Nicola Cornick — the Woman in the Lake

Anne here, interviewing Nicola Cornick about her new book, THE WOMAN IN THE LAKE, which came out in the USA last week and comes out in the UK next week. That's the US cover on the right. WomanInTheLake

The publisher's blurb:
From the bestselling author of House of Shadows and The Phantom Tree  comes a spellbinding tale of jealousy, greed, plotting and revenge—part  history, part mystery—for fans of Kate Morton, Susanna Kearsley and  Barbara Erskine

London, 1765
Lady  Isabella Gerard, a respectable member of Georgian society, orders her  maid to take her new golden gown and destroy it, its shimmering beauty  tainted by the actions of her brutal husband the night before.

Three  months later, Lord Gerard stands at the shoreline of the lake, looking  down at a woman wearing the golden gown. As the body slowly rolls over  to reveal her face, it’s clear this was not his intended victim…

250 Years Later…
When  a gown she stole from a historic home as a child is mysteriously  returned to Fenella Brightwell, it begins to possess her in exactly the  same way that it did as a girl. Soon the fragile new life Fen has  created for herself away from her abusive ex-husband is threatened at  its foundations by the gown’s power over her until she can't tell what  is real and what is imaginary.

As Fen uncovers more about the  gown and Isabella’s story, she begins to see the parallels with her own  life. When each piece of history is revealed, the gown—and its  past—seems to possess her more and more, culminating in a dramatic  revelation set to destroy her sanity.

WomanIntheLakeUKThe Reviews:
Publishers Weekly said: "The tentative romance between Fenella and Hamish effectively balances the sinister mood of the 18th-century story. Romance fans will be most satisfied."  Steph's Fiction said: "If you love historical fiction, then I highly recommend you pick up a copy!" The New York Journal of Books said: "As the story unfolds, the reader understands why, piece by piece. It’s fascinating to look back at life centuries ago, to imagine the people and their circumstance, and this novel fleshes them out with an assured storytelling style."

The Interview:
Anne:  Nicola, congratulations on the release of THE WOMAN IN THE LAKE, your 3rd dual timeline novel. I was intrigued by the contrast in your two covers, the American one focusing on the historical story, the British cover on the more modern story.

Which of the two periods did you enjoy writing the most — and why?

Nicola: Thank you, Anne! I’m really excited that THE WOMAN IN THE LAKE is making its debut at last

When I started writing dual time books I definitely enjoyed writing the historical period the most and it’s still the one that comes more easily to me. I guess at heart I will always be a historical author! Over time, however, I’ve grown more interested in writing the contemporary strand of the books and I think this is because they always contain a mystery element. I love that idea of solving a historical mystery in the present!

Anne: I'm always interested in how the spark of an idea leads to the writing of a novel. What inspired you to write The Woman in the Lake?

Nicola: Quite a few different ideas came together to inspire the book. Firstly I was fascinated by the history of my adoptive home town, Swindon. People in the UK assume that Swindon doesn’t have any history pre-industrial revolution but in fact there’s a wealth of fascinating stuff from the 18thcentury and earlier, including smuggling! So I wanted to write about the lesser-known aspects of Swindon history.

Anne: Did you have to do any specific or unusual research for The Woman in the Lake? What was the most interesting or the most difficult?

Nicola: The most interesting research was into the Wiltshire Moonrakers, the smugglers who were active in the area in the 17thand 18thcenturies. Given that the smuggling trade was illegal it was difficult to find any official records of their activity! However I was able to piece together details from court records and also from research on the ground; there are lots of tunnels beneath Swindon Old Town that were used for storing the illegal liquor!

Anne: Sounds fascinating. Did you have a favourite character in The Woman in the Lake?

Nicola: I had a very soft spot for Hamish, the hero of the contemporary strand because he was actually based on a real person. It was exactly like the scene in the book when Fen and Hamish meet. I was coming home late on the train from an event in London, reading a book by Georgette Heyer, when this guy sat down next to me and started to make conversation by asking about the book! We had a really nice chat but as I’m very married it didn’t go anywhere; being a writer, though, I thought “that would make a great scene in a book…”

In the historical strand, my favourite was Constance because she is a tough cookie. The odds are stacked against her but she fights her way out of her situation and I really admire women who did that.

