Naming Characters

Anne here, and today I'm talking about how I go about naming my characters, which I've been asked on several occasions. BabyNames

Firstly I need character names that fit the time period and geographic location. So no obviously Irish or Scottish or European names for English characters, for instance, and certainly no modern, or even modern-sounding names. Though you'd be surprised how some names that sound very modern have been around for centuries. But that's a blog for another time. 

Next I need the names to fit the characters in my head. There is no hard and fast rule for this — not even any logic at times. If a name is too strongly associated with a person I know — or worse, some little ratbag I once taught — I can't use it. Interference would happen.

Tallie'sKnightThe thing is, the character's name needs to evoke the character lurking in my mind — even before I start writing. I have been known to change a character's name half way through a book, when the character isn't working for me. I did that with Tallie's Knight — she was originally Serena, but Serena was quite self-possessed and maybe a bit too perfect and I didn't much like her. I ditched Serena, dug around in some Greek myths, chose one of the Muses — Thalia — to name my heroine — they did that a lot in those days. Poor girl what a name to be saddled with! And my heroine sprang to life as Tallie, young, warm-hearted, impulsive and the book was off and running.

The sound of a name is also important. Repetitious sounds can lead to confusing characters, so I try not to start character names with the same letter or sound. Even the echo of a similar sound can do it — I'm currently writing a novella with two sisters, Sally and Josie, and I found I was getting them mixed up, so Josie became Juliet and now there's no confusing them. Screen Shot 2021-11-03 at 6.28.24 PM

Titles and surnames are pretty important too. Georgette Heyer used the names of villages, towns, rivers and so on for some of her names and titles. The heroine of The Grand Sophy is named after the village of Stanton Lacy, for instance, and it's fun spotting her character names on the map. I have used that technique often — though it's important to check that real living lord and ladies don't have that title, for titles were generally attached to land. (click on the map to enlarge it.)

So I choose some possibilities and then google them. I also check The Peerage surname index, and have sometimes found that my chosen title, while it did exist at some point, had been abeyance for many years. So I feel free to use it.

I wasn't always so careful though. In my second book (Tallie's Knight) which was my first with a lord, I initially called the hero Lord Carrington. My editor at the time was unamused and pithily pointed out that Lord Carrington was, at the time, the Secretary of Defence. Whoops!

Screen Shot 2021-11-03 at 7.09.16 PMI'd chosen that name quite frivolously, from a bottle of pink champagne that someone had given me, called Carrington Blush. So, sticking with the wine theme, I chose a favorite red winemaker (d'Arenberg), but added ville to the end instead of burg, and thus, my hero became Lord d'Arenville.

I made another mistake when I gave a minor character in my Marriage of Convenience series the title of the Countess of Maldon — Maldon is a pretty historic village near me. I meant to check it, but in the scramble to meet my deadline I forgot, and whoops, the Baron Burnett of Maldon has been the Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales since 2017. Which isn't quite the same as an earldom, but still. And now that girl is the heroine of a half-finished novella. I hope the Lord Chief Justice doesn't mind too much. I doubt he reads regency romance anyway.

I rarely have real historical characters in my novels, but I do occasionally name a minor character after someone I know — as long as their name fits the time period and geography. So my friend Trish Morey became the Countess of Morey and her four beautiful daughters got a mention. I dedicated my latest book, The Scoundrel's Daughter, to my friend Alison, and gave a very brief walk-on part to her and her husband, as Sir Alan and Lady Reynolds. It had a side benefit in that it made the real Alan curious enough to read the book. These "real" name characters rarely do anything — not even speak in the book, as I don't like mixing my own reality with my fiction. It's just that I need a name, and . . .  why not?

Servants, if they're not simply a function such as "a footman carried her bag upstairs" generally need plain common names, so I've had a Polly, a Betty, a Clara and so on, or I use their surnames, as was common at the time. I did have fun with a butler who I called Hewitt Featherby — which was the actual name of an ancestor of a friend of mine, and it was so glorious I couldn't resist. Butlers can be fun. Featherby was in my Chance Sisters series and he replaced Lady Beatrice's ghastly previous butler who I called Caudle. Because I could.

So that's it, my not terribly scientific method of naming characters. I hope it's been helpful or illuminating. Anything surprise you about it? Feel free to comment.

