November What We’re Reading!

Snowed in for Christmas by Mary Jo

Christina kicks off:

Snowed in for Christmas by Sarah Morgan.

Ms Morgan has done it again – I didn’t think she could improve on last year’s Christmas story, but this is her best one yet and I absolutely loved it! It was one of those books where you can’t wait to finish to see how it ends, but at the same time you are devastated to have to leave this fictional world. There is plenty of family drama, lots of delicious romance and some wonderful characters, all set against the backdrop of a gorgeous country house in the wilds of Scotland.

I think my favourite character was the grandmother, Nanna Jean, whose outspoken comments had me laughing out loud. I hope I can be like her when I’m old! One of the heroines, Lucy, has no family left and is dreading Christmas, but when she ends up spending it with the Miller family everything changes. She’s an outsider but they make her feel welcome and included, and it was incredibly heart-warming.

And although the family may seem perfect to her, they are far from it, with tensions and undercurrents rife. Daughters of the house, Alice and Clemmie, have their own problems and heartache, and I felt for them as they fought for what they wanted. Being snowed in proves to be a blessing, as they are all given the chance to work through their problems rather than run away from them. I was rooting for all of them every step of the way and couldn’t have put this book down if my life depended on it! Highly recommended.

 

Space Junk by Sara L. Hudson. This is a story that might appeal to anyone who enjoys Ali Hazelwood’s STEM heroines. It features Space JunkNASA engineer Dr Jackie Darling Lee who is a huge nerd and dreams of being an astronaut, although at the moment she’s working in ground control. She is a genius but has no social life to speak of, and has only had one very unfortunate encounter with the male species … until she meets Flynn West.

He’s actually from one of the richest families in Houston, but owns and works at his own vintage muscle car restorations company. He used to be part of the social scene but got tired of everyone wanting to be with him just for his money, especially the women. He trusts no one, but when Jackie enters his life, everything he thought he knew goes out the window. There’s something about her nerdy glasses and general gorgeousness that has him hot and bothered. The two of them have incredible chemistry, but they both have old hang-ups, neither trusts easily and there are some misunderstandings before all can end well.

I really enjoyed this story (and the three others in the series, although they don’t feature women in STEM) and would recommend it for anyone who wants a fun, light-hearted read.

TheGunclePat's choice:

The Guncle, Steven Rowley

Now, for something completely different. . . Auntie Mame on steroids. Patrick was a beloved TV character who retired in his thirties when he both lost the love of his life and his show ended. He retired to Palm Springs, where old movie stars go to die and proceeded to entomb himself in his showplace home.

Until disaster happens—his best friend since college, who happens to be his brother’s wife, dies of cancer. And his brother, after years of dealing with his dying wife and his difficult job, admits he’s addicted to pills, any pills. And he wants his gay brother on the other side of the country to take care of his grief-stricken children.

Patrick talks to them as if they’re adults his age, because he knows no other way of conversing. He’s witty, knowledgeable, and completely un-PC. But he’s little more than a child himself, so they bond over squirting bidets and a swimming pool filled with floats, desserts for dinner, and Christmas in July. And together, slowly and painfully, they heal each other.

This is a lovely escape into inappropriate behavior, humor, and all the ways people can express their despair. Give it a try!

After DarkNicola:

As I’m on the move I can’t contribute much to the WWR, but I did want to say that all those Wenches who recommended the Jayne Castle Harmony series are responsible for a dent in my bank balance. I am well and truly hooked.  I can’t believe how quickly I fell for them.  Resistance was futile! 

The first Harmony book is After Dark

Andrea:

This month I was completely immersed in The Ink Black Heart, the latest book in the Cormoran Strike mystery series by Robert Galbraith, aka J.K. Rowling. (At over 1000 pages, I can be forgiven for reading one book!) I really love this series because the mysteries, though very dark at times—the concept of pure evil plays a role in Galbraith/Rowling’s novels—are so well crafted, and always explore issues that have relevance to what’s going on in society today. This plot is absolutely riveting, as well as incredibly timely, as it delves into the fraught world of cyber bullying and anonymous trolls on Twitter.

The book starts with a distraught—and slightly flakey—bohemian artist coming to the private detective agency run by Strike and his The Ink Dark Heartpartner, Robin. The artist is the co-creator of a darkly quirky animated cartoon called The Ink Black Heart, which has become a YouTube cult hit and is about to be acquired by Netflix, and she asks Robin to help her uncover the identity of a Twitter influencer who has begun a vicious online hate campaign against her because she is “selling out."

Robin feels compelled to turn her down as the agency has no expertise in cyber investigation.  However, the artist somehow leaves behind her folder of “evidence” and when Robin reads several days later that the artist and her collaborator have been murdered and the police are stymied, Robin feels compelled to take a closer look at the folder in case there are clues that might help the police solve the crime.

But she and Strike soon find themselves drawn into the investigation and the complex world of internet “fandom.” A cyber game based on the cartoon has taken on a life of its own. The murdered artist believed her nemesis was one of the creators of the online game, and as Strike and Robin try to learn their identities, they are plunged into the frightening underbelly of anonymous social media, where the manipulation is being done by organized groups with chilling agendas . . .

It was both frightening and fascinating to watch Strike and Robin peel back the layers of lies and identities, each one becoming darker and darker —I couldn’t put it down! (My only quibble was that I was a little disappointed with the development of Strike and Robin’s personal relationship. One twist felt a bit jarring, and I hope it will be rectified in the next book.)

Fairytale kingSusan here:

This month I was pulled deep into Stephen King's Fairy Tale. Two of the Guys in my family were reading it at about the same time, so it was like a little book club, talking about the book as we read at varying paces. I'm in awe of his writing, his extraordinary skill and his casual yet masterful style, and I admire the depth of creativity and wisdom he has as a writer and a person.  But I'm not fond of horror, so I've read cautiously through his work. The Guys encouraged me to give this one a try – and I liked the title. <g>

Charlie Reade is a teenage high school athlete, normal enough, but his mom died and his grieving dad turned to drink, so he learned how to fend for himself and take care of others. When he meets the cranky town recluse, Mr. Bowditch, who lives in a creepy old house with an old dog for company, Charlie helps the old man out and becomes attached to the dog–and soon discovers Bowditch is more than he seems. He has a mysterious supply of gold, secrets that Charlie must never ask about–and apparently a portal to another world in his backyard.

One thing leads to another, and soon Charlie enters that world, finding familiar characters from fairy tales, but it's the dark world of those tales, as the people struggle under the rule of an evil presence that is gradually taking over. To Charlie's astonishment, he has a destiny in this dark conglomerate fairy tale, if he can find the key–and the courage.

King is a wizard of a writer–his stories and his style have a kind of dark magic. You keep reading even if you're not sure you want to, step by step going deeper. Fairy Tale creates that kind of compelling vortex, and I wasn't sure where it was going. King twists everything you know and love about fairy tales–then honors the principles and heart of that story world with a complex good vs. evil tale that's surprising at every turn and just brilliant. No spoilers, but I can promise the reward is worth it. ShudderingCity

Anne here with lots of great recommendations: 

I've been a fan of Sharon Shinn's ever since I saw a long line of her books on Mary Jo's bookshelves, and took one down and started reading. The Shuddering City is her latest book and I thoroughly enjoyed it. It's one of those books where you have multiple lead characters, seemingly unconnected at first, but as the net draws tighter, the connections become clearer and the stakes—and the tension—rise. I couldn't put it down.

Next is the latest in Elly Griffiths' "Ruth Galloway" series which I always enjoy — The House at Sea's End.

Dr Ruth Galloway is called in by a team of archaeologists investigating coastal erosion on the north Norfolk coast, when they unearth six bodies buried at the foot of a cliff. Far from being ancient burials, tests reveal that the bodies have lain, preserved in the sand, for sixty years — since WW2, when the UK was threatened with a Nazi invasion. And there are people still alive who will do anything to prevent the secret getting out.

HouseAtSeasEndThoroughly engrossing, as always.

Kate Clayborn  — Beginner's Luck

Picked up on a wenchly recommendation, I very much enjoyed this trilogy about three friends who win a lottery. It changes each of their lives in ways they never imagined. Beginner's Luck is the first book in the series.  I've read all three and recommend them as very enjoyable, light-hearted reading.

After finishing all the books in the "Trader's Tales" series, by Nathan Lowell I moved on to and enjoyed his In Ashes Born, which continues the adventures of the protagonist, Ishmael Wang.

I also read The Wizard's Butler by Nathan Lowell, and liked that as well. I think (hope) it's the start of a new series.

From the blurb: "He thinks he's a wizard," they said. For five grand a month and a million-dollar chaser, Roger Mulligan didn't care how crazy the old geezer was. All he had to do was keep Joseph Perry Shackleford alive and keep him from squandering the estate for a year.

