    Aala kupukupu a ka uka o Kane-hoa.
    E ho-a!
    Hoa na lima o ka makani, he Wai-kaloa.
    He Wai-kaloa ka makani anu Lihue.
    Alina e lehua i kau ka opua–
    Ku’u pua,
    Ku’u pua i’ini e ku-i a lei.
    Ina ia oe ke lei ’a mai la.
    [Translation]
    Anklet-Song
    Fragrant the grasses of high Kane-hoa.
    Bind on the anklets, bind!
    Bind with finger deft as the wind
    That cools the air of this bower.
    Lehua bloom pales at my flower,
    O sweetheart of mine,
    Bud that I’d pluck and wear in my wreath,
    If thou wert but a flower!

    Reply
  52. Aloha, again! Regarding poetry, the Hawaiians did not have a written language until the missionaries came to the islands in the 1800s and helped them create one (12 letters only – a, e, i, o, u, hk, l, m, n, p, w, all pronounced like German letters).
    For the preceeding 1000 years, the Hawaiians relied upon story telling, often part of the hula. Here’s a poem I found for you:
    Mele Ku-pe’e
    Aala kupukupu a ka uka o Kane-hoa.
    E ho-a!
    Hoa na lima o ka makani, he Wai-kaloa.
    He Wai-kaloa ka makani anu Lihue.
    Alina e lehua i kau ka opua–
    Ku’u pua,
    Ku’u pua i’ini e ku-i a lei.
    Ina ia oe ke lei ’a mai la.
    [Translation]
    Anklet-Song
    Fragrant the grasses of high Kane-hoa.
    Bind on the anklets, bind!
    Bind with finger deft as the wind
    That cools the air of this bower.
    Lehua bloom pales at my flower,
    O sweetheart of mine,
    Bud that I’d pluck and wear in my wreath,
    If thou wert but a flower!

    Reply
  53. Aloha, again! Regarding poetry, the Hawaiians did not have a written language until the missionaries came to the islands in the 1800s and helped them create one (12 letters only – a, e, i, o, u, hk, l, m, n, p, w, all pronounced like German letters).
    For the preceeding 1000 years, the Hawaiians relied upon story telling, often part of the hula. Here’s a poem I found for you:
    Mele Ku-pe’e
    Aala kupukupu a ka uka o Kane-hoa.
    E ho-a!
    Hoa na lima o ka makani, he Wai-kaloa.
    He Wai-kaloa ka makani anu Lihue.
    Alina e lehua i kau ka opua–
    Ku’u pua,
    Ku’u pua i’ini e ku-i a lei.
    Ina ia oe ke lei ’a mai la.
    [Translation]
    Anklet-Song
    Fragrant the grasses of high Kane-hoa.
    Bind on the anklets, bind!
    Bind with finger deft as the wind
    That cools the air of this bower.
    Lehua bloom pales at my flower,
    O sweetheart of mine,
    Bud that I’d pluck and wear in my wreath,
    If thou wert but a flower!

    Reply
  54. Aloha, again! Regarding poetry, the Hawaiians did not have a written language until the missionaries came to the islands in the 1800s and helped them create one (12 letters only – a, e, i, o, u, hk, l, m, n, p, w, all pronounced like German letters).
    For the preceeding 1000 years, the Hawaiians relied upon story telling, often part of the hula. Here’s a poem I found for you:
    Mele Ku-pe’e
    Aala kupukupu a ka uka o Kane-hoa.
    E ho-a!
    Hoa na lima o ka makani, he Wai-kaloa.
    He Wai-kaloa ka makani anu Lihue.
    Alina e lehua i kau ka opua–
    Ku’u pua,
    Ku’u pua i’ini e ku-i a lei.
    Ina ia oe ke lei ’a mai la.
    [Translation]
    Anklet-Song
    Fragrant the grasses of high Kane-hoa.
    Bind on the anklets, bind!
    Bind with finger deft as the wind
    That cools the air of this bower.
    Lehua bloom pales at my flower,
    O sweetheart of mine,
    Bud that I’d pluck and wear in my wreath,
    If thou wert but a flower!

    Reply
  55. Aloha, again! Regarding poetry, the Hawaiians did not have a written language until the missionaries came to the islands in the 1800s and helped them create one (12 letters only – a, e, i, o, u, hk, l, m, n, p, w, all pronounced like German letters).
    For the preceeding 1000 years, the Hawaiians relied upon story telling, often part of the hula. Here’s a poem I found for you:
    Mele Ku-pe’e
    Aala kupukupu a ka uka o Kane-hoa.
    E ho-a!
    Hoa na lima o ka makani, he Wai-kaloa.
    He Wai-kaloa ka makani anu Lihue.
    Alina e lehua i kau ka opua–
    Ku’u pua,
    Ku’u pua i’ini e ku-i a lei.
    Ina ia oe ke lei ’a mai la.
    [Translation]
    Anklet-Song
    Fragrant the grasses of high Kane-hoa.
    Bind on the anklets, bind!
    Bind with finger deft as the wind
    That cools the air of this bower.
    Lehua bloom pales at my flower,
    O sweetheart of mine,
    Bud that I’d pluck and wear in my wreath,
    If thou wert but a flower!

