Novelists Inc Future of Publishing Conference

Patbookmark    Pat here:
Morning Walk
In general, I dislike conferences. I’m an introvert who prefers a small, quiet dinner party to the massive noise and energy of a crowd. (You will notice I even walk on the beach when no else is there!) I love seeing old friends and talking to industry professionals, but the intense scheduling of conferences almost always triggers my flight instincts, so I only attend ones where I know I can get outside the hotel, explore, and relax.

The one exception to this rule is the Novelists Inc conference, and that’s probably because they avoid crowds, intense scheduling, and always hold their annual meeting somewhere that begs exploring. This year, it was in a resort on St Pete beach—in October, when the weather is perfect. And the meetings were fascinating exchanges between industry titans and my friends. Really, it’s hard to beat a venue like that.  (some video interviews of authors attending:  http://www.genreality.net/ninc-2  )

For those of you interested in the future of publishing—even NYC publishers agree that e-books have arrived. Sales of e-books have jumped from 3% of the trade View_from_Hotel2market to 9% in the past year. They’re expecting the sales of digital books to expand exponentially after Christmas with the arrival of discounted e-readers. This is causing a tremendous shift in how publishers and authors interact and no one is entirely certain how the house of cards will fall.  One thing we’re all agreed on—we want print books to survive. For now, publishers are using “agency pricing” for ebook sales in hopes of keeping bookstores and print books out there. That might work for another year, in my opinion, while new ebook reader owners explore all the free and $2.99 offerings available on the internet, while continuing to buy paper at discounted prices at Walmart or wherever. But the convenience of buying books without leaving the house is just too tempting for electronic books to be second string forever.

 Since I spent as much of my conference time going to lunches and dinners with fun people instead of attending workshops, that’s the biggest news I have to contribute from the conference. I know we had everything from belly dancing classes to brainstorming with side trips on how to publish electronically—a panel that could have lasted three times as long and still not answered everyone’s questions. But as a result of these discussions, look for a lot more backlist ebooks in the future. (If you want to know where your favorite authors are publishing their backlist, I'd suggest bookmarking this page: http://backlistebooks.com/  It's a temporary site, but they're adding authors every day, and should be up full strength soon.)

St Pete Sunset2I know it may seem odd to nonwriters, but networking and learning the business is as important in our isolated worlds as it is in the big “outside” industrial world. Are there any questions in particular you’d like to ask about what we learned at the conference? (Here's a list of our line-up: http://ninc.com/conferences/2010/index.asp ) Readers need to be really concerned about the future of books, because formats and distribution will be developing wildly over these next few years, and the consumer will be the ultimate judge of how we read in the 21st century.

Or maybe you just want to know our favorite restaurant in St. Pete. "G" Doesn't the scenery look absolutely idyllic? We'll probably be going back there next year. They have hammocks!

60 thoughts on “Novelists Inc Future of Publishing Conference”

  1. I love that authors are putting their backlists online. There are some books I would almost kill to get, and they aren’t available anywhere, not even used, for an exoribitant price, for which the author receives nothing.
    As for ebooks, I’m for anything that gives more choice at a reasonable price. For a long time, ebooks were looked down on because the quality was bad. Not any more.
    Ebooks also offer a much wider variety than print books. I know ebook authors who write historicals set in ancient Egypt and Crete, Roman England, Victorian Australia and WWII. These books can also combine genres in unique ways. Traditional publishing won’t touch these books. Not because they’re bad books, but they say they “won’t sell enough”. Also, you can find the whole range from sweet to erotic. Try finding something sweet in trad publishing nowadays that isn’t inspirational.
    OK, I’m speaking with a vested interest because I write for an epub. Many, but not all, trad published authors have treated me like a lower form of life. Some of it has to do with the supposed lack of quality, and some with the amount of money most ebook authors make. To put it mildly, what we make is pitiful, compared to the amount of effort we put into the work. Erotica authors make the most, but then, sex sells. And the corker is, many trad published authors now routinely also write for epubs.
    I don’t want print books to die. I love all books. But I am for more choice. Part of the reason I started to write was because I found fewer and fewer trad published romances I liked. I doubt I’m the only one.

