Nicola Cornick and “The Brides of Fortune”

1valchloesmall Anne here, welcoming Nicola Cornick back to Word Wenchdom, as promised, to tell us about her upcoming trilogy, "The Brides of Fortune."  Nicola, welcome back. Tell us about these brides.

Nicola:~  Thanks, Anne, it's lovely to be back. The trilogy – or quartet, if you include the short story! – is set in the Regency period in the fictional Yorkshire town of Fortune’s Folly. The unscrupulous Lord of the Manor, Sir Montague Fortune, discovers that by a legal oversight, all the medieval taxes have never been repealed. So he sets out to exploit this by levying as many taxes as he can find on his townsfolk! Chief amongst them is the Dames’ Tax, which entitles him to take half of the wealth of every unmarried woman resident in the town unless she weds within a year. Word goes around the Ton that this is happening and all the fortune-hunters decide that they will journey to Yorkshire to try to persuade the heiresses that it would be preferable to marry than to give their money to Sir Montague. The ladies are trapped, of course. If they wed then legally all their money becomes the property of their husbands. If they don’t, Sir Montague will take half of it anyway! Naturally enough they are not going to give in without a fight!

Anne:~  It sounds like a lot of fun.Nicola portrait

I confess, I love finding out what the inspiration, the spark was, that gave birth to particular books. Most writers I know have no trouble coming up with new ideas, in fact most of us have more ideas than we could ever write, so I love finding out what it was that made that one particular story demand to be written.  So, where did the initial idea for this trilogy come from?

Nicola:~  Although I write historical fiction I do get a lot of my ideas from modern themes and contemporary news stories. For example, I have written in the past about winning the national lottery and also about the cult of celebrity. The Fortune’s Folly trilogy was another idea that came from a modern newspaper. I read a report a couple of years ago of a man in Kent who had bought the title of Lord of the Manor of a particular village. He then discovered that as part of the deal he could tax all the villagers! No one had done it for centuries but he was a bit greedy and started to charge people to park on the village green when they went shopping, and to walk their dogs etc etc. The village was in uproar as a result. I read this and thought what a marvellous idea it would be to base a book around it. That developed into a trilogy as I went along!

Anne:~  Fascinating. And what sort of research did you do? 

Harrowgate

Nicola:~ I had great fun researching medieval taxes as background.  My favourites were the childwite, which a man had to pay when he fathered an illegitimate child (and in many cases there was quite a lot of disagreement over who should be paying!) and the amober, which was the tax you had to pay the lord to waive his right to sleep with the bride on the wedding night! That one features in book 3 of the trilogy! On a more sober note I made Fortune’s Folly a spa town and I enjoyed researching the history of Harrogate and other northern spas. I particularly liked the fact that one of the spa water wells in Harrogate was called the “Stinking Spaw” because the sulphur made the water so smelly. I thought that was very descriptive! I even tried drinking the spa water myself so that I could identify with the experience of those characters who were taking the waters for their health! 

Spawafter

Anne:~  Gosh, that's taking research to brave heights. I'm not sure I'd quaff anything called stinking spaw! LOL. And this cartoon makes the same point— look at the picture upside down for the 'before taking the waters ' view.

Tell us about the heroes in this series.

Nicola:~ The heroes of the three trilogy books are all fortune hunters but they are also government agents who are using the fact that Fortune’s Folly has become the marriage mart of England as cover to pursue their investigations into a very influential and criminal local businessman, Warren Sampson. I decided to explore the idea of what we would call “home security” in the books, because I had read a lot about spies and counter spies during the Napoleonic Wars but I wanted to look at what was happening inside the country in terms of social stability and crime and disorder. I’d started exploring this with the Glory Girls highwaywomen in my previous book, Unmasked, and the trilogy really follows on from that. So the Guardians, as they are called, all work for the Home Secretary and have the brief of keeping the peace at home whilst Britain is engaged in fighting a threat overseas as well.

The Secrets of a Courtesan

Anne:~  This is by no means your first series of linked books. How do you approach the writing of a series?  Do you collage? Plan it all out like a military campaign? Create a "bible" with all the details, character bios, etc. in it? Or do you make it up as you go along and note things down as they happen?  

Nicola:~  I do enjoy writing linked books and have written several series. What drives me to write series is that I love creating that Regency “world,” as I hope I have done with Fortune’s Folly, and peopling it with my characters. But I must confess that I find it very difficult because I am always plotting myself into a corner! What seems a great idea in book 1 turns out to be a problem for the heroine of book 3 somewhere down the line. I used to be a great deal more organised at planning when I was writing a series. In fact I used to be a great deal more organised in my writing full stop. These days I write by the seat of my pants. I make it up as I go along. I wish I was more of a planner but just at the moment this approach doesn’t seem to work for me and you have to go with what does work so that means launching myself in and hoping for the best!

Anne:~  I think there are few "organic writers' among the word wenches, so you're in good company there. You're launching the series with an electronic "prequel" I believe. This is a bit of an innovation, isn't it — launching a print series with an e-book?  What is the prequel about?

Nicola:~  I believe Harlequin have done this once before for one of their paranormal single title series by Gena Showalter and it was a massive success, so fingers crossed! The suggestion to write a prequel came along as I was finishing book 3 of the series so I then had to go back and think what might be happening in Fortune’s Folly before Sir Montague discovered the Dames’ Tax. I decided that a bustling little market town was the perfect place for a fugitive to hide and so The Secrets of a Courtesan was born, in which my heroine, Eve Nightingale, has reinvented herself as a respectable shopkeeper in Fortune’s Folly and thinks her scandalous past has been buried. Of course it has not been buried deep enough… The e-book also sets the scene and introduces some of the characters in the series but it is a complete story in itself.

Anne:~  It sounds like a lot of fun. I'm looking forward to reading it. (Nicola's e-book, The Secrets of a Courtesan, is available from the Harlequin e-book store.)

 

Here is an extract from  The Secrets of a Courtesan:

Suddenly Rowarth was beside her, his hand on her elbow as he helped her to her feet, his touch searing her through the material of her sleeve. He picked up the slightly squashed cheese and handed it politely to her. Their fingers touched. Eve felt heat ripple through her awakening feelings she had thought long dead. Rowarth was summoning the dairyman and the butcher with authoritative gestures now to replace the items she had lost.

Money changed hands. Eve heard the clink of coin and the men’s mumbled thanks. She felt hot and dizzy, the sun beating down on her bonnet and dazzling her eyes. She tried to steady her breathing. There was not the remotest chance of escaping a confrontation with Rowarth now. He still held her, lightly but with a touch that made her entire body thrum with awareness.

“Eve.”


She looked up and met his eyes and again felt the shock like a physical blow. 


“Rowarth.” She was proud that her voice was so steady. “What an unexpected… surprise.”


His lips curved into a smile that was sinfully wicked but not remotely reassuring. “Is there any other sort?” he murmured.


“There are nice surprises,” Eve said.


“And then there is meeting me again.” His smile deepened. “Which I imagine falls into a different category given the alacrity with which you ran away from me.”


Pain twisted in Eve, bitter and sharp, not even slightly blunted with the passing of time. Yes, she had run from him. She had had no other choice in the world. And now, five years later, the mere sight of him could still affect her so profoundly that she felt faint and light-headed, her emotions stretched as taut as a wire.