But they didn't tell him about the pixies."

NumberTheStarsMary Jo wraps up the reads for November:

Number the Stars by Lois Lowry

Published in 1989, Number the Stars is a classic Newbery Award winning children's book, one of the bestselling children's books of all time.  You may be familiar with the story, but it was entirely under my radar until a bookseller friend of mine mentioned that it was set in Denmark in 1943 and tells how Denmark smuggled its Jewish population to safety in Sweden when the Nazis decided to "relocate" them to concentration camps.

Though I knew that Denmark had saved its Jewish community, I'd never thought much about how it was done.  Number the Stars tells the story through the eyes of Annemarie Johansen, a 10 year old girl who lives in Copenhagen with her parents and younger sister.  She and her best friend, Ellen Rosen, know that it's wise not to attract the attention of the soldiers who are stationed throughout the city, but Annemarie has only a vague understanding of what the Nazi occupation of Denmark means to her country.

When rabbis are warned of the relocation plan, the Danish Resistance undertakes to hide and protect all the threatened Jews. A friend of the Johansen family brings Ellen to their home and says that for a few days she must be concealed with them by pretending to be the oldest Johansen daughter, Lise, who died earlier in the war in a car accident.  Nazi soldiers visit the Johansens and are very threatening, but Annemarie hides Ellen's star of David pendant and the family manages to convince the soldiers that Ellen is Lise. 

Then Annemarie and her mother take Ellen to Annemarie's Uncle Henrik, who is a fisherman on the coast that faces Sweden.  After Ellen is reunited with her parents, Annemarie learns what is going on and takes a great risk to insure that the Rosens and others escape to safety. 

This is a powerful story told in a simple, direct way and it's easy to understand its enduring appeal. Lowry says her inspiration for Number the Stars came from a friend who was a child in Copenhagen during WWII. Lowry traveled to Denmark to research more of the details that make the book so convincing.  She also took the photograph of the young Danish girl that is on the cover of most editions of the novel.

It's a wonderful story of a nation's compassion and heroism, and of a young girl discovering that she has the courage to do what is necessary.  There is a reason why Number the Stars has become an enduring classic.

See anything you'd like to try?  And what have you been reading lately?  Please share!

Mary Jo

150 thoughts on “November What We’re Reading!”

  1. I just finished “Remember Love” by Mary Balogh. Uplifting story of delayed fulfillment in love that is worth reading as are all of her books.
    A non-fiction book I read recently is “Manhattan Phoenix” by Daniel S. Levy. A beautifully written account of a fire in 1835 that decimated all that was built up in Manhattan, and the rise of the city from that time until early 20th-century.
    The documentation of personal tragedies, slavery, cholera outbreaks, fear and hatred of Great Britain in the form of an actor fighting an American actor concerning different stage roles, and so many other stories of the time. A very interesting and emotionally moving research by the author.

    Reply
  2. I just finished “Remember Love” by Mary Balogh. Uplifting story of delayed fulfillment in love that is worth reading as are all of her books.
    A non-fiction book I read recently is “Manhattan Phoenix” by Daniel S. Levy. A beautifully written account of a fire in 1835 that decimated all that was built up in Manhattan, and the rise of the city from that time until early 20th-century.
    The documentation of personal tragedies, slavery, cholera outbreaks, fear and hatred of Great Britain in the form of an actor fighting an American actor concerning different stage roles, and so many other stories of the time. A very interesting and emotionally moving research by the author.

    Reply
  3. I just finished “Remember Love” by Mary Balogh. Uplifting story of delayed fulfillment in love that is worth reading as are all of her books.
    A non-fiction book I read recently is “Manhattan Phoenix” by Daniel S. Levy. A beautifully written account of a fire in 1835 that decimated all that was built up in Manhattan, and the rise of the city from that time until early 20th-century.
    The documentation of personal tragedies, slavery, cholera outbreaks, fear and hatred of Great Britain in the form of an actor fighting an American actor concerning different stage roles, and so many other stories of the time. A very interesting and emotionally moving research by the author.

    Reply
  4. I just finished “Remember Love” by Mary Balogh. Uplifting story of delayed fulfillment in love that is worth reading as are all of her books.
    A non-fiction book I read recently is “Manhattan Phoenix” by Daniel S. Levy. A beautifully written account of a fire in 1835 that decimated all that was built up in Manhattan, and the rise of the city from that time until early 20th-century.
    The documentation of personal tragedies, slavery, cholera outbreaks, fear and hatred of Great Britain in the form of an actor fighting an American actor concerning different stage roles, and so many other stories of the time. A very interesting and emotionally moving research by the author.

    Reply
  5. I just finished “Remember Love” by Mary Balogh. Uplifting story of delayed fulfillment in love that is worth reading as are all of her books.
    A non-fiction book I read recently is “Manhattan Phoenix” by Daniel S. Levy. A beautifully written account of a fire in 1835 that decimated all that was built up in Manhattan, and the rise of the city from that time until early 20th-century.
    The documentation of personal tragedies, slavery, cholera outbreaks, fear and hatred of Great Britain in the form of an actor fighting an American actor concerning different stage roles, and so many other stories of the time. A very interesting and emotionally moving research by the author.

    Reply
  6. Wow, I read widely this month, including these three non-fictions and a novel novel (doubled purposely!):
    First was The Biggest Bluff: How I Learned to Pay Attention, Master Myself, and Win by Maria Konnikova. The author is a writer and Ph.D. psychologist who, in a personal down period of her life, set out to learn how to roll with it and win. As the WaPo put it, “The tale of how Konnikova followed a story about poker players and wound up becoming a story herself will have you riveted, first as you learn about her big winnings, and then as she conveys the lessons she learned both about human nature and herself.” This is a fantastic read, not least because you’ll find new facets of yourself while absorbing it.
    Next up is a very different tale, The Scandalous Hamiltons: A Gilded Age Grifter, a Founding Father’s Disgraced Descendant, and a Trial at the Dawn of Tabloid Journalism by Bill Shaffer. You’ve read about the Astors and Vanderbilts in Victorian-era New York. Now meet another, seedier layer of those days, the grifters trying to grab a brass ring (and a fortune) by marrying into it. These are some of the warpedest (yes, I made that word up, but, oh, how it fits) characters I’ve ever come across, and it’s all real and meticulously well-documented by the author.
    Third is Neil Degrasse Tyson’s latest, Starry Messenger. Basically, this is a collection of essays musing on us and our universe. Tyson’s style is notably conversational and his musings are always worth contemplating. Highly recommended.
    Finally, Golden State: A Novel by Michelle Richmond. Let me just say, the protagonist is having one veerrry bad day, with diversions back to how that came about in her life. Like nothing else you’ll read this year. Check it out—I double dog dare you!

    Reply
  7. Wow, I read widely this month, including these three non-fictions and a novel novel (doubled purposely!):
    First was The Biggest Bluff: How I Learned to Pay Attention, Master Myself, and Win by Maria Konnikova. The author is a writer and Ph.D. psychologist who, in a personal down period of her life, set out to learn how to roll with it and win. As the WaPo put it, “The tale of how Konnikova followed a story about poker players and wound up becoming a story herself will have you riveted, first as you learn about her big winnings, and then as she conveys the lessons she learned both about human nature and herself.” This is a fantastic read, not least because you’ll find new facets of yourself while absorbing it.
    Next up is a very different tale, The Scandalous Hamiltons: A Gilded Age Grifter, a Founding Father’s Disgraced Descendant, and a Trial at the Dawn of Tabloid Journalism by Bill Shaffer. You’ve read about the Astors and Vanderbilts in Victorian-era New York. Now meet another, seedier layer of those days, the grifters trying to grab a brass ring (and a fortune) by marrying into it. These are some of the warpedest (yes, I made that word up, but, oh, how it fits) characters I’ve ever come across, and it’s all real and meticulously well-documented by the author.
    Third is Neil Degrasse Tyson’s latest, Starry Messenger. Basically, this is a collection of essays musing on us and our universe. Tyson’s style is notably conversational and his musings are always worth contemplating. Highly recommended.
    Finally, Golden State: A Novel by Michelle Richmond. Let me just say, the protagonist is having one veerrry bad day, with diversions back to how that came about in her life. Like nothing else you’ll read this year. Check it out—I double dog dare you!

