Noble Scots and Other Eccentricities

Rice_EntrancingtheEarl_600x900Pat here:

I really ought to dig into my research files more often to see what I’ve looked up while I’m plotting a book, but by the time the book is ready for release, that material is a couple of years old, and I’ve forgotten about it. So out of curiosity, I dug into my files for ENTRANCING THE EARL, my May release, to see what I toyed with before I began writing. I can’t see any related blogs, other than my coloring between the lines complaint for the last book in my School of Magic series. But if I’m repeating myself, sorry!

ENTRANCING THE EARL required research into 19th century beekeeping, architecture and construction of Scots brochs and the history behind them, and Scots peerages—which aren’t the same as English.

Just because authors get the most complaints about aristocratic titles, and I don’t want to hear anyone complaining about my female, unmarried countess, I’ll give you a fast lesson in Scots peerages—it’s complicated.

 

Before the Treaty of Union in 1707 brought Scotland into the British government, Scotland had its own peerage, dating back centuries. Many of these original writs granted the right for the title to pass to the eldest female offspring when no male was present. (One assumes this was a result of centuries of war eliminating the males and giving us medieval romances where the heroine Ebgh castlebears a title and estate the conquering hero may confiscate through marriage, so the title lives on.)

Just for fun—Scots law also permits peerages to pass to bastards if they’re legitimatized by their parents marrying later. That’s probably a consequence of arcane marriage laws like hand-fasting that might not be recognized by church or parliament. I can see a few entertaining conflicts developing out of this one!

Even the ranks of Scots peers are different. They have barons, yes, but they are not considered noble, one assumes because there were so danged many of them and the titles were often bought and sold and weren’t necessarily hereditary. Instead, they have Lords of Parliament, and then the usual viscount, earl, marquis, and duke.

York tower gateSo, yes, my Scots twins whose grandfather was an earl, could have a countess for a mother, and the title could pass down to her daughters. I only dug as deep as Wikipedia for this one since the point isn’t a major one, but these ancient writs passed to “heirs-general.” Generally, the system preferred the eldest sons, but when it came to the women, there was no preference. Then it gets a little sticky because the women inherit equally, but the title can’t be divided. So I allowed the title to go into abeyance and just one of the sisters file a petition to claim it. Since this was not a common practice, I see no reason I can’t pull that rabbit out of the hat quite reasonably. (which is what I'm doing with my photos because I'm running late. This is York tower, not Scotland <G>)

So never say an author doesn’t research their subjects. We may forget what we researched. We may tickle it a little to make it work for us. We may fill in the blanks with our imagination. But somewhere under that creative license, the facts are weirder than what we write.

Do you generally accept the aristocratic titles we slap on our characters (other than the fact that we’ve populated the Regency with more dukes than all the members of Parliament put together)? If you don’t think the title is handled correctly, do you bother to look it up or just get annoyed? (I’m afraid I’m lazy and think I know it all and fall into the latter category) And because I avoid dukes due to hating Your Gracing him all over the place, do you know the rules for addressing dukes and royalty? If you do, how often do you think authors get it right?

185 thoughts on “Noble Scots and Other Eccentricities”

  1. Authors that I consistently read get it right. If a new to me author gets it wrong I don’t look for more books.
    Regency authors seem to understand better than other historical writers. In older time periods not so much.

    Reply
  2. Authors that I consistently read get it right. If a new to me author gets it wrong I don’t look for more books.
    Regency authors seem to understand better than other historical writers. In older time periods not so much.

    Reply
  3. Authors that I consistently read get it right. If a new to me author gets it wrong I don’t look for more books.
    Regency authors seem to understand better than other historical writers. In older time periods not so much.

    Reply
  4. Authors that I consistently read get it right. If a new to me author gets it wrong I don’t look for more books.
    Regency authors seem to understand better than other historical writers. In older time periods not so much.

    Reply
  5. Authors that I consistently read get it right. If a new to me author gets it wrong I don’t look for more books.
    Regency authors seem to understand better than other historical writers. In older time periods not so much.

    Reply
  6. I don’t mind the made up titles but it drives me crazy when writers gets forms of address wrong, especially, for example, when they call a knight’s wife from a gentry family Lady Susanna instead of Lady Appleton. Fortunately, most of the authors I read regularly, including the Wenches, know better.

    Reply
  7. I don’t mind the made up titles but it drives me crazy when writers gets forms of address wrong, especially, for example, when they call a knight’s wife from a gentry family Lady Susanna instead of Lady Appleton. Fortunately, most of the authors I read regularly, including the Wenches, know better.

    Reply
  8. I don’t mind the made up titles but it drives me crazy when writers gets forms of address wrong, especially, for example, when they call a knight’s wife from a gentry family Lady Susanna instead of Lady Appleton. Fortunately, most of the authors I read regularly, including the Wenches, know better.

    Reply
  9. I don’t mind the made up titles but it drives me crazy when writers gets forms of address wrong, especially, for example, when they call a knight’s wife from a gentry family Lady Susanna instead of Lady Appleton. Fortunately, most of the authors I read regularly, including the Wenches, know better.

    Reply
  10. I don’t mind the made up titles but it drives me crazy when writers gets forms of address wrong, especially, for example, when they call a knight’s wife from a gentry family Lady Susanna instead of Lady Appleton. Fortunately, most of the authors I read regularly, including the Wenches, know better.

    Reply
  11. Thanks for speaking up, Bev! Maybe Regency writers have been longer, so we know the score better? That said, Regency is a specific time period where we can look up the specific titles and courtesies of the period. But those traditions are not static and don’t apply to today and not necessarily to other eras, so it can get confusing.

    Reply
  12. Thanks for speaking up, Bev! Maybe Regency writers have been longer, so we know the score better? That said, Regency is a specific time period where we can look up the specific titles and courtesies of the period. But those traditions are not static and don’t apply to today and not necessarily to other eras, so it can get confusing.

    Reply
  13. Thanks for speaking up, Bev! Maybe Regency writers have been longer, so we know the score better? That said, Regency is a specific time period where we can look up the specific titles and courtesies of the period. But those traditions are not static and don’t apply to today and not necessarily to other eras, so it can get confusing.

    Reply
  14. Thanks for speaking up, Bev! Maybe Regency writers have been longer, so we know the score better? That said, Regency is a specific time period where we can look up the specific titles and courtesies of the period. But those traditions are not static and don’t apply to today and not necessarily to other eras, so it can get confusing.