But Rowarth’s measured tones had nothing but coldness in them for her now. Whatever feelings she still had for him, so deeply held that she had never quite been able to banish them, were not shared. Mistresses came and went, after all. He had been everything to her and there had never been anyone else for her since, but she could hardly expect it to be the same for him.


The crowds had melted away leaving them alone. People were still staring, though from a discreet distance. Women were staring. But then, Eve thought, women had always stared at Alasdair Rowarth. Women had always wanted him. He was handsome, he was rich and he was a duke. What more could one ask for?

Anne:~   Sounds most intriguing. Thanks so much for joining us again, Nicola. It's been a delightful visit.

Nicola:~  You're welcome, Anne. Thanks to you and the other Word Wenches for inviting me to be a guest.

Confessions of a duchess Scandals of an innocentUndoing of a lady -US 

Anne:~ The first print book in Nicola's Fortune’s Folly trilogy, The Confessions of a Duchess, will be out from HQN Books in June 2009 and the others will follow in consecutive months. And just look at these covers — aren't they gorrrrgeous? I'm envious.


Nicola has a question for you: What do you like about linked stories? Or dislike about them, for that matter?

She's offering a download of the e-book and a copy of the first trilogy book to two lucky commenters. (The e-book won't be available until the 20th May.)


160 thoughts on “Nicola Cornick and “The Brides of Fortune””

  1. I love linked stories! They are my favorite type of romance novel. I really prefer when it is about a family, I feel like the characters are more developed, especially when the reappear in the next books (and the foreshadowing about next books’ romances). When I buy a book in a series that is linked together, I pretty much know that I will like the book if I have read one of the previous books in the series and enjoyed it.

    Reply
  2. I love linked stories! They are my favorite type of romance novel. I really prefer when it is about a family, I feel like the characters are more developed, especially when the reappear in the next books (and the foreshadowing about next books’ romances). When I buy a book in a series that is linked together, I pretty much know that I will like the book if I have read one of the previous books in the series and enjoyed it.

    Reply
  3. I love linked stories! They are my favorite type of romance novel. I really prefer when it is about a family, I feel like the characters are more developed, especially when the reappear in the next books (and the foreshadowing about next books’ romances). When I buy a book in a series that is linked together, I pretty much know that I will like the book if I have read one of the previous books in the series and enjoyed it.

    Reply
  4. I love linked stories! They are my favorite type of romance novel. I really prefer when it is about a family, I feel like the characters are more developed, especially when the reappear in the next books (and the foreshadowing about next books’ romances). When I buy a book in a series that is linked together, I pretty much know that I will like the book if I have read one of the previous books in the series and enjoyed it.

    Reply
  5. I love linked stories! They are my favorite type of romance novel. I really prefer when it is about a family, I feel like the characters are more developed, especially when the reappear in the next books (and the foreshadowing about next books’ romances). When I buy a book in a series that is linked together, I pretty much know that I will like the book if I have read one of the previous books in the series and enjoyed it.

    Reply
  6. I don’t like linked stories, because I hate coming in the middle. I want to know everything, all at once, and I hate missing anything. I’d prefer to have everything in one long book, but I know that won’t happen.
    That said, I love your stories. I’m especially looking forward to “The Confessions of a Duchess” because I want to know what happens to Laura and Dexter. I liked them both from “Unmasked”, her because she’s a non-traditional heroine, and him because he’s a nice guy. I like nice guy heroes. I find them so much more attractive than the so-called “bad boys”.

    Reply
  7. I don’t like linked stories, because I hate coming in the middle. I want to know everything, all at once, and I hate missing anything. I’d prefer to have everything in one long book, but I know that won’t happen.
    That said, I love your stories. I’m especially looking forward to “The Confessions of a Duchess” because I want to know what happens to Laura and Dexter. I liked them both from “Unmasked”, her because she’s a non-traditional heroine, and him because he’s a nice guy. I like nice guy heroes. I find them so much more attractive than the so-called “bad boys”.

    Reply
  8. I don’t like linked stories, because I hate coming in the middle. I want to know everything, all at once, and I hate missing anything. I’d prefer to have everything in one long book, but I know that won’t happen.
    That said, I love your stories. I’m especially looking forward to “The Confessions of a Duchess” because I want to know what happens to Laura and Dexter. I liked them both from “Unmasked”, her because she’s a non-traditional heroine, and him because he’s a nice guy. I like nice guy heroes. I find them so much more attractive than the so-called “bad boys”.

    Reply
  9. I don’t like linked stories, because I hate coming in the middle. I want to know everything, all at once, and I hate missing anything. I’d prefer to have everything in one long book, but I know that won’t happen.
    That said, I love your stories. I’m especially looking forward to “The Confessions of a Duchess” because I want to know what happens to Laura and Dexter. I liked them both from “Unmasked”, her because she’s a non-traditional heroine, and him because he’s a nice guy. I like nice guy heroes. I find them so much more attractive than the so-called “bad boys”.

    Reply
  10. I don’t like linked stories, because I hate coming in the middle. I want to know everything, all at once, and I hate missing anything. I’d prefer to have everything in one long book, but I know that won’t happen.
    That said, I love your stories. I’m especially looking forward to “The Confessions of a Duchess” because I want to know what happens to Laura and Dexter. I liked them both from “Unmasked”, her because she’s a non-traditional heroine, and him because he’s a nice guy. I like nice guy heroes. I find them so much more attractive than the so-called “bad boys”.

    Reply
  11. Hi LizzyBee, hi Louis! I share your love of linked series as a reader myself. I love to be introduced to the characters and watch their stories develop and my understanding of them deepen as each book in the series progresses. And I hate to say goodbye to them at the end. I think that’s why I left a few threads unresolved at the end of the Brides of Fortune series. Secretly I probably wanted to go back and pick up with those characters again!

    Reply
  12. Hi LizzyBee, hi Louis! I share your love of linked series as a reader myself. I love to be introduced to the characters and watch their stories develop and my understanding of them deepen as each book in the series progresses. And I hate to say goodbye to them at the end. I think that’s why I left a few threads unresolved at the end of the Brides of Fortune series. Secretly I probably wanted to go back and pick up with those characters again!

    Reply
  13. Hi LizzyBee, hi Louis! I share your love of linked series as a reader myself. I love to be introduced to the characters and watch their stories develop and my understanding of them deepen as each book in the series progresses. And I hate to say goodbye to them at the end. I think that’s why I left a few threads unresolved at the end of the Brides of Fortune series. Secretly I probably wanted to go back and pick up with those characters again!

    Reply
  14. Hi LizzyBee, hi Louis! I share your love of linked series as a reader myself. I love to be introduced to the characters and watch their stories develop and my understanding of them deepen as each book in the series progresses. And I hate to say goodbye to them at the end. I think that’s why I left a few threads unresolved at the end of the Brides of Fortune series. Secretly I probably wanted to go back and pick up with those characters again!

    Reply
  15. Hi LizzyBee, hi Louis! I share your love of linked series as a reader myself. I love to be introduced to the characters and watch their stories develop and my understanding of them deepen as each book in the series progresses. And I hate to say goodbye to them at the end. I think that’s why I left a few threads unresolved at the end of the Brides of Fortune series. Secretly I probably wanted to go back and pick up with those characters again!