190 thoughts on “Naming Characters”

  1. **I ditched Serena, dug around in some Greek myths, chose one of the Muses — Thalia — to name my heroine — they did that a lot in those days. Poor girl what a name to be saddled with!**
    Oh, Anne. I think I’d have been much happier saddled with that name! I admit, part of the reason I was thrilled with The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson was because Theodora was called Theo through the book. That would have been okay too! Unfortunately, my name is a product of my aunt’s terrible handwriting on my birth certificate. My middle name is hers and even that’s not spelled correctly. *sigh*
    I think a character’s name is a bit of a reflection of who they are as well. Prue comes to mind and the Imp…you did a great choice with all five of them really.

    Reply
  2. **I ditched Serena, dug around in some Greek myths, chose one of the Muses — Thalia — to name my heroine — they did that a lot in those days. Poor girl what a name to be saddled with!**
    Oh, Anne. I think I’d have been much happier saddled with that name! I admit, part of the reason I was thrilled with The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson was because Theodora was called Theo through the book. That would have been okay too! Unfortunately, my name is a product of my aunt’s terrible handwriting on my birth certificate. My middle name is hers and even that’s not spelled correctly. *sigh*
    I think a character’s name is a bit of a reflection of who they are as well. Prue comes to mind and the Imp…you did a great choice with all five of them really.

    Reply
  3. **I ditched Serena, dug around in some Greek myths, chose one of the Muses — Thalia — to name my heroine — they did that a lot in those days. Poor girl what a name to be saddled with!**
    Oh, Anne. I think I’d have been much happier saddled with that name! I admit, part of the reason I was thrilled with The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson was because Theodora was called Theo through the book. That would have been okay too! Unfortunately, my name is a product of my aunt’s terrible handwriting on my birth certificate. My middle name is hers and even that’s not spelled correctly. *sigh*
    I think a character’s name is a bit of a reflection of who they are as well. Prue comes to mind and the Imp…you did a great choice with all five of them really.

    Reply
  4. **I ditched Serena, dug around in some Greek myths, chose one of the Muses — Thalia — to name my heroine — they did that a lot in those days. Poor girl what a name to be saddled with!**
    Oh, Anne. I think I’d have been much happier saddled with that name! I admit, part of the reason I was thrilled with The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson was because Theodora was called Theo through the book. That would have been okay too! Unfortunately, my name is a product of my aunt’s terrible handwriting on my birth certificate. My middle name is hers and even that’s not spelled correctly. *sigh*
    I think a character’s name is a bit of a reflection of who they are as well. Prue comes to mind and the Imp…you did a great choice with all five of them really.

    Reply
  5. **I ditched Serena, dug around in some Greek myths, chose one of the Muses — Thalia — to name my heroine — they did that a lot in those days. Poor girl what a name to be saddled with!**
    Oh, Anne. I think I’d have been much happier saddled with that name! I admit, part of the reason I was thrilled with The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson was because Theodora was called Theo through the book. That would have been okay too! Unfortunately, my name is a product of my aunt’s terrible handwriting on my birth certificate. My middle name is hers and even that’s not spelled correctly. *sigh*
    I think a character’s name is a bit of a reflection of who they are as well. Prue comes to mind and the Imp…you did a great choice with all five of them really.

    Reply
  6. Very interesting post. One of the blessings of the internet (there are so many curses) is that you can research names and other things so much more easily than the good old days.
    In a book I read recently, a minor character (a servant) is called Molly the first time we meet her but thereafter she is referred to as Dolly. I’m thinking it was probably just a typo. I don’t think I would have even noticed except that as a child my grandma’s pet name for me was Molly.

    Reply
  7. Very interesting post. One of the blessings of the internet (there are so many curses) is that you can research names and other things so much more easily than the good old days.
    In a book I read recently, a minor character (a servant) is called Molly the first time we meet her but thereafter she is referred to as Dolly. I’m thinking it was probably just a typo. I don’t think I would have even noticed except that as a child my grandma’s pet name for me was Molly.

    Reply
  8. Very interesting post. One of the blessings of the internet (there are so many curses) is that you can research names and other things so much more easily than the good old days.
    In a book I read recently, a minor character (a servant) is called Molly the first time we meet her but thereafter she is referred to as Dolly. I’m thinking it was probably just a typo. I don’t think I would have even noticed except that as a child my grandma’s pet name for me was Molly.