    Reply
  15. Thanks for speaking up, Bev! Maybe Regency writers have been longer, so we know the score better? That said, Regency is a specific time period where we can look up the specific titles and courtesies of the period. But those traditions are not static and don’t apply to today and not necessarily to other eras, so it can get confusing.

    Reply
  16. The wenches have been around long enough to know better or we’d have been beaten to death by brickbats by now. I do sometimes wonder if new authors think a title is just a fun thing to pop in front of a name, though.

    Reply
  17. The wenches have been around long enough to know better or we’d have been beaten to death by brickbats by now. I do sometimes wonder if new authors think a title is just a fun thing to pop in front of a name, though.

    Reply
  18. The wenches have been around long enough to know better or we’d have been beaten to death by brickbats by now. I do sometimes wonder if new authors think a title is just a fun thing to pop in front of a name, though.

    Reply
  19. The wenches have been around long enough to know better or we’d have been beaten to death by brickbats by now. I do sometimes wonder if new authors think a title is just a fun thing to pop in front of a name, though.

    Reply
  20. The wenches have been around long enough to know better or we’d have been beaten to death by brickbats by now. I do sometimes wonder if new authors think a title is just a fun thing to pop in front of a name, though.

    Reply
  21. I love love love that cover – so beautiful!
    Scottish titles are so interesting, aren’t they, and more fun! I don’t really mind how many dukes or earls there are, but I do get irritated when titles are used the wrong way. Like when a Lady Jane, who is the daughter of say the Duke of Somerville, is addressed as Lady Somerville for example (which is actually her mother’s title) – so frustrating! Or as Kathy Lynn said, a Knight’s wife addressed as Lady Jane instead of Lady [husband’s surname].

    Reply
  22. I love love love that cover – so beautiful!
    Scottish titles are so interesting, aren’t they, and more fun! I don’t really mind how many dukes or earls there are, but I do get irritated when titles are used the wrong way. Like when a Lady Jane, who is the daughter of say the Duke of Somerville, is addressed as Lady Somerville for example (which is actually her mother’s title) – so frustrating! Or as Kathy Lynn said, a Knight’s wife addressed as Lady Jane instead of Lady [husband’s surname].

    Reply
  23. I love love love that cover – so beautiful!
    Scottish titles are so interesting, aren’t they, and more fun! I don’t really mind how many dukes or earls there are, but I do get irritated when titles are used the wrong way. Like when a Lady Jane, who is the daughter of say the Duke of Somerville, is addressed as Lady Somerville for example (which is actually her mother’s title) – so frustrating! Or as Kathy Lynn said, a Knight’s wife addressed as Lady Jane instead of Lady [husband’s surname].

    Reply
  24. I love love love that cover – so beautiful!
    Scottish titles are so interesting, aren’t they, and more fun! I don’t really mind how many dukes or earls there are, but I do get irritated when titles are used the wrong way. Like when a Lady Jane, who is the daughter of say the Duke of Somerville, is addressed as Lady Somerville for example (which is actually her mother’s title) – so frustrating! Or as Kathy Lynn said, a Knight’s wife addressed as Lady Jane instead of Lady [husband’s surname].

    Reply
  25. I love love love that cover – so beautiful!
    Scottish titles are so interesting, aren’t they, and more fun! I don’t really mind how many dukes or earls there are, but I do get irritated when titles are used the wrong way. Like when a Lady Jane, who is the daughter of say the Duke of Somerville, is addressed as Lady Somerville for example (which is actually her mother’s title) – so frustrating! Or as Kathy Lynn said, a Knight’s wife addressed as Lady Jane instead of Lady [husband’s surname].

    Reply
  26. I can remember–way back in the mists of time when dinosaurs roamed–writing my first historical romance. I read a LOT of historicals, fiction, nonfiction, romance, and while reading, it never occurred to me to try to figure out why one was Lady Jane and another Lady Somerset. But when I started that book, I couldn’t go on until I figured it out. Since dinosaurs were stomping about, google wasn’t available, but I found the neatest little book in the library and (shhh, don’t tell anyone), I copied it. I used those few sheets as my guide for decades, until I had it memorized.

    Reply
  27. I can remember–way back in the mists of time when dinosaurs roamed–writing my first historical romance. I read a LOT of historicals, fiction, nonfiction, romance, and while reading, it never occurred to me to try to figure out why one was Lady Jane and another Lady Somerset. But when I started that book, I couldn’t go on until I figured it out. Since dinosaurs were stomping about, google wasn’t available, but I found the neatest little book in the library and (shhh, don’t tell anyone), I copied it. I used those few sheets as my guide for decades, until I had it memorized.

    Reply
  28. I can remember–way back in the mists of time when dinosaurs roamed–writing my first historical romance. I read a LOT of historicals, fiction, nonfiction, romance, and while reading, it never occurred to me to try to figure out why one was Lady Jane and another Lady Somerset. But when I started that book, I couldn’t go on until I figured it out. Since dinosaurs were stomping about, google wasn’t available, but I found the neatest little book in the library and (shhh, don’t tell anyone), I copied it. I used those few sheets as my guide for decades, until I had it memorized.

    Reply
  29. I can remember–way back in the mists of time when dinosaurs roamed–writing my first historical romance. I read a LOT of historicals, fiction, nonfiction, romance, and while reading, it never occurred to me to try to figure out why one was Lady Jane and another Lady Somerset. But when I started that book, I couldn’t go on until I figured it out. Since dinosaurs were stomping about, google wasn’t available, but I found the neatest little book in the library and (shhh, don’t tell anyone), I copied it. I used those few sheets as my guide for decades, until I had it memorized.

    Reply
  30. I can remember–way back in the mists of time when dinosaurs roamed–writing my first historical romance. I read a LOT of historicals, fiction, nonfiction, romance, and while reading, it never occurred to me to try to figure out why one was Lady Jane and another Lady Somerset. But when I started that book, I couldn’t go on until I figured it out. Since dinosaurs were stomping about, google wasn’t available, but I found the neatest little book in the library and (shhh, don’t tell anyone), I copied it. I used those few sheets as my guide for decades, until I had it memorized.

    Reply
  31. As to excess dukes, I take the view that each author’s regencies are placed in an alternate universe, of many variations on a basic model. In that way all those extra dukes get spread among an infinity of regency worlds and there are never too many in any one universe.
    Otherwise I have to conclude that it’s all marketing rubbish (very few authors have their dukes do any actual duking – no duties, no court responsibilities, no role in local or national government, and always single and available for spy chasing, gambling, and affairs in the demimonde before he meets the One Woman). It’s just silly. Plus it ignores that men and women lower down on the social spectrum had interesting lives too.