    Reply
  16. Hi Linda! Interestingly another person said exactly the same thing to me the other day about wanting everything in one long book but what with publisher requirements on word count and author exhaustion, it isn’t going to happen!! I’m so pleased that you are prepared to make an exception for my books though. Thank you. That’s a great compliment.
    I’m also very glad that you enjoyed Laura and Dexter in Unmasked. I think she is an unusual and different heroine (as all the heroines in this series are in their own way). I like writing non-traditional heroines! They interest me. And yes, Dexter is a nice guy in the sense that he’s extremely honorable. In fact he makes problems for himself by being incredibly principled…
    You’ve raised another interesting topic as well in the nice guy versus bad boy hero debate. Do people prefer rakish heroes or do they like heroes with integrity? Or both? Can a bad boy hero have integrity?

    Reply
  17. Hi Linda! Interestingly another person said exactly the same thing to me the other day about wanting everything in one long book but what with publisher requirements on word count and author exhaustion, it isn’t going to happen!! I’m so pleased that you are prepared to make an exception for my books though. Thank you. That’s a great compliment.
    I’m also very glad that you enjoyed Laura and Dexter in Unmasked. I think she is an unusual and different heroine (as all the heroines in this series are in their own way). I like writing non-traditional heroines! They interest me. And yes, Dexter is a nice guy in the sense that he’s extremely honorable. In fact he makes problems for himself by being incredibly principled…
    You’ve raised another interesting topic as well in the nice guy versus bad boy hero debate. Do people prefer rakish heroes or do they like heroes with integrity? Or both? Can a bad boy hero have integrity?

    Reply
  18. Hi Linda! Interestingly another person said exactly the same thing to me the other day about wanting everything in one long book but what with publisher requirements on word count and author exhaustion, it isn’t going to happen!! I’m so pleased that you are prepared to make an exception for my books though. Thank you. That’s a great compliment.
    I’m also very glad that you enjoyed Laura and Dexter in Unmasked. I think she is an unusual and different heroine (as all the heroines in this series are in their own way). I like writing non-traditional heroines! They interest me. And yes, Dexter is a nice guy in the sense that he’s extremely honorable. In fact he makes problems for himself by being incredibly principled…
    You’ve raised another interesting topic as well in the nice guy versus bad boy hero debate. Do people prefer rakish heroes or do they like heroes with integrity? Or both? Can a bad boy hero have integrity?

    Reply
  19. Hi Linda! Interestingly another person said exactly the same thing to me the other day about wanting everything in one long book but what with publisher requirements on word count and author exhaustion, it isn’t going to happen!! I’m so pleased that you are prepared to make an exception for my books though. Thank you. That’s a great compliment.
    I’m also very glad that you enjoyed Laura and Dexter in Unmasked. I think she is an unusual and different heroine (as all the heroines in this series are in their own way). I like writing non-traditional heroines! They interest me. And yes, Dexter is a nice guy in the sense that he’s extremely honorable. In fact he makes problems for himself by being incredibly principled…
    You’ve raised another interesting topic as well in the nice guy versus bad boy hero debate. Do people prefer rakish heroes or do they like heroes with integrity? Or both? Can a bad boy hero have integrity?

    Reply
  20. Hi Linda! Interestingly another person said exactly the same thing to me the other day about wanting everything in one long book but what with publisher requirements on word count and author exhaustion, it isn’t going to happen!! I’m so pleased that you are prepared to make an exception for my books though. Thank you. That’s a great compliment.
    I’m also very glad that you enjoyed Laura and Dexter in Unmasked. I think she is an unusual and different heroine (as all the heroines in this series are in their own way). I like writing non-traditional heroines! They interest me. And yes, Dexter is a nice guy in the sense that he’s extremely honorable. In fact he makes problems for himself by being incredibly principled…
    You’ve raised another interesting topic as well in the nice guy versus bad boy hero debate. Do people prefer rakish heroes or do they like heroes with integrity? Or both? Can a bad boy hero have integrity?

    Reply
  21. When I say a “nice guy”, I mean the hero with honor. I find an honorable man incredibly attractive.
    I have my doubts about those rakes. A man who has been with numerous women is probably very physically attractive, but I wouldn’t care to have him be a hero.

    Reply
  22. When I say a “nice guy”, I mean the hero with honor. I find an honorable man incredibly attractive.
    I have my doubts about those rakes. A man who has been with numerous women is probably very physically attractive, but I wouldn’t care to have him be a hero.

    Reply
  23. When I say a “nice guy”, I mean the hero with honor. I find an honorable man incredibly attractive.
    I have my doubts about those rakes. A man who has been with numerous women is probably very physically attractive, but I wouldn’t care to have him be a hero.

    Reply
  24. When I say a “nice guy”, I mean the hero with honor. I find an honorable man incredibly attractive.
    I have my doubts about those rakes. A man who has been with numerous women is probably very physically attractive, but I wouldn’t care to have him be a hero.

    Reply
  25. When I say a “nice guy”, I mean the hero with honor. I find an honorable man incredibly attractive.
    I have my doubts about those rakes. A man who has been with numerous women is probably very physically attractive, but I wouldn’t care to have him be a hero.

    Reply
  26. I enjoy linked stories, but — and this is before I’ve seen the books, based only on one sentence in the interview above.
    Can’t these “heiresses” afford competent solicitors to tie up a significant portion of their money in trust and settlements for the benefit of themselves and their children so the fortune-hunting would-be husbands can’t get their hands on it under the common-law provisions?
    I should think the women would be annoyed by the pressure to marry that the tax is putting on them, but they ought be to able to use the tools available to protect their own interests, at least if they have enough property to make them worth a fortune-hunter’s while. It was really the working class woman who was skinted by the ability of her husband under the law to grab her wages and drink them up. There wasn’t much to be done to protect the income that a woman earned through her own efforts after she was married unless she was a business owner incorporated to do business as a femme sole.

    Reply
  27. I enjoy linked stories, but — and this is before I’ve seen the books, based only on one sentence in the interview above.
    Can’t these “heiresses” afford competent solicitors to tie up a significant portion of their money in trust and settlements for the benefit of themselves and their children so the fortune-hunting would-be husbands can’t get their hands on it under the common-law provisions?
    I should think the women would be annoyed by the pressure to marry that the tax is putting on them, but they ought be to able to use the tools available to protect their own interests, at least if they have enough property to make them worth a fortune-hunter’s while. It was really the working class woman who was skinted by the ability of her husband under the law to grab her wages and drink them up. There wasn’t much to be done to protect the income that a woman earned through her own efforts after she was married unless she was a business owner incorporated to do business as a femme sole.

    Reply
  28. I enjoy linked stories, but — and this is before I’ve seen the books, based only on one sentence in the interview above.
    Can’t these “heiresses” afford competent solicitors to tie up a significant portion of their money in trust and settlements for the benefit of themselves and their children so the fortune-hunting would-be husbands can’t get their hands on it under the common-law provisions?
    I should think the women would be annoyed by the pressure to marry that the tax is putting on them, but they ought be to able to use the tools available to protect their own interests, at least if they have enough property to make them worth a fortune-hunter’s while. It was really the working class woman who was skinted by the ability of her husband under the law to grab her wages and drink them up. There wasn’t much to be done to protect the income that a woman earned through her own efforts after she was married unless she was a business owner incorporated to do business as a femme sole.