    Reply
  56. So much food for discussion!
    Lyn S is right that the Library of Congress is both a gorgeous building (actually 3, but the Jefferson Building is the beautiful one) and an incredible national resource. If anyone reading this ever goes to Washington DC, be sure to visit.
    I think my first introduction to Romance came through poetry. Leigh Hunt’s “Jenny Kissed Me” (“Jenny kissed me when we met/Jumping from the chair she sat in . . .”) doesn’t have a HEA, but I’ve always thought a romance writer could use it as the basis for a VG story with a different ending, where the line “say I’m old and say I’m weary” refers more to emotion than to years, and the love restores the hero. When Dana Gioia was head of the NEA, he used “Jenny” as the basis for a national discussion of our favorite poems.
    “The Highwayman” by Alfred Noyes is another 19th C poem with a sad ending, but when I was 13 I thought it was the most romantic thing I’d ever read.
    As for Yeats, I took a course on his poetry in my early 20s and fell in love with his work. In “Leda and the Swan” he foretells the fall of Troy (Leda was Helen’s mother) with “the broken wall, the burning tower” without having to spell it out in detail. The poem is intensely erotic and layered, and he achieves these effects through the imagery alone. He also has a number of early poems that are quite romantic. One of my favorites is “To an Isle in the Water” with the opening “Shy one, shy one, shy one of my heart.”
    And to Anne’s initial topic of libraries, I discovered most of these poems and books through my school and town libraries.

    Reply
  57. So much food for discussion!
    Lyn S is right that the Library of Congress is both a gorgeous building (actually 3, but the Jefferson Building is the beautiful one) and an incredible national resource. If anyone reading this ever goes to Washington DC, be sure to visit.
    I think my first introduction to Romance came through poetry. Leigh Hunt’s “Jenny Kissed Me” (“Jenny kissed me when we met/Jumping from the chair she sat in . . .”) doesn’t have a HEA, but I’ve always thought a romance writer could use it as the basis for a VG story with a different ending, where the line “say I’m old and say I’m weary” refers more to emotion than to years, and the love restores the hero. When Dana Gioia was head of the NEA, he used “Jenny” as the basis for a national discussion of our favorite poems.
    “The Highwayman” by Alfred Noyes is another 19th C poem with a sad ending, but when I was 13 I thought it was the most romantic thing I’d ever read.
    As for Yeats, I took a course on his poetry in my early 20s and fell in love with his work. In “Leda and the Swan” he foretells the fall of Troy (Leda was Helen’s mother) with “the broken wall, the burning tower” without having to spell it out in detail. The poem is intensely erotic and layered, and he achieves these effects through the imagery alone. He also has a number of early poems that are quite romantic. One of my favorites is “To an Isle in the Water” with the opening “Shy one, shy one, shy one of my heart.”
    And to Anne’s initial topic of libraries, I discovered most of these poems and books through my school and town libraries.

    Reply
  58. So much food for discussion!
    Lyn S is right that the Library of Congress is both a gorgeous building (actually 3, but the Jefferson Building is the beautiful one) and an incredible national resource. If anyone reading this ever goes to Washington DC, be sure to visit.
    I think my first introduction to Romance came through poetry. Leigh Hunt’s “Jenny Kissed Me” (“Jenny kissed me when we met/Jumping from the chair she sat in . . .”) doesn’t have a HEA, but I’ve always thought a romance writer could use it as the basis for a VG story with a different ending, where the line “say I’m old and say I’m weary” refers more to emotion than to years, and the love restores the hero. When Dana Gioia was head of the NEA, he used “Jenny” as the basis for a national discussion of our favorite poems.
    “The Highwayman” by Alfred Noyes is another 19th C poem with a sad ending, but when I was 13 I thought it was the most romantic thing I’d ever read.
    As for Yeats, I took a course on his poetry in my early 20s and fell in love with his work. In “Leda and the Swan” he foretells the fall of Troy (Leda was Helen’s mother) with “the broken wall, the burning tower” without having to spell it out in detail. The poem is intensely erotic and layered, and he achieves these effects through the imagery alone. He also has a number of early poems that are quite romantic. One of my favorites is “To an Isle in the Water” with the opening “Shy one, shy one, shy one of my heart.”
    And to Anne’s initial topic of libraries, I discovered most of these poems and books through my school and town libraries.

    Reply
  59. So much food for discussion!
    Lyn S is right that the Library of Congress is both a gorgeous building (actually 3, but the Jefferson Building is the beautiful one) and an incredible national resource. If anyone reading this ever goes to Washington DC, be sure to visit.
    I think my first introduction to Romance came through poetry. Leigh Hunt’s “Jenny Kissed Me” (“Jenny kissed me when we met/Jumping from the chair she sat in . . .”) doesn’t have a HEA, but I’ve always thought a romance writer could use it as the basis for a VG story with a different ending, where the line “say I’m old and say I’m weary” refers more to emotion than to years, and the love restores the hero. When Dana Gioia was head of the NEA, he used “Jenny” as the basis for a national discussion of our favorite poems.
    “The Highwayman” by Alfred Noyes is another 19th C poem with a sad ending, but when I was 13 I thought it was the most romantic thing I’d ever read.
    As for Yeats, I took a course on his poetry in my early 20s and fell in love with his work. In “Leda and the Swan” he foretells the fall of Troy (Leda was Helen’s mother) with “the broken wall, the burning tower” without having to spell it out in detail. The poem is intensely erotic and layered, and he achieves these effects through the imagery alone. He also has a number of early poems that are quite romantic. One of my favorites is “To an Isle in the Water” with the opening “Shy one, shy one, shy one of my heart.”
    And to Anne’s initial topic of libraries, I discovered most of these poems and books through my school and town libraries.