    Reply
  32. As to excess dukes, I take the view that each author’s regencies are placed in an alternate universe, of many variations on a basic model. In that way all those extra dukes get spread among an infinity of regency worlds and there are never too many in any one universe.
    Otherwise I have to conclude that it’s all marketing rubbish (very few authors have their dukes do any actual duking – no duties, no court responsibilities, no role in local or national government, and always single and available for spy chasing, gambling, and affairs in the demimonde before he meets the One Woman). It’s just silly. Plus it ignores that men and women lower down on the social spectrum had interesting lives too.

    Reply
  33. As to excess dukes, I take the view that each author’s regencies are placed in an alternate universe, of many variations on a basic model. In that way all those extra dukes get spread among an infinity of regency worlds and there are never too many in any one universe.
    Otherwise I have to conclude that it’s all marketing rubbish (very few authors have their dukes do any actual duking – no duties, no court responsibilities, no role in local or national government, and always single and available for spy chasing, gambling, and affairs in the demimonde before he meets the One Woman). It’s just silly. Plus it ignores that men and women lower down on the social spectrum had interesting lives too.

    Reply
  34. As to excess dukes, I take the view that each author’s regencies are placed in an alternate universe, of many variations on a basic model. In that way all those extra dukes get spread among an infinity of regency worlds and there are never too many in any one universe.
    Otherwise I have to conclude that it’s all marketing rubbish (very few authors have their dukes do any actual duking – no duties, no court responsibilities, no role in local or national government, and always single and available for spy chasing, gambling, and affairs in the demimonde before he meets the One Woman). It’s just silly. Plus it ignores that men and women lower down on the social spectrum had interesting lives too.

    Reply
  35. As to excess dukes, I take the view that each author’s regencies are placed in an alternate universe, of many variations on a basic model. In that way all those extra dukes get spread among an infinity of regency worlds and there are never too many in any one universe.
    Otherwise I have to conclude that it’s all marketing rubbish (very few authors have their dukes do any actual duking – no duties, no court responsibilities, no role in local or national government, and always single and available for spy chasing, gambling, and affairs in the demimonde before he meets the One Woman). It’s just silly. Plus it ignores that men and women lower down on the social spectrum had interesting lives too.

    Reply
  36. I like the idea of quantum physics and divided timelines of Regency. I really don’t know what inspires everyone to write dukes. I’m missing that gene, I think. They have it all. What kind of conflict is left except whining about the burden of work?

    Reply
  37. I like the idea of quantum physics and divided timelines of Regency. I really don’t know what inspires everyone to write dukes. I’m missing that gene, I think. They have it all. What kind of conflict is left except whining about the burden of work?

    Reply
  38. I like the idea of quantum physics and divided timelines of Regency. I really don’t know what inspires everyone to write dukes. I’m missing that gene, I think. They have it all. What kind of conflict is left except whining about the burden of work?

    Reply
  39. I like the idea of quantum physics and divided timelines of Regency. I really don’t know what inspires everyone to write dukes. I’m missing that gene, I think. They have it all. What kind of conflict is left except whining about the burden of work?

    Reply
  40. I like the idea of quantum physics and divided timelines of Regency. I really don’t know what inspires everyone to write dukes. I’m missing that gene, I think. They have it all. What kind of conflict is left except whining about the burden of work?

    Reply
  41. Fab post, Pat. These days I think a lot of historical writers get it right — though forms of address are still a sticking point—but I often come across contemporaries where they have an illegitimate son inheriting the kingdom or the title, which is just so wrong!
    I’ve only ever had two dukes, and one was only (shock horror) the subject of a brief secondary romance. As for Janice’s comment about fictional dukes having no real day-to-day duties — it’s like all those self-made millionaires in contemporary romance, who having worked their way to the top, never give business another thought. Ah, the power of fantasy.

    Reply
  42. Fab post, Pat. These days I think a lot of historical writers get it right — though forms of address are still a sticking point—but I often come across contemporaries where they have an illegitimate son inheriting the kingdom or the title, which is just so wrong!
    I’ve only ever had two dukes, and one was only (shock horror) the subject of a brief secondary romance. As for Janice’s comment about fictional dukes having no real day-to-day duties — it’s like all those self-made millionaires in contemporary romance, who having worked their way to the top, never give business another thought. Ah, the power of fantasy.

    Reply
  43. Fab post, Pat. These days I think a lot of historical writers get it right — though forms of address are still a sticking point—but I often come across contemporaries where they have an illegitimate son inheriting the kingdom or the title, which is just so wrong!
    I’ve only ever had two dukes, and one was only (shock horror) the subject of a brief secondary romance. As for Janice’s comment about fictional dukes having no real day-to-day duties — it’s like all those self-made millionaires in contemporary romance, who having worked their way to the top, never give business another thought. Ah, the power of fantasy.

    Reply
  44. Fab post, Pat. These days I think a lot of historical writers get it right — though forms of address are still a sticking point—but I often come across contemporaries where they have an illegitimate son inheriting the kingdom or the title, which is just so wrong!
    I’ve only ever had two dukes, and one was only (shock horror) the subject of a brief secondary romance. As for Janice’s comment about fictional dukes having no real day-to-day duties — it’s like all those self-made millionaires in contemporary romance, who having worked their way to the top, never give business another thought. Ah, the power of fantasy.

    Reply
  45. Fab post, Pat. These days I think a lot of historical writers get it right — though forms of address are still a sticking point—but I often come across contemporaries where they have an illegitimate son inheriting the kingdom or the title, which is just so wrong!
    I’ve only ever had two dukes, and one was only (shock horror) the subject of a brief secondary romance. As for Janice’s comment about fictional dukes having no real day-to-day duties — it’s like all those self-made millionaires in contemporary romance, who having worked their way to the top, never give business another thought. Ah, the power of fantasy.

    Reply
  46. Ludovic Stewart, 2nd Duke of Lennox, was famously “the only Duke in 2 Kingdoms” when James 6th and 1st came south to ascend the throne after Queen Elizabeth’s death.
    So, from a total of 1 in 1603 up to the hundreds appearing in Regency fiction, that’s a pretty unlikely “rate of creation” LOL.
    But then again, it’s fiction, not history we are reading.

    Reply
  47. Ludovic Stewart, 2nd Duke of Lennox, was famously “the only Duke in 2 Kingdoms” when James 6th and 1st came south to ascend the throne after Queen Elizabeth’s death.
    So, from a total of 1 in 1603 up to the hundreds appearing in Regency fiction, that’s a pretty unlikely “rate of creation” LOL.
    But then again, it’s fiction, not history we are reading.