    Reply
  29. I enjoy linked stories, but — and this is before I’ve seen the books, based only on one sentence in the interview above.
    Can’t these “heiresses” afford competent solicitors to tie up a significant portion of their money in trust and settlements for the benefit of themselves and their children so the fortune-hunting would-be husbands can’t get their hands on it under the common-law provisions?
    I should think the women would be annoyed by the pressure to marry that the tax is putting on them, but they ought be to able to use the tools available to protect their own interests, at least if they have enough property to make them worth a fortune-hunter’s while. It was really the working class woman who was skinted by the ability of her husband under the law to grab her wages and drink them up. There wasn’t much to be done to protect the income that a woman earned through her own efforts after she was married unless she was a business owner incorporated to do business as a femme sole.

    Reply
  30. I enjoy linked stories, but — and this is before I’ve seen the books, based only on one sentence in the interview above.
    Can’t these “heiresses” afford competent solicitors to tie up a significant portion of their money in trust and settlements for the benefit of themselves and their children so the fortune-hunting would-be husbands can’t get their hands on it under the common-law provisions?
    I should think the women would be annoyed by the pressure to marry that the tax is putting on them, but they ought be to able to use the tools available to protect their own interests, at least if they have enough property to make them worth a fortune-hunter’s while. It was really the working class woman who was skinted by the ability of her husband under the law to grab her wages and drink them up. There wasn’t much to be done to protect the income that a woman earned through her own efforts after she was married unless she was a business owner incorporated to do business as a femme sole.

    Reply
  31. Me too, Linda, on finding honorable heroes attractive. Maybe that was why I was drawn to the idea of writing the hero as protector in this series. On the other hand, I try for the best of both worlds with the hero of book two who is an out and out rake but has his own code of honor.

    Reply
  32. Me too, Linda, on finding honorable heroes attractive. Maybe that was why I was drawn to the idea of writing the hero as protector in this series. On the other hand, I try for the best of both worlds with the hero of book two who is an out and out rake but has his own code of honor.

    Reply
  33. Me too, Linda, on finding honorable heroes attractive. Maybe that was why I was drawn to the idea of writing the hero as protector in this series. On the other hand, I try for the best of both worlds with the hero of book two who is an out and out rake but has his own code of honor.

    Reply
  34. Me too, Linda, on finding honorable heroes attractive. Maybe that was why I was drawn to the idea of writing the hero as protector in this series. On the other hand, I try for the best of both worlds with the hero of book two who is an out and out rake but has his own code of honor.

    Reply
  35. Me too, Linda, on finding honorable heroes attractive. Maybe that was why I was drawn to the idea of writing the hero as protector in this series. On the other hand, I try for the best of both worlds with the hero of book two who is an out and out rake but has his own code of honor.

    Reply
  36. Hi Virginia. Well, I don’t want to put too many spoilers in but in fact one of the steps that the heroines do take in the books is banding together to employ a solicitor to take on their cause…
    And in the end they resort to using Magna Carta and the Charter of the Forest!

    Reply
  37. Hi Virginia. Well, I don’t want to put too many spoilers in but in fact one of the steps that the heroines do take in the books is banding together to employ a solicitor to take on their cause…
    And in the end they resort to using Magna Carta and the Charter of the Forest!

    Reply
  38. Hi Virginia. Well, I don’t want to put too many spoilers in but in fact one of the steps that the heroines do take in the books is banding together to employ a solicitor to take on their cause…
    And in the end they resort to using Magna Carta and the Charter of the Forest!

    Reply
  39. Hi Virginia. Well, I don’t want to put too many spoilers in but in fact one of the steps that the heroines do take in the books is banding together to employ a solicitor to take on their cause…
    And in the end they resort to using Magna Carta and the Charter of the Forest!

    Reply
  40. Hi Virginia. Well, I don’t want to put too many spoilers in but in fact one of the steps that the heroines do take in the books is banding together to employ a solicitor to take on their cause…
    And in the end they resort to using Magna Carta and the Charter of the Forest!

    Reply
  41. I love linked books because I feel that I get to know the characters in each of the stories and move with them thoughout all of the books. They often make me feel part of the story (if that makes sense).
    Nicola I am soo looking foward to these books I can’t wait they are on my must have list.
    Thank You Anne for inviting Nicola
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  42. I love linked books because I feel that I get to know the characters in each of the stories and move with them thoughout all of the books. They often make me feel part of the story (if that makes sense).
    Nicola I am soo looking foward to these books I can’t wait they are on my must have list.
    Thank You Anne for inviting Nicola
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  43. I love linked books because I feel that I get to know the characters in each of the stories and move with them thoughout all of the books. They often make me feel part of the story (if that makes sense).
    Nicola I am soo looking foward to these books I can’t wait they are on my must have list.
    Thank You Anne for inviting Nicola
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  44. I love linked books because I feel that I get to know the characters in each of the stories and move with them thoughout all of the books. They often make me feel part of the story (if that makes sense).
    Nicola I am soo looking foward to these books I can’t wait they are on my must have list.
    Thank You Anne for inviting Nicola
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  45. I love linked books because I feel that I get to know the characters in each of the stories and move with them thoughout all of the books. They often make me feel part of the story (if that makes sense).
    Nicola I am soo looking foward to these books I can’t wait they are on my must have list.
    Thank You Anne for inviting Nicola
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  46. Speaking from an author’s POV, I like linked stories because after the initial set-up, it makes the world building easier, giving me more room to work with the characters and the romance. It would be lovely if we could go back to the big books with leisurely set-ups, but a trilogy is a fine way around that!

    Reply
  47. Speaking from an author’s POV, I like linked stories because after the initial set-up, it makes the world building easier, giving me more room to work with the characters and the romance. It would be lovely if we could go back to the big books with leisurely set-ups, but a trilogy is a fine way around that!

    Reply
  48. Speaking from an author’s POV, I like linked stories because after the initial set-up, it makes the world building easier, giving me more room to work with the characters and the romance. It would be lovely if we could go back to the big books with leisurely set-ups, but a trilogy is a fine way around that!

    Reply
  49. Speaking from an author’s POV, I like linked stories because after the initial set-up, it makes the world building easier, giving me more room to work with the characters and the romance. It would be lovely if we could go back to the big books with leisurely set-ups, but a trilogy is a fine way around that!

    Reply
  50. Speaking from an author’s POV, I like linked stories because after the initial set-up, it makes the world building easier, giving me more room to work with the characters and the romance. It would be lovely if we could go back to the big books with leisurely set-ups, but a trilogy is a fine way around that!

    Reply
  51. I like linked stories because I get interested in all the characters. I want their stories to continue. I love the Ice series by Anne Stuart.
    I dislike linked stories when it appears that the author is losing interest in the story.

    Reply
  52. I like linked stories because I get interested in all the characters. I want their stories to continue. I love the Ice series by Anne Stuart.
    I dislike linked stories when it appears that the author is losing interest in the story.

    Reply
  53. I like linked stories because I get interested in all the characters. I want their stories to continue. I love the Ice series by Anne Stuart.
    I dislike linked stories when it appears that the author is losing interest in the story.

    Reply
  54. I like linked stories because I get interested in all the characters. I want their stories to continue. I love the Ice series by Anne Stuart.
    I dislike linked stories when it appears that the author is losing interest in the story.

    Reply
  55. I like linked stories because I get interested in all the characters. I want their stories to continue. I love the Ice series by Anne Stuart.
    I dislike linked stories when it appears that the author is losing interest in the story.