    Reply
  60. So much food for discussion!
    Lyn S is right that the Library of Congress is both a gorgeous building (actually 3, but the Jefferson Building is the beautiful one) and an incredible national resource. If anyone reading this ever goes to Washington DC, be sure to visit.
    I think my first introduction to Romance came through poetry. Leigh Hunt’s “Jenny Kissed Me” (“Jenny kissed me when we met/Jumping from the chair she sat in . . .”) doesn’t have a HEA, but I’ve always thought a romance writer could use it as the basis for a VG story with a different ending, where the line “say I’m old and say I’m weary” refers more to emotion than to years, and the love restores the hero. When Dana Gioia was head of the NEA, he used “Jenny” as the basis for a national discussion of our favorite poems.
    “The Highwayman” by Alfred Noyes is another 19th C poem with a sad ending, but when I was 13 I thought it was the most romantic thing I’d ever read.
    As for Yeats, I took a course on his poetry in my early 20s and fell in love with his work. In “Leda and the Swan” he foretells the fall of Troy (Leda was Helen’s mother) with “the broken wall, the burning tower” without having to spell it out in detail. The poem is intensely erotic and layered, and he achieves these effects through the imagery alone. He also has a number of early poems that are quite romantic. One of my favorites is “To an Isle in the Water” with the opening “Shy one, shy one, shy one of my heart.”
    And to Anne’s initial topic of libraries, I discovered most of these poems and books through my school and town libraries.

    Reply
  61. Sherrie, that’s a gorgeous excerpt — I’m going to chase that poem up. And Bayard means brown horse, I think, so clearly he was from a horse family. Or else it’s a pen-name. Lovely, thank you.
    Ooh, Nicola, Young Lochinvar — love him. I had a secondary romance heroine — Tibby, the heroine’s governess, who adored this poem, and her hero in the end acted out the poem for her, kidnapping her from a wedding. Such fun.

    Reply
  62. Sherrie, that’s a gorgeous excerpt — I’m going to chase that poem up. And Bayard means brown horse, I think, so clearly he was from a horse family. Or else it’s a pen-name. Lovely, thank you.
    Ooh, Nicola, Young Lochinvar — love him. I had a secondary romance heroine — Tibby, the heroine’s governess, who adored this poem, and her hero in the end acted out the poem for her, kidnapping her from a wedding. Such fun.

    Reply
  63. Sherrie, that’s a gorgeous excerpt — I’m going to chase that poem up. And Bayard means brown horse, I think, so clearly he was from a horse family. Or else it’s a pen-name. Lovely, thank you.
    Ooh, Nicola, Young Lochinvar — love him. I had a secondary romance heroine — Tibby, the heroine’s governess, who adored this poem, and her hero in the end acted out the poem for her, kidnapping her from a wedding. Such fun.

    Reply
  64. Sherrie, that’s a gorgeous excerpt — I’m going to chase that poem up. And Bayard means brown horse, I think, so clearly he was from a horse family. Or else it’s a pen-name. Lovely, thank you.
    Ooh, Nicola, Young Lochinvar — love him. I had a secondary romance heroine — Tibby, the heroine’s governess, who adored this poem, and her hero in the end acted out the poem for her, kidnapping her from a wedding. Such fun.

    Reply
  65. Sherrie, that’s a gorgeous excerpt — I’m going to chase that poem up. And Bayard means brown horse, I think, so clearly he was from a horse family. Or else it’s a pen-name. Lovely, thank you.
    Ooh, Nicola, Young Lochinvar — love him. I had a secondary romance heroine — Tibby, the heroine’s governess, who adored this poem, and her hero in the end acted out the poem for her, kidnapping her from a wedding. Such fun.

    Reply
  66. Nicola, I meant to say, I’ve been watching the public library in the UK with dismay, and have contributed my mite to some on-line campaigns. A public library, free to all is a sign, IMO of true civilization. The assumption that these days kids can get all they need from TV and the web is so short-sighted.
    Best of luck in saving as many of your public libraries as you can.

    Reply
  67. Nicola, I meant to say, I’ve been watching the public library in the UK with dismay, and have contributed my mite to some on-line campaigns. A public library, free to all is a sign, IMO of true civilization. The assumption that these days kids can get all they need from TV and the web is so short-sighted.
    Best of luck in saving as many of your public libraries as you can.

    Reply
  68. Nicola, I meant to say, I’ve been watching the public library in the UK with dismay, and have contributed my mite to some on-line campaigns. A public library, free to all is a sign, IMO of true civilization. The assumption that these days kids can get all they need from TV and the web is so short-sighted.
    Best of luck in saving as many of your public libraries as you can.

