The New Bedford Whaling Museum

Entrance squid

By Mary Jo

A year and a half ago we took a lovely little New England cruise (here's the link to my blog about it), and our first stop was at New Bedford, Massachusetts. We were told not to miss the New Bedford Whaling Museum. (I assume that's a squid on the museum entrance!)

Being a 21st female with a conservationist bent, I was somewhat dubious about a museum dedicated to killing whales, but in fact, it was fascinating.  New Bedford was the whaling capital of the world back in the 19th century, and now it's one of America's top commercial fishing ports. Whale Skeletons.

There is a half size model of the whaling ship Lagoda, and the skeletons of several whales hang overhead.  (Those whales died of natural or accidental causes and were not killed by whalers.) Lagoda Half Scale Model

There is a whole large gallery devoted to the New Bedford-Azores connection.  The Azores are Portuguese islands in the Atlantic, and many sailors on 19th century whaling ships came from the Azores, which led to the development of sizable populations of Portuguese Americans living in New England. 

Perhaps my favorite part of the museum was the Scrimshaw Gallery.  Scrimshaw is the carving of bone or ivory and seems to have developed on whaling ships in the late 18th century.  On those long, long voyages, sailors had to find something to do! 

Here's a sampling of pictures I took at the museum, which was well worth the visit.  Plus,  IMG_3576 we took a boat tour of the harbor and had a seaside view of the vast commercial fishing industry. 

The marine industry world wide is huge and fascinating, and the roots go deep into human history.  Truly impressive! 

This New England cruise left me wanting more!  Are you familiar with the area?  Would you like to visit? 

Mary Jo, a born tourist!

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85 thoughts on “The New Bedford Whaling Museum”

  1. I’ve been to Mystic, Connecticut; Providence, Rhode Island; and Boston, Massachusetts. Otherwise my acquaintence with New England is through reading. I do enjoy my novel visits there.

    Reply
  2. I’ve been to Mystic, Connecticut; Providence, Rhode Island; and Boston, Massachusetts. Otherwise my acquaintence with New England is through reading. I do enjoy my novel visits there.

    Reply
  3. I’ve been to Mystic, Connecticut; Providence, Rhode Island; and Boston, Massachusetts. Otherwise my acquaintence with New England is through reading. I do enjoy my novel visits there.

    Reply
  4. I’ve been to Mystic, Connecticut; Providence, Rhode Island; and Boston, Massachusetts. Otherwise my acquaintence with New England is through reading. I do enjoy my novel visits there.

    Reply
  5. I’ve been to Mystic, Connecticut; Providence, Rhode Island; and Boston, Massachusetts. Otherwise my acquaintence with New England is through reading. I do enjoy my novel visits there.

    Reply
  6. I haven’t actually been there, except in the pages of a book. For me, inevitably, New Bedford+whales=Moby Dick. It’s not my favorite book, but I have read it three times, once in high school, once in college, and once for teaching it. That has served to imprint it firmly in my memory, for better or for worse. Mostly better. 🙂

    Reply
  7. I haven’t actually been there, except in the pages of a book. For me, inevitably, New Bedford+whales=Moby Dick. It’s not my favorite book, but I have read it three times, once in high school, once in college, and once for teaching it. That has served to imprint it firmly in my memory, for better or for worse. Mostly better. 🙂

    Reply
  8. I haven’t actually been there, except in the pages of a book. For me, inevitably, New Bedford+whales=Moby Dick. It’s not my favorite book, but I have read it three times, once in high school, once in college, and once for teaching it. That has served to imprint it firmly in my memory, for better or for worse. Mostly better. 🙂

    Reply
  9. I haven’t actually been there, except in the pages of a book. For me, inevitably, New Bedford+whales=Moby Dick. It’s not my favorite book, but I have read it three times, once in high school, once in college, and once for teaching it. That has served to imprint it firmly in my memory, for better or for worse. Mostly better. 🙂

    Reply
  10. I haven’t actually been there, except in the pages of a book. For me, inevitably, New Bedford+whales=Moby Dick. It’s not my favorite book, but I have read it three times, once in high school, once in college, and once for teaching it. That has served to imprint it firmly in my memory, for better or for worse. Mostly better. 🙂

    Reply
  11. I went to a whaling museum on Nantucket last summer (part of a trip to Newport, RI and Cape Cod) and I found it so interesting. Like you, I was dubious at first but I love history and whaling is part of it, especially in that area. That’s the only time I’ve been there and I’d love to go back.