    Reply
  56. Oooo…I loved the excerpt! Thanks for including it and whetting my appetite!
    I like linked books because they make the world familiar and if I really liked the first one, I know I’ll love the second, and third, and so forth.
    BTW, I LOVE the covers of the books! They are fabulously beautiful!

    Reply
  57. Oooo…I loved the excerpt! Thanks for including it and whetting my appetite!
    I like linked books because they make the world familiar and if I really liked the first one, I know I’ll love the second, and third, and so forth.
    BTW, I LOVE the covers of the books! They are fabulously beautiful!

    Reply
  58. Oooo…I loved the excerpt! Thanks for including it and whetting my appetite!
    I like linked books because they make the world familiar and if I really liked the first one, I know I’ll love the second, and third, and so forth.
    BTW, I LOVE the covers of the books! They are fabulously beautiful!

    Reply
  59. Oooo…I loved the excerpt! Thanks for including it and whetting my appetite!
    I like linked books because they make the world familiar and if I really liked the first one, I know I’ll love the second, and third, and so forth.
    BTW, I LOVE the covers of the books! They are fabulously beautiful!

    Reply
  60. Oooo…I loved the excerpt! Thanks for including it and whetting my appetite!
    I like linked books because they make the world familiar and if I really liked the first one, I know I’ll love the second, and third, and so forth.
    BTW, I LOVE the covers of the books! They are fabulously beautiful!

    Reply
  61. I like linked stories. However I do agree wwith a previous poster that there are times when it seems like the author is uninterested in the series and some books may be better than others. May favorite linked series is the Skye O’Malley series.

    Reply
  62. I like linked stories. However I do agree wwith a previous poster that there are times when it seems like the author is uninterested in the series and some books may be better than others. May favorite linked series is the Skye O’Malley series.

    Reply
  63. I like linked stories. However I do agree wwith a previous poster that there are times when it seems like the author is uninterested in the series and some books may be better than others. May favorite linked series is the Skye O’Malley series.

    Reply
  64. I like linked stories. However I do agree wwith a previous poster that there are times when it seems like the author is uninterested in the series and some books may be better than others. May favorite linked series is the Skye O’Malley series.

    Reply
  65. I like linked stories. However I do agree wwith a previous poster that there are times when it seems like the author is uninterested in the series and some books may be better than others. May favorite linked series is the Skye O’Malley series.

    Reply
  66. Oh no, more great books for the TBR pile!
    Thanks for another great visit, Nicola. Can’t wait to have you here regularly.
    I do like linked stories, just as long as the books work as stand-alones too. It’s frustrating if there are too many references to past events and people that pull you out of the current story.

    Reply
  67. Oh no, more great books for the TBR pile!
    Thanks for another great visit, Nicola. Can’t wait to have you here regularly.
    I do like linked stories, just as long as the books work as stand-alones too. It’s frustrating if there are too many references to past events and people that pull you out of the current story.

    Reply
  68. Oh no, more great books for the TBR pile!
    Thanks for another great visit, Nicola. Can’t wait to have you here regularly.
    I do like linked stories, just as long as the books work as stand-alones too. It’s frustrating if there are too many references to past events and people that pull you out of the current story.

    Reply
  69. Oh no, more great books for the TBR pile!
    Thanks for another great visit, Nicola. Can’t wait to have you here regularly.
    I do like linked stories, just as long as the books work as stand-alones too. It’s frustrating if there are too many references to past events and people that pull you out of the current story.

    Reply
  70. Oh no, more great books for the TBR pile!
    Thanks for another great visit, Nicola. Can’t wait to have you here regularly.
    I do like linked stories, just as long as the books work as stand-alones too. It’s frustrating if there are too many references to past events and people that pull you out of the current story.

    Reply
  71. I enjoy reading linked stories
    I enjoy reading what the old
    characters are now doing and to
    enjoy the new characters.It keeps
    old friends alive.

    Reply
  72. I enjoy reading linked stories
    I enjoy reading what the old
    characters are now doing and to
    enjoy the new characters.It keeps
    old friends alive.

    Reply
  73. I enjoy reading linked stories
    I enjoy reading what the old
    characters are now doing and to
    enjoy the new characters.It keeps
    old friends alive.

    Reply
  74. I enjoy reading linked stories
    I enjoy reading what the old
    characters are now doing and to
    enjoy the new characters.It keeps
    old friends alive.

    Reply
  75. I enjoy reading linked stories
    I enjoy reading what the old
    characters are now doing and to
    enjoy the new characters.It keeps
    old friends alive.

    Reply
  76. Thank you so much for all the thought-provoking comments on linked series! I think it’s a very interesting thought that you can tell as a reader if an author has lost interest in a series and the reader picks up on that and their interest wanes too. Also as Andrea says, if the books are stand alone this works better for me too – enough references to other books to whet the appetite but not too many that you get pulled out of the story.

    Reply
  77. Thank you so much for all the thought-provoking comments on linked series! I think it’s a very interesting thought that you can tell as a reader if an author has lost interest in a series and the reader picks up on that and their interest wanes too. Also as Andrea says, if the books are stand alone this works better for me too – enough references to other books to whet the appetite but not too many that you get pulled out of the story.

    Reply
  78. Thank you so much for all the thought-provoking comments on linked series! I think it’s a very interesting thought that you can tell as a reader if an author has lost interest in a series and the reader picks up on that and their interest wanes too. Also as Andrea says, if the books are stand alone this works better for me too – enough references to other books to whet the appetite but not too many that you get pulled out of the story.

    Reply
  79. Thank you so much for all the thought-provoking comments on linked series! I think it’s a very interesting thought that you can tell as a reader if an author has lost interest in a series and the reader picks up on that and their interest wanes too. Also as Andrea says, if the books are stand alone this works better for me too – enough references to other books to whet the appetite but not too many that you get pulled out of the story.

    Reply
  80. Thank you so much for all the thought-provoking comments on linked series! I think it’s a very interesting thought that you can tell as a reader if an author has lost interest in a series and the reader picks up on that and their interest wanes too. Also as Andrea says, if the books are stand alone this works better for me too – enough references to other books to whet the appetite but not too many that you get pulled out of the story.

    Reply
  81. I like linked stories because it gives a good writer more time to build up her world and characters; I think they work best when all the characters are closely interwoven throughout all books in the series, as Mary Balogh did in her Web trilogy (before the ‘rules’ said they all had to be totally separate).
    The only thing I can think of that really annoys me about linked books is when hero & heroine from Book 1, say, are trotted around in Book 3, just to tell us that they have X number of children now, yet still have the hots for each other — without playing any meaningful role in the events of Book 3. I know some folks like these unrelated walkons, but I hate ’em. If the writer is going to stick a previous couple into a book, at least have them do something that matters in the current story.

    Reply
  82. I like linked stories because it gives a good writer more time to build up her world and characters; I think they work best when all the characters are closely interwoven throughout all books in the series, as Mary Balogh did in her Web trilogy (before the ‘rules’ said they all had to be totally separate).
    The only thing I can think of that really annoys me about linked books is when hero & heroine from Book 1, say, are trotted around in Book 3, just to tell us that they have X number of children now, yet still have the hots for each other — without playing any meaningful role in the events of Book 3. I know some folks like these unrelated walkons, but I hate ’em. If the writer is going to stick a previous couple into a book, at least have them do something that matters in the current story.