    Reply
  8. Wow, I read widely this month, including these three non-fictions and a novel novel (doubled purposely!):
    First was The Biggest Bluff: How I Learned to Pay Attention, Master Myself, and Win by Maria Konnikova. The author is a writer and Ph.D. psychologist who, in a personal down period of her life, set out to learn how to roll with it and win. As the WaPo put it, “The tale of how Konnikova followed a story about poker players and wound up becoming a story herself will have you riveted, first as you learn about her big winnings, and then as she conveys the lessons she learned both about human nature and herself.” This is a fantastic read, not least because you’ll find new facets of yourself while absorbing it.
    Next up is a very different tale, The Scandalous Hamiltons: A Gilded Age Grifter, a Founding Father’s Disgraced Descendant, and a Trial at the Dawn of Tabloid Journalism by Bill Shaffer. You’ve read about the Astors and Vanderbilts in Victorian-era New York. Now meet another, seedier layer of those days, the grifters trying to grab a brass ring (and a fortune) by marrying into it. These are some of the warpedest (yes, I made that word up, but, oh, how it fits) characters I’ve ever come across, and it’s all real and meticulously well-documented by the author.
    Third is Neil Degrasse Tyson’s latest, Starry Messenger. Basically, this is a collection of essays musing on us and our universe. Tyson’s style is notably conversational and his musings are always worth contemplating. Highly recommended.
    Finally, Golden State: A Novel by Michelle Richmond. Let me just say, the protagonist is having one veerrry bad day, with diversions back to how that came about in her life. Like nothing else you’ll read this year. Check it out—I double dog dare you!

    Reply
  9. Wow, I read widely this month, including these three non-fictions and a novel novel (doubled purposely!):
    First was The Biggest Bluff: How I Learned to Pay Attention, Master Myself, and Win by Maria Konnikova. The author is a writer and Ph.D. psychologist who, in a personal down period of her life, set out to learn how to roll with it and win. As the WaPo put it, “The tale of how Konnikova followed a story about poker players and wound up becoming a story herself will have you riveted, first as you learn about her big winnings, and then as she conveys the lessons she learned both about human nature and herself.” This is a fantastic read, not least because you’ll find new facets of yourself while absorbing it.
    Next up is a very different tale, The Scandalous Hamiltons: A Gilded Age Grifter, a Founding Father’s Disgraced Descendant, and a Trial at the Dawn of Tabloid Journalism by Bill Shaffer. You’ve read about the Astors and Vanderbilts in Victorian-era New York. Now meet another, seedier layer of those days, the grifters trying to grab a brass ring (and a fortune) by marrying into it. These are some of the warpedest (yes, I made that word up, but, oh, how it fits) characters I’ve ever come across, and it’s all real and meticulously well-documented by the author.
    Third is Neil Degrasse Tyson’s latest, Starry Messenger. Basically, this is a collection of essays musing on us and our universe. Tyson’s style is notably conversational and his musings are always worth contemplating. Highly recommended.
    Finally, Golden State: A Novel by Michelle Richmond. Let me just say, the protagonist is having one veerrry bad day, with diversions back to how that came about in her life. Like nothing else you’ll read this year. Check it out—I double dog dare you!

    Reply
  10. Wow, I read widely this month, including these three non-fictions and a novel novel (doubled purposely!):
    First was The Biggest Bluff: How I Learned to Pay Attention, Master Myself, and Win by Maria Konnikova. The author is a writer and Ph.D. psychologist who, in a personal down period of her life, set out to learn how to roll with it and win. As the WaPo put it, “The tale of how Konnikova followed a story about poker players and wound up becoming a story herself will have you riveted, first as you learn about her big winnings, and then as she conveys the lessons she learned both about human nature and herself.” This is a fantastic read, not least because you’ll find new facets of yourself while absorbing it.
    Next up is a very different tale, The Scandalous Hamiltons: A Gilded Age Grifter, a Founding Father’s Disgraced Descendant, and a Trial at the Dawn of Tabloid Journalism by Bill Shaffer. You’ve read about the Astors and Vanderbilts in Victorian-era New York. Now meet another, seedier layer of those days, the grifters trying to grab a brass ring (and a fortune) by marrying into it. These are some of the warpedest (yes, I made that word up, but, oh, how it fits) characters I’ve ever come across, and it’s all real and meticulously well-documented by the author.
    Third is Neil Degrasse Tyson’s latest, Starry Messenger. Basically, this is a collection of essays musing on us and our universe. Tyson’s style is notably conversational and his musings are always worth contemplating. Highly recommended.
    Finally, Golden State: A Novel by Michelle Richmond. Let me just say, the protagonist is having one veerrry bad day, with diversions back to how that came about in her life. Like nothing else you’ll read this year. Check it out—I double dog dare you!

    Reply
  11. Wonderful, thought-provoking recommendations, as always. I was delighted with Christina’s citing the Sarah Morgan book. I’ve enjoyed so many of her series. I will definitely add thus year’s Christmas book to my “buy” list. I’m currently embroiled in Quarter to Midnight, the first book in Karen Rose’s latest romantic suspense series, which is set in New Orleans. And since I’ll be away tomorrow and take Rose’s 650 page hardcover with me, my book companion will be a re-read of J. D. Robb’s Obsession in Death. As always, I’m forwarding today’s post to three very good friends, who are always eager to learn what the wenches are reading and what they’re recommending.

    Reply
  12. Wonderful, thought-provoking recommendations, as always. I was delighted with Christina’s citing the Sarah Morgan book. I’ve enjoyed so many of her series. I will definitely add thus year’s Christmas book to my “buy” list. I’m currently embroiled in Quarter to Midnight, the first book in Karen Rose’s latest romantic suspense series, which is set in New Orleans. And since I’ll be away tomorrow and take Rose’s 650 page hardcover with me, my book companion will be a re-read of J. D. Robb’s Obsession in Death. As always, I’m forwarding today’s post to three very good friends, who are always eager to learn what the wenches are reading and what they’re recommending.

    Reply
  13. Wonderful, thought-provoking recommendations, as always. I was delighted with Christina’s citing the Sarah Morgan book. I’ve enjoyed so many of her series. I will definitely add thus year’s Christmas book to my “buy” list. I’m currently embroiled in Quarter to Midnight, the first book in Karen Rose’s latest romantic suspense series, which is set in New Orleans. And since I’ll be away tomorrow and take Rose’s 650 page hardcover with me, my book companion will be a re-read of J. D. Robb’s Obsession in Death. As always, I’m forwarding today’s post to three very good friends, who are always eager to learn what the wenches are reading and what they’re recommending.

    Reply
  14. Wonderful, thought-provoking recommendations, as always. I was delighted with Christina’s citing the Sarah Morgan book. I’ve enjoyed so many of her series. I will definitely add thus year’s Christmas book to my “buy” list. I’m currently embroiled in Quarter to Midnight, the first book in Karen Rose’s latest romantic suspense series, which is set in New Orleans. And since I’ll be away tomorrow and take Rose’s 650 page hardcover with me, my book companion will be a re-read of J. D. Robb’s Obsession in Death. As always, I’m forwarding today’s post to three very good friends, who are always eager to learn what the wenches are reading and what they’re recommending.

    Reply
  15. Wonderful, thought-provoking recommendations, as always. I was delighted with Christina’s citing the Sarah Morgan book. I’ve enjoyed so many of her series. I will definitely add thus year’s Christmas book to my “buy” list. I’m currently embroiled in Quarter to Midnight, the first book in Karen Rose’s latest romantic suspense series, which is set in New Orleans. And since I’ll be away tomorrow and take Rose’s 650 page hardcover with me, my book companion will be a re-read of J. D. Robb’s Obsession in Death. As always, I’m forwarding today’s post to three very good friends, who are always eager to learn what the wenches are reading and what they’re recommending.

    Reply
  16. I’m adding audios of the Sarah Morgan book to the TBR …. Thanks Christina and also the new Balogh Ravenswood series … thanks Patricia!
    A Highlight for me this month was ‘The midnight Library’ by Mat Haig. It seems that before dying you visit the midnight library where you have the chance of trying alternative existences. It draws on the idea of parallel universes as postulated by some Quantum theorists. The role of consciousness is rather fudged but it all makes for excellent entertainment!
    I also enjoyed the audio of Amanda Quick’s ‘Mischief’. The heroine is fascinated by archaeology and gets involved in plotting revenge against the man she believes killed her friend. Also if interested in the secretive love making techniques from ancient Zainar then you must read this!
    Finally I have enjoyed the first two audios of MJP’s Guardian Trilogy. Unfortunately book 3 ‘A Distant Magic’ is not available in the UK … will keep watch for it!

    Reply
  17. I’m adding audios of the Sarah Morgan book to the TBR …. Thanks Christina and also the new Balogh Ravenswood series … thanks Patricia!
    A Highlight for me this month was ‘The midnight Library’ by Mat Haig. It seems that before dying you visit the midnight library where you have the chance of trying alternative existences. It draws on the idea of parallel universes as postulated by some Quantum theorists. The role of consciousness is rather fudged but it all makes for excellent entertainment!
    I also enjoyed the audio of Amanda Quick’s ‘Mischief’. The heroine is fascinated by archaeology and gets involved in plotting revenge against the man she believes killed her friend. Also if interested in the secretive love making techniques from ancient Zainar then you must read this!
    Finally I have enjoyed the first two audios of MJP’s Guardian Trilogy. Unfortunately book 3 ‘A Distant Magic’ is not available in the UK … will keep watch for it!