    Reply
  12. I went to a whaling museum on Nantucket last summer (part of a trip to Newport, RI and Cape Cod) and I found it so interesting. Like you, I was dubious at first but I love history and whaling is part of it, especially in that area. That’s the only time I’ve been there and I’d love to go back.

    Reply
  13. I went to a whaling museum on Nantucket last summer (part of a trip to Newport, RI and Cape Cod) and I found it so interesting. Like you, I was dubious at first but I love history and whaling is part of it, especially in that area. That’s the only time I’ve been there and I’d love to go back.

    Reply
  14. I went to a whaling museum on Nantucket last summer (part of a trip to Newport, RI and Cape Cod) and I found it so interesting. Like you, I was dubious at first but I love history and whaling is part of it, especially in that area. That’s the only time I’ve been there and I’d love to go back.

    Reply
  15. I went to a whaling museum on Nantucket last summer (part of a trip to Newport, RI and Cape Cod) and I found it so interesting. Like you, I was dubious at first but I love history and whaling is part of it, especially in that area. That’s the only time I’ve been there and I’d love to go back.

    Reply
  16. My only knowledge of the whaling industry is what I have gleaned from novels. Moby Dick comes to mind immediately, but I have also read several romance novels that either centered around the families of whalers, or touched on the whaling industry from the outer edges. I know one “prize” from whaling was spermaceti which was used in fragrances, and whale oil was also widely used. My question is, was the whalebone used in corsets also harvested from the same whales as the whale oil and/or spermaceti?

    Reply
  17. My only knowledge of the whaling industry is what I have gleaned from novels. Moby Dick comes to mind immediately, but I have also read several romance novels that either centered around the families of whalers, or touched on the whaling industry from the outer edges. I know one “prize” from whaling was spermaceti which was used in fragrances, and whale oil was also widely used. My question is, was the whalebone used in corsets also harvested from the same whales as the whale oil and/or spermaceti?

    Reply
  18. My only knowledge of the whaling industry is what I have gleaned from novels. Moby Dick comes to mind immediately, but I have also read several romance novels that either centered around the families of whalers, or touched on the whaling industry from the outer edges. I know one “prize” from whaling was spermaceti which was used in fragrances, and whale oil was also widely used. My question is, was the whalebone used in corsets also harvested from the same whales as the whale oil and/or spermaceti?

    Reply
  19. My only knowledge of the whaling industry is what I have gleaned from novels. Moby Dick comes to mind immediately, but I have also read several romance novels that either centered around the families of whalers, or touched on the whaling industry from the outer edges. I know one “prize” from whaling was spermaceti which was used in fragrances, and whale oil was also widely used. My question is, was the whalebone used in corsets also harvested from the same whales as the whale oil and/or spermaceti?

    Reply
  20. My only knowledge of the whaling industry is what I have gleaned from novels. Moby Dick comes to mind immediately, but I have also read several romance novels that either centered around the families of whalers, or touched on the whaling industry from the outer edges. I know one “prize” from whaling was spermaceti which was used in fragrances, and whale oil was also widely used. My question is, was the whalebone used in corsets also harvested from the same whales as the whale oil and/or spermaceti?

    Reply
  21. Misti, as you say, whaling was so significant in the 19th century, most especially in New England. My cruise ship didn’t make it to Nantucket because bad weather was coming in. I’d love to make it there someday! If you get to New Bedford, the whaling museum there is definitely worth a visit. So much history on display!

    Reply
  22. Misti, as you say, whaling was so significant in the 19th century, most especially in New England. My cruise ship didn’t make it to Nantucket because bad weather was coming in. I’d love to make it there someday! If you get to New Bedford, the whaling museum there is definitely worth a visit. So much history on display!

    Reply
  23. Misti, as you say, whaling was so significant in the 19th century, most especially in New England. My cruise ship didn’t make it to Nantucket because bad weather was coming in. I’d love to make it there someday! If you get to New Bedford, the whaling museum there is definitely worth a visit. So much history on display!

    Reply
  24. Misti, as you say, whaling was so significant in the 19th century, most especially in New England. My cruise ship didn’t make it to Nantucket because bad weather was coming in. I’d love to make it there someday! If you get to New Bedford, the whaling museum there is definitely worth a visit. So much history on display!