    Reply
  83. I like linked stories because it gives a good writer more time to build up her world and characters; I think they work best when all the characters are closely interwoven throughout all books in the series, as Mary Balogh did in her Web trilogy (before the ‘rules’ said they all had to be totally separate).
    The only thing I can think of that really annoys me about linked books is when hero & heroine from Book 1, say, are trotted around in Book 3, just to tell us that they have X number of children now, yet still have the hots for each other — without playing any meaningful role in the events of Book 3. I know some folks like these unrelated walkons, but I hate ’em. If the writer is going to stick a previous couple into a book, at least have them do something that matters in the current story.

    Reply
  84. I like linked stories because it gives a good writer more time to build up her world and characters; I think they work best when all the characters are closely interwoven throughout all books in the series, as Mary Balogh did in her Web trilogy (before the ‘rules’ said they all had to be totally separate).
    The only thing I can think of that really annoys me about linked books is when hero & heroine from Book 1, say, are trotted around in Book 3, just to tell us that they have X number of children now, yet still have the hots for each other — without playing any meaningful role in the events of Book 3. I know some folks like these unrelated walkons, but I hate ’em. If the writer is going to stick a previous couple into a book, at least have them do something that matters in the current story.

    Reply
  85. I like linked stories because it gives a good writer more time to build up her world and characters; I think they work best when all the characters are closely interwoven throughout all books in the series, as Mary Balogh did in her Web trilogy (before the ‘rules’ said they all had to be totally separate).
    The only thing I can think of that really annoys me about linked books is when hero & heroine from Book 1, say, are trotted around in Book 3, just to tell us that they have X number of children now, yet still have the hots for each other — without playing any meaningful role in the events of Book 3. I know some folks like these unrelated walkons, but I hate ’em. If the writer is going to stick a previous couple into a book, at least have them do something that matters in the current story.

    Reply
  86. LOL Janice on the heroes and heroines popping out of the woodwork with their tribe of children! Hopefully I have found the happy medium in this series. The books are closely linked and the stories and characters interwoven (which was why the series gave me so many headaches to write, not being a planner!) but book 3, for example, could be read on it’s own and still make sense and then I hope the reader would want to go back and read the other two.

    Reply
  87. LOL Janice on the heroes and heroines popping out of the woodwork with their tribe of children! Hopefully I have found the happy medium in this series. The books are closely linked and the stories and characters interwoven (which was why the series gave me so many headaches to write, not being a planner!) but book 3, for example, could be read on it’s own and still make sense and then I hope the reader would want to go back and read the other two.

    Reply
  88. LOL Janice on the heroes and heroines popping out of the woodwork with their tribe of children! Hopefully I have found the happy medium in this series. The books are closely linked and the stories and characters interwoven (which was why the series gave me so many headaches to write, not being a planner!) but book 3, for example, could be read on it’s own and still make sense and then I hope the reader would want to go back and read the other two.

    Reply
  89. LOL Janice on the heroes and heroines popping out of the woodwork with their tribe of children! Hopefully I have found the happy medium in this series. The books are closely linked and the stories and characters interwoven (which was why the series gave me so many headaches to write, not being a planner!) but book 3, for example, could be read on it’s own and still make sense and then I hope the reader would want to go back and read the other two.

    Reply
  90. LOL Janice on the heroes and heroines popping out of the woodwork with their tribe of children! Hopefully I have found the happy medium in this series. The books are closely linked and the stories and characters interwoven (which was why the series gave me so many headaches to write, not being a planner!) but book 3, for example, could be read on it’s own and still make sense and then I hope the reader would want to go back and read the other two.

    Reply
  91. Hello Nicola! I just wanted to pop in and say “Hi” (waving) 🙂 Those covers are gorgeous–can’t wait for the books…

    Reply
  92. Hello Nicola! I just wanted to pop in and say “Hi” (waving) 🙂 Those covers are gorgeous–can’t wait for the books…

    Reply
  93. Hello Nicola! I just wanted to pop in and say “Hi” (waving) 🙂 Those covers are gorgeous–can’t wait for the books…

    Reply
  94. Hello Nicola! I just wanted to pop in and say “Hi” (waving) 🙂 Those covers are gorgeous–can’t wait for the books…

    Reply
  95. Hello Nicola! I just wanted to pop in and say “Hi” (waving) 🙂 Those covers are gorgeous–can’t wait for the books…

    Reply
  96. Hi Nicola,
    I like linked books because I don’t have to say goodbye to characters I enjoyed. I might get to hear what happens to them after the end of their book.

    Reply
  97. Hi Nicola,
    I like linked books because I don’t have to say goodbye to characters I enjoyed. I might get to hear what happens to them after the end of their book.

    Reply
  98. Hi Nicola,
    I like linked books because I don’t have to say goodbye to characters I enjoyed. I might get to hear what happens to them after the end of their book.

    Reply
  99. Hi Nicola,
    I like linked books because I don’t have to say goodbye to characters I enjoyed. I might get to hear what happens to them after the end of their book.

    Reply
  100. Hi Nicola,
    I like linked books because I don’t have to say goodbye to characters I enjoyed. I might get to hear what happens to them after the end of their book.

    Reply
  101. Hi Nicola,
    I generally really like linked books, and I have especially loved the Bridgerton series by Julia Quinn. To make 8 books all good and interesting, and different is quite an acheivement.
    I’d be very interested to know the process you and your publisher went through with this series – i.e. did they ask you to do linked books, or was it your idea?
    Also, did you have to write full synopsis for them before they commissioned them? (I’m assuming they didn’t expect you to write all three before they accepted them!)
    Thanks
    Jenna

    Reply
  102. Hi Nicola,
    I generally really like linked books, and I have especially loved the Bridgerton series by Julia Quinn. To make 8 books all good and interesting, and different is quite an acheivement.
    I’d be very interested to know the process you and your publisher went through with this series – i.e. did they ask you to do linked books, or was it your idea?
    Also, did you have to write full synopsis for them before they commissioned them? (I’m assuming they didn’t expect you to write all three before they accepted them!)
    Thanks
    Jenna

    Reply
  103. Hi Nicola,
    I generally really like linked books, and I have especially loved the Bridgerton series by Julia Quinn. To make 8 books all good and interesting, and different is quite an acheivement.
    I’d be very interested to know the process you and your publisher went through with this series – i.e. did they ask you to do linked books, or was it your idea?
    Also, did you have to write full synopsis for them before they commissioned them? (I’m assuming they didn’t expect you to write all three before they accepted them!)
    Thanks
    Jenna

    Reply
  104. Hi Nicola,
    I generally really like linked books, and I have especially loved the Bridgerton series by Julia Quinn. To make 8 books all good and interesting, and different is quite an acheivement.
    I’d be very interested to know the process you and your publisher went through with this series – i.e. did they ask you to do linked books, or was it your idea?
    Also, did you have to write full synopsis for them before they commissioned them? (I’m assuming they didn’t expect you to write all three before they accepted them!)
    Thanks
    Jenna

    Reply
  105. Hi Nicola,
    I generally really like linked books, and I have especially loved the Bridgerton series by Julia Quinn. To make 8 books all good and interesting, and different is quite an acheivement.
    I’d be very interested to know the process you and your publisher went through with this series – i.e. did they ask you to do linked books, or was it your idea?
    Also, did you have to write full synopsis for them before they commissioned them? (I’m assuming they didn’t expect you to write all three before they accepted them!)
    Thanks
    Jenna

    Reply
  106. Hi Chey, yes, I think that as both a reader and an author it’s tough to say goodbye to characters you love at the end of a book and a series does give you the opportunity to see their further adventures!