Anne: I love how that chance meeting — a stranger in a train — led to a scene in the book. And I do like how your historical heroines are almost always strong women. I believe that your character Lady Isabella was based on a real-life aristocrat, an ancestor of Lady Diana Spencer — and with the same name. Lady Diana

Nicola: That’s right! Lady Diana Spencer, an 18thcentury aristocrat and ancestor of the late Diana Princess of Wales was a big influence on the story. She was a fascinating character whose life mirrored that of Princess Diana to a degree. She married Frederick St John of Lydiard Park almost on a whim and they were very ill-suited and unhappy. He was endlessly unfaithful as well as abusive and extravagant. Diana had a number of love affairs and was divorced from Fred and involved in a scandalous Crim Concase. The bit I love about her story, though, is that she supported herself as an artist, doing designs for Wedgwood pottery amongst other projects. Although it wasn’t well paid she brought in her own money and not many 18thcentury aristocratic women did that.

Anne: No indeed. Could you give us a small taste of The Woman in the Lake?

Lydiard christmasNicola: Here’s an extract from the book where Isabella has returned to Lydiard Park near Swindon, her husband’s ancestral home, determined to plan her revenge on him:

I had not been to Lydiard since the first year of my marriage. I had been happy enough then, although perhaps not as happy as I should have been as a new bride. Marriage had not been at all as I had imagined.

“What on earth were you thinking, Bella?” My sister Betty had asked bluntly when my betrothal was announced. “Were you drunk? Everyone says you must have been to accept Eustace Gerard.”

It was true that Eustace had proposed to me at Vauxhall Gardens but I had been quite sober that night. It had been a whim, an impulse, I suppose. He had offered escape, or so I had thought, and I had been bored with my pattern card life as a young lady of the ton and had grasped after something different. In those days Eustace had made me laugh. He made no such efforts to amuse a wife. I drew my cloak a little closer about me. For all that this was July the air was chill and fresh out here in the country. It had a different quality from London.

The lad from the stables had run on ahead to raise the house whilst the groom and coachman dealt with the horses. By the time that Constance and I reached the door, there was a lantern flaring in the hall and Pound, the steward, was shrugging on his jacket and hurrying towards us, cross and flustered. His shirt flapped loose and his hair stood up at the back.

“My lady! We did not expect you! If you had told us-”

I raised a hand to stem the flow of reproach. I was too weary to hear him out. “It is of no consequence. All I require is my usual room made up and some hot water and a little food…”

He looked appalled. Such simple matters seemed impossible to achieve. For the first time I looked about the hall and saw what the darkness and lamplight had concealed, the cobwebs and dust, the filthy drapes. There was a smell of stale air and old candle wax. It was cold. Probably there were rats.

“Surely,” I said, my voice sharpening, “my lord pays you to maintain his house in an appropriate style even when he is not present?”

Pound’s face pursed up like a prune. “Had we known to expect you-” He repeated.

“You should always expect me. I do not have to give you notice of my whereabouts.”

“No, my lady.” His expression smoothed away into blandness but I knew that for all the outward show, he was annoyed. That, however, was not my concern.

Constance, looking from one of us to the other, stepped forward. “I can go to find some food and some hot water, ma’am,” she said, “if Mr Pound can raise the housekeeper and see to your room.”

Constance was always the peacemaker. Probably Pound was some distant cousin of hers; she came from a village only a few miles distant and everyone in those parts was related to one another.

“I’ll wait in the drawing room,” I said. “Thank you, Constance.”

Pound’s gaze flickered between us, hard to read. He seemed surprised that I addressed Constance by her first name. It was not the custom but with a personal maid I always felt the need to be less formal. We were friends of a kind, after all. She dropped a curtsey and sped off towards the kitchen passage. Pound followed more slowly, adjusting his jacket and smoothing his hair for the housekeeper’s benefit if not for mine.