    Reply
  2. I love that authors are putting their backlists online. There are some books I would almost kill to get, and they aren’t available anywhere, not even used, for an exoribitant price, for which the author receives nothing.
    As for ebooks, I’m for anything that gives more choice at a reasonable price. For a long time, ebooks were looked down on because the quality was bad. Not any more.
    Ebooks also offer a much wider variety than print books. I know ebook authors who write historicals set in ancient Egypt and Crete, Roman England, Victorian Australia and WWII. These books can also combine genres in unique ways. Traditional publishing won’t touch these books. Not because they’re bad books, but they say they “won’t sell enough”. Also, you can find the whole range from sweet to erotic. Try finding something sweet in trad publishing nowadays that isn’t inspirational.
    OK, I’m speaking with a vested interest because I write for an epub. Many, but not all, trad published authors have treated me like a lower form of life. Some of it has to do with the supposed lack of quality, and some with the amount of money most ebook authors make. To put it mildly, what we make is pitiful, compared to the amount of effort we put into the work. Erotica authors make the most, but then, sex sells. And the corker is, many trad published authors now routinely also write for epubs.
    I don’t want print books to die. I love all books. But I am for more choice. Part of the reason I started to write was because I found fewer and fewer trad published romances I liked. I doubt I’m the only one.

    Reply
  3. I love that authors are putting their backlists online. There are some books I would almost kill to get, and they aren’t available anywhere, not even used, for an exoribitant price, for which the author receives nothing.
    As for ebooks, I’m for anything that gives more choice at a reasonable price. For a long time, ebooks were looked down on because the quality was bad. Not any more.
    Ebooks also offer a much wider variety than print books. I know ebook authors who write historicals set in ancient Egypt and Crete, Roman England, Victorian Australia and WWII. These books can also combine genres in unique ways. Traditional publishing won’t touch these books. Not because they’re bad books, but they say they “won’t sell enough”. Also, you can find the whole range from sweet to erotic. Try finding something sweet in trad publishing nowadays that isn’t inspirational.
    OK, I’m speaking with a vested interest because I write for an epub. Many, but not all, trad published authors have treated me like a lower form of life. Some of it has to do with the supposed lack of quality, and some with the amount of money most ebook authors make. To put it mildly, what we make is pitiful, compared to the amount of effort we put into the work. Erotica authors make the most, but then, sex sells. And the corker is, many trad published authors now routinely also write for epubs.
    I don’t want print books to die. I love all books. But I am for more choice. Part of the reason I started to write was because I found fewer and fewer trad published romances I liked. I doubt I’m the only one.

    Reply
  4. I love that authors are putting their backlists online. There are some books I would almost kill to get, and they aren’t available anywhere, not even used, for an exoribitant price, for which the author receives nothing.
    As for ebooks, I’m for anything that gives more choice at a reasonable price. For a long time, ebooks were looked down on because the quality was bad. Not any more.
    Ebooks also offer a much wider variety than print books. I know ebook authors who write historicals set in ancient Egypt and Crete, Roman England, Victorian Australia and WWII. These books can also combine genres in unique ways. Traditional publishing won’t touch these books. Not because they’re bad books, but they say they “won’t sell enough”. Also, you can find the whole range from sweet to erotic. Try finding something sweet in trad publishing nowadays that isn’t inspirational.
    OK, I’m speaking with a vested interest because I write for an epub. Many, but not all, trad published authors have treated me like a lower form of life. Some of it has to do with the supposed lack of quality, and some with the amount of money most ebook authors make. To put it mildly, what we make is pitiful, compared to the amount of effort we put into the work. Erotica authors make the most, but then, sex sells. And the corker is, many trad published authors now routinely also write for epubs.
    I don’t want print books to die. I love all books. But I am for more choice. Part of the reason I started to write was because I found fewer and fewer trad published romances I liked. I doubt I’m the only one.