    Reply
  25. Misti, as you say, whaling was so significant in the 19th century, most especially in New England. My cruise ship didn’t make it to Nantucket because bad weather was coming in. I’d love to make it there someday! If you get to New Bedford, the whaling museum there is definitely worth a visit. So much history on display!

    Reply
  26. Claire Harter, here’s a great Wikipedia link that describes the different products of whales: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whaling_in_the_United_States
    I’m not sure if one whale species produced all of the products, but the flexicle whalebone used in corsets came from baleen whales, of which there are 15 species. The corset material came from baleen, which is the fibrous filtering material found the whale mouths. Sea water was filtered through and krill and other small creatures remained in the whale’s mouth for lunch. Baleen is actually keratin, which is why it’s flexible. True whale bone from the whale’s skeleton is hard, like human and other mammal bones.

    Reply
  27. Claire Harter, here’s a great Wikipedia link that describes the different products of whales: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whaling_in_the_United_States
    I’m not sure if one whale species produced all of the products, but the flexicle whalebone used in corsets came from baleen whales, of which there are 15 species. The corset material came from baleen, which is the fibrous filtering material found the whale mouths. Sea water was filtered through and krill and other small creatures remained in the whale’s mouth for lunch. Baleen is actually keratin, which is why it’s flexible. True whale bone from the whale’s skeleton is hard, like human and other mammal bones.

    Reply
  28. Claire Harter, here’s a great Wikipedia link that describes the different products of whales: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whaling_in_the_United_States
    I’m not sure if one whale species produced all of the products, but the flexicle whalebone used in corsets came from baleen whales, of which there are 15 species. The corset material came from baleen, which is the fibrous filtering material found the whale mouths. Sea water was filtered through and krill and other small creatures remained in the whale’s mouth for lunch. Baleen is actually keratin, which is why it’s flexible. True whale bone from the whale’s skeleton is hard, like human and other mammal bones.

    Reply
  29. Claire Harter, here’s a great Wikipedia link that describes the different products of whales: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whaling_in_the_United_States
    I’m not sure if one whale species produced all of the products, but the flexicle whalebone used in corsets came from baleen whales, of which there are 15 species. The corset material came from baleen, which is the fibrous filtering material found the whale mouths. Sea water was filtered through and krill and other small creatures remained in the whale’s mouth for lunch. Baleen is actually keratin, which is why it’s flexible. True whale bone from the whale’s skeleton is hard, like human and other mammal bones.

    Reply
  30. Claire Harter, here’s a great Wikipedia link that describes the different products of whales: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whaling_in_the_United_States
    I’m not sure if one whale species produced all of the products, but the flexicle whalebone used in corsets came from baleen whales, of which there are 15 species. The corset material came from baleen, which is the fibrous filtering material found the whale mouths. Sea water was filtered through and krill and other small creatures remained in the whale’s mouth for lunch. Baleen is actually keratin, which is why it’s flexible. True whale bone from the whale’s skeleton is hard, like human and other mammal bones.

    Reply
  31. I attended graduate school in Providence so was in that neck of the woods for some four plus years; however, I don’t think I got to New Bedford…too much time in the lab! The museum looks like a fascinating place. Thank you for sharing your photos and memories, Mary Jo.

    Reply
  32. I attended graduate school in Providence so was in that neck of the woods for some four plus years; however, I don’t think I got to New Bedford…too much time in the lab! The museum looks like a fascinating place. Thank you for sharing your photos and memories, Mary Jo.

    Reply
  33. I attended graduate school in Providence so was in that neck of the woods for some four plus years; however, I don’t think I got to New Bedford…too much time in the lab! The museum looks like a fascinating place. Thank you for sharing your photos and memories, Mary Jo.

    Reply
  34. I attended graduate school in Providence so was in that neck of the woods for some four plus years; however, I don’t think I got to New Bedford…too much time in the lab! The museum looks like a fascinating place. Thank you for sharing your photos and memories, Mary Jo.

    Reply
  35. I attended graduate school in Providence so was in that neck of the woods for some four plus years; however, I don’t think I got to New Bedford…too much time in the lab! The museum looks like a fascinating place. Thank you for sharing your photos and memories, Mary Jo.