The drawing room was as unwelcoming as the hall. There was no light so I went back to the hall and took a branch of candles from the table by the door. From upstairs came the sound of voices raised in altercation. I had not met the Lydiard housekeeper and did not know her name but it seemed she had a fine pair of lungs even if she did not know how to keep house.

Pulling one of the covers off a chair I sat down and waited. Even with the candlelight the room looked sad and dark. Shrouded pictures of Eustace’s ancestors looked down their Gerard noses at me as though I, the daughter of a Duke, was not good enough to marry a mere Viscount. No light or warmth had penetrated here during the day and I thought I smelled damp plaster. The grand marble fireplace yawned cold and empty, full of the winter’s ashes. I wondered for a moment why I had come here, to the end of the world, and then I remembered.  I remembered the golden gown, I remembered Eustace’s violence and I remembered that I planned to be revenged on him. Here, at Lydiard, I would settle the score.

Anne: Intriguing! Thanks so much for this interview, Nicola. Best of luck with The Woman in the Lake.

Nicola: Thank you so much, Anne!

Anne: Nicola is giving away a copy of The Woman in the Lake to someone who leaves a comment, or who responds to the challenge that follows. When I heard the name of that smuggling gang, the Wiltshire Moonrakers  I thought it sounded quite a romantic-sounding name for a smuggling gang. Your challenge — should you choose to accept it — is to pair the name of your city, town or suburb with a romantic, evocative or sinister name for a smuggling gang. 

 

200 thoughts on “Nicola Cornick — the Woman in the Lake”

  1. ‘The Woman in the Lake’ is already available in audio and with no less than four narrators …. should be no probs confusing characters! Do you have any say in the choice of reader Nicola?
    Fascinating interview. It seems that the gown forms the link between the two time periods. Do you have any thoughts on how a physical object might link the mental states of characters across time … perhaps memories are somehow encapsulated in the fabric. I guess this is straying into the SciFi genre though. Perhaps best left as a mystery here.
    On the challenge, I feel drawn to the group of poets centered at Dimock, ‘The Dimock Poets’ (Robert Frost,Rupert Brooke etc).
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dymock_poets
    Dimock is also famous for the wild daffodils that proliferate in the woods and meadows, known as the Golden Triangle
    http://www.kempleytardis.org.uk/daffodil-walks/
    So I propose ‘The Golden Poets of Dimock’

    Reply
  2. ‘The Woman in the Lake’ is already available in audio and with no less than four narrators …. should be no probs confusing characters! Do you have any say in the choice of reader Nicola?
    Fascinating interview. It seems that the gown forms the link between the two time periods. Do you have any thoughts on how a physical object might link the mental states of characters across time … perhaps memories are somehow encapsulated in the fabric. I guess this is straying into the SciFi genre though. Perhaps best left as a mystery here.
    On the challenge, I feel drawn to the group of poets centered at Dimock, ‘The Dimock Poets’ (Robert Frost,Rupert Brooke etc).
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dymock_poets
    Dimock is also famous for the wild daffodils that proliferate in the woods and meadows, known as the Golden Triangle
    http://www.kempleytardis.org.uk/daffodil-walks/
    So I propose ‘The Golden Poets of Dimock’

    Reply
  3. ‘The Woman in the Lake’ is already available in audio and with no less than four narrators …. should be no probs confusing characters! Do you have any say in the choice of reader Nicola?
    Fascinating interview. It seems that the gown forms the link between the two time periods. Do you have any thoughts on how a physical object might link the mental states of characters across time … perhaps memories are somehow encapsulated in the fabric. I guess this is straying into the SciFi genre though. Perhaps best left as a mystery here.
    On the challenge, I feel drawn to the group of poets centered at Dimock, ‘The Dimock Poets’ (Robert Frost,Rupert Brooke etc).
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dymock_poets
    Dimock is also famous for the wild daffodils that proliferate in the woods and meadows, known as the Golden Triangle
    http://www.kempleytardis.org.uk/daffodil-walks/
    So I propose ‘The Golden Poets of Dimock’