    Reply
  5. I love that authors are putting their backlists online. There are some books I would almost kill to get, and they aren’t available anywhere, not even used, for an exoribitant price, for which the author receives nothing.
    As for ebooks, I’m for anything that gives more choice at a reasonable price. For a long time, ebooks were looked down on because the quality was bad. Not any more.
    Ebooks also offer a much wider variety than print books. I know ebook authors who write historicals set in ancient Egypt and Crete, Roman England, Victorian Australia and WWII. These books can also combine genres in unique ways. Traditional publishing won’t touch these books. Not because they’re bad books, but they say they “won’t sell enough”. Also, you can find the whole range from sweet to erotic. Try finding something sweet in trad publishing nowadays that isn’t inspirational.
    OK, I’m speaking with a vested interest because I write for an epub. Many, but not all, trad published authors have treated me like a lower form of life. Some of it has to do with the supposed lack of quality, and some with the amount of money most ebook authors make. To put it mildly, what we make is pitiful, compared to the amount of effort we put into the work. Erotica authors make the most, but then, sex sells. And the corker is, many trad published authors now routinely also write for epubs.
    I don’t want print books to die. I love all books. But I am for more choice. Part of the reason I started to write was because I found fewer and fewer trad published romances I liked. I doubt I’m the only one.

    Reply
  6. Were you at the Don Cesar by any chance? It’s a gorgeous hotel. We’ve stayed down at Pass-a-Grille Beach a number of times, which is quiet enough for even a recluse. Surely enough romance readers like their books in print for it to continue to survive? If there was an out-of-print title I desperately wanted to read, I would tolerate an e-format, but print books are better in so many ways.

    Reply
  7. Were you at the Don Cesar by any chance? It’s a gorgeous hotel. We’ve stayed down at Pass-a-Grille Beach a number of times, which is quiet enough for even a recluse. Surely enough romance readers like their books in print for it to continue to survive? If there was an out-of-print title I desperately wanted to read, I would tolerate an e-format, but print books are better in so many ways.

    Reply
  8. Were you at the Don Cesar by any chance? It’s a gorgeous hotel. We’ve stayed down at Pass-a-Grille Beach a number of times, which is quiet enough for even a recluse. Surely enough romance readers like their books in print for it to continue to survive? If there was an out-of-print title I desperately wanted to read, I would tolerate an e-format, but print books are better in so many ways.

    Reply
  9. Were you at the Don Cesar by any chance? It’s a gorgeous hotel. We’ve stayed down at Pass-a-Grille Beach a number of times, which is quiet enough for even a recluse. Surely enough romance readers like their books in print for it to continue to survive? If there was an out-of-print title I desperately wanted to read, I would tolerate an e-format, but print books are better in so many ways.

    Reply
  10. Were you at the Don Cesar by any chance? It’s a gorgeous hotel. We’ve stayed down at Pass-a-Grille Beach a number of times, which is quiet enough for even a recluse. Surely enough romance readers like their books in print for it to continue to survive? If there was an out-of-print title I desperately wanted to read, I would tolerate an e-format, but print books are better in so many ways.

    Reply
  11. I now have an ereader. Okay, I don’t exactly have it. It was a gift to my husband. But I’m the one who is most apt to use it.
    What I like about it is all those free, out of copyright books that libraries don’t bother to keep. Plus the oddities that you can only read as PDFs. They’re still PDFs on the reader, and still a pain to read, though not as bad as on a computer screen. And it’s handy for taking along when traveling — much lighter than a dozen books.
    What I don’t like is the physical act of reading. It just isn’t as comfortable as reading a book.
    So far I’ve stuck to free books. In the future, I can see me paying for an out of print book, but new books that I can buy anywhere? No thanks.

    Reply
  12. I now have an ereader. Okay, I don’t exactly have it. It was a gift to my husband. But I’m the one who is most apt to use it.
    What I like about it is all those free, out of copyright books that libraries don’t bother to keep. Plus the oddities that you can only read as PDFs. They’re still PDFs on the reader, and still a pain to read, though not as bad as on a computer screen. And it’s handy for taking along when traveling — much lighter than a dozen books.
    What I don’t like is the physical act of reading. It just isn’t as comfortable as reading a book.
    So far I’ve stuck to free books. In the future, I can see me paying for an out of print book, but new books that I can buy anywhere? No thanks.

    Reply
  13. I now have an ereader. Okay, I don’t exactly have it. It was a gift to my husband. But I’m the one who is most apt to use it.
    What I like about it is all those free, out of copyright books that libraries don’t bother to keep. Plus the oddities that you can only read as PDFs. They’re still PDFs on the reader, and still a pain to read, though not as bad as on a computer screen. And it’s handy for taking along when traveling — much lighter than a dozen books.
    What I don’t like is the physical act of reading. It just isn’t as comfortable as reading a book.
    So far I’ve stuck to free books. In the future, I can see me paying for an out of print book, but new books that I can buy anywhere? No thanks.