    Reply
  69. Nicola, I meant to say, I’ve been watching the public library in the UK with dismay, and have contributed my mite to some on-line campaigns. A public library, free to all is a sign, IMO of true civilization. The assumption that these days kids can get all they need from TV and the web is so short-sighted.
    Best of luck in saving as many of your public libraries as you can.

    Reply
  70. Nicola, I meant to say, I’ve been watching the public library in the UK with dismay, and have contributed my mite to some on-line campaigns. A public library, free to all is a sign, IMO of true civilization. The assumption that these days kids can get all they need from TV and the web is so short-sighted.
    Best of luck in saving as many of your public libraries as you can.

    Reply
  71. Carol, whenever I find it hard to concentrate, or have too many distractions at home, I hie me to one of my local libraries (blessedly I have 4) and write there.
    The other day I was there, writing madly in the hushed silence, middle of the day in the middle of the week and mostly old people quietly reading.
    Then comes a class from the local primary school, 6 or 7 year olds, all tiptoeing and shhhh-ing each other to muffled giggles and all lining up for the big attraction — the water cooler. So funny. But then they all got their books and sat down to be read a story and were just entranced.
    So as well as 15 pages of work, I had a magic moment.

    Reply
  72. Carol, whenever I find it hard to concentrate, or have too many distractions at home, I hie me to one of my local libraries (blessedly I have 4) and write there.
    The other day I was there, writing madly in the hushed silence, middle of the day in the middle of the week and mostly old people quietly reading.
    Then comes a class from the local primary school, 6 or 7 year olds, all tiptoeing and shhhh-ing each other to muffled giggles and all lining up for the big attraction — the water cooler. So funny. But then they all got their books and sat down to be read a story and were just entranced.
    So as well as 15 pages of work, I had a magic moment.

    Reply
  73. Carol, whenever I find it hard to concentrate, or have too many distractions at home, I hie me to one of my local libraries (blessedly I have 4) and write there.
    The other day I was there, writing madly in the hushed silence, middle of the day in the middle of the week and mostly old people quietly reading.
    Then comes a class from the local primary school, 6 or 7 year olds, all tiptoeing and shhhh-ing each other to muffled giggles and all lining up for the big attraction — the water cooler. So funny. But then they all got their books and sat down to be read a story and were just entranced.
    So as well as 15 pages of work, I had a magic moment.

    Reply
  74. Carol, whenever I find it hard to concentrate, or have too many distractions at home, I hie me to one of my local libraries (blessedly I have 4) and write there.
    The other day I was there, writing madly in the hushed silence, middle of the day in the middle of the week and mostly old people quietly reading.
    Then comes a class from the local primary school, 6 or 7 year olds, all tiptoeing and shhhh-ing each other to muffled giggles and all lining up for the big attraction — the water cooler. So funny. But then they all got their books and sat down to be read a story and were just entranced.
    So as well as 15 pages of work, I had a magic moment.

    Reply
  75. Carol, whenever I find it hard to concentrate, or have too many distractions at home, I hie me to one of my local libraries (blessedly I have 4) and write there.
    The other day I was there, writing madly in the hushed silence, middle of the day in the middle of the week and mostly old people quietly reading.
    Then comes a class from the local primary school, 6 or 7 year olds, all tiptoeing and shhhh-ing each other to muffled giggles and all lining up for the big attraction — the water cooler. So funny. But then they all got their books and sat down to be read a story and were just entranced.
    So as well as 15 pages of work, I had a magic moment.

    Reply
  76. Cynthia, I discovered Yeats at University and my copy of his Selected Poetry still bristles with strips of paper marking my favorites. I’ve just got it out and will reread. I don’t remember your particular poem but I just read it now and it’s magic, weaving such enticement to the child. “In pools among the rushes that scarce could bathe a star…” lovely. His writing always stirs me. Thank you for sharing.
    In my first series for Berkley, I included a snippet of poetry or a quote at the beginning of each chapter. I didn’t for the second series, but I’m thinking now, I did so enjoy doing that, finding the right quote…

    Reply
  77. Cynthia, I discovered Yeats at University and my copy of his Selected Poetry still bristles with strips of paper marking my favorites. I’ve just got it out and will reread. I don’t remember your particular poem but I just read it now and it’s magic, weaving such enticement to the child. “In pools among the rushes that scarce could bathe a star…” lovely. His writing always stirs me. Thank you for sharing.
    In my first series for Berkley, I included a snippet of poetry or a quote at the beginning of each chapter. I didn’t for the second series, but I’m thinking now, I did so enjoy doing that, finding the right quote…

    Reply
  78. Cynthia, I discovered Yeats at University and my copy of his Selected Poetry still bristles with strips of paper marking my favorites. I’ve just got it out and will reread. I don’t remember your particular poem but I just read it now and it’s magic, weaving such enticement to the child. “In pools among the rushes that scarce could bathe a star…” lovely. His writing always stirs me. Thank you for sharing.
    In my first series for Berkley, I included a snippet of poetry or a quote at the beginning of each chapter. I didn’t for the second series, but I’m thinking now, I did so enjoy doing that, finding the right quote…