    Reply
  48. Ludovic Stewart, 2nd Duke of Lennox, was famously “the only Duke in 2 Kingdoms” when James 6th and 1st came south to ascend the throne after Queen Elizabeth’s death.
    So, from a total of 1 in 1603 up to the hundreds appearing in Regency fiction, that’s a pretty unlikely “rate of creation” LOL.
    But then again, it’s fiction, not history we are reading.

    Reply
  49. Ludovic Stewart, 2nd Duke of Lennox, was famously “the only Duke in 2 Kingdoms” when James 6th and 1st came south to ascend the throne after Queen Elizabeth’s death.
    So, from a total of 1 in 1603 up to the hundreds appearing in Regency fiction, that’s a pretty unlikely “rate of creation” LOL.
    But then again, it’s fiction, not history we are reading.

    Reply
  50. Ludovic Stewart, 2nd Duke of Lennox, was famously “the only Duke in 2 Kingdoms” when James 6th and 1st came south to ascend the throne after Queen Elizabeth’s death.
    So, from a total of 1 in 1603 up to the hundreds appearing in Regency fiction, that’s a pretty unlikely “rate of creation” LOL.
    But then again, it’s fiction, not history we are reading.

    Reply
  51. Here, here, Beverly! I get daily offers from Book Bub that almost always include at least one “Regency.” I always look at the reviews, and if there’s even one that complains of incorrect Regency details, too-modern language, or proofreading errors, I’m out of there, even if it’s free. Too many books, too little time for that nonsense. For more-accurate reads, I make time, even if I’m new to the author. Long memory, too. I remember a character from the ’80s-’90s who said the heroine “might catch a baron, or viscount, or duke, OR EVEN AN EARL.” So thanks so much to our Wenches like Pat who make it interesting AND accurate. You’re efforts are very much appreciated.

    Reply
  52. Here, here, Beverly! I get daily offers from Book Bub that almost always include at least one “Regency.” I always look at the reviews, and if there’s even one that complains of incorrect Regency details, too-modern language, or proofreading errors, I’m out of there, even if it’s free. Too many books, too little time for that nonsense. For more-accurate reads, I make time, even if I’m new to the author. Long memory, too. I remember a character from the ’80s-’90s who said the heroine “might catch a baron, or viscount, or duke, OR EVEN AN EARL.” So thanks so much to our Wenches like Pat who make it interesting AND accurate. You’re efforts are very much appreciated.

    Reply
  53. Here, here, Beverly! I get daily offers from Book Bub that almost always include at least one “Regency.” I always look at the reviews, and if there’s even one that complains of incorrect Regency details, too-modern language, or proofreading errors, I’m out of there, even if it’s free. Too many books, too little time for that nonsense. For more-accurate reads, I make time, even if I’m new to the author. Long memory, too. I remember a character from the ’80s-’90s who said the heroine “might catch a baron, or viscount, or duke, OR EVEN AN EARL.” So thanks so much to our Wenches like Pat who make it interesting AND accurate. You’re efforts are very much appreciated.

    Reply
  54. Here, here, Beverly! I get daily offers from Book Bub that almost always include at least one “Regency.” I always look at the reviews, and if there’s even one that complains of incorrect Regency details, too-modern language, or proofreading errors, I’m out of there, even if it’s free. Too many books, too little time for that nonsense. For more-accurate reads, I make time, even if I’m new to the author. Long memory, too. I remember a character from the ’80s-’90s who said the heroine “might catch a baron, or viscount, or duke, OR EVEN AN EARL.” So thanks so much to our Wenches like Pat who make it interesting AND accurate. You’re efforts are very much appreciated.

    Reply
  55. Here, here, Beverly! I get daily offers from Book Bub that almost always include at least one “Regency.” I always look at the reviews, and if there’s even one that complains of incorrect Regency details, too-modern language, or proofreading errors, I’m out of there, even if it’s free. Too many books, too little time for that nonsense. For more-accurate reads, I make time, even if I’m new to the author. Long memory, too. I remember a character from the ’80s-’90s who said the heroine “might catch a baron, or viscount, or duke, OR EVEN AN EARL.” So thanks so much to our Wenches like Pat who make it interesting AND accurate. You’re efforts are very much appreciated.

    Reply
  56. Plus, said dukes always seem to be six-packed, have great guns, and are swash-bucklingly handsome. Have said authors never looked at portraits of past dukes or photos of current ones?

    Reply
  57. Plus, said dukes always seem to be six-packed, have great guns, and are swash-bucklingly handsome. Have said authors never looked at portraits of past dukes or photos of current ones?

    Reply
  58. Plus, said dukes always seem to be six-packed, have great guns, and are swash-bucklingly handsome. Have said authors never looked at portraits of past dukes or photos of current ones?

    Reply
  59. Plus, said dukes always seem to be six-packed, have great guns, and are swash-bucklingly handsome. Have said authors never looked at portraits of past dukes or photos of current ones?

    Reply
  60. Plus, said dukes always seem to be six-packed, have great guns, and are swash-bucklingly handsome. Have said authors never looked at portraits of past dukes or photos of current ones?

    Reply
  61. Different things bother different people, I guess. I don’t mind the proliferation of dukes, since they all inhabit their own fictional universes, and I think the real problem with the misuse of titles is that I get confused about who is who. ( Lady Mary? but I thought she was the earl’s wife, not his daughter.) And words slipping around in time don’t greatly bother me because most of the time I don’t realize that they are out of period. Yesterday I discovered that “shiv” is a 20th century word, but if a criminal in the 18th century used it, I wouldn’t have blinked.
    However, modern phrasing is apt to toss me out of the story—a 19th century gentleman saying “Well, that was a fun afternoon”—and ignoring historical norms and attitudes bothers me. No, the duke cannot decide who will inherit his title, and no, that girl who thinks it would be no big deal to have an illegitimate child is tragically wrong.
    And I adore that cover!

    Reply
  62. Different things bother different people, I guess. I don’t mind the proliferation of dukes, since they all inhabit their own fictional universes, and I think the real problem with the misuse of titles is that I get confused about who is who. ( Lady Mary? but I thought she was the earl’s wife, not his daughter.) And words slipping around in time don’t greatly bother me because most of the time I don’t realize that they are out of period. Yesterday I discovered that “shiv” is a 20th century word, but if a criminal in the 18th century used it, I wouldn’t have blinked.
    However, modern phrasing is apt to toss me out of the story—a 19th century gentleman saying “Well, that was a fun afternoon”—and ignoring historical norms and attitudes bothers me. No, the duke cannot decide who will inherit his title, and no, that girl who thinks it would be no big deal to have an illegitimate child is tragically wrong.
    And I adore that cover!