    Reply
  18. I’m adding audios of the Sarah Morgan book to the TBR …. Thanks Christina and also the new Balogh Ravenswood series … thanks Patricia!
    A Highlight for me this month was ‘The midnight Library’ by Mat Haig. It seems that before dying you visit the midnight library where you have the chance of trying alternative existences. It draws on the idea of parallel universes as postulated by some Quantum theorists. The role of consciousness is rather fudged but it all makes for excellent entertainment!
    I also enjoyed the audio of Amanda Quick’s ‘Mischief’. The heroine is fascinated by archaeology and gets involved in plotting revenge against the man she believes killed her friend. Also if interested in the secretive love making techniques from ancient Zainar then you must read this!
    Finally I have enjoyed the first two audios of MJP’s Guardian Trilogy. Unfortunately book 3 ‘A Distant Magic’ is not available in the UK … will keep watch for it!

    Reply
  19. I’m adding audios of the Sarah Morgan book to the TBR …. Thanks Christina and also the new Balogh Ravenswood series … thanks Patricia!
    A Highlight for me this month was ‘The midnight Library’ by Mat Haig. It seems that before dying you visit the midnight library where you have the chance of trying alternative existences. It draws on the idea of parallel universes as postulated by some Quantum theorists. The role of consciousness is rather fudged but it all makes for excellent entertainment!
    I also enjoyed the audio of Amanda Quick’s ‘Mischief’. The heroine is fascinated by archaeology and gets involved in plotting revenge against the man she believes killed her friend. Also if interested in the secretive love making techniques from ancient Zainar then you must read this!
    Finally I have enjoyed the first two audios of MJP’s Guardian Trilogy. Unfortunately book 3 ‘A Distant Magic’ is not available in the UK … will keep watch for it!

    Reply
  20. I’m adding audios of the Sarah Morgan book to the TBR …. Thanks Christina and also the new Balogh Ravenswood series … thanks Patricia!
    A Highlight for me this month was ‘The midnight Library’ by Mat Haig. It seems that before dying you visit the midnight library where you have the chance of trying alternative existences. It draws on the idea of parallel universes as postulated by some Quantum theorists. The role of consciousness is rather fudged but it all makes for excellent entertainment!
    I also enjoyed the audio of Amanda Quick’s ‘Mischief’. The heroine is fascinated by archaeology and gets involved in plotting revenge against the man she believes killed her friend. Also if interested in the secretive love making techniques from ancient Zainar then you must read this!
    Finally I have enjoyed the first two audios of MJP’s Guardian Trilogy. Unfortunately book 3 ‘A Distant Magic’ is not available in the UK … will keep watch for it!

    Reply
  21. I’ve been reading series written by Sandra Owens and Puffin Island series by Sarah Morgan. At the moment I’m reading The McKenna Legacy series by Patricia Rosemoor. I’m also reading an autobiography written by my favourite singer and songwriter Pave Maijanen. He managed to finish it (with a little help) before he passed away in the beginning of 2021.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XqoD98q1bBs
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hL8BVgIgIWo
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M56ehidzQSo

    Reply
  22. I’ve been reading series written by Sandra Owens and Puffin Island series by Sarah Morgan. At the moment I’m reading The McKenna Legacy series by Patricia Rosemoor. I’m also reading an autobiography written by my favourite singer and songwriter Pave Maijanen. He managed to finish it (with a little help) before he passed away in the beginning of 2021.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XqoD98q1bBs
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hL8BVgIgIWo
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M56ehidzQSo

    Reply
  23. I’ve been reading series written by Sandra Owens and Puffin Island series by Sarah Morgan. At the moment I’m reading The McKenna Legacy series by Patricia Rosemoor. I’m also reading an autobiography written by my favourite singer and songwriter Pave Maijanen. He managed to finish it (with a little help) before he passed away in the beginning of 2021.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XqoD98q1bBs
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hL8BVgIgIWo
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M56ehidzQSo

    Reply
  24. I’ve been reading series written by Sandra Owens and Puffin Island series by Sarah Morgan. At the moment I’m reading The McKenna Legacy series by Patricia Rosemoor. I’m also reading an autobiography written by my favourite singer and songwriter Pave Maijanen. He managed to finish it (with a little help) before he passed away in the beginning of 2021.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XqoD98q1bBs
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hL8BVgIgIWo
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M56ehidzQSo

    Reply
  25. I’ve been reading series written by Sandra Owens and Puffin Island series by Sarah Morgan. At the moment I’m reading The McKenna Legacy series by Patricia Rosemoor. I’m also reading an autobiography written by my favourite singer and songwriter Pave Maijanen. He managed to finish it (with a little help) before he passed away in the beginning of 2021.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XqoD98q1bBs
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hL8BVgIgIWo
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M56ehidzQSo

    Reply
  26. Since last time ~
    — for my distant bookgroup, I read The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett. This was an intriguing novel about identical light skinned twins in the 1950s and their lives (and the lives of their daughters) after one of them leaves to pass as white.
    — enjoyed the contemporary romance novella Below Zero by Ali Hazelwood.
    — reread with pleasure two science fiction romances Dark Horse and Dark Deeds both by Michelle Diener. Also enjoyed Dark Ambitions, a novella which features characters from Dark Horse.
    — Outcrossing (Mysterious Charm Book 1) by Celia Lake: I liked this 1920s era fantasy, but my copy (a document, perhaps an advanced reader’s copy?) had many sentence fragments and was missing a chapter. I suspect/hope that the published copy is more polished.
    — the graphic novel Fangs by Sarah Andersen. This was a very quick and highly enjoyable read about a relationship between a vampire and a werewolf. I laughed a lot while reading this and shared quite a few snippets with my husband.
    — Artifact Space by Miles Cameron which I’d describe as military science fiction featuring a young female main character. I almost put this aside in the first chapter, but I’m glad I persevered as I did enjoy it. I look forward to reading the next book when it is published.
    — completed my reread of the Class 5 series with Dark Minds, Dark Matters, Dark Class, and the Dark Class Bonus Epilogue by Michelle Diener. I enjoyed them all.
    — Nora Goes Off Script by Annabel Monaghan was a dangerous book. I took it to bed one night to sample and then one more chaptered until I finished it! As you might surmise, I enjoyed it.
    — For my local book group, Cloud Cuckoo Land by Anthony Doerr. Since this was a long book (637 pages), I read it slowly over a couple of weeks. It was very different from the previous book I’d read by this author, All the Light We Cannot See, but I did ultimately find it a rewarding read.
    — A Restless Truth (The Last Binding Book 2) by Freya Marske; this was an enjoyable historical fantasy romance. It is a follow on to the author’s first book but features two women as the leads.
    — Only Bad Options: A Galactic Bonds book by Jennifer Estep was an enjoyable science fiction romance though it did strain credulity a time or two.
    — I’ve always heard wonderful things about Connie Willis’ To Say Nothing of the Dog. Though I’ve tried it several times, I’ve never progressed far and wondered if she just wasn’t for me. However, I read one of her shorter works and quite liked it. It’s available as a solo work ~ All Seated on the Ground by Connie Willis. It’s also in this collection ~ A Lot Like Christmas: Stories by Connie Willis with some 400 additional pages of stories.
    — enjoyed Skyward (The Skyward Series Book 1) by Brandon Sanderson which is categorized as young adult science fiction.
    — enjoyed the historical romance novella Her Every Wish (Worth Saga) by Courtney Milan; rather than featuring more typical well to do characters, it has two fairly poor characters, one of whom is of mixed race.