    Reply
  79. Cynthia, I discovered Yeats at University and my copy of his Selected Poetry still bristles with strips of paper marking my favorites. I’ve just got it out and will reread. I don’t remember your particular poem but I just read it now and it’s magic, weaving such enticement to the child. “In pools among the rushes that scarce could bathe a star…” lovely. His writing always stirs me. Thank you for sharing.
    In my first series for Berkley, I included a snippet of poetry or a quote at the beginning of each chapter. I didn’t for the second series, but I’m thinking now, I did so enjoy doing that, finding the right quote…

    Reply
  80. Cynthia, I discovered Yeats at University and my copy of his Selected Poetry still bristles with strips of paper marking my favorites. I’ve just got it out and will reread. I don’t remember your particular poem but I just read it now and it’s magic, weaving such enticement to the child. “In pools among the rushes that scarce could bathe a star…” lovely. His writing always stirs me. Thank you for sharing.
    In my first series for Berkley, I included a snippet of poetry or a quote at the beginning of each chapter. I didn’t for the second series, but I’m thinking now, I did so enjoy doing that, finding the right quote…

    Reply
  81. Jo, they did the same here with post-offices — all these grand Victorian-era edifices, sold to become restaurants etc while the post office is located in some efficient little box.
    And I doubt they read poems such as Young Lochinvar in schools these days, though I might be wrong — and hope I am. Those ballads are thrilling to hear recited aloud.
    And yes, I remember my first time reading Yeat’s Leda and the Swan -and rereading your extract now, it still is marvellous. Thanks.

    Reply
  82. Jo, they did the same here with post-offices — all these grand Victorian-era edifices, sold to become restaurants etc while the post office is located in some efficient little box.
    And I doubt they read poems such as Young Lochinvar in schools these days, though I might be wrong — and hope I am. Those ballads are thrilling to hear recited aloud.
    And yes, I remember my first time reading Yeat’s Leda and the Swan -and rereading your extract now, it still is marvellous. Thanks.

    Reply
  83. Jo, they did the same here with post-offices — all these grand Victorian-era edifices, sold to become restaurants etc while the post office is located in some efficient little box.
    And I doubt they read poems such as Young Lochinvar in schools these days, though I might be wrong — and hope I am. Those ballads are thrilling to hear recited aloud.
    And yes, I remember my first time reading Yeat’s Leda and the Swan -and rereading your extract now, it still is marvellous. Thanks.

    Reply
  84. Jo, they did the same here with post-offices — all these grand Victorian-era edifices, sold to become restaurants etc while the post office is located in some efficient little box.
    And I doubt they read poems such as Young Lochinvar in schools these days, though I might be wrong — and hope I am. Those ballads are thrilling to hear recited aloud.
    And yes, I remember my first time reading Yeat’s Leda and the Swan -and rereading your extract now, it still is marvellous. Thanks.

    Reply
  85. Jo, they did the same here with post-offices — all these grand Victorian-era edifices, sold to become restaurants etc while the post office is located in some efficient little box.
    And I doubt they read poems such as Young Lochinvar in schools these days, though I might be wrong — and hope I am. Those ballads are thrilling to hear recited aloud.
    And yes, I remember my first time reading Yeat’s Leda and the Swan -and rereading your extract now, it still is marvellous. Thanks.

    Reply
  86. Lynne, that’s a very useful link — thank you. Isn’t it brilliant how much research material is now available on line now? I’ve been able to get so much wonderful detail through on-line searching and from wonderful librarians making old sources digitally available.
    And this relatively new practice of putting on displays and exhibitions in libraries is the reason that I’ve seen actual letters by Jane Austen and other writers I’ve long admired. It’s one thing to read her words in a book, but to see the actual letters – pretty special.

    Reply
  87. Lynne, that’s a very useful link — thank you. Isn’t it brilliant how much research material is now available on line now? I’ve been able to get so much wonderful detail through on-line searching and from wonderful librarians making old sources digitally available.
    And this relatively new practice of putting on displays and exhibitions in libraries is the reason that I’ve seen actual letters by Jane Austen and other writers I’ve long admired. It’s one thing to read her words in a book, but to see the actual letters – pretty special.

    Reply
  88. Lynne, that’s a very useful link — thank you. Isn’t it brilliant how much research material is now available on line now? I’ve been able to get so much wonderful detail through on-line searching and from wonderful librarians making old sources digitally available.
    And this relatively new practice of putting on displays and exhibitions in libraries is the reason that I’ve seen actual letters by Jane Austen and other writers I’ve long admired. It’s one thing to read her words in a book, but to see the actual letters – pretty special.

    Reply
  89. Lynne, that’s a very useful link — thank you. Isn’t it brilliant how much research material is now available on line now? I’ve been able to get so much wonderful detail through on-line searching and from wonderful librarians making old sources digitally available.
    And this relatively new practice of putting on displays and exhibitions in libraries is the reason that I’ve seen actual letters by Jane Austen and other writers I’ve long admired. It’s one thing to read her words in a book, but to see the actual letters – pretty special.