    Reply
  4. ‘The Woman in the Lake’ is already available in audio and with no less than four narrators …. should be no probs confusing characters! Do you have any say in the choice of reader Nicola?
    Fascinating interview. It seems that the gown forms the link between the two time periods. Do you have any thoughts on how a physical object might link the mental states of characters across time … perhaps memories are somehow encapsulated in the fabric. I guess this is straying into the SciFi genre though. Perhaps best left as a mystery here.
    On the challenge, I feel drawn to the group of poets centered at Dimock, ‘The Dimock Poets’ (Robert Frost,Rupert Brooke etc).
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dymock_poets
    Dimock is also famous for the wild daffodils that proliferate in the woods and meadows, known as the Golden Triangle
    http://www.kempleytardis.org.uk/daffodil-walks/
    So I propose ‘The Golden Poets of Dimock’

    Reply
  5. ‘The Woman in the Lake’ is already available in audio and with no less than four narrators …. should be no probs confusing characters! Do you have any say in the choice of reader Nicola?
    Fascinating interview. It seems that the gown forms the link between the two time periods. Do you have any thoughts on how a physical object might link the mental states of characters across time … perhaps memories are somehow encapsulated in the fabric. I guess this is straying into the SciFi genre though. Perhaps best left as a mystery here.
    On the challenge, I feel drawn to the group of poets centered at Dimock, ‘The Dimock Poets’ (Robert Frost,Rupert Brooke etc).
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dymock_poets
    Dimock is also famous for the wild daffodils that proliferate in the woods and meadows, known as the Golden Triangle
    http://www.kempleytardis.org.uk/daffodil-walks/
    So I propose ‘The Golden Poets of Dimock’

    Reply
  6. That is an excellent gang name, Quantum! Very evocative. Yes, I was asked to listen to audio clips from a variety of narrators and choose the ones I thought fitted best. It was great fun!
    Whilst the gown is the linking object across the centuries, it’s really the way in which it possesses the characters that is the connection. I won’t say any more, though – spoilers!

    Reply
  7. That is an excellent gang name, Quantum! Very evocative. Yes, I was asked to listen to audio clips from a variety of narrators and choose the ones I thought fitted best. It was great fun!
    Whilst the gown is the linking object across the centuries, it’s really the way in which it possesses the characters that is the connection. I won’t say any more, though – spoilers!

    Reply
  8. That is an excellent gang name, Quantum! Very evocative. Yes, I was asked to listen to audio clips from a variety of narrators and choose the ones I thought fitted best. It was great fun!
    Whilst the gown is the linking object across the centuries, it’s really the way in which it possesses the characters that is the connection. I won’t say any more, though – spoilers!

    Reply
  9. That is an excellent gang name, Quantum! Very evocative. Yes, I was asked to listen to audio clips from a variety of narrators and choose the ones I thought fitted best. It was great fun!
    Whilst the gown is the linking object across the centuries, it’s really the way in which it possesses the characters that is the connection. I won’t say any more, though – spoilers!

    Reply
  10. That is an excellent gang name, Quantum! Very evocative. Yes, I was asked to listen to audio clips from a variety of narrators and choose the ones I thought fitted best. It was great fun!
    Whilst the gown is the linking object across the centuries, it’s really the way in which it possesses the characters that is the connection. I won’t say any more, though – spoilers!

    Reply
  11. What an enjoyable post, Anne and Nicola. Best wishes, Nicola, for the success of this new book. As regards the challenge, I once lived in Moorabbin, so my smuggling gang would be the Moorabbin Moon-cursers.

    Reply
  12. What an enjoyable post, Anne and Nicola. Best wishes, Nicola, for the success of this new book. As regards the challenge, I once lived in Moorabbin, so my smuggling gang would be the Moorabbin Moon-cursers.

    Reply
  13. What an enjoyable post, Anne and Nicola. Best wishes, Nicola, for the success of this new book. As regards the challenge, I once lived in Moorabbin, so my smuggling gang would be the Moorabbin Moon-cursers.