    Reply
  27. Since last time ~
    — for my distant bookgroup, I read The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett. This was an intriguing novel about identical light skinned twins in the 1950s and their lives (and the lives of their daughters) after one of them leaves to pass as white.
    — enjoyed the contemporary romance novella Below Zero by Ali Hazelwood.
    — reread with pleasure two science fiction romances Dark Horse and Dark Deeds both by Michelle Diener. Also enjoyed Dark Ambitions, a novella which features characters from Dark Horse.
    — Outcrossing (Mysterious Charm Book 1) by Celia Lake: I liked this 1920s era fantasy, but my copy (a document, perhaps an advanced reader’s copy?) had many sentence fragments and was missing a chapter. I suspect/hope that the published copy is more polished.
    — the graphic novel Fangs by Sarah Andersen. This was a very quick and highly enjoyable read about a relationship between a vampire and a werewolf. I laughed a lot while reading this and shared quite a few snippets with my husband.
    — Artifact Space by Miles Cameron which I’d describe as military science fiction featuring a young female main character. I almost put this aside in the first chapter, but I’m glad I persevered as I did enjoy it. I look forward to reading the next book when it is published.
    — completed my reread of the Class 5 series with Dark Minds, Dark Matters, Dark Class, and the Dark Class Bonus Epilogue by Michelle Diener. I enjoyed them all.
    — Nora Goes Off Script by Annabel Monaghan was a dangerous book. I took it to bed one night to sample and then one more chaptered until I finished it! As you might surmise, I enjoyed it.
    — For my local book group, Cloud Cuckoo Land by Anthony Doerr. Since this was a long book (637 pages), I read it slowly over a couple of weeks. It was very different from the previous book I’d read by this author, All the Light We Cannot See, but I did ultimately find it a rewarding read.
    — A Restless Truth (The Last Binding Book 2) by Freya Marske; this was an enjoyable historical fantasy romance. It is a follow on to the author’s first book but features two women as the leads.
    — Only Bad Options: A Galactic Bonds book by Jennifer Estep was an enjoyable science fiction romance though it did strain credulity a time or two.
    — I’ve always heard wonderful things about Connie Willis’ To Say Nothing of the Dog. Though I’ve tried it several times, I’ve never progressed far and wondered if she just wasn’t for me. However, I read one of her shorter works and quite liked it. It’s available as a solo work ~ All Seated on the Ground by Connie Willis. It’s also in this collection ~ A Lot Like Christmas: Stories by Connie Willis with some 400 additional pages of stories.
    — enjoyed Skyward (The Skyward Series Book 1) by Brandon Sanderson which is categorized as young adult science fiction.
    — enjoyed the historical romance novella Her Every Wish (Worth Saga) by Courtney Milan; rather than featuring more typical well to do characters, it has two fairly poor characters, one of whom is of mixed race.

    Reply
  28. Since last time ~
    — for my distant bookgroup, I read The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett. This was an intriguing novel about identical light skinned twins in the 1950s and their lives (and the lives of their daughters) after one of them leaves to pass as white.
    — enjoyed the contemporary romance novella Below Zero by Ali Hazelwood.
    — reread with pleasure two science fiction romances Dark Horse and Dark Deeds both by Michelle Diener. Also enjoyed Dark Ambitions, a novella which features characters from Dark Horse.
    — Outcrossing (Mysterious Charm Book 1) by Celia Lake: I liked this 1920s era fantasy, but my copy (a document, perhaps an advanced reader’s copy?) had many sentence fragments and was missing a chapter. I suspect/hope that the published copy is more polished.
    — the graphic novel Fangs by Sarah Andersen. This was a very quick and highly enjoyable read about a relationship between a vampire and a werewolf. I laughed a lot while reading this and shared quite a few snippets with my husband.
    — Artifact Space by Miles Cameron which I’d describe as military science fiction featuring a young female main character. I almost put this aside in the first chapter, but I’m glad I persevered as I did enjoy it. I look forward to reading the next book when it is published.
    — completed my reread of the Class 5 series with Dark Minds, Dark Matters, Dark Class, and the Dark Class Bonus Epilogue by Michelle Diener. I enjoyed them all.
    — Nora Goes Off Script by Annabel Monaghan was a dangerous book. I took it to bed one night to sample and then one more chaptered until I finished it! As you might surmise, I enjoyed it.
    — For my local book group, Cloud Cuckoo Land by Anthony Doerr. Since this was a long book (637 pages), I read it slowly over a couple of weeks. It was very different from the previous book I’d read by this author, All the Light We Cannot See, but I did ultimately find it a rewarding read.
    — A Restless Truth (The Last Binding Book 2) by Freya Marske; this was an enjoyable historical fantasy romance. It is a follow on to the author’s first book but features two women as the leads.
    — Only Bad Options: A Galactic Bonds book by Jennifer Estep was an enjoyable science fiction romance though it did strain credulity a time or two.
    — I’ve always heard wonderful things about Connie Willis’ To Say Nothing of the Dog. Though I’ve tried it several times, I’ve never progressed far and wondered if she just wasn’t for me. However, I read one of her shorter works and quite liked it. It’s available as a solo work ~ All Seated on the Ground by Connie Willis. It’s also in this collection ~ A Lot Like Christmas: Stories by Connie Willis with some 400 additional pages of stories.
    — enjoyed Skyward (The Skyward Series Book 1) by Brandon Sanderson which is categorized as young adult science fiction.
    — enjoyed the historical romance novella Her Every Wish (Worth Saga) by Courtney Milan; rather than featuring more typical well to do characters, it has two fairly poor characters, one of whom is of mixed race.

    Reply
  29. Since last time ~
    — for my distant bookgroup, I read The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett. This was an intriguing novel about identical light skinned twins in the 1950s and their lives (and the lives of their daughters) after one of them leaves to pass as white.
    — enjoyed the contemporary romance novella Below Zero by Ali Hazelwood.
    — reread with pleasure two science fiction romances Dark Horse and Dark Deeds both by Michelle Diener. Also enjoyed Dark Ambitions, a novella which features characters from Dark Horse.
    — Outcrossing (Mysterious Charm Book 1) by Celia Lake: I liked this 1920s era fantasy, but my copy (a document, perhaps an advanced reader’s copy?) had many sentence fragments and was missing a chapter. I suspect/hope that the published copy is more polished.
    — the graphic novel Fangs by Sarah Andersen. This was a very quick and highly enjoyable read about a relationship between a vampire and a werewolf. I laughed a lot while reading this and shared quite a few snippets with my husband.
    — Artifact Space by Miles Cameron which I’d describe as military science fiction featuring a young female main character. I almost put this aside in the first chapter, but I’m glad I persevered as I did enjoy it. I look forward to reading the next book when it is published.
    — completed my reread of the Class 5 series with Dark Minds, Dark Matters, Dark Class, and the Dark Class Bonus Epilogue by Michelle Diener. I enjoyed them all.
    — Nora Goes Off Script by Annabel Monaghan was a dangerous book. I took it to bed one night to sample and then one more chaptered until I finished it! As you might surmise, I enjoyed it.
    — For my local book group, Cloud Cuckoo Land by Anthony Doerr. Since this was a long book (637 pages), I read it slowly over a couple of weeks. It was very different from the previous book I’d read by this author, All the Light We Cannot See, but I did ultimately find it a rewarding read.
    — A Restless Truth (The Last Binding Book 2) by Freya Marske; this was an enjoyable historical fantasy romance. It is a follow on to the author’s first book but features two women as the leads.
    — Only Bad Options: A Galactic Bonds book by Jennifer Estep was an enjoyable science fiction romance though it did strain credulity a time or two.
    — I’ve always heard wonderful things about Connie Willis’ To Say Nothing of the Dog. Though I’ve tried it several times, I’ve never progressed far and wondered if she just wasn’t for me. However, I read one of her shorter works and quite liked it. It’s available as a solo work ~ All Seated on the Ground by Connie Willis. It’s also in this collection ~ A Lot Like Christmas: Stories by Connie Willis with some 400 additional pages of stories.
    — enjoyed Skyward (The Skyward Series Book 1) by Brandon Sanderson which is categorized as young adult science fiction.
    — enjoyed the historical romance novella Her Every Wish (Worth Saga) by Courtney Milan; rather than featuring more typical well to do characters, it has two fairly poor characters, one of whom is of mixed race.