    Reply
  14. I now have an ereader. Okay, I don’t exactly have it. It was a gift to my husband. But I’m the one who is most apt to use it.
    What I like about it is all those free, out of copyright books that libraries don’t bother to keep. Plus the oddities that you can only read as PDFs. They’re still PDFs on the reader, and still a pain to read, though not as bad as on a computer screen. And it’s handy for taking along when traveling — much lighter than a dozen books.
    What I don’t like is the physical act of reading. It just isn’t as comfortable as reading a book.
    So far I’ve stuck to free books. In the future, I can see me paying for an out of print book, but new books that I can buy anywhere? No thanks.

    Reply
  15. I now have an ereader. Okay, I don’t exactly have it. It was a gift to my husband. But I’m the one who is most apt to use it.
    What I like about it is all those free, out of copyright books that libraries don’t bother to keep. Plus the oddities that you can only read as PDFs. They’re still PDFs on the reader, and still a pain to read, though not as bad as on a computer screen. And it’s handy for taking along when traveling — much lighter than a dozen books.
    What I don’t like is the physical act of reading. It just isn’t as comfortable as reading a book.
    So far I’ve stuck to free books. In the future, I can see me paying for an out of print book, but new books that I can buy anywhere? No thanks.

    Reply
  16. We stayed at the Tradewinds, further down the beach. We wanted to get to Pass-a-Grille (and find out how that name came about!) but didn’t have adequate time or transportation.
    Yes, writers love having their books in print, but we’re the last people to be consulted about what we want. If current market conditions continue, you will only be seeing bestselling authors in print, at increasingly higher prices. This, alone, will force readers into the e-book market.
    And there was a great deal of discussion about what kind of “filter” will eventually come about to ensure readers that they’re getting good, readable books instead of whatever nonsense someone wants to post on Amazon. Publishers currently serve that function. But we’re not entirely certain they will do so in the future. Brave new world, indeed!

    Reply
  17. We stayed at the Tradewinds, further down the beach. We wanted to get to Pass-a-Grille (and find out how that name came about!) but didn’t have adequate time or transportation.
    Yes, writers love having their books in print, but we’re the last people to be consulted about what we want. If current market conditions continue, you will only be seeing bestselling authors in print, at increasingly higher prices. This, alone, will force readers into the e-book market.
    And there was a great deal of discussion about what kind of “filter” will eventually come about to ensure readers that they’re getting good, readable books instead of whatever nonsense someone wants to post on Amazon. Publishers currently serve that function. But we’re not entirely certain they will do so in the future. Brave new world, indeed!

    Reply
  18. We stayed at the Tradewinds, further down the beach. We wanted to get to Pass-a-Grille (and find out how that name came about!) but didn’t have adequate time or transportation.
    Yes, writers love having their books in print, but we’re the last people to be consulted about what we want. If current market conditions continue, you will only be seeing bestselling authors in print, at increasingly higher prices. This, alone, will force readers into the e-book market.
    And there was a great deal of discussion about what kind of “filter” will eventually come about to ensure readers that they’re getting good, readable books instead of whatever nonsense someone wants to post on Amazon. Publishers currently serve that function. But we’re not entirely certain they will do so in the future. Brave new world, indeed!

    Reply
  19. We stayed at the Tradewinds, further down the beach. We wanted to get to Pass-a-Grille (and find out how that name came about!) but didn’t have adequate time or transportation.
    Yes, writers love having their books in print, but we’re the last people to be consulted about what we want. If current market conditions continue, you will only be seeing bestselling authors in print, at increasingly higher prices. This, alone, will force readers into the e-book market.
    And there was a great deal of discussion about what kind of “filter” will eventually come about to ensure readers that they’re getting good, readable books instead of whatever nonsense someone wants to post on Amazon. Publishers currently serve that function. But we’re not entirely certain they will do so in the future. Brave new world, indeed!