    Reply
  63. Different things bother different people, I guess. I don’t mind the proliferation of dukes, since they all inhabit their own fictional universes, and I think the real problem with the misuse of titles is that I get confused about who is who. ( Lady Mary? but I thought she was the earl’s wife, not his daughter.) And words slipping around in time don’t greatly bother me because most of the time I don’t realize that they are out of period. Yesterday I discovered that “shiv” is a 20th century word, but if a criminal in the 18th century used it, I wouldn’t have blinked.
    However, modern phrasing is apt to toss me out of the story—a 19th century gentleman saying “Well, that was a fun afternoon”—and ignoring historical norms and attitudes bothers me. No, the duke cannot decide who will inherit his title, and no, that girl who thinks it would be no big deal to have an illegitimate child is tragically wrong.
    And I adore that cover!

    Reply
  64. Different things bother different people, I guess. I don’t mind the proliferation of dukes, since they all inhabit their own fictional universes, and I think the real problem with the misuse of titles is that I get confused about who is who. ( Lady Mary? but I thought she was the earl’s wife, not his daughter.) And words slipping around in time don’t greatly bother me because most of the time I don’t realize that they are out of period. Yesterday I discovered that “shiv” is a 20th century word, but if a criminal in the 18th century used it, I wouldn’t have blinked.
    However, modern phrasing is apt to toss me out of the story—a 19th century gentleman saying “Well, that was a fun afternoon”—and ignoring historical norms and attitudes bothers me. No, the duke cannot decide who will inherit his title, and no, that girl who thinks it would be no big deal to have an illegitimate child is tragically wrong.
    And I adore that cover!

    Reply
  65. Different things bother different people, I guess. I don’t mind the proliferation of dukes, since they all inhabit their own fictional universes, and I think the real problem with the misuse of titles is that I get confused about who is who. ( Lady Mary? but I thought she was the earl’s wife, not his daughter.) And words slipping around in time don’t greatly bother me because most of the time I don’t realize that they are out of period. Yesterday I discovered that “shiv” is a 20th century word, but if a criminal in the 18th century used it, I wouldn’t have blinked.
    However, modern phrasing is apt to toss me out of the story—a 19th century gentleman saying “Well, that was a fun afternoon”—and ignoring historical norms and attitudes bothers me. No, the duke cannot decide who will inherit his title, and no, that girl who thinks it would be no big deal to have an illegitimate child is tragically wrong.
    And I adore that cover!

    Reply
  66. Let me preface this by saying I’m just a happy reader. I don’t even know enough to be a purist and probably wouldn’t be one even if I did. As long as a story holds my interest, I’m pretty forgiving.
    I love historical Regencies but have often wondered why the heroes all have to have titles. Didn’t other classes of people have interesting lives? I bet they did.
    I’m more likely to notice a typo or a modern phrase (she maintained her cool) and it may or may not put me off. But the biggest sin to me is when (like Lil mentions) characters ignore the mores and attitudes of the times.
    Interesting post and interesting responses.

    Reply
  67. Let me preface this by saying I’m just a happy reader. I don’t even know enough to be a purist and probably wouldn’t be one even if I did. As long as a story holds my interest, I’m pretty forgiving.
    I love historical Regencies but have often wondered why the heroes all have to have titles. Didn’t other classes of people have interesting lives? I bet they did.
    I’m more likely to notice a typo or a modern phrase (she maintained her cool) and it may or may not put me off. But the biggest sin to me is when (like Lil mentions) characters ignore the mores and attitudes of the times.
    Interesting post and interesting responses.

    Reply
  68. Let me preface this by saying I’m just a happy reader. I don’t even know enough to be a purist and probably wouldn’t be one even if I did. As long as a story holds my interest, I’m pretty forgiving.
    I love historical Regencies but have often wondered why the heroes all have to have titles. Didn’t other classes of people have interesting lives? I bet they did.
    I’m more likely to notice a typo or a modern phrase (she maintained her cool) and it may or may not put me off. But the biggest sin to me is when (like Lil mentions) characters ignore the mores and attitudes of the times.
    Interesting post and interesting responses.

    Reply
  69. Let me preface this by saying I’m just a happy reader. I don’t even know enough to be a purist and probably wouldn’t be one even if I did. As long as a story holds my interest, I’m pretty forgiving.
    I love historical Regencies but have often wondered why the heroes all have to have titles. Didn’t other classes of people have interesting lives? I bet they did.
    I’m more likely to notice a typo or a modern phrase (she maintained her cool) and it may or may not put me off. But the biggest sin to me is when (like Lil mentions) characters ignore the mores and attitudes of the times.
    Interesting post and interesting responses.

    Reply
  70. Let me preface this by saying I’m just a happy reader. I don’t even know enough to be a purist and probably wouldn’t be one even if I did. As long as a story holds my interest, I’m pretty forgiving.
    I love historical Regencies but have often wondered why the heroes all have to have titles. Didn’t other classes of people have interesting lives? I bet they did.
    I’m more likely to notice a typo or a modern phrase (she maintained her cool) and it may or may not put me off. But the biggest sin to me is when (like Lil mentions) characters ignore the mores and attitudes of the times.
    Interesting post and interesting responses.

    Reply
  71. I have enjoyed the fact that evidently every second male child born in Britain is a duke. Actually, I am not into titles. I find them interesting in the fact that they evidently have a great deal of power in the world.
    I am not going to be upset by teeny errors, but some of the language and some of the actions at times make me wonder who did the research here? Like maybe a like middle school girl?
    Sorry, that was tacky.
    I hope everyone is well and happy.

    Reply
  72. I have enjoyed the fact that evidently every second male child born in Britain is a duke. Actually, I am not into titles. I find them interesting in the fact that they evidently have a great deal of power in the world.
    I am not going to be upset by teeny errors, but some of the language and some of the actions at times make me wonder who did the research here? Like maybe a like middle school girl?
    Sorry, that was tacky.
    I hope everyone is well and happy.

    Reply
  73. I have enjoyed the fact that evidently every second male child born in Britain is a duke. Actually, I am not into titles. I find them interesting in the fact that they evidently have a great deal of power in the world.
    I am not going to be upset by teeny errors, but some of the language and some of the actions at times make me wonder who did the research here? Like maybe a like middle school girl?
    Sorry, that was tacky.
    I hope everyone is well and happy.