    Reply
  90. Lynne, that’s a very useful link — thank you. Isn’t it brilliant how much research material is now available on line now? I’ve been able to get so much wonderful detail through on-line searching and from wonderful librarians making old sources digitally available.
    And this relatively new practice of putting on displays and exhibitions in libraries is the reason that I’ve seen actual letters by Jane Austen and other writers I’ve long admired. It’s one thing to read her words in a book, but to see the actual letters – pretty special.

    Reply
  91. Kim, yes, I imagine the joy of discovering those authors while far from home and the source of endless books in English. I remember the intense joy of finding 3 of E/F/ Bensons’s Lucia books in Corfu — I’d only read one up to then, and so my addiction started there, in Greece.
    And when my dad was at the RAAF school in Penang (Malaysia) my mum, unable to work for the first time in her life (she was a teacher) took it upon herself to sort and rearrange the RAAF social club library.
    Beautiful poetry, thank you for sharing. The first time I was in Hawaii, I was mesmerized by an explanation and demonstration of the hula by a bunch of old women. Storytelling indeed.

    Reply
  92. Kim, yes, I imagine the joy of discovering those authors while far from home and the source of endless books in English. I remember the intense joy of finding 3 of E/F/ Bensons’s Lucia books in Corfu — I’d only read one up to then, and so my addiction started there, in Greece.
    And when my dad was at the RAAF school in Penang (Malaysia) my mum, unable to work for the first time in her life (she was a teacher) took it upon herself to sort and rearrange the RAAF social club library.
    Beautiful poetry, thank you for sharing. The first time I was in Hawaii, I was mesmerized by an explanation and demonstration of the hula by a bunch of old women. Storytelling indeed.

    Reply
  93. Kim, yes, I imagine the joy of discovering those authors while far from home and the source of endless books in English. I remember the intense joy of finding 3 of E/F/ Bensons’s Lucia books in Corfu — I’d only read one up to then, and so my addiction started there, in Greece.
    And when my dad was at the RAAF school in Penang (Malaysia) my mum, unable to work for the first time in her life (she was a teacher) took it upon herself to sort and rearrange the RAAF social club library.
    Beautiful poetry, thank you for sharing. The first time I was in Hawaii, I was mesmerized by an explanation and demonstration of the hula by a bunch of old women. Storytelling indeed.

    Reply
  94. Kim, yes, I imagine the joy of discovering those authors while far from home and the source of endless books in English. I remember the intense joy of finding 3 of E/F/ Bensons’s Lucia books in Corfu — I’d only read one up to then, and so my addiction started there, in Greece.
    And when my dad was at the RAAF school in Penang (Malaysia) my mum, unable to work for the first time in her life (she was a teacher) took it upon herself to sort and rearrange the RAAF social club library.
    Beautiful poetry, thank you for sharing. The first time I was in Hawaii, I was mesmerized by an explanation and demonstration of the hula by a bunch of old women. Storytelling indeed.

    Reply
  95. Kim, yes, I imagine the joy of discovering those authors while far from home and the source of endless books in English. I remember the intense joy of finding 3 of E/F/ Bensons’s Lucia books in Corfu — I’d only read one up to then, and so my addiction started there, in Greece.
    And when my dad was at the RAAF school in Penang (Malaysia) my mum, unable to work for the first time in her life (she was a teacher) took it upon herself to sort and rearrange the RAAF social club library.
    Beautiful poetry, thank you for sharing. The first time I was in Hawaii, I was mesmerized by an explanation and demonstration of the hula by a bunch of old women. Storytelling indeed.

    Reply
  96. Susan, I’m hot-footing it to that Leigh Hunt poem — I don’t know it at all.
    And I adore The Highwayman — another one that doesn’t end well. I remember teaching it when I taught in a girls high school, and the girls would shiver. And then ask how they could plait a love-knot into their hair. Alas, teachers are supposed to know stuff, but in that particular matter, I was useless. Go to the library, was my only response.

    Reply
  97. Susan, I’m hot-footing it to that Leigh Hunt poem — I don’t know it at all.
    And I adore The Highwayman — another one that doesn’t end well. I remember teaching it when I taught in a girls high school, and the girls would shiver. And then ask how they could plait a love-knot into their hair. Alas, teachers are supposed to know stuff, but in that particular matter, I was useless. Go to the library, was my only response.

    Reply
  98. Susan, I’m hot-footing it to that Leigh Hunt poem — I don’t know it at all.
    And I adore The Highwayman — another one that doesn’t end well. I remember teaching it when I taught in a girls high school, and the girls would shiver. And then ask how they could plait a love-knot into their hair. Alas, teachers are supposed to know stuff, but in that particular matter, I was useless. Go to the library, was my only response.

    Reply
  99. Susan, I’m hot-footing it to that Leigh Hunt poem — I don’t know it at all.
    And I adore The Highwayman — another one that doesn’t end well. I remember teaching it when I taught in a girls high school, and the girls would shiver. And then ask how they could plait a love-knot into their hair. Alas, teachers are supposed to know stuff, but in that particular matter, I was useless. Go to the library, was my only response.