    Reply
  20. We stayed at the Tradewinds, further down the beach. We wanted to get to Pass-a-Grille (and find out how that name came about!) but didn’t have adequate time or transportation.
    Yes, writers love having their books in print, but we’re the last people to be consulted about what we want. If current market conditions continue, you will only be seeing bestselling authors in print, at increasingly higher prices. This, alone, will force readers into the e-book market.
    And there was a great deal of discussion about what kind of “filter” will eventually come about to ensure readers that they’re getting good, readable books instead of whatever nonsense someone wants to post on Amazon. Publishers currently serve that function. But we’re not entirely certain they will do so in the future. Brave new world, indeed!

    Reply
  21. I guess it depends on what you call “work.” “G” Brainstorming and meditating on plots can easily be done while staring into space. And amazing amounts of work get done over meals, which can be eaten on patios overlooking the beauty. Actually, now that I think about it, the setting was inspiring enough to get quite a bit done!

    Reply
  22. I guess it depends on what you call “work.” “G” Brainstorming and meditating on plots can easily be done while staring into space. And amazing amounts of work get done over meals, which can be eaten on patios overlooking the beauty. Actually, now that I think about it, the setting was inspiring enough to get quite a bit done!

    Reply
  23. I guess it depends on what you call “work.” “G” Brainstorming and meditating on plots can easily be done while staring into space. And amazing amounts of work get done over meals, which can be eaten on patios overlooking the beauty. Actually, now that I think about it, the setting was inspiring enough to get quite a bit done!

    Reply
  24. I guess it depends on what you call “work.” “G” Brainstorming and meditating on plots can easily be done while staring into space. And amazing amounts of work get done over meals, which can be eaten on patios overlooking the beauty. Actually, now that I think about it, the setting was inspiring enough to get quite a bit done!

    Reply
  25. I guess it depends on what you call “work.” “G” Brainstorming and meditating on plots can easily be done while staring into space. And amazing amounts of work get done over meals, which can be eaten on patios overlooking the beauty. Actually, now that I think about it, the setting was inspiring enough to get quite a bit done!

    Reply
  26. I’m beginning to feel like a dinosaur. I have nothing against ebooks and can understand that for many uses (OOP or hard-to-find books, the vision-impaired, travel) they are superior to print. But for me, I prefer old-fashioned print books. There are several reasons: 1) I stare at a computer screen all day at work and do not want to stare at another screen for hours when I come home. 2) Sharing books is easier when they are physical objects. 3) I like the idea that I am supporting local jobs. I know some of the clerks at both the Borders and the independent bookstore near my house, and I don’t want them to lose their jobs. Local stores keep my neighborhood vibrant, and I’ve got a vested interest in that. Both stores have membership discounts and I rarely buy HB, so the price differential between them and Amazon is not great. Books are a fairly inexpensive obsession, and I realize how lucky I am that I can generally indulge that obsession. As a baby boomer I’m used to being in the middle of every trend, but the move to ebooks is one trend where I’m being left behind, and it feels odd.

    Reply
  27. I’m beginning to feel like a dinosaur. I have nothing against ebooks and can understand that for many uses (OOP or hard-to-find books, the vision-impaired, travel) they are superior to print. But for me, I prefer old-fashioned print books. There are several reasons: 1) I stare at a computer screen all day at work and do not want to stare at another screen for hours when I come home. 2) Sharing books is easier when they are physical objects. 3) I like the idea that I am supporting local jobs. I know some of the clerks at both the Borders and the independent bookstore near my house, and I don’t want them to lose their jobs. Local stores keep my neighborhood vibrant, and I’ve got a vested interest in that. Both stores have membership discounts and I rarely buy HB, so the price differential between them and Amazon is not great. Books are a fairly inexpensive obsession, and I realize how lucky I am that I can generally indulge that obsession. As a baby boomer I’m used to being in the middle of every trend, but the move to ebooks is one trend where I’m being left behind, and it feels odd.