    Reply
  74. I have enjoyed the fact that evidently every second male child born in Britain is a duke. Actually, I am not into titles. I find them interesting in the fact that they evidently have a great deal of power in the world.
    I am not going to be upset by teeny errors, but some of the language and some of the actions at times make me wonder who did the research here? Like maybe a like middle school girl?
    Sorry, that was tacky.
    I hope everyone is well and happy.

    Reply
  75. I have enjoyed the fact that evidently every second male child born in Britain is a duke. Actually, I am not into titles. I find them interesting in the fact that they evidently have a great deal of power in the world.
    I am not going to be upset by teeny errors, but some of the language and some of the actions at times make me wonder who did the research here? Like maybe a like middle school girl?
    Sorry, that was tacky.
    I hope everyone is well and happy.

    Reply
  76. It is the huge errors that bother me, but also the seriousness of the author. I noticed from the time I read the first of her books that Julia Quinn writes romps. She doesen;t make large errors but she’s not as meticulous as you Wenches are. Because her books ARE romps (nibbled to death by ducks?) i don’t mind the small lapses. In more seriious works they would bother me. (Incidntly, he spoofs on romances are a lot funnier than Northangr Abbey.

    Reply
  77. It is the huge errors that bother me, but also the seriousness of the author. I noticed from the time I read the first of her books that Julia Quinn writes romps. She doesen;t make large errors but she’s not as meticulous as you Wenches are. Because her books ARE romps (nibbled to death by ducks?) i don’t mind the small lapses. In more seriious works they would bother me. (Incidntly, he spoofs on romances are a lot funnier than Northangr Abbey.

    Reply
  78. It is the huge errors that bother me, but also the seriousness of the author. I noticed from the time I read the first of her books that Julia Quinn writes romps. She doesen;t make large errors but she’s not as meticulous as you Wenches are. Because her books ARE romps (nibbled to death by ducks?) i don’t mind the small lapses. In more seriious works they would bother me. (Incidntly, he spoofs on romances are a lot funnier than Northangr Abbey.

    Reply
  79. It is the huge errors that bother me, but also the seriousness of the author. I noticed from the time I read the first of her books that Julia Quinn writes romps. She doesen;t make large errors but she’s not as meticulous as you Wenches are. Because her books ARE romps (nibbled to death by ducks?) i don’t mind the small lapses. In more seriious works they would bother me. (Incidntly, he spoofs on romances are a lot funnier than Northangr Abbey.

    Reply
  80. It is the huge errors that bother me, but also the seriousness of the author. I noticed from the time I read the first of her books that Julia Quinn writes romps. She doesen;t make large errors but she’s not as meticulous as you Wenches are. Because her books ARE romps (nibbled to death by ducks?) i don’t mind the small lapses. In more seriious works they would bother me. (Incidntly, he spoofs on romances are a lot funnier than Northangr Abbey.

    Reply
  81. thank you on the cover. I adore it too!
    Modern vs historical words and phrases are a perpetual torment. So many things that sound “modern” are actually old, and of course, vice versa.
    And if the titles were done properly and readers understood the difference, a lot of that confusion would go away. “Oh. Lady Lastname! She’s married so she’s not the simple minded maiden.”

    Reply
  82. thank you on the cover. I adore it too!
    Modern vs historical words and phrases are a perpetual torment. So many things that sound “modern” are actually old, and of course, vice versa.
    And if the titles were done properly and readers understood the difference, a lot of that confusion would go away. “Oh. Lady Lastname! She’s married so she’s not the simple minded maiden.”

    Reply
  83. thank you on the cover. I adore it too!
    Modern vs historical words and phrases are a perpetual torment. So many things that sound “modern” are actually old, and of course, vice versa.
    And if the titles were done properly and readers understood the difference, a lot of that confusion would go away. “Oh. Lady Lastname! She’s married so she’s not the simple minded maiden.”

    Reply
  84. thank you on the cover. I adore it too!
    Modern vs historical words and phrases are a perpetual torment. So many things that sound “modern” are actually old, and of course, vice versa.
    And if the titles were done properly and readers understood the difference, a lot of that confusion would go away. “Oh. Lady Lastname! She’s married so she’s not the simple minded maiden.”

    Reply
  85. thank you on the cover. I adore it too!
    Modern vs historical words and phrases are a perpetual torment. So many things that sound “modern” are actually old, and of course, vice versa.
    And if the titles were done properly and readers understood the difference, a lot of that confusion would go away. “Oh. Lady Lastname! She’s married so she’s not the simple minded maiden.”

    Reply
  86. It is a fun discussion, isn’t it? And yes, I wish we could do more of the “common” hero. but then, it’s so much fun to play with a bankrupt earl or an American who unexpectedly inherits or… so I leave the common man to my contemporaries.

    Reply
  87. It is a fun discussion, isn’t it? And yes, I wish we could do more of the “common” hero. but then, it’s so much fun to play with a bankrupt earl or an American who unexpectedly inherits or… so I leave the common man to my contemporaries.

    Reply
  88. It is a fun discussion, isn’t it? And yes, I wish we could do more of the “common” hero. but then, it’s so much fun to play with a bankrupt earl or an American who unexpectedly inherits or… so I leave the common man to my contemporaries.

    Reply
  89. It is a fun discussion, isn’t it? And yes, I wish we could do more of the “common” hero. but then, it’s so much fun to play with a bankrupt earl or an American who unexpectedly inherits or… so I leave the common man to my contemporaries.

    Reply
  90. It is a fun discussion, isn’t it? And yes, I wish we could do more of the “common” hero. but then, it’s so much fun to play with a bankrupt earl or an American who unexpectedly inherits or… so I leave the common man to my contemporaries.

    Reply
  91. The power of the lords was mostly in their money and lands, depending on the period of history. I have to wonder why we don’t have a proliferation of contemporary Senators to match all the historical dues.
    What marvels me about the lack of research is how so EASY it is to do today! Man, the work I had to do before the internet…
    we are all well and happy and hope you are too!

    Reply
  92. The power of the lords was mostly in their money and lands, depending on the period of history. I have to wonder why we don’t have a proliferation of contemporary Senators to match all the historical dues.
    What marvels me about the lack of research is how so EASY it is to do today! Man, the work I had to do before the internet…
    we are all well and happy and hope you are too!

    Reply
  93. The power of the lords was mostly in their money and lands, depending on the period of history. I have to wonder why we don’t have a proliferation of contemporary Senators to match all the historical dues.
    What marvels me about the lack of research is how so EASY it is to do today! Man, the work I had to do before the internet…
    we are all well and happy and hope you are too!