    Reply
  14. What an enjoyable post, Anne and Nicola. Best wishes, Nicola, for the success of this new book. As regards the challenge, I once lived in Moorabbin, so my smuggling gang would be the Moorabbin Moon-cursers.

    Reply
  15. What an enjoyable post, Anne and Nicola. Best wishes, Nicola, for the success of this new book. As regards the challenge, I once lived in Moorabbin, so my smuggling gang would be the Moorabbin Moon-cursers.

    Reply
  16. A wonderful interview. Do Not include my name in the drawing; I already own the book. I have just started reading it and I am enjoying chapter by chapter.

    Reply
  17. A wonderful interview. Do Not include my name in the drawing; I already own the book. I have just started reading it and I am enjoying chapter by chapter.

    Reply
  18. A wonderful interview. Do Not include my name in the drawing; I already own the book. I have just started reading it and I am enjoying chapter by chapter.

    Reply
  19. A wonderful interview. Do Not include my name in the drawing; I already own the book. I have just started reading it and I am enjoying chapter by chapter.

    Reply
  20. A wonderful interview. Do Not include my name in the drawing; I already own the book. I have just started reading it and I am enjoying chapter by chapter.

    Reply
  21. Oh my! Not really my city’s name but since San Antonio is know for the Alamo I think the name “The Alamo Invaders” would be an excellent name for a smuggler’s gang.

    Reply
  22. Oh my! Not really my city’s name but since San Antonio is know for the Alamo I think the name “The Alamo Invaders” would be an excellent name for a smuggler’s gang.

    Reply
  23. Oh my! Not really my city’s name but since San Antonio is know for the Alamo I think the name “The Alamo Invaders” would be an excellent name for a smuggler’s gang.

    Reply
  24. Oh my! Not really my city’s name but since San Antonio is know for the Alamo I think the name “The Alamo Invaders” would be an excellent name for a smuggler’s gang.

    Reply
  25. Oh my! Not really my city’s name but since San Antonio is know for the Alamo I think the name “The Alamo Invaders” would be an excellent name for a smuggler’s gang.

    Reply
  26. I finished the book last night. What a good read 🙂 I admired the way Nicola wove the various threads together — it was very absorbing, a real page turner.
    So what’s up next? 🙂

    Reply
  27. I finished the book last night. What a good read 🙂 I admired the way Nicola wove the various threads together — it was very absorbing, a real page turner.
    So what’s up next? 🙂

    Reply
  28. I finished the book last night. What a good read 🙂 I admired the way Nicola wove the various threads together — it was very absorbing, a real page turner.
    So what’s up next? 🙂

    Reply
  29. I finished the book last night. What a good read 🙂 I admired the way Nicola wove the various threads together — it was very absorbing, a real page turner.
    So what’s up next? 🙂

    Reply
  30. I finished the book last night. What a good read 🙂 I admired the way Nicola wove the various threads together — it was very absorbing, a real page turner.
    So what’s up next? 🙂

    Reply
  31. Wow, what a fantastic story, can’t wait to read this one. Am a great fan of all you Wenches, started reading this genre with Mary Jo Putney and then on to the rest of the group. Thank you for all your hard work.

    Reply
  32. Wow, what a fantastic story, can’t wait to read this one. Am a great fan of all you Wenches, started reading this genre with Mary Jo Putney and then on to the rest of the group. Thank you for all your hard work.

    Reply
  33. Wow, what a fantastic story, can’t wait to read this one. Am a great fan of all you Wenches, started reading this genre with Mary Jo Putney and then on to the rest of the group. Thank you for all your hard work.

    Reply
  34. Wow, what a fantastic story, can’t wait to read this one. Am a great fan of all you Wenches, started reading this genre with Mary Jo Putney and then on to the rest of the group. Thank you for all your hard work.

    Reply
  35. Wow, what a fantastic story, can’t wait to read this one. Am a great fan of all you Wenches, started reading this genre with Mary Jo Putney and then on to the rest of the group. Thank you for all your hard work.