    Reply
  28. I’m beginning to feel like a dinosaur. I have nothing against ebooks and can understand that for many uses (OOP or hard-to-find books, the vision-impaired, travel) they are superior to print. But for me, I prefer old-fashioned print books. There are several reasons: 1) I stare at a computer screen all day at work and do not want to stare at another screen for hours when I come home. 2) Sharing books is easier when they are physical objects. 3) I like the idea that I am supporting local jobs. I know some of the clerks at both the Borders and the independent bookstore near my house, and I don’t want them to lose their jobs. Local stores keep my neighborhood vibrant, and I’ve got a vested interest in that. Both stores have membership discounts and I rarely buy HB, so the price differential between them and Amazon is not great. Books are a fairly inexpensive obsession, and I realize how lucky I am that I can generally indulge that obsession. As a baby boomer I’m used to being in the middle of every trend, but the move to ebooks is one trend where I’m being left behind, and it feels odd.

    Reply
  29. I’m beginning to feel like a dinosaur. I have nothing against ebooks and can understand that for many uses (OOP or hard-to-find books, the vision-impaired, travel) they are superior to print. But for me, I prefer old-fashioned print books. There are several reasons: 1) I stare at a computer screen all day at work and do not want to stare at another screen for hours when I come home. 2) Sharing books is easier when they are physical objects. 3) I like the idea that I am supporting local jobs. I know some of the clerks at both the Borders and the independent bookstore near my house, and I don’t want them to lose their jobs. Local stores keep my neighborhood vibrant, and I’ve got a vested interest in that. Both stores have membership discounts and I rarely buy HB, so the price differential between them and Amazon is not great. Books are a fairly inexpensive obsession, and I realize how lucky I am that I can generally indulge that obsession. As a baby boomer I’m used to being in the middle of every trend, but the move to ebooks is one trend where I’m being left behind, and it feels odd.

    Reply
  30. I’m beginning to feel like a dinosaur. I have nothing against ebooks and can understand that for many uses (OOP or hard-to-find books, the vision-impaired, travel) they are superior to print. But for me, I prefer old-fashioned print books. There are several reasons: 1) I stare at a computer screen all day at work and do not want to stare at another screen for hours when I come home. 2) Sharing books is easier when they are physical objects. 3) I like the idea that I am supporting local jobs. I know some of the clerks at both the Borders and the independent bookstore near my house, and I don’t want them to lose their jobs. Local stores keep my neighborhood vibrant, and I’ve got a vested interest in that. Both stores have membership discounts and I rarely buy HB, so the price differential between them and Amazon is not great. Books are a fairly inexpensive obsession, and I realize how lucky I am that I can generally indulge that obsession. As a baby boomer I’m used to being in the middle of every trend, but the move to ebooks is one trend where I’m being left behind, and it feels odd.

    Reply
  31. Susan, you obviously have access to good stores and reasonable prices. Many people don’t. I’m praying there are more people like you out there to keep those stores open, because I don’t know what will happen to mass market books if those outlets collapse.
    But ebooks serve other purposes, and I for one am happy to be selling my backlist and making money on them for a change! Those old used paperbacks fall apart after a while, but ebooks are so neatly tucked away in this tiny machine. “G”

    Reply
  32. Susan, you obviously have access to good stores and reasonable prices. Many people don’t. I’m praying there are more people like you out there to keep those stores open, because I don’t know what will happen to mass market books if those outlets collapse.
    But ebooks serve other purposes, and I for one am happy to be selling my backlist and making money on them for a change! Those old used paperbacks fall apart after a while, but ebooks are so neatly tucked away in this tiny machine. “G”

    Reply
  33. Susan, you obviously have access to good stores and reasonable prices. Many people don’t. I’m praying there are more people like you out there to keep those stores open, because I don’t know what will happen to mass market books if those outlets collapse.
    But ebooks serve other purposes, and I for one am happy to be selling my backlist and making money on them for a change! Those old used paperbacks fall apart after a while, but ebooks are so neatly tucked away in this tiny machine. “G”

    Reply
  34. Susan, you obviously have access to good stores and reasonable prices. Many people don’t. I’m praying there are more people like you out there to keep those stores open, because I don’t know what will happen to mass market books if those outlets collapse.
    But ebooks serve other purposes, and I for one am happy to be selling my backlist and making money on them for a change! Those old used paperbacks fall apart after a while, but ebooks are so neatly tucked away in this tiny machine. “G”