    Reply
  94. The power of the lords was mostly in their money and lands, depending on the period of history. I have to wonder why we don’t have a proliferation of contemporary Senators to match all the historical dues.
    What marvels me about the lack of research is how so EASY it is to do today! Man, the work I had to do before the internet…
    we are all well and happy and hope you are too!

    Reply
  95. The power of the lords was mostly in their money and lands, depending on the period of history. I have to wonder why we don’t have a proliferation of contemporary Senators to match all the historical dues.
    What marvels me about the lack of research is how so EASY it is to do today! Man, the work I had to do before the internet…
    we are all well and happy and hope you are too!

    Reply
  96. Yes, Sonya, that was my first duke, and he was rather sweet. And you know, I still get an occasional email asking for his story, even though he married the heroine’s sister in that book. People want the whole story, not just the bits they saw as the secondary romance.
    Thanks for remembering him.

    Reply
  97. Yes, Sonya, that was my first duke, and he was rather sweet. And you know, I still get an occasional email asking for his story, even though he married the heroine’s sister in that book. People want the whole story, not just the bits they saw as the secondary romance.
    Thanks for remembering him.

    Reply
  98. Yes, Sonya, that was my first duke, and he was rather sweet. And you know, I still get an occasional email asking for his story, even though he married the heroine’s sister in that book. People want the whole story, not just the bits they saw as the secondary romance.
    Thanks for remembering him.

    Reply
  99. Yes, Sonya, that was my first duke, and he was rather sweet. And you know, I still get an occasional email asking for his story, even though he married the heroine’s sister in that book. People want the whole story, not just the bits they saw as the secondary romance.
    Thanks for remembering him.

    Reply
  100. Yes, Sonya, that was my first duke, and he was rather sweet. And you know, I still get an occasional email asking for his story, even though he married the heroine’s sister in that book. People want the whole story, not just the bits they saw as the secondary romance.
    Thanks for remembering him.

    Reply
  101. I’m so intrigued by this new book, more now because of your sharing the differences in the Scottish peerage. Just from reading Regencies I knew there were some differences, like the tip of the iceberg of actual knowledge.
    Whether or not I bother to look up something is based on how I’ve judged the rest of the book so far. This has never happened with a Wench book, but I may just let a questionable usage annoy me and finish the book to see what happens. And then not read that author again. I read those reviews now too, when back when I started I wanted to read ALL the books. :/ I have so much quantity in my TBR I can definitely be choosy about quality. That may sound grouchy, but I’m getting old. I don’t have time to read junk food when I worry I’ll never get to enjoy the excellent fare I have waiting for me.
    Like everybody else…Oh my that cover! Congratulations.

    Reply
  102. I’m so intrigued by this new book, more now because of your sharing the differences in the Scottish peerage. Just from reading Regencies I knew there were some differences, like the tip of the iceberg of actual knowledge.
    Whether or not I bother to look up something is based on how I’ve judged the rest of the book so far. This has never happened with a Wench book, but I may just let a questionable usage annoy me and finish the book to see what happens. And then not read that author again. I read those reviews now too, when back when I started I wanted to read ALL the books. :/ I have so much quantity in my TBR I can definitely be choosy about quality. That may sound grouchy, but I’m getting old. I don’t have time to read junk food when I worry I’ll never get to enjoy the excellent fare I have waiting for me.
    Like everybody else…Oh my that cover! Congratulations.

    Reply
  103. I’m so intrigued by this new book, more now because of your sharing the differences in the Scottish peerage. Just from reading Regencies I knew there were some differences, like the tip of the iceberg of actual knowledge.
    Whether or not I bother to look up something is based on how I’ve judged the rest of the book so far. This has never happened with a Wench book, but I may just let a questionable usage annoy me and finish the book to see what happens. And then not read that author again. I read those reviews now too, when back when I started I wanted to read ALL the books. :/ I have so much quantity in my TBR I can definitely be choosy about quality. That may sound grouchy, but I’m getting old. I don’t have time to read junk food when I worry I’ll never get to enjoy the excellent fare I have waiting for me.
    Like everybody else…Oh my that cover! Congratulations.

    Reply
  104. I’m so intrigued by this new book, more now because of your sharing the differences in the Scottish peerage. Just from reading Regencies I knew there were some differences, like the tip of the iceberg of actual knowledge.
    Whether or not I bother to look up something is based on how I’ve judged the rest of the book so far. This has never happened with a Wench book, but I may just let a questionable usage annoy me and finish the book to see what happens. And then not read that author again. I read those reviews now too, when back when I started I wanted to read ALL the books. :/ I have so much quantity in my TBR I can definitely be choosy about quality. That may sound grouchy, but I’m getting old. I don’t have time to read junk food when I worry I’ll never get to enjoy the excellent fare I have waiting for me.
    Like everybody else…Oh my that cover! Congratulations.

    Reply
  105. I’m so intrigued by this new book, more now because of your sharing the differences in the Scottish peerage. Just from reading Regencies I knew there were some differences, like the tip of the iceberg of actual knowledge.
    Whether or not I bother to look up something is based on how I’ve judged the rest of the book so far. This has never happened with a Wench book, but I may just let a questionable usage annoy me and finish the book to see what happens. And then not read that author again. I read those reviews now too, when back when I started I wanted to read ALL the books. :/ I have so much quantity in my TBR I can definitely be choosy about quality. That may sound grouchy, but I’m getting old. I don’t have time to read junk food when I worry I’ll never get to enjoy the excellent fare I have waiting for me.
    Like everybody else…Oh my that cover! Congratulations.

    Reply
  106. I know what you mean about so many books to choose from! I’ve become very picky too. I’m probably missing some good reads, but who has that much time?
    And thank you on the kind words! I do adore that cover.

    Reply
  107. I know what you mean about so many books to choose from! I’ve become very picky too. I’m probably missing some good reads, but who has that much time?
    And thank you on the kind words! I do adore that cover.

    Reply
  108. I know what you mean about so many books to choose from! I’ve become very picky too. I’m probably missing some good reads, but who has that much time?
    And thank you on the kind words! I do adore that cover.

    Reply
  109. I know what you mean about so many books to choose from! I’ve become very picky too. I’m probably missing some good reads, but who has that much time?
    And thank you on the kind words! I do adore that cover.

    Reply
  110. I know what you mean about so many books to choose from! I’ve become very picky too. I’m probably missing some good reads, but who has that much time?
    And thank you on the kind words! I do adore that cover.