    Reply
  36. Kareni, if you get back to Providence for a reunion or some such, New Bedford would have a great side trip! But my lab scientist friends admittedly didn’t get out much during grad school.

    Reply
  37. Kareni, if you get back to Providence for a reunion or some such, New Bedford would have a great side trip! But my lab scientist friends admittedly didn’t get out much during grad school.

    Reply
  38. Kareni, if you get back to Providence for a reunion or some such, New Bedford would have a great side trip! But my lab scientist friends admittedly didn’t get out much during grad school.

    Reply
  39. Kareni, if you get back to Providence for a reunion or some such, New Bedford would have a great side trip! But my lab scientist friends admittedly didn’t get out much during grad school.

    Reply
  40. Kareni, if you get back to Providence for a reunion or some such, New Bedford would have a great side trip! But my lab scientist friends admittedly didn’t get out much during grad school.

    Reply
  41. So cool! I wanna go. My mother loved Moby Dick, but I could never get into it, DNF, and felt guilty… then last year I got the right audiobook rec (Frank Muller narrator) and BOOM! Now a favorite… listening was like being on drugs it was so good.

    Reply
  42. So cool! I wanna go. My mother loved Moby Dick, but I could never get into it, DNF, and felt guilty… then last year I got the right audiobook rec (Frank Muller narrator) and BOOM! Now a favorite… listening was like being on drugs it was so good.

    Reply
  43. So cool! I wanna go. My mother loved Moby Dick, but I could never get into it, DNF, and felt guilty… then last year I got the right audiobook rec (Frank Muller narrator) and BOOM! Now a favorite… listening was like being on drugs it was so good.

    Reply
  44. So cool! I wanna go. My mother loved Moby Dick, but I could never get into it, DNF, and felt guilty… then last year I got the right audiobook rec (Frank Muller narrator) and BOOM! Now a favorite… listening was like being on drugs it was so good.

    Reply
  45. So cool! I wanna go. My mother loved Moby Dick, but I could never get into it, DNF, and felt guilty… then last year I got the right audiobook rec (Frank Muller narrator) and BOOM! Now a favorite… listening was like being on drugs it was so good.

    Reply
  46. Mary Jo I visited the museum many many years ago and loved it the family lived in Framingham for about two years when I was a child (about 50 years ago) and while my father fished at the Cape my mother entertained us by taking us to all the museums The whaling museum was one and you are right the scrimshaws are fantastic. I have very fond memories and have often returned when I am able but it has been too many years now

    Reply
  47. Mary Jo I visited the museum many many years ago and loved it the family lived in Framingham for about two years when I was a child (about 50 years ago) and while my father fished at the Cape my mother entertained us by taking us to all the museums The whaling museum was one and you are right the scrimshaws are fantastic. I have very fond memories and have often returned when I am able but it has been too many years now

    Reply
  48. Mary Jo I visited the museum many many years ago and loved it the family lived in Framingham for about two years when I was a child (about 50 years ago) and while my father fished at the Cape my mother entertained us by taking us to all the museums The whaling museum was one and you are right the scrimshaws are fantastic. I have very fond memories and have often returned when I am able but it has been too many years now

    Reply
  49. Mary Jo I visited the museum many many years ago and loved it the family lived in Framingham for about two years when I was a child (about 50 years ago) and while my father fished at the Cape my mother entertained us by taking us to all the museums The whaling museum was one and you are right the scrimshaws are fantastic. I have very fond memories and have often returned when I am able but it has been too many years now

    Reply
  50. Mary Jo I visited the museum many many years ago and loved it the family lived in Framingham for about two years when I was a child (about 50 years ago) and while my father fished at the Cape my mother entertained us by taking us to all the museums The whaling museum was one and you are right the scrimshaws are fantastic. I have very fond memories and have often returned when I am able but it has been too many years now

    Reply
  51. Mary Jo – loved the post, especially the scrimshaw! I live in Marblehead, MA, which calls itself the birthplace of the American Navy. Beverly, two towns up the coast, claims the same! Both are full of history and in between the two lies Salem, home to the Peabody and Essex Museum, which was founded by ship owners who felt an obligation to share with the world the interesting items they (actually, their crews, as few owners ever went on voyages) found on their trips around the world. Their heyday was the era of the clipper ships, but whaling plays a part of the history, too. The New Bedford Whaling Museum is wonderful, as is Mystic, and the museum on Nantucket, but the PEM is internationally recognized as one of the greatest museums dedicated to seafaring anywhere. From the beautiful porcelain of the China Trade to sailors’ valentines made of South Sea shells – and some lovely scrimshaw pieces, not to mention an entire Chinese house, modern Indian art, and an extensive collection of 18th century furniture and decorative arts, I would happily move in if they’d let me! You’d love it, I think — so much inspiration! Worth a trip!