    Reply
  35. Susan, you obviously have access to good stores and reasonable prices. Many people don’t. I’m praying there are more people like you out there to keep those stores open, because I don’t know what will happen to mass market books if those outlets collapse.
    But ebooks serve other purposes, and I for one am happy to be selling my backlist and making money on them for a change! Those old used paperbacks fall apart after a while, but ebooks are so neatly tucked away in this tiny machine. “G”

    Reply
  36. I buy mostly print books, but I’ve begun buying some ebooks, even though I haven’t bought an ereader yet. I live in a small town, and I can’t always find the books I want locally. I can find print books in the city, but sometimes I am too impatient to wait for the next trip. And I love having backlists of favorite authors available, both for myself and for friends when I recommend older titles.
    I plan to buy an ereader soon. I’m waiting to see what Santa brings. 🙂 But I’ve already discovered that I still want my keepers in print. I’ve bought both electronic and paper copies of several books recently.

    Reply
  37. I buy mostly print books, but I’ve begun buying some ebooks, even though I haven’t bought an ereader yet. I live in a small town, and I can’t always find the books I want locally. I can find print books in the city, but sometimes I am too impatient to wait for the next trip. And I love having backlists of favorite authors available, both for myself and for friends when I recommend older titles.
    I plan to buy an ereader soon. I’m waiting to see what Santa brings. 🙂 But I’ve already discovered that I still want my keepers in print. I’ve bought both electronic and paper copies of several books recently.

    Reply
  38. I buy mostly print books, but I’ve begun buying some ebooks, even though I haven’t bought an ereader yet. I live in a small town, and I can’t always find the books I want locally. I can find print books in the city, but sometimes I am too impatient to wait for the next trip. And I love having backlists of favorite authors available, both for myself and for friends when I recommend older titles.
    I plan to buy an ereader soon. I’m waiting to see what Santa brings. 🙂 But I’ve already discovered that I still want my keepers in print. I’ve bought both electronic and paper copies of several books recently.

    Reply
  39. I buy mostly print books, but I’ve begun buying some ebooks, even though I haven’t bought an ereader yet. I live in a small town, and I can’t always find the books I want locally. I can find print books in the city, but sometimes I am too impatient to wait for the next trip. And I love having backlists of favorite authors available, both for myself and for friends when I recommend older titles.
    I plan to buy an ereader soon. I’m waiting to see what Santa brings. 🙂 But I’ve already discovered that I still want my keepers in print. I’ve bought both electronic and paper copies of several books recently.

    Reply
  40. I buy mostly print books, but I’ve begun buying some ebooks, even though I haven’t bought an ereader yet. I live in a small town, and I can’t always find the books I want locally. I can find print books in the city, but sometimes I am too impatient to wait for the next trip. And I love having backlists of favorite authors available, both for myself and for friends when I recommend older titles.
    I plan to buy an ereader soon. I’m waiting to see what Santa brings. 🙂 But I’ve already discovered that I still want my keepers in print. I’ve bought both electronic and paper copies of several books recently.

    Reply
  41. Santa should be able to get some good discounts on e-readers, if he can resist buying the new ones with all the bells and whistles!
    And thank you, Rev. And the bookstores thank you. “G” Those books will be reissued in print starting next year, but verrry slowly.
    I read hardcovers from the library, and mass markets from discount stores, and if the price is right, (hard to resist $9.99 hardcover bestsellers) I’ll load up my e-reader. I love being able to read without crushing a book spine, and I love being able to cart a library in my purse!

    Reply
  42. Santa should be able to get some good discounts on e-readers, if he can resist buying the new ones with all the bells and whistles!
    And thank you, Rev. And the bookstores thank you. “G” Those books will be reissued in print starting next year, but verrry slowly.
    I read hardcovers from the library, and mass markets from discount stores, and if the price is right, (hard to resist $9.99 hardcover bestsellers) I’ll load up my e-reader. I love being able to read without crushing a book spine, and I love being able to cart a library in my purse!

    Reply
  43. Santa should be able to get some good discounts on e-readers, if he can resist buying the new ones with all the bells and whistles!
    And thank you, Rev. And the bookstores thank you. “G” Those books will be reissued in print starting next year, but verrry slowly.
    I read hardcovers from the library, and mass markets from discount stores, and if the price is right, (hard to resist $9.99 hardcover bestsellers) I’ll load up my e-reader. I love being able to read without crushing a book spine, and I love being able to cart a library in my purse!