    Reply
  111. I don’t mind the proliferation of dukes in Regency romances. They are a part of the genre in the same way that in cozy mysteries small towns abound with murders and criminal activities.
    As a reader, it used to bother me when I started reading widely in the historical romance genre and found that not all authors were as meticulous in their research, however, now I’ve started to adjust my expectations accordingly, so I don’t mind as much anymore.
    Not sure if that makes sense to anyone other than me!

    Reply
  112. I don’t mind the proliferation of dukes in Regency romances. They are a part of the genre in the same way that in cozy mysteries small towns abound with murders and criminal activities.
    As a reader, it used to bother me when I started reading widely in the historical romance genre and found that not all authors were as meticulous in their research, however, now I’ve started to adjust my expectations accordingly, so I don’t mind as much anymore.
    Not sure if that makes sense to anyone other than me!

    Reply
  113. I don’t mind the proliferation of dukes in Regency romances. They are a part of the genre in the same way that in cozy mysteries small towns abound with murders and criminal activities.
    As a reader, it used to bother me when I started reading widely in the historical romance genre and found that not all authors were as meticulous in their research, however, now I’ve started to adjust my expectations accordingly, so I don’t mind as much anymore.
    Not sure if that makes sense to anyone other than me!

    Reply
  114. I don’t mind the proliferation of dukes in Regency romances. They are a part of the genre in the same way that in cozy mysteries small towns abound with murders and criminal activities.
    As a reader, it used to bother me when I started reading widely in the historical romance genre and found that not all authors were as meticulous in their research, however, now I’ve started to adjust my expectations accordingly, so I don’t mind as much anymore.
    Not sure if that makes sense to anyone other than me!

    Reply
  115. I don’t mind the proliferation of dukes in Regency romances. They are a part of the genre in the same way that in cozy mysteries small towns abound with murders and criminal activities.
    As a reader, it used to bother me when I started reading widely in the historical romance genre and found that not all authors were as meticulous in their research, however, now I’ve started to adjust my expectations accordingly, so I don’t mind as much anymore.
    Not sure if that makes sense to anyone other than me!

    Reply
  116. I think I will wait for my call from the palace before swatting up on all this aristocratic etiquette! I read historicals more for the plot and behavioral customs … like pistols at dawn or card playing in gaming hells … not to bothered about forms of address, especially when magic is involved!
    I loved the cover for ‘Entrancing the Earl and I really liked book 1 in the series. Just wish they were available in audio.
    Not sure that I approve of The Many Worlds interpretation of Quantum Theory …. and I’m certain it doesn’t apply to Dukes! LOL

    Reply
  117. I think I will wait for my call from the palace before swatting up on all this aristocratic etiquette! I read historicals more for the plot and behavioral customs … like pistols at dawn or card playing in gaming hells … not to bothered about forms of address, especially when magic is involved!
    I loved the cover for ‘Entrancing the Earl and I really liked book 1 in the series. Just wish they were available in audio.
    Not sure that I approve of The Many Worlds interpretation of Quantum Theory …. and I’m certain it doesn’t apply to Dukes! LOL

    Reply
  118. I think I will wait for my call from the palace before swatting up on all this aristocratic etiquette! I read historicals more for the plot and behavioral customs … like pistols at dawn or card playing in gaming hells … not to bothered about forms of address, especially when magic is involved!
    I loved the cover for ‘Entrancing the Earl and I really liked book 1 in the series. Just wish they were available in audio.
    Not sure that I approve of The Many Worlds interpretation of Quantum Theory …. and I’m certain it doesn’t apply to Dukes! LOL

    Reply
  119. I think I will wait for my call from the palace before swatting up on all this aristocratic etiquette! I read historicals more for the plot and behavioral customs … like pistols at dawn or card playing in gaming hells … not to bothered about forms of address, especially when magic is involved!
    I loved the cover for ‘Entrancing the Earl and I really liked book 1 in the series. Just wish they were available in audio.
    Not sure that I approve of The Many Worlds interpretation of Quantum Theory …. and I’m certain it doesn’t apply to Dukes! LOL

    Reply
  120. I think I will wait for my call from the palace before swatting up on all this aristocratic etiquette! I read historicals more for the plot and behavioral customs … like pistols at dawn or card playing in gaming hells … not to bothered about forms of address, especially when magic is involved!
    I loved the cover for ‘Entrancing the Earl and I really liked book 1 in the series. Just wish they were available in audio.
    Not sure that I approve of The Many Worlds interpretation of Quantum Theory …. and I’m certain it doesn’t apply to Dukes! LOL

    Reply
  121. sorry about the audio. Maybe one day when I get tired of writing I’ll try to figure it out. But since I still haven’t been paid for the first audio books out there, I’m in no hurry to try again. It’s a frustrating business.
    Well, I do tend to get a bit flaky with theories.

    Reply
  122. sorry about the audio. Maybe one day when I get tired of writing I’ll try to figure it out. But since I still haven’t been paid for the first audio books out there, I’m in no hurry to try again. It’s a frustrating business.
    Well, I do tend to get a bit flaky with theories.

    Reply
  123. sorry about the audio. Maybe one day when I get tired of writing I’ll try to figure it out. But since I still haven’t been paid for the first audio books out there, I’m in no hurry to try again. It’s a frustrating business.
    Well, I do tend to get a bit flaky with theories.

    Reply
  124. sorry about the audio. Maybe one day when I get tired of writing I’ll try to figure it out. But since I still haven’t been paid for the first audio books out there, I’m in no hurry to try again. It’s a frustrating business.
    Well, I do tend to get a bit flaky with theories.

    Reply
  125. sorry about the audio. Maybe one day when I get tired of writing I’ll try to figure it out. But since I still haven’t been paid for the first audio books out there, I’m in no hurry to try again. It’s a frustrating business.
    Well, I do tend to get a bit flaky with theories.

    Reply
  126. Even professionals can get a bit flaky understanding Quantum theory on an intuitive philosophical level!
    How does remuneration work for authors? I assumed that royalties were paid for each sale.

    Reply
  127. Even professionals can get a bit flaky understanding Quantum theory on an intuitive philosophical level!
    How does remuneration work for authors? I assumed that royalties were paid for each sale.

    Reply
  128. Even professionals can get a bit flaky understanding Quantum theory on an intuitive philosophical level!
    How does remuneration work for authors? I assumed that royalties were paid for each sale.

    Reply
  129. Even professionals can get a bit flaky understanding Quantum theory on an intuitive philosophical level!
    How does remuneration work for authors? I assumed that royalties were paid for each sale.

    Reply
  130. Even professionals can get a bit flaky understanding Quantum theory on an intuitive philosophical level!
    How does remuneration work for authors? I assumed that royalties were paid for each sale.

    Reply

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