    Reply
  30. Since last time ~
    — for my distant bookgroup, I read The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett. This was an intriguing novel about identical light skinned twins in the 1950s and their lives (and the lives of their daughters) after one of them leaves to pass as white.
    — enjoyed the contemporary romance novella Below Zero by Ali Hazelwood.
    — reread with pleasure two science fiction romances Dark Horse and Dark Deeds both by Michelle Diener. Also enjoyed Dark Ambitions, a novella which features characters from Dark Horse.
    — Outcrossing (Mysterious Charm Book 1) by Celia Lake: I liked this 1920s era fantasy, but my copy (a document, perhaps an advanced reader’s copy?) had many sentence fragments and was missing a chapter. I suspect/hope that the published copy is more polished.
    — the graphic novel Fangs by Sarah Andersen. This was a very quick and highly enjoyable read about a relationship between a vampire and a werewolf. I laughed a lot while reading this and shared quite a few snippets with my husband.
    — Artifact Space by Miles Cameron which I’d describe as military science fiction featuring a young female main character. I almost put this aside in the first chapter, but I’m glad I persevered as I did enjoy it. I look forward to reading the next book when it is published.
    — completed my reread of the Class 5 series with Dark Minds, Dark Matters, Dark Class, and the Dark Class Bonus Epilogue by Michelle Diener. I enjoyed them all.
    — Nora Goes Off Script by Annabel Monaghan was a dangerous book. I took it to bed one night to sample and then one more chaptered until I finished it! As you might surmise, I enjoyed it.
    — For my local book group, Cloud Cuckoo Land by Anthony Doerr. Since this was a long book (637 pages), I read it slowly over a couple of weeks. It was very different from the previous book I’d read by this author, All the Light We Cannot See, but I did ultimately find it a rewarding read.
    — A Restless Truth (The Last Binding Book 2) by Freya Marske; this was an enjoyable historical fantasy romance. It is a follow on to the author’s first book but features two women as the leads.
    — Only Bad Options: A Galactic Bonds book by Jennifer Estep was an enjoyable science fiction romance though it did strain credulity a time or two.
    — I’ve always heard wonderful things about Connie Willis’ To Say Nothing of the Dog. Though I’ve tried it several times, I’ve never progressed far and wondered if she just wasn’t for me. However, I read one of her shorter works and quite liked it. It’s available as a solo work ~ All Seated on the Ground by Connie Willis. It’s also in this collection ~ A Lot Like Christmas: Stories by Connie Willis with some 400 additional pages of stories.
    — enjoyed Skyward (The Skyward Series Book 1) by Brandon Sanderson which is categorized as young adult science fiction.
    — enjoyed the historical romance novella Her Every Wish (Worth Saga) by Courtney Milan; rather than featuring more typical well to do characters, it has two fairly poor characters, one of whom is of mixed race.

    Reply
  31. Every month I look forward to this post from the Word Wenches and their readers. I always find books I want to read, and that is a gift.
    This month I have nothing to contribute. I have been dealing with flu and reading is low on my list of things to do….yes….I know a book addict like me doesn’t want to read. What can I say?
    Thanks for the contributions and introductions by each of you. As always, you have widened my horizons.

    Reply
  32. Every month I look forward to this post from the Word Wenches and their readers. I always find books I want to read, and that is a gift.
    This month I have nothing to contribute. I have been dealing with flu and reading is low on my list of things to do….yes….I know a book addict like me doesn’t want to read. What can I say?
    Thanks for the contributions and introductions by each of you. As always, you have widened my horizons.

    Reply
  33. Every month I look forward to this post from the Word Wenches and their readers. I always find books I want to read, and that is a gift.
    This month I have nothing to contribute. I have been dealing with flu and reading is low on my list of things to do….yes….I know a book addict like me doesn’t want to read. What can I say?
    Thanks for the contributions and introductions by each of you. As always, you have widened my horizons.

    Reply
  34. Every month I look forward to this post from the Word Wenches and their readers. I always find books I want to read, and that is a gift.
    This month I have nothing to contribute. I have been dealing with flu and reading is low on my list of things to do….yes….I know a book addict like me doesn’t want to read. What can I say?
    Thanks for the contributions and introductions by each of you. As always, you have widened my horizons.

    Reply
  35. Every month I look forward to this post from the Word Wenches and their readers. I always find books I want to read, and that is a gift.
    This month I have nothing to contribute. I have been dealing with flu and reading is low on my list of things to do….yes….I know a book addict like me doesn’t want to read. What can I say?
    Thanks for the contributions and introductions by each of you. As always, you have widened my horizons.

    Reply
  36. Thanks for all the great recommendations, I’ll be adding Space Junk and Number the Stars to my TBR list. I was on a bit of a sci-fi binge this month. After enjoying Games of Command I tried two more Linnea Sinclair books, Gabriel’s Ghost and Finders Keepers. I was not a big fan of GG but Finders Keepers is my favorite Sinclair book so far. I read The Spare Man by Mary Robinette Kowal, an amusing homage to The Thin Man, a mash-up of mystery and sci fi. A number of people here mentioned Nathan Lowell’s Trader’s Tales books, so I tried Quarter Share, and I really loved it. I don’t know what makes this book so enjoyable, without the usual sci-fi action, aliens, battles in space, etc., but it’s very compulsive reading. I’m sure I’ll be reading the whole series.
    I also read and loved Love Lettering. Kate Clayborn did a great job describing life in New York City.

    Reply
  37. Thanks for all the great recommendations, I’ll be adding Space Junk and Number the Stars to my TBR list. I was on a bit of a sci-fi binge this month. After enjoying Games of Command I tried two more Linnea Sinclair books, Gabriel’s Ghost and Finders Keepers. I was not a big fan of GG but Finders Keepers is my favorite Sinclair book so far. I read The Spare Man by Mary Robinette Kowal, an amusing homage to The Thin Man, a mash-up of mystery and sci fi. A number of people here mentioned Nathan Lowell’s Trader’s Tales books, so I tried Quarter Share, and I really loved it. I don’t know what makes this book so enjoyable, without the usual sci-fi action, aliens, battles in space, etc., but it’s very compulsive reading. I’m sure I’ll be reading the whole series.
    I also read and loved Love Lettering. Kate Clayborn did a great job describing life in New York City.

    Reply
  38. Thanks for all the great recommendations, I’ll be adding Space Junk and Number the Stars to my TBR list. I was on a bit of a sci-fi binge this month. After enjoying Games of Command I tried two more Linnea Sinclair books, Gabriel’s Ghost and Finders Keepers. I was not a big fan of GG but Finders Keepers is my favorite Sinclair book so far. I read The Spare Man by Mary Robinette Kowal, an amusing homage to The Thin Man, a mash-up of mystery and sci fi. A number of people here mentioned Nathan Lowell’s Trader’s Tales books, so I tried Quarter Share, and I really loved it. I don’t know what makes this book so enjoyable, without the usual sci-fi action, aliens, battles in space, etc., but it’s very compulsive reading. I’m sure I’ll be reading the whole series.
    I also read and loved Love Lettering. Kate Clayborn did a great job describing life in New York City.

    Reply
  39. Thanks for all the great recommendations, I’ll be adding Space Junk and Number the Stars to my TBR list. I was on a bit of a sci-fi binge this month. After enjoying Games of Command I tried two more Linnea Sinclair books, Gabriel’s Ghost and Finders Keepers. I was not a big fan of GG but Finders Keepers is my favorite Sinclair book so far. I read The Spare Man by Mary Robinette Kowal, an amusing homage to The Thin Man, a mash-up of mystery and sci fi. A number of people here mentioned Nathan Lowell’s Trader’s Tales books, so I tried Quarter Share, and I really loved it. I don’t know what makes this book so enjoyable, without the usual sci-fi action, aliens, battles in space, etc., but it’s very compulsive reading. I’m sure I’ll be reading the whole series.
    I also read and loved Love Lettering. Kate Clayborn did a great job describing life in New York City.

    Reply
  40. Thanks for all the great recommendations, I’ll be adding Space Junk and Number the Stars to my TBR list. I was on a bit of a sci-fi binge this month. After enjoying Games of Command I tried two more Linnea Sinclair books, Gabriel’s Ghost and Finders Keepers. I was not a big fan of GG but Finders Keepers is my favorite Sinclair book so far. I read The Spare Man by Mary Robinette Kowal, an amusing homage to The Thin Man, a mash-up of mystery and sci fi. A number of people here mentioned Nathan Lowell’s Trader’s Tales books, so I tried Quarter Share, and I really loved it. I don’t know what makes this book so enjoyable, without the usual sci-fi action, aliens, battles in space, etc., but it’s very compulsive reading. I’m sure I’ll be reading the whole series.
    I also read and loved Love Lettering. Kate Clayborn did a great job describing life in New York City.

    Reply
  41. Yay…more books to add to my I need to find that book list. Grin.
    This months mentions – The Victory Garden by Rhys Bowen. Set during WWI, young Emily chafes at not being allowed to do war work because her parents think it is too “common”. She turns 21 and strikes out and manages to volunteer and become a Land Girl. Also manages to have a romance/love affair with the man of her choice that her parents didn’t approve of. Lots of change and growth in her life. A HEA is hinted at in the end of the book
    A Nun in the Closet by Dorothy Gilman. Reread. A light fun book with lots of chuckles. More a story versus a mystery but everyone is a fully fleshed person.
    Dragon Slippers, Dragon Flight & Dragon Spears – Jessica Day George. A fun, young adult trilogy involving Dragons! Adventure! A very low key romance, no angst. Really enjoyed reading the entire series
    Full Share & Double Share by Nathan Lowell I lucked out that both books arrived in a timely fashion from interlibrary loan and was able to read them in order. Very much enjoying the series. I’ll have to ask for the next two books. I was concerned whether I’d still enjoy the series once Ishmael leaves the Lois, but no, still just as good. Lots of good chuckles and more character growth.
    The Little Teashop of Lost and Found by Trisha Ashley. Reread. Totally enjoying it again. Set in a small English town. Alice is reinventing her life and doing a fine job of it. (This is my read in the middle of the night book right now).