    Reply
  100. Susan, I’m hot-footing it to that Leigh Hunt poem — I don’t know it at all.
    And I adore The Highwayman — another one that doesn’t end well. I remember teaching it when I taught in a girls high school, and the girls would shiver. And then ask how they could plait a love-knot into their hair. Alas, teachers are supposed to know stuff, but in that particular matter, I was useless. Go to the library, was my only response.

    Reply
  101. Fabulous post, Anne. Those photos of the Melbourne library stunned me. I had no idea it was so gorgeous. You do the most interesting things. I love that so many of us love libraries. For a while there I wanted to be the librarian and love that line in move, The Mummy, the proud, ‘I, Sir, am a librarian.’
    A line froma poem? Have to go with ‘I wandered lonely as a cloud…’ I do love daffodils.
    xx Fi

    Reply
  102. Fabulous post, Anne. Those photos of the Melbourne library stunned me. I had no idea it was so gorgeous. You do the most interesting things. I love that so many of us love libraries. For a while there I wanted to be the librarian and love that line in move, The Mummy, the proud, ‘I, Sir, am a librarian.’
    A line froma poem? Have to go with ‘I wandered lonely as a cloud…’ I do love daffodils.
    xx Fi

    Reply
  103. Fabulous post, Anne. Those photos of the Melbourne library stunned me. I had no idea it was so gorgeous. You do the most interesting things. I love that so many of us love libraries. For a while there I wanted to be the librarian and love that line in move, The Mummy, the proud, ‘I, Sir, am a librarian.’
    A line froma poem? Have to go with ‘I wandered lonely as a cloud…’ I do love daffodils.
    xx Fi

    Reply
  104. Fabulous post, Anne. Those photos of the Melbourne library stunned me. I had no idea it was so gorgeous. You do the most interesting things. I love that so many of us love libraries. For a while there I wanted to be the librarian and love that line in move, The Mummy, the proud, ‘I, Sir, am a librarian.’
    A line froma poem? Have to go with ‘I wandered lonely as a cloud…’ I do love daffodils.
    xx Fi

    Reply
  105. Fabulous post, Anne. Those photos of the Melbourne library stunned me. I had no idea it was so gorgeous. You do the most interesting things. I love that so many of us love libraries. For a while there I wanted to be the librarian and love that line in move, The Mummy, the proud, ‘I, Sir, am a librarian.’
    A line froma poem? Have to go with ‘I wandered lonely as a cloud…’ I do love daffodils.
    xx Fi

    Reply
  106. Thanks, Fi. Love the “I, sir, am a librarian.”
    I think librarians are heroes. Must write one one day. Trouble is, in the Regency they were usually private circulating libraries, run a bit like an exclusive video library today (or do they call them DVD libraries now)
    Still, might be a nice job for a heroine.

    Reply
  107. Thanks, Fi. Love the “I, sir, am a librarian.”
    I think librarians are heroes. Must write one one day. Trouble is, in the Regency they were usually private circulating libraries, run a bit like an exclusive video library today (or do they call them DVD libraries now)
    Still, might be a nice job for a heroine.

    Reply
  108. Thanks, Fi. Love the “I, sir, am a librarian.”
    I think librarians are heroes. Must write one one day. Trouble is, in the Regency they were usually private circulating libraries, run a bit like an exclusive video library today (or do they call them DVD libraries now)
    Still, might be a nice job for a heroine.

    Reply
  109. Thanks, Fi. Love the “I, sir, am a librarian.”
    I think librarians are heroes. Must write one one day. Trouble is, in the Regency they were usually private circulating libraries, run a bit like an exclusive video library today (or do they call them DVD libraries now)
    Still, might be a nice job for a heroine.

    Reply
  110. Thanks, Fi. Love the “I, sir, am a librarian.”
    I think librarians are heroes. Must write one one day. Trouble is, in the Regency they were usually private circulating libraries, run a bit like an exclusive video library today (or do they call them DVD libraries now)
    Still, might be a nice job for a heroine.

    Reply
  111. I love libraries, especially old libraries in beautiful buildings. Of course my introduction to community libraries was via the mobile library that stopped in the village in Suffolk where we lived. I’d never experienced one in the States and I thought it truly wondrous. Then the two retired librarians moved in next door and I saw something even more wondrous. A library in someone’s house! I was in heaven.
    I think of all that is lost when libraries disappear. I think of the libraries in history lost to use forever. I’d give anything to visit the library in ancient Alexandria for just one day.
    One of my very favorite libraries is the one at the Mozarteum in Salzburg. Many of Mozart’s original sketches and hand-written scores are housed there. To see his music written in his own hand is an awe-inspiring experience.
    I do love poetry and The Highwayman has been my favorite since I was nine years old.
    Another favorite :
    How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.
    I love thee to the depth and breadth and height
    My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight
    For the ends of Being and ideal Grace.
    I love thee to the level of everyday’s
    Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light.
    I love thee freely, as men strive for Right;
    I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise.
    I love thee with a passion put to use
    In my old griefs, and with my childhood’s faith.
    I love thee with a love I seemed to lose
    With my lost saints, — I love thee with the breath,
    Smiles, tears, of all my life! — and, if God choose,
    I shall but love thee better after death.
    Elizabeth Barrett Browning