    Reply
  44. Santa should be able to get some good discounts on e-readers, if he can resist buying the new ones with all the bells and whistles!
    And thank you, Rev. And the bookstores thank you. “G” Those books will be reissued in print starting next year, but verrry slowly.
    I read hardcovers from the library, and mass markets from discount stores, and if the price is right, (hard to resist $9.99 hardcover bestsellers) I’ll load up my e-reader. I love being able to read without crushing a book spine, and I love being able to cart a library in my purse!

    Reply
  45. Santa should be able to get some good discounts on e-readers, if he can resist buying the new ones with all the bells and whistles!
    And thank you, Rev. And the bookstores thank you. “G” Those books will be reissued in print starting next year, but verrry slowly.
    I read hardcovers from the library, and mass markets from discount stores, and if the price is right, (hard to resist $9.99 hardcover bestsellers) I’ll load up my e-reader. I love being able to read without crushing a book spine, and I love being able to cart a library in my purse!

    Reply
  46. Pat, you are correct that I’m very lucky, both in terms of proximity to book stores (it’s one reason I like being a city girl) and having the wherewithal to buy books. I certainly recognize how lucky I am and also understand why others love their e-readers. I just worry that print will go away and bookstores disappear, along with one of my chief pleasures — the ability to spend hours browsing the aisles, picking up whatever strikes my fancy, and reading bits and pieces of various books while I decide what to buy. It’s my idea of heaven on a Sunday afternoon.
    P.S. I loved “The Wicked Wyckerley” and am looking forward to the other books in the series (although Fitz is so adorable he will be a hard hero to top).

    Reply
  47. Pat, you are correct that I’m very lucky, both in terms of proximity to book stores (it’s one reason I like being a city girl) and having the wherewithal to buy books. I certainly recognize how lucky I am and also understand why others love their e-readers. I just worry that print will go away and bookstores disappear, along with one of my chief pleasures — the ability to spend hours browsing the aisles, picking up whatever strikes my fancy, and reading bits and pieces of various books while I decide what to buy. It’s my idea of heaven on a Sunday afternoon.
    P.S. I loved “The Wicked Wyckerley” and am looking forward to the other books in the series (although Fitz is so adorable he will be a hard hero to top).

    Reply
  48. Pat, you are correct that I’m very lucky, both in terms of proximity to book stores (it’s one reason I like being a city girl) and having the wherewithal to buy books. I certainly recognize how lucky I am and also understand why others love their e-readers. I just worry that print will go away and bookstores disappear, along with one of my chief pleasures — the ability to spend hours browsing the aisles, picking up whatever strikes my fancy, and reading bits and pieces of various books while I decide what to buy. It’s my idea of heaven on a Sunday afternoon.
    P.S. I loved “The Wicked Wyckerley” and am looking forward to the other books in the series (although Fitz is so adorable he will be a hard hero to top).

    Reply
  49. Pat, you are correct that I’m very lucky, both in terms of proximity to book stores (it’s one reason I like being a city girl) and having the wherewithal to buy books. I certainly recognize how lucky I am and also understand why others love their e-readers. I just worry that print will go away and bookstores disappear, along with one of my chief pleasures — the ability to spend hours browsing the aisles, picking up whatever strikes my fancy, and reading bits and pieces of various books while I decide what to buy. It’s my idea of heaven on a Sunday afternoon.
    P.S. I loved “The Wicked Wyckerley” and am looking forward to the other books in the series (although Fitz is so adorable he will be a hard hero to top).

    Reply
  50. Pat, you are correct that I’m very lucky, both in terms of proximity to book stores (it’s one reason I like being a city girl) and having the wherewithal to buy books. I certainly recognize how lucky I am and also understand why others love their e-readers. I just worry that print will go away and bookstores disappear, along with one of my chief pleasures — the ability to spend hours browsing the aisles, picking up whatever strikes my fancy, and reading bits and pieces of various books while I decide what to buy. It’s my idea of heaven on a Sunday afternoon.
    P.S. I loved “The Wicked Wyckerley” and am looking forward to the other books in the series (although Fitz is so adorable he will be a hard hero to top).

    Reply

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