    Reply
  42. Yay…more books to add to my I need to find that book list. Grin.
    This months mentions – The Victory Garden by Rhys Bowen. Set during WWI, young Emily chafes at not being allowed to do war work because her parents think it is too “common”. She turns 21 and strikes out and manages to volunteer and become a Land Girl. Also manages to have a romance/love affair with the man of her choice that her parents didn’t approve of. Lots of change and growth in her life. A HEA is hinted at in the end of the book
    A Nun in the Closet by Dorothy Gilman. Reread. A light fun book with lots of chuckles. More a story versus a mystery but everyone is a fully fleshed person.
    Dragon Slippers, Dragon Flight & Dragon Spears – Jessica Day George. A fun, young adult trilogy involving Dragons! Adventure! A very low key romance, no angst. Really enjoyed reading the entire series
    Full Share & Double Share by Nathan Lowell I lucked out that both books arrived in a timely fashion from interlibrary loan and was able to read them in order. Very much enjoying the series. I’ll have to ask for the next two books. I was concerned whether I’d still enjoy the series once Ishmael leaves the Lois, but no, still just as good. Lots of good chuckles and more character growth.
    The Little Teashop of Lost and Found by Trisha Ashley. Reread. Totally enjoying it again. Set in a small English town. Alice is reinventing her life and doing a fine job of it. (This is my read in the middle of the night book right now).

    Reply
  43. Yay…more books to add to my I need to find that book list. Grin.
    This months mentions – The Victory Garden by Rhys Bowen. Set during WWI, young Emily chafes at not being allowed to do war work because her parents think it is too “common”. She turns 21 and strikes out and manages to volunteer and become a Land Girl. Also manages to have a romance/love affair with the man of her choice that her parents didn’t approve of. Lots of change and growth in her life. A HEA is hinted at in the end of the book
    A Nun in the Closet by Dorothy Gilman. Reread. A light fun book with lots of chuckles. More a story versus a mystery but everyone is a fully fleshed person.
    Dragon Slippers, Dragon Flight & Dragon Spears – Jessica Day George. A fun, young adult trilogy involving Dragons! Adventure! A very low key romance, no angst. Really enjoyed reading the entire series
    Full Share & Double Share by Nathan Lowell I lucked out that both books arrived in a timely fashion from interlibrary loan and was able to read them in order. Very much enjoying the series. I’ll have to ask for the next two books. I was concerned whether I’d still enjoy the series once Ishmael leaves the Lois, but no, still just as good. Lots of good chuckles and more character growth.
    The Little Teashop of Lost and Found by Trisha Ashley. Reread. Totally enjoying it again. Set in a small English town. Alice is reinventing her life and doing a fine job of it. (This is my read in the middle of the night book right now).

    Reply
  44. Yay…more books to add to my I need to find that book list. Grin.
    This months mentions – The Victory Garden by Rhys Bowen. Set during WWI, young Emily chafes at not being allowed to do war work because her parents think it is too “common”. She turns 21 and strikes out and manages to volunteer and become a Land Girl. Also manages to have a romance/love affair with the man of her choice that her parents didn’t approve of. Lots of change and growth in her life. A HEA is hinted at in the end of the book
    A Nun in the Closet by Dorothy Gilman. Reread. A light fun book with lots of chuckles. More a story versus a mystery but everyone is a fully fleshed person.
    Dragon Slippers, Dragon Flight & Dragon Spears – Jessica Day George. A fun, young adult trilogy involving Dragons! Adventure! A very low key romance, no angst. Really enjoyed reading the entire series
    Full Share & Double Share by Nathan Lowell I lucked out that both books arrived in a timely fashion from interlibrary loan and was able to read them in order. Very much enjoying the series. I’ll have to ask for the next two books. I was concerned whether I’d still enjoy the series once Ishmael leaves the Lois, but no, still just as good. Lots of good chuckles and more character growth.
    The Little Teashop of Lost and Found by Trisha Ashley. Reread. Totally enjoying it again. Set in a small English town. Alice is reinventing her life and doing a fine job of it. (This is my read in the middle of the night book right now).

    Reply
  45. Yay…more books to add to my I need to find that book list. Grin.
    This months mentions – The Victory Garden by Rhys Bowen. Set during WWI, young Emily chafes at not being allowed to do war work because her parents think it is too “common”. She turns 21 and strikes out and manages to volunteer and become a Land Girl. Also manages to have a romance/love affair with the man of her choice that her parents didn’t approve of. Lots of change and growth in her life. A HEA is hinted at in the end of the book
    A Nun in the Closet by Dorothy Gilman. Reread. A light fun book with lots of chuckles. More a story versus a mystery but everyone is a fully fleshed person.
    Dragon Slippers, Dragon Flight & Dragon Spears – Jessica Day George. A fun, young adult trilogy involving Dragons! Adventure! A very low key romance, no angst. Really enjoyed reading the entire series
    Full Share & Double Share by Nathan Lowell I lucked out that both books arrived in a timely fashion from interlibrary loan and was able to read them in order. Very much enjoying the series. I’ll have to ask for the next two books. I was concerned whether I’d still enjoy the series once Ishmael leaves the Lois, but no, still just as good. Lots of good chuckles and more character growth.
    The Little Teashop of Lost and Found by Trisha Ashley. Reread. Totally enjoying it again. Set in a small English town. Alice is reinventing her life and doing a fine job of it. (This is my read in the middle of the night book right now).

    Reply
  46. What a wonderful collection of books read by the Wenches and the commenters!
    Anne, Nathan Lowell is recovering from cancer treatment (his prognosis is good) and says that an Ishmael book is simmering. The next Wizard book is on hiatus for now.

    Reply
  47. What a wonderful collection of books read by the Wenches and the commenters!
    Anne, Nathan Lowell is recovering from cancer treatment (his prognosis is good) and says that an Ishmael book is simmering. The next Wizard book is on hiatus for now.

    Reply
  48. What a wonderful collection of books read by the Wenches and the commenters!
    Anne, Nathan Lowell is recovering from cancer treatment (his prognosis is good) and says that an Ishmael book is simmering. The next Wizard book is on hiatus for now.

    Reply
  49. What a wonderful collection of books read by the Wenches and the commenters!
    Anne, Nathan Lowell is recovering from cancer treatment (his prognosis is good) and says that an Ishmael book is simmering. The next Wizard book is on hiatus for now.

    Reply
  50. What a wonderful collection of books read by the Wenches and the commenters!
    Anne, Nathan Lowell is recovering from cancer treatment (his prognosis is good) and says that an Ishmael book is simmering. The next Wizard book is on hiatus for now.

    Reply
  51. Patricia, Mary Balogh needs no further comment. *G* The New York book sounds very interesting, though. I know that most large cities suffered great and devastating fires, but I didn’t know that had happened in NYC. Fascinating indeed!

    Reply
  52. Patricia, Mary Balogh needs no further comment. *G* The New York book sounds very interesting, though. I know that most large cities suffered great and devastating fires, but I didn’t know that had happened in NYC. Fascinating indeed!

    Reply
  53. Patricia, Mary Balogh needs no further comment. *G* The New York book sounds very interesting, though. I know that most large cities suffered great and devastating fires, but I didn’t know that had happened in NYC. Fascinating indeed!

    Reply
  54. Patricia, Mary Balogh needs no further comment. *G* The New York book sounds very interesting, though. I know that most large cities suffered great and devastating fires, but I didn’t know that had happened in NYC. Fascinating indeed!

    Reply
  55. Patricia, Mary Balogh needs no further comment. *G* The New York book sounds very interesting, though. I know that most large cities suffered great and devastating fires, but I didn’t know that had happened in NYC. Fascinating indeed!

    Reply
  56. Quantum–a lot of good stories require a certain suspension of disbelief, but The Midnight Library does sound intriguing.
    I’ll look into status of the audio of A Distant Magic. Amazon UK has a separate listing for original edition of ADM, different from the recent ebook release, so hard to find. The audio was about the only one of my books that had audio rights sold to Blackstone, which is annoying. I’ve been trying to get all of my audiobooks under the Recorded Books roof with international distribution, but it’s a long, slow process. Stay tuned!

    Reply
  57. Quantum–a lot of good stories require a certain suspension of disbelief, but The Midnight Library does sound intriguing.
    I’ll look into status of the audio of A Distant Magic. Amazon UK has a separate listing for original edition of ADM, different from the recent ebook release, so hard to find. The audio was about the only one of my books that had audio rights sold to Blackstone, which is annoying. I’ve been trying to get all of my audiobooks under the Recorded Books roof with international distribution, but it’s a long, slow process. Stay tuned!