    Reply
  36. Hi Janice. Thank you! I’m delighted you enjoyed it. Next is a dual time book about the love triangle between Elizabeth I, Robert Dudley and Amy Robsart. That’s written and in the system but I’m not sure when it’s coming out yet. And NOW I’m writing about Richard III! Yes, it’s the big one (at least for me as I’ve been a fan of Richard all my life!)

    Reply
  37. Hi Janice. Thank you! I’m delighted you enjoyed it. Next is a dual time book about the love triangle between Elizabeth I, Robert Dudley and Amy Robsart. That’s written and in the system but I’m not sure when it’s coming out yet. And NOW I’m writing about Richard III! Yes, it’s the big one (at least for me as I’ve been a fan of Richard all my life!)

    Reply
  38. Hi Janice. Thank you! I’m delighted you enjoyed it. Next is a dual time book about the love triangle between Elizabeth I, Robert Dudley and Amy Robsart. That’s written and in the system but I’m not sure when it’s coming out yet. And NOW I’m writing about Richard III! Yes, it’s the big one (at least for me as I’ve been a fan of Richard all my life!)

    Reply
  39. Hi Janice. Thank you! I’m delighted you enjoyed it. Next is a dual time book about the love triangle between Elizabeth I, Robert Dudley and Amy Robsart. That’s written and in the system but I’m not sure when it’s coming out yet. And NOW I’m writing about Richard III! Yes, it’s the big one (at least for me as I’ve been a fan of Richard all my life!)

    Reply
  40. Hi Janice. Thank you! I’m delighted you enjoyed it. Next is a dual time book about the love triangle between Elizabeth I, Robert Dudley and Amy Robsart. That’s written and in the system but I’m not sure when it’s coming out yet. And NOW I’m writing about Richard III! Yes, it’s the big one (at least for me as I’ve been a fan of Richard all my life!)

    Reply
  41. What a fabulous sounding book! Please add my name to the hat! As for the challenge…am dreadful at this sort of thing but… I grew up in a college town, so Townies for sure. Perhaps the Terrible Townies, the Tatted Townies, the Total Townies? 😉

    Reply
  42. What a fabulous sounding book! Please add my name to the hat! As for the challenge…am dreadful at this sort of thing but… I grew up in a college town, so Townies for sure. Perhaps the Terrible Townies, the Tatted Townies, the Total Townies? 😉

    Reply
  43. What a fabulous sounding book! Please add my name to the hat! As for the challenge…am dreadful at this sort of thing but… I grew up in a college town, so Townies for sure. Perhaps the Terrible Townies, the Tatted Townies, the Total Townies? 😉

    Reply
  44. What a fabulous sounding book! Please add my name to the hat! As for the challenge…am dreadful at this sort of thing but… I grew up in a college town, so Townies for sure. Perhaps the Terrible Townies, the Tatted Townies, the Total Townies? 😉

    Reply
  45. What a fabulous sounding book! Please add my name to the hat! As for the challenge…am dreadful at this sort of thing but… I grew up in a college town, so Townies for sure. Perhaps the Terrible Townies, the Tatted Townies, the Total Townies? 😉

    Reply
  46. Thanks for the excellent interview. I enjoy history so very much. As I read your interview, I was thinking about the times I have had a sense that I understood the emotions from another time. For me it has almost been as though I were watching from a distance.
    Since I am a fan of character driven stories, this sounds like a book I would love.

    Reply
  47. Thanks for the excellent interview. I enjoy history so very much. As I read your interview, I was thinking about the times I have had a sense that I understood the emotions from another time. For me it has almost been as though I were watching from a distance.
    Since I am a fan of character driven stories, this sounds like a book I would love.

    Reply
  48. Thanks for the excellent interview. I enjoy history so very much. As I read your interview, I was thinking about the times I have had a sense that I understood the emotions from another time. For me it has almost been as though I were watching from a distance.
    Since I am a fan of character driven stories, this sounds like a book I would love.

    Reply
  49. Thanks for the excellent interview. I enjoy history so very much. As I read your interview, I was thinking about the times I have had a sense that I understood the emotions from another time. For me it has almost been as though I were watching from a distance.
    Since I am a fan of character driven stories, this sounds like a book I would love.