    Reply
  107. Hi Chey, yes, I think that as both a reader and an author it’s tough to say goodbye to characters you love at the end of a book and a series does give you the opportunity to see their further adventures!

    Reply
  108. Hi Chey, yes, I think that as both a reader and an author it’s tough to say goodbye to characters you love at the end of a book and a series does give you the opportunity to see their further adventures!

    Reply
  109. Hi Chey, yes, I think that as both a reader and an author it’s tough to say goodbye to characters you love at the end of a book and a series does give you the opportunity to see their further adventures!

    Reply
  110. Hi Chey, yes, I think that as both a reader and an author it’s tough to say goodbye to characters you love at the end of a book and a series does give you the opportunity to see their further adventures!

    Reply
  111. Hi Jenna. Yes, my publisher asked me to write a linked series (my editor passed on the request through gritted teeth – she hadn’t got over the previous series we’d worked on together) so I knew from the start that the books were going to be closely connected. We talked through a few themes and then I went away to write a full synopsis for all three books. I do genuinely find writing a series a huge challenge because my ideas grow and change so much during the writing of the books. As you know, the characters so often dictate the way that a story goes and one can’t always predict how that is going to work out. So I knew as I was writing the synopses that the finished books might be very different. They are, but fortunately my editor was happy with the way the books developed. The Fortune’s Folly series is very closely linked in the sense that there are a couple of sub-plots running all the way through the three books and of course all the characters feature in all the books. The linked series I am currently writing is much less closely linked, a character here or there, and I do find that allows me more breathing space and that I don’t plot myself into corners so much.

    Reply
  112. Hi Jenna. Yes, my publisher asked me to write a linked series (my editor passed on the request through gritted teeth – she hadn’t got over the previous series we’d worked on together) so I knew from the start that the books were going to be closely connected. We talked through a few themes and then I went away to write a full synopsis for all three books. I do genuinely find writing a series a huge challenge because my ideas grow and change so much during the writing of the books. As you know, the characters so often dictate the way that a story goes and one can’t always predict how that is going to work out. So I knew as I was writing the synopses that the finished books might be very different. They are, but fortunately my editor was happy with the way the books developed. The Fortune’s Folly series is very closely linked in the sense that there are a couple of sub-plots running all the way through the three books and of course all the characters feature in all the books. The linked series I am currently writing is much less closely linked, a character here or there, and I do find that allows me more breathing space and that I don’t plot myself into corners so much.

    Reply
  113. Hi Jenna. Yes, my publisher asked me to write a linked series (my editor passed on the request through gritted teeth – she hadn’t got over the previous series we’d worked on together) so I knew from the start that the books were going to be closely connected. We talked through a few themes and then I went away to write a full synopsis for all three books. I do genuinely find writing a series a huge challenge because my ideas grow and change so much during the writing of the books. As you know, the characters so often dictate the way that a story goes and one can’t always predict how that is going to work out. So I knew as I was writing the synopses that the finished books might be very different. They are, but fortunately my editor was happy with the way the books developed. The Fortune’s Folly series is very closely linked in the sense that there are a couple of sub-plots running all the way through the three books and of course all the characters feature in all the books. The linked series I am currently writing is much less closely linked, a character here or there, and I do find that allows me more breathing space and that I don’t plot myself into corners so much.

    Reply
  114. Hi Jenna. Yes, my publisher asked me to write a linked series (my editor passed on the request through gritted teeth – she hadn’t got over the previous series we’d worked on together) so I knew from the start that the books were going to be closely connected. We talked through a few themes and then I went away to write a full synopsis for all three books. I do genuinely find writing a series a huge challenge because my ideas grow and change so much during the writing of the books. As you know, the characters so often dictate the way that a story goes and one can’t always predict how that is going to work out. So I knew as I was writing the synopses that the finished books might be very different. They are, but fortunately my editor was happy with the way the books developed. The Fortune’s Folly series is very closely linked in the sense that there are a couple of sub-plots running all the way through the three books and of course all the characters feature in all the books. The linked series I am currently writing is much less closely linked, a character here or there, and I do find that allows me more breathing space and that I don’t plot myself into corners so much.

    Reply
  115. Hi Jenna. Yes, my publisher asked me to write a linked series (my editor passed on the request through gritted teeth – she hadn’t got over the previous series we’d worked on together) so I knew from the start that the books were going to be closely connected. We talked through a few themes and then I went away to write a full synopsis for all three books. I do genuinely find writing a series a huge challenge because my ideas grow and change so much during the writing of the books. As you know, the characters so often dictate the way that a story goes and one can’t always predict how that is going to work out. So I knew as I was writing the synopses that the finished books might be very different. They are, but fortunately my editor was happy with the way the books developed. The Fortune’s Folly series is very closely linked in the sense that there are a couple of sub-plots running all the way through the three books and of course all the characters feature in all the books. The linked series I am currently writing is much less closely linked, a character here or there, and I do find that allows me more breathing space and that I don’t plot myself into corners so much.

    Reply
  116. LiKe others, I like linked stories for the opportunity it gives the reader to revisit couples whose romantic journeys have finshed. Just nosey, I guess. I like to know how they’re getting on.
    Can rakes and bad boys have honour? Of course. Do I prefer them to a more traditionally honourable hero? Often I do. They’ve a longer journey ahead of them before they win their lady’s heart and I like that.

    Reply
  117. LiKe others, I like linked stories for the opportunity it gives the reader to revisit couples whose romantic journeys have finshed. Just nosey, I guess. I like to know how they’re getting on.
    Can rakes and bad boys have honour? Of course. Do I prefer them to a more traditionally honourable hero? Often I do. They’ve a longer journey ahead of them before they win their lady’s heart and I like that.

    Reply
  118. LiKe others, I like linked stories for the opportunity it gives the reader to revisit couples whose romantic journeys have finshed. Just nosey, I guess. I like to know how they’re getting on.
    Can rakes and bad boys have honour? Of course. Do I prefer them to a more traditionally honourable hero? Often I do. They’ve a longer journey ahead of them before they win their lady’s heart and I like that.

    Reply
  119. LiKe others, I like linked stories for the opportunity it gives the reader to revisit couples whose romantic journeys have finshed. Just nosey, I guess. I like to know how they’re getting on.
    Can rakes and bad boys have honour? Of course. Do I prefer them to a more traditionally honourable hero? Often I do. They’ve a longer journey ahead of them before they win their lady’s heart and I like that.

    Reply
  120. LiKe others, I like linked stories for the opportunity it gives the reader to revisit couples whose romantic journeys have finshed. Just nosey, I guess. I like to know how they’re getting on.
    Can rakes and bad boys have honour? Of course. Do I prefer them to a more traditionally honourable hero? Often I do. They’ve a longer journey ahead of them before they win their lady’s heart and I like that.