    Reply
  58. Quantum–a lot of good stories require a certain suspension of disbelief, but The Midnight Library does sound intriguing.
    I’ll look into status of the audio of A Distant Magic. Amazon UK has a separate listing for original edition of ADM, different from the recent ebook release, so hard to find. The audio was about the only one of my books that had audio rights sold to Blackstone, which is annoying. I’ve been trying to get all of my audiobooks under the Recorded Books roof with international distribution, but it’s a long, slow process. Stay tuned!

    Reply
  59. Quantum–a lot of good stories require a certain suspension of disbelief, but The Midnight Library does sound intriguing.
    I’ll look into status of the audio of A Distant Magic. Amazon UK has a separate listing for original edition of ADM, different from the recent ebook release, so hard to find. The audio was about the only one of my books that had audio rights sold to Blackstone, which is annoying. I’ve been trying to get all of my audiobooks under the Recorded Books roof with international distribution, but it’s a long, slow process. Stay tuned!

    Reply
  60. Quantum–a lot of good stories require a certain suspension of disbelief, but The Midnight Library does sound intriguing.
    I’ll look into status of the audio of A Distant Magic. Amazon UK has a separate listing for original edition of ADM, different from the recent ebook release, so hard to find. The audio was about the only one of my books that had audio rights sold to Blackstone, which is annoying. I’ve been trying to get all of my audiobooks under the Recorded Books roof with international distribution, but it’s a long, slow process. Stay tuned!

    Reply
  61. Kareni,
    As always, your reading list dazzles the rest of us! I’ve read Diener’s Class 5 series, but not that novella. Must look for it. I also have Connie Willis’s Christmas collection, and this is a good time to pull it up! Thank you.

    Reply
  62. Kareni,
    As always, your reading list dazzles the rest of us! I’ve read Diener’s Class 5 series, but not that novella. Must look for it. I also have Connie Willis’s Christmas collection, and this is a good time to pull it up! Thank you.

    Reply
  63. Kareni,
    As always, your reading list dazzles the rest of us! I’ve read Diener’s Class 5 series, but not that novella. Must look for it. I also have Connie Willis’s Christmas collection, and this is a good time to pull it up! Thank you.

    Reply
  64. Kareni,
    As always, your reading list dazzles the rest of us! I’ve read Diener’s Class 5 series, but not that novella. Must look for it. I also have Connie Willis’s Christmas collection, and this is a good time to pull it up! Thank you.

    Reply
  65. Kareni,
    As always, your reading list dazzles the rest of us! I’ve read Diener’s Class 5 series, but not that novella. Must look for it. I also have Connie Willis’s Christmas collection, and this is a good time to pull it up! Thank you.

    Reply
  66. Sympathies on the flu, Annette! A horde of viruses have just been waiting to sweep in and attack. It’s a sad thing when a book addict doesn’t feel well enough to read. I hope you feel better soon.

    Reply
  67. Sympathies on the flu, Annette! A horde of viruses have just been waiting to sweep in and attack. It’s a sad thing when a book addict doesn’t feel well enough to read. I hope you feel better soon.

    Reply
  68. Sympathies on the flu, Annette! A horde of viruses have just been waiting to sweep in and attack. It’s a sad thing when a book addict doesn’t feel well enough to read. I hope you feel better soon.

    Reply
  69. Sympathies on the flu, Annette! A horde of viruses have just been waiting to sweep in and attack. It’s a sad thing when a book addict doesn’t feel well enough to read. I hope you feel better soon.

    Reply
  70. Sympathies on the flu, Annette! A horde of viruses have just been waiting to sweep in and attack. It’s a sad thing when a book addict doesn’t feel well enough to read. I hope you feel better soon.

    Reply
  71. Karin, I really like Linnea Sinclair’s books, especially Games of Command. (Cats disguising themselves as furzels!) Nathan Lowell’s books are mystifying–superficially simple, yet so captivating. It’s a Mystery!

    Reply
  72. Karin, I really like Linnea Sinclair’s books, especially Games of Command. (Cats disguising themselves as furzels!) Nathan Lowell’s books are mystifying–superficially simple, yet so captivating. It’s a Mystery!

    Reply
  73. Karin, I really like Linnea Sinclair’s books, especially Games of Command. (Cats disguising themselves as furzels!) Nathan Lowell’s books are mystifying–superficially simple, yet so captivating. It’s a Mystery!

    Reply
  74. Karin, I really like Linnea Sinclair’s books, especially Games of Command. (Cats disguising themselves as furzels!) Nathan Lowell’s books are mystifying–superficially simple, yet so captivating. It’s a Mystery!

    Reply
  75. Karin, I really like Linnea Sinclair’s books, especially Games of Command. (Cats disguising themselves as furzels!) Nathan Lowell’s books are mystifying–superficially simple, yet so captivating. It’s a Mystery!

    Reply
  76. Minna, I’m not sure that musicians and artists ever really retire. But I looked him up on Wikipedia and see that he died of ALS, one of the cruelest of disease. He was 70, which these days seems young. But he made his mark on the musical world.

    Reply
  77. Minna, I’m not sure that musicians and artists ever really retire. But I looked him up on Wikipedia and see that he died of ALS, one of the cruelest of disease. He was 70, which these days seems young. But he made his mark on the musical world.

    Reply
  78. Minna, I’m not sure that musicians and artists ever really retire. But I looked him up on Wikipedia and see that he died of ALS, one of the cruelest of disease. He was 70, which these days seems young. But he made his mark on the musical world.

    Reply
  79. Minna, I’m not sure that musicians and artists ever really retire. But I looked him up on Wikipedia and see that he died of ALS, one of the cruelest of disease. He was 70, which these days seems young. But he made his mark on the musical world.

    Reply
  80. Minna, I’m not sure that musicians and artists ever really retire. But I looked him up on Wikipedia and see that he died of ALS, one of the cruelest of disease. He was 70, which these days seems young. But he made his mark on the musical world.

    Reply
  81. Well, he had intended to have a partial retirement. But since that was not to be, he wrote his autobiography and gave his blessing for the new version of his song Pidä Huolta (Take Care) and for its use to collect money for kids and teenagers mental health care chat, where they can get help. Take Care/Pidä huolta has often been used to collect money for some good purpose or other.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=84RcxGhlXQ4
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TAqsSPZlHN8
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pAKIWMqKBrw
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N2ImtXkWoBo
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=in1DAZj52po
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0gp_wl3fLMc
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-IFt5UBOqVg

    Reply
  82. Well, he had intended to have a partial retirement. But since that was not to be, he wrote his autobiography and gave his blessing for the new version of his song Pidä Huolta (Take Care) and for its use to collect money for kids and teenagers mental health care chat, where they can get help. Take Care/Pidä huolta has often been used to collect money for some good purpose or other.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=84RcxGhlXQ4
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TAqsSPZlHN8
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pAKIWMqKBrw
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N2ImtXkWoBo
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=in1DAZj52po
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0gp_wl3fLMc
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-IFt5UBOqVg

    Reply
  83. Well, he had intended to have a partial retirement. But since that was not to be, he wrote his autobiography and gave his blessing for the new version of his song Pidä Huolta (Take Care) and for its use to collect money for kids and teenagers mental health care chat, where they can get help. Take Care/Pidä huolta has often been used to collect money for some good purpose or other.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=84RcxGhlXQ4
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TAqsSPZlHN8
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pAKIWMqKBrw
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N2ImtXkWoBo
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=in1DAZj52po
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0gp_wl3fLMc
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-IFt5UBOqVg

    Reply
  84. Well, he had intended to have a partial retirement. But since that was not to be, he wrote his autobiography and gave his blessing for the new version of his song Pidä Huolta (Take Care) and for its use to collect money for kids and teenagers mental health care chat, where they can get help. Take Care/Pidä huolta has often been used to collect money for some good purpose or other.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=84RcxGhlXQ4
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TAqsSPZlHN8
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pAKIWMqKBrw
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N2ImtXkWoBo
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=in1DAZj52po
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0gp_wl3fLMc
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-IFt5UBOqVg

    Reply
  85. Well, he had intended to have a partial retirement. But since that was not to be, he wrote his autobiography and gave his blessing for the new version of his song Pidä Huolta (Take Care) and for its use to collect money for kids and teenagers mental health care chat, where they can get help. Take Care/Pidä huolta has often been used to collect money for some good purpose or other.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=84RcxGhlXQ4
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TAqsSPZlHN8
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pAKIWMqKBrw
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N2ImtXkWoBo
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=in1DAZj52po
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0gp_wl3fLMc
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-IFt5UBOqVg

    Reply

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