    Reply
  50. Thanks for the excellent interview. I enjoy history so very much. As I read your interview, I was thinking about the times I have had a sense that I understood the emotions from another time. For me it has almost been as though I were watching from a distance.
    Since I am a fan of character driven stories, this sounds like a book I would love.

    Reply
  51. The very best of luck with the book Nicola.Interesting research. Don’t enter me in the draw as I have it pre-ordered and hope it’ll be on it’s way to me tomorrow. I know I could download it straight away but I have the other two in paperback and want to add this one to the collection.

    Reply
  52. The very best of luck with the book Nicola.Interesting research. Don’t enter me in the draw as I have it pre-ordered and hope it’ll be on it’s way to me tomorrow. I know I could download it straight away but I have the other two in paperback and want to add this one to the collection.

    Reply
  53. The very best of luck with the book Nicola.Interesting research. Don’t enter me in the draw as I have it pre-ordered and hope it’ll be on it’s way to me tomorrow. I know I could download it straight away but I have the other two in paperback and want to add this one to the collection.

    Reply
  54. The very best of luck with the book Nicola.Interesting research. Don’t enter me in the draw as I have it pre-ordered and hope it’ll be on it’s way to me tomorrow. I know I could download it straight away but I have the other two in paperback and want to add this one to the collection.

    Reply
  55. The very best of luck with the book Nicola.Interesting research. Don’t enter me in the draw as I have it pre-ordered and hope it’ll be on it’s way to me tomorrow. I know I could download it straight away but I have the other two in paperback and want to add this one to the collection.

    Reply
  56. I really the interview and am intrigued by the storyline.
    What about the Lewisville Liquor Looters? (I like alliteration) grin.

    Reply
  57. I really the interview and am intrigued by the storyline.
    What about the Lewisville Liquor Looters? (I like alliteration) grin.

    Reply
  58. I really the interview and am intrigued by the storyline.
    What about the Lewisville Liquor Looters? (I like alliteration) grin.

    Reply
  59. I really the interview and am intrigued by the storyline.
    What about the Lewisville Liquor Looters? (I like alliteration) grin.

    Reply
  60. I really the interview and am intrigued by the storyline.
    What about the Lewisville Liquor Looters? (I like alliteration) grin.

    Reply
  61. I purchased the book immediately after the first mention in a previous blog & now I’m even more excited to read it. Nicola – you said: I love that idea of solving a historical mystery in the present! Exactly, that’s why I enjoy dual time books.

    Reply
  62. I purchased the book immediately after the first mention in a previous blog & now I’m even more excited to read it. Nicola – you said: I love that idea of solving a historical mystery in the present! Exactly, that’s why I enjoy dual time books.

    Reply
  63. I purchased the book immediately after the first mention in a previous blog & now I’m even more excited to read it. Nicola – you said: I love that idea of solving a historical mystery in the present! Exactly, that’s why I enjoy dual time books.

    Reply
  64. I purchased the book immediately after the first mention in a previous blog & now I’m even more excited to read it. Nicola – you said: I love that idea of solving a historical mystery in the present! Exactly, that’s why I enjoy dual time books.

    Reply
  65. I purchased the book immediately after the first mention in a previous blog & now I’m even more excited to read it. Nicola – you said: I love that idea of solving a historical mystery in the present! Exactly, that’s why I enjoy dual time books.

    Reply
  66. Sounds like a fascinating book, I can’t wait to read it! My local smuggling gang…maybe, the Nottingham marauders 😅

    Reply
  67. Sounds like a fascinating book, I can’t wait to read it! My local smuggling gang…maybe, the Nottingham marauders 😅

    Reply
  68. Sounds like a fascinating book, I can’t wait to read it! My local smuggling gang…maybe, the Nottingham marauders 😅

    Reply
  69. Sounds like a fascinating book, I can’t wait to read it! My local smuggling gang…maybe, the Nottingham marauders 😅

    Reply
  70. Sounds like a fascinating book, I can’t wait to read it! My local smuggling gang…maybe, the Nottingham marauders 😅

    Reply
  71. Congratulations, Nicola. I can’t wait to read The Woman in the Lake. Meanwhile I’ll hang out here with the Virginian Contrabandians.