    Reply
  112. I love libraries, especially old libraries in beautiful buildings. Of course my introduction to community libraries was via the mobile library that stopped in the village in Suffolk where we lived. I’d never experienced one in the States and I thought it truly wondrous. Then the two retired librarians moved in next door and I saw something even more wondrous. A library in someone’s house! I was in heaven.
    I think of all that is lost when libraries disappear. I think of the libraries in history lost to use forever. I’d give anything to visit the library in ancient Alexandria for just one day.
    One of my very favorite libraries is the one at the Mozarteum in Salzburg. Many of Mozart’s original sketches and hand-written scores are housed there. To see his music written in his own hand is an awe-inspiring experience.
    I do love poetry and The Highwayman has been my favorite since I was nine years old.
    Another favorite :
    How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.
    I love thee to the depth and breadth and height
    My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight
    For the ends of Being and ideal Grace.
    I love thee to the level of everyday’s
    Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light.
    I love thee freely, as men strive for Right;
    I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise.
    I love thee with a passion put to use
    In my old griefs, and with my childhood’s faith.
    I love thee with a love I seemed to lose
    With my lost saints, — I love thee with the breath,
    Smiles, tears, of all my life! — and, if God choose,
    I shall but love thee better after death.
    Elizabeth Barrett Browning

    Reply
  113. I love libraries, especially old libraries in beautiful buildings. Of course my introduction to community libraries was via the mobile library that stopped in the village in Suffolk where we lived. I’d never experienced one in the States and I thought it truly wondrous. Then the two retired librarians moved in next door and I saw something even more wondrous. A library in someone’s house! I was in heaven.
    I think of all that is lost when libraries disappear. I think of the libraries in history lost to use forever. I’d give anything to visit the library in ancient Alexandria for just one day.
    One of my very favorite libraries is the one at the Mozarteum in Salzburg. Many of Mozart’s original sketches and hand-written scores are housed there. To see his music written in his own hand is an awe-inspiring experience.
    I do love poetry and The Highwayman has been my favorite since I was nine years old.
    Another favorite :
    How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.
    I love thee to the depth and breadth and height
    My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight
    For the ends of Being and ideal Grace.
    I love thee to the level of everyday’s
    Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light.
    I love thee freely, as men strive for Right;
    I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise.
    I love thee with a passion put to use
    In my old griefs, and with my childhood’s faith.
    I love thee with a love I seemed to lose
    With my lost saints, — I love thee with the breath,
    Smiles, tears, of all my life! — and, if God choose,
    I shall but love thee better after death.
    Elizabeth Barrett Browning

    Reply
  114. I love libraries, especially old libraries in beautiful buildings. Of course my introduction to community libraries was via the mobile library that stopped in the village in Suffolk where we lived. I’d never experienced one in the States and I thought it truly wondrous. Then the two retired librarians moved in next door and I saw something even more wondrous. A library in someone’s house! I was in heaven.
    I think of all that is lost when libraries disappear. I think of the libraries in history lost to use forever. I’d give anything to visit the library in ancient Alexandria for just one day.
    One of my very favorite libraries is the one at the Mozarteum in Salzburg. Many of Mozart’s original sketches and hand-written scores are housed there. To see his music written in his own hand is an awe-inspiring experience.
    I do love poetry and The Highwayman has been my favorite since I was nine years old.
    Another favorite :
    How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.
    I love thee to the depth and breadth and height
    My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight
    For the ends of Being and ideal Grace.
    I love thee to the level of everyday’s
    Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light.
    I love thee freely, as men strive for Right;
    I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise.
    I love thee with a passion put to use
    In my old griefs, and with my childhood’s faith.
    I love thee with a love I seemed to lose
    With my lost saints, — I love thee with the breath,
    Smiles, tears, of all my life! — and, if God choose,
    I shall but love thee better after death.
    Elizabeth Barrett Browning

    Reply
  115. I love libraries, especially old libraries in beautiful buildings. Of course my introduction to community libraries was via the mobile library that stopped in the village in Suffolk where we lived. I’d never experienced one in the States and I thought it truly wondrous. Then the two retired librarians moved in next door and I saw something even more wondrous. A library in someone’s house! I was in heaven.
    I think of all that is lost when libraries disappear. I think of the libraries in history lost to use forever. I’d give anything to visit the library in ancient Alexandria for just one day.
    One of my very favorite libraries is the one at the Mozarteum in Salzburg. Many of Mozart’s original sketches and hand-written scores are housed there. To see his music written in his own hand is an awe-inspiring experience.
    I do love poetry and The Highwayman has been my favorite since I was nine years old.
    Another favorite :
    How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.
    I love thee to the depth and breadth and height
    My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight
    For the ends of Being and ideal Grace.
    I love thee to the level of everyday’s
    Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light.
    I love thee freely, as men strive for Right;
    I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise.
    I love thee with a passion put to use
    In my old griefs, and with my childhood’s faith.
    I love thee with a love I seemed to lose
    With my lost saints, — I love thee with the breath,
    Smiles, tears, of all my life! — and, if God choose,
    I shall but love thee better after death.
    Elizabeth Barrett Browning

    Reply

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