    Reply
  52. Mary Jo – loved the post, especially the scrimshaw! I live in Marblehead, MA, which calls itself the birthplace of the American Navy. Beverly, two towns up the coast, claims the same! Both are full of history and in between the two lies Salem, home to the Peabody and Essex Museum, which was founded by ship owners who felt an obligation to share with the world the interesting items they (actually, their crews, as few owners ever went on voyages) found on their trips around the world. Their heyday was the era of the clipper ships, but whaling plays a part of the history, too. The New Bedford Whaling Museum is wonderful, as is Mystic, and the museum on Nantucket, but the PEM is internationally recognized as one of the greatest museums dedicated to seafaring anywhere. From the beautiful porcelain of the China Trade to sailors’ valentines made of South Sea shells – and some lovely scrimshaw pieces, not to mention an entire Chinese house, modern Indian art, and an extensive collection of 18th century furniture and decorative arts, I would happily move in if they’d let me! You’d love it, I think — so much inspiration! Worth a trip!

    Reply
  53. Mary Jo – loved the post, especially the scrimshaw! I live in Marblehead, MA, which calls itself the birthplace of the American Navy. Beverly, two towns up the coast, claims the same! Both are full of history and in between the two lies Salem, home to the Peabody and Essex Museum, which was founded by ship owners who felt an obligation to share with the world the interesting items they (actually, their crews, as few owners ever went on voyages) found on their trips around the world. Their heyday was the era of the clipper ships, but whaling plays a part of the history, too. The New Bedford Whaling Museum is wonderful, as is Mystic, and the museum on Nantucket, but the PEM is internationally recognized as one of the greatest museums dedicated to seafaring anywhere. From the beautiful porcelain of the China Trade to sailors’ valentines made of South Sea shells – and some lovely scrimshaw pieces, not to mention an entire Chinese house, modern Indian art, and an extensive collection of 18th century furniture and decorative arts, I would happily move in if they’d let me! You’d love it, I think — so much inspiration! Worth a trip!

    Reply
  54. Mary Jo – loved the post, especially the scrimshaw! I live in Marblehead, MA, which calls itself the birthplace of the American Navy. Beverly, two towns up the coast, claims the same! Both are full of history and in between the two lies Salem, home to the Peabody and Essex Museum, which was founded by ship owners who felt an obligation to share with the world the interesting items they (actually, their crews, as few owners ever went on voyages) found on their trips around the world. Their heyday was the era of the clipper ships, but whaling plays a part of the history, too. The New Bedford Whaling Museum is wonderful, as is Mystic, and the museum on Nantucket, but the PEM is internationally recognized as one of the greatest museums dedicated to seafaring anywhere. From the beautiful porcelain of the China Trade to sailors’ valentines made of South Sea shells – and some lovely scrimshaw pieces, not to mention an entire Chinese house, modern Indian art, and an extensive collection of 18th century furniture and decorative arts, I would happily move in if they’d let me! You’d love it, I think — so much inspiration! Worth a trip!

    Reply
  55. Mary Jo – loved the post, especially the scrimshaw! I live in Marblehead, MA, which calls itself the birthplace of the American Navy. Beverly, two towns up the coast, claims the same! Both are full of history and in between the two lies Salem, home to the Peabody and Essex Museum, which was founded by ship owners who felt an obligation to share with the world the interesting items they (actually, their crews, as few owners ever went on voyages) found on their trips around the world. Their heyday was the era of the clipper ships, but whaling plays a part of the history, too. The New Bedford Whaling Museum is wonderful, as is Mystic, and the museum on Nantucket, but the PEM is internationally recognized as one of the greatest museums dedicated to seafaring anywhere. From the beautiful porcelain of the China Trade to sailors’ valentines made of South Sea shells – and some lovely scrimshaw pieces, not to mention an entire Chinese house, modern Indian art, and an extensive collection of 18th century furniture and decorative arts, I would happily move in if they’d let me! You’d love it, I think — so much inspiration! Worth a trip!