    Reply
  72. Congratulations, Nicola. I can’t wait to read The Woman in the Lake. Meanwhile I’ll hang out here with the Virginian Contrabandians.

    Reply
  73. Congratulations, Nicola. I can’t wait to read The Woman in the Lake. Meanwhile I’ll hang out here with the Virginian Contrabandians.

    Reply
  74. Congratulations, Nicola. I can’t wait to read The Woman in the Lake. Meanwhile I’ll hang out here with the Virginian Contrabandians.

    Reply
  75. Congratulations, Nicola. I can’t wait to read The Woman in the Lake. Meanwhile I’ll hang out here with the Virginian Contrabandians.

    Reply
  76. Thank you, Annette. How interesting that you have that sense of connection to the emotions of characters of the past sometimes. That’s a very special feeling, I think, linking us to history ans those people who have gone before.

    Reply
  77. Thank you, Annette. How interesting that you have that sense of connection to the emotions of characters of the past sometimes. That’s a very special feeling, I think, linking us to history ans those people who have gone before.

    Reply
  78. Thank you, Annette. How interesting that you have that sense of connection to the emotions of characters of the past sometimes. That’s a very special feeling, I think, linking us to history ans those people who have gone before.

    Reply
  79. Thank you, Annette. How interesting that you have that sense of connection to the emotions of characters of the past sometimes. That’s a very special feeling, I think, linking us to history ans those people who have gone before.

    Reply
  80. Thank you, Annette. How interesting that you have that sense of connection to the emotions of characters of the past sometimes. That’s a very special feeling, I think, linking us to history ans those people who have gone before.

    Reply
  81. Ah, thank you very much, Jeanne. Yes, the dual time story allows us to enjoy solving that mystery element as we read about the history. It’s always been my favourite sort of read too!

    Reply
  82. Ah, thank you very much, Jeanne. Yes, the dual time story allows us to enjoy solving that mystery element as we read about the history. It’s always been my favourite sort of read too!

    Reply
  83. Ah, thank you very much, Jeanne. Yes, the dual time story allows us to enjoy solving that mystery element as we read about the history. It’s always been my favourite sort of read too!

    Reply
  84. Ah, thank you very much, Jeanne. Yes, the dual time story allows us to enjoy solving that mystery element as we read about the history. It’s always been my favourite sort of read too!

    Reply
  85. Ah, thank you very much, Jeanne. Yes, the dual time story allows us to enjoy solving that mystery element as we read about the history. It’s always been my favourite sort of read too!

    Reply
  86. I can’t wait to read this book, Nicola. But maybe while I’m waiting I’ll go adventuring with the Cove Conspirators.

    Reply
  87. I can’t wait to read this book, Nicola. But maybe while I’m waiting I’ll go adventuring with the Cove Conspirators.

    Reply
  88. I can’t wait to read this book, Nicola. But maybe while I’m waiting I’ll go adventuring with the Cove Conspirators.

    Reply
  89. I can’t wait to read this book, Nicola. But maybe while I’m waiting I’ll go adventuring with the Cove Conspirators.

    Reply
  90. I can’t wait to read this book, Nicola. But maybe while I’m waiting I’ll go adventuring with the Cove Conspirators.

    Reply
  91. This historical is enthralling and memorable. The story is a real treasure which I would enjoy greatly. I have met the Montreal Machers.

    Reply
  92. This historical is enthralling and memorable. The story is a real treasure which I would enjoy greatly. I have met the Montreal Machers.

    Reply
  93. This historical is enthralling and memorable. The story is a real treasure which I would enjoy greatly. I have met the Montreal Machers.

    Reply
  94. This historical is enthralling and memorable. The story is a real treasure which I would enjoy greatly. I have met the Montreal Machers.

    Reply
  95. This historical is enthralling and memorable. The story is a real treasure which I would enjoy greatly. I have met the Montreal Machers.

    Reply

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