    Reply
  121. What do I like about linked stories? I like being able to follow a group of people or friends over a longer space of time – even if it is some people only appear as brief snippets. Sometimes I find characters intriguing and want to know what happens to them further on down the line.
    What I don’t like? I really don’t like when the bookstore only carries one of the books (and if I discover the series late, that I can’t find the books I haven’t read)

    Reply
  122. What do I like about linked stories? I like being able to follow a group of people or friends over a longer space of time – even if it is some people only appear as brief snippets. Sometimes I find characters intriguing and want to know what happens to them further on down the line.
    What I don’t like? I really don’t like when the bookstore only carries one of the books (and if I discover the series late, that I can’t find the books I haven’t read)

    Reply
  123. What do I like about linked stories? I like being able to follow a group of people or friends over a longer space of time – even if it is some people only appear as brief snippets. Sometimes I find characters intriguing and want to know what happens to them further on down the line.
    What I don’t like? I really don’t like when the bookstore only carries one of the books (and if I discover the series late, that I can’t find the books I haven’t read)

    Reply
  124. What do I like about linked stories? I like being able to follow a group of people or friends over a longer space of time – even if it is some people only appear as brief snippets. Sometimes I find characters intriguing and want to know what happens to them further on down the line.
    What I don’t like? I really don’t like when the bookstore only carries one of the books (and if I discover the series late, that I can’t find the books I haven’t read)

    Reply
  125. What do I like about linked stories? I like being able to follow a group of people or friends over a longer space of time – even if it is some people only appear as brief snippets. Sometimes I find characters intriguing and want to know what happens to them further on down the line.
    What I don’t like? I really don’t like when the bookstore only carries one of the books (and if I discover the series late, that I can’t find the books I haven’t read)

    Reply
  126. I really like linked stories……especially when I am traveling or facing a difficult personal time.
    I start the first book, and if I like it, I know that I am set for my next couple of reads!
    Mary Balogh and the early Bedwyns took me on a flight to Australia many years ago, and then I reread most of the MJP old inter-related regencies while sitting with my mother during her final days.
    In times of stress, knowing that I will like a book is a real blessing.

    Reply
  127. I really like linked stories……especially when I am traveling or facing a difficult personal time.
    I start the first book, and if I like it, I know that I am set for my next couple of reads!
    Mary Balogh and the early Bedwyns took me on a flight to Australia many years ago, and then I reread most of the MJP old inter-related regencies while sitting with my mother during her final days.
    In times of stress, knowing that I will like a book is a real blessing.

    Reply
  128. I really like linked stories……especially when I am traveling or facing a difficult personal time.
    I start the first book, and if I like it, I know that I am set for my next couple of reads!
    Mary Balogh and the early Bedwyns took me on a flight to Australia many years ago, and then I reread most of the MJP old inter-related regencies while sitting with my mother during her final days.
    In times of stress, knowing that I will like a book is a real blessing.

    Reply
  129. I really like linked stories……especially when I am traveling or facing a difficult personal time.
    I start the first book, and if I like it, I know that I am set for my next couple of reads!
    Mary Balogh and the early Bedwyns took me on a flight to Australia many years ago, and then I reread most of the MJP old inter-related regencies while sitting with my mother during her final days.
    In times of stress, knowing that I will like a book is a real blessing.

    Reply
  130. I really like linked stories……especially when I am traveling or facing a difficult personal time.
    I start the first book, and if I like it, I know that I am set for my next couple of reads!
    Mary Balogh and the early Bedwyns took me on a flight to Australia many years ago, and then I reread most of the MJP old inter-related regencies while sitting with my mother during her final days.
    In times of stress, knowing that I will like a book is a real blessing.

    Reply
  131. Like Laura, I love to start a book and discover that it is one of many, although my first Jo Beverley was Devilish; the last (at that time) of the Mallorens! I read so many books that I love the no brainer of buying the next in a series. Notables for me are the Bedwyns- Mary Balogh, The Mallorens and the Rogues- Jo Beverley, The Cynsters and Bastion Club – Stephanie Laurens and the Merridews- Anne Gracie. I will definitely be trying Nicola’s books and thanks for taking time to talk with us.

    Reply
  132. Like Laura, I love to start a book and discover that it is one of many, although my first Jo Beverley was Devilish; the last (at that time) of the Mallorens! I read so many books that I love the no brainer of buying the next in a series. Notables for me are the Bedwyns- Mary Balogh, The Mallorens and the Rogues- Jo Beverley, The Cynsters and Bastion Club – Stephanie Laurens and the Merridews- Anne Gracie. I will definitely be trying Nicola’s books and thanks for taking time to talk with us.

    Reply
  133. Like Laura, I love to start a book and discover that it is one of many, although my first Jo Beverley was Devilish; the last (at that time) of the Mallorens! I read so many books that I love the no brainer of buying the next in a series. Notables for me are the Bedwyns- Mary Balogh, The Mallorens and the Rogues- Jo Beverley, The Cynsters and Bastion Club – Stephanie Laurens and the Merridews- Anne Gracie. I will definitely be trying Nicola’s books and thanks for taking time to talk with us.

    Reply
  134. Like Laura, I love to start a book and discover that it is one of many, although my first Jo Beverley was Devilish; the last (at that time) of the Mallorens! I read so many books that I love the no brainer of buying the next in a series. Notables for me are the Bedwyns- Mary Balogh, The Mallorens and the Rogues- Jo Beverley, The Cynsters and Bastion Club – Stephanie Laurens and the Merridews- Anne Gracie. I will definitely be trying Nicola’s books and thanks for taking time to talk with us.

    Reply
  135. Like Laura, I love to start a book and discover that it is one of many, although my first Jo Beverley was Devilish; the last (at that time) of the Mallorens! I read so many books that I love the no brainer of buying the next in a series. Notables for me are the Bedwyns- Mary Balogh, The Mallorens and the Rogues- Jo Beverley, The Cynsters and Bastion Club – Stephanie Laurens and the Merridews- Anne Gracie. I will definitely be trying Nicola’s books and thanks for taking time to talk with us.

    Reply
  136. I do like the linked stories very much, but hate to have to wait 1, 2 or more months for the next one. My solution – I tend to ‘collect’ the series and don’t start the first until I have all of them in hand. This doesn’t mean that I read them one after another, but will usually read the first of a historical series, then read 1 or 2 contemporary books, then go back to the 2nd book in the series.

    Reply
  137. I do like the linked stories very much, but hate to have to wait 1, 2 or more months for the next one. My solution – I tend to ‘collect’ the series and don’t start the first until I have all of them in hand. This doesn’t mean that I read them one after another, but will usually read the first of a historical series, then read 1 or 2 contemporary books, then go back to the 2nd book in the series.

    Reply
  138. I do like the linked stories very much, but hate to have to wait 1, 2 or more months for the next one. My solution – I tend to ‘collect’ the series and don’t start the first until I have all of them in hand. This doesn’t mean that I read them one after another, but will usually read the first of a historical series, then read 1 or 2 contemporary books, then go back to the 2nd book in the series.

    Reply
  139. I do like the linked stories very much, but hate to have to wait 1, 2 or more months for the next one. My solution – I tend to ‘collect’ the series and don’t start the first until I have all of them in hand. This doesn’t mean that I read them one after another, but will usually read the first of a historical series, then read 1 or 2 contemporary books, then go back to the 2nd book in the series.

    Reply
  140. I do like the linked stories very much, but hate to have to wait 1, 2 or more months for the next one. My solution – I tend to ‘collect’ the series and don’t start the first until I have all of them in hand. This doesn’t mean that I read them one after another, but will usually read the first of a historical series, then read 1 or 2 contemporary books, then go back to the 2nd book in the series.

    Reply

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