    Reply
  56. For a period, New Bedford was the richest city in the US.
    Come to RI around Columbus Day for our lovely, lovely autumn leaves. Be sure to see Newport–the city with the most colonial houses (some, open to the public) in the US AND the biggest and best mansions of the Gilded Age. Plus, walk on Ocean Walk above the ocean in back of all the Gilded Age’s mansions. Then, about an hour away, go to Federal Hill in Providence (take a guided tour of the city) for the best Italian food in the US. If you have time, definitely go to Salem, Massachusetts for the witchcraft history and the Peabody Museum, described above. On your way to Salem, stay a day or two in Boston and see our unique mostly colonial history. Take in a play at night. If you have the time, go to Mystic (about 90 minutes from Newport) in Connecticut for the Aquarium, a whaling museum,and the last whaling ship, now open to the public.

    Reply
  57. For a period, New Bedford was the richest city in the US.
    Come to RI around Columbus Day for our lovely, lovely autumn leaves. Be sure to see Newport–the city with the most colonial houses (some, open to the public) in the US AND the biggest and best mansions of the Gilded Age. Plus, walk on Ocean Walk above the ocean in back of all the Gilded Age’s mansions. Then, about an hour away, go to Federal Hill in Providence (take a guided tour of the city) for the best Italian food in the US. If you have time, definitely go to Salem, Massachusetts for the witchcraft history and the Peabody Museum, described above. On your way to Salem, stay a day or two in Boston and see our unique mostly colonial history. Take in a play at night. If you have the time, go to Mystic (about 90 minutes from Newport) in Connecticut for the Aquarium, a whaling museum,and the last whaling ship, now open to the public.

    Reply
  58. For a period, New Bedford was the richest city in the US.
    Come to RI around Columbus Day for our lovely, lovely autumn leaves. Be sure to see Newport–the city with the most colonial houses (some, open to the public) in the US AND the biggest and best mansions of the Gilded Age. Plus, walk on Ocean Walk above the ocean in back of all the Gilded Age’s mansions. Then, about an hour away, go to Federal Hill in Providence (take a guided tour of the city) for the best Italian food in the US. If you have time, definitely go to Salem, Massachusetts for the witchcraft history and the Peabody Museum, described above. On your way to Salem, stay a day or two in Boston and see our unique mostly colonial history. Take in a play at night. If you have the time, go to Mystic (about 90 minutes from Newport) in Connecticut for the Aquarium, a whaling museum,and the last whaling ship, now open to the public.

    Reply
  59. For a period, New Bedford was the richest city in the US.
    Come to RI around Columbus Day for our lovely, lovely autumn leaves. Be sure to see Newport–the city with the most colonial houses (some, open to the public) in the US AND the biggest and best mansions of the Gilded Age. Plus, walk on Ocean Walk above the ocean in back of all the Gilded Age’s mansions. Then, about an hour away, go to Federal Hill in Providence (take a guided tour of the city) for the best Italian food in the US. If you have time, definitely go to Salem, Massachusetts for the witchcraft history and the Peabody Museum, described above. On your way to Salem, stay a day or two in Boston and see our unique mostly colonial history. Take in a play at night. If you have the time, go to Mystic (about 90 minutes from Newport) in Connecticut for the Aquarium, a whaling museum,and the last whaling ship, now open to the public.

    Reply
  60. For a period, New Bedford was the richest city in the US.
    Come to RI around Columbus Day for our lovely, lovely autumn leaves. Be sure to see Newport–the city with the most colonial houses (some, open to the public) in the US AND the biggest and best mansions of the Gilded Age. Plus, walk on Ocean Walk above the ocean in back of all the Gilded Age’s mansions. Then, about an hour away, go to Federal Hill in Providence (take a guided tour of the city) for the best Italian food in the US. If you have time, definitely go to Salem, Massachusetts for the witchcraft history and the Peabody Museum, described above. On your way to Salem, stay a day or two in Boston and see our unique mostly colonial history. Take in a play at night. If you have the time, go to Mystic (about 90 minutes from Newport) in Connecticut for the Aquarium, a whaling museum,and the last whaling ship, now open to the public.

    Reply

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