    Reply
  9. Very interesting post. One of the blessings of the internet (there are so many curses) is that you can research names and other things so much more easily than the good old days.
    In a book I read recently, a minor character (a servant) is called Molly the first time we meet her but thereafter she is referred to as Dolly. I’m thinking it was probably just a typo. I don’t think I would have even noticed except that as a child my grandma’s pet name for me was Molly.

    Reply
  10. Very interesting post. One of the blessings of the internet (there are so many curses) is that you can research names and other things so much more easily than the good old days.
    In a book I read recently, a minor character (a servant) is called Molly the first time we meet her but thereafter she is referred to as Dolly. I’m thinking it was probably just a typo. I don’t think I would have even noticed except that as a child my grandma’s pet name for me was Molly.

    Reply
  11. I found this post very interesting. Naming is a hard job. I never before thought of the problem of having so MANUY offspring to name. I used up my ingenuity with three children. I wanted names that went well together. They went together so well, my tongue couldn’t keep them apart! (Robert, Sally, Molly — the latter is a nickname, but the only name we’ve ever used for her).

    Reply
  12. I found this post very interesting. Naming is a hard job. I never before thought of the problem of having so MANUY offspring to name. I used up my ingenuity with three children. I wanted names that went well together. They went together so well, my tongue couldn’t keep them apart! (Robert, Sally, Molly — the latter is a nickname, but the only name we’ve ever used for her).

    Reply
  13. I found this post very interesting. Naming is a hard job. I never before thought of the problem of having so MANUY offspring to name. I used up my ingenuity with three children. I wanted names that went well together. They went together so well, my tongue couldn’t keep them apart! (Robert, Sally, Molly — the latter is a nickname, but the only name we’ve ever used for her).

    Reply
  14. I found this post very interesting. Naming is a hard job. I never before thought of the problem of having so MANUY offspring to name. I used up my ingenuity with three children. I wanted names that went well together. They went together so well, my tongue couldn’t keep them apart! (Robert, Sally, Molly — the latter is a nickname, but the only name we’ve ever used for her).

    Reply
  15. I found this post very interesting. Naming is a hard job. I never before thought of the problem of having so MANUY offspring to name. I used up my ingenuity with three children. I wanted names that went well together. They went together so well, my tongue couldn’t keep them apart! (Robert, Sally, Molly — the latter is a nickname, but the only name we’ve ever used for her).

    Reply
  16. Naming can be a real challenge, Anne! I’ve used the geographic method, plus I have a copy of A WORLD OF BABY NAMES, which breaks names down by nationality, gives pronunciations, and usually a general idea of when and where they were popular. I spend a fair amount of time pondering the names of major characters when I start writing, and sometimes I stall while trying to name a secondary characters. So many factors to consider!

    Reply
  17. Naming can be a real challenge, Anne! I’ve used the geographic method, plus I have a copy of A WORLD OF BABY NAMES, which breaks names down by nationality, gives pronunciations, and usually a general idea of when and where they were popular. I spend a fair amount of time pondering the names of major characters when I start writing, and sometimes I stall while trying to name a secondary characters. So many factors to consider!

    Reply
  18. Naming can be a real challenge, Anne! I’ve used the geographic method, plus I have a copy of A WORLD OF BABY NAMES, which breaks names down by nationality, gives pronunciations, and usually a general idea of when and where they were popular. I spend a fair amount of time pondering the names of major characters when I start writing, and sometimes I stall while trying to name a secondary characters. So many factors to consider!

    Reply
  19. Naming can be a real challenge, Anne! I’ve used the geographic method, plus I have a copy of A WORLD OF BABY NAMES, which breaks names down by nationality, gives pronunciations, and usually a general idea of when and where they were popular. I spend a fair amount of time pondering the names of major characters when I start writing, and sometimes I stall while trying to name a secondary characters. So many factors to consider!

    Reply
  20. Naming can be a real challenge, Anne! I’ve used the geographic method, plus I have a copy of A WORLD OF BABY NAMES, which breaks names down by nationality, gives pronunciations, and usually a general idea of when and where they were popular. I spend a fair amount of time pondering the names of major characters when I start writing, and sometimes I stall while trying to name a secondary characters. So many factors to consider!

    Reply
  21. Thanks, Theo. Yes, I think you’re right — ” a character’s name is a bit of a reflection of who they are as well.” As the book progresses they become themselves, and their name reflects who they are.
    In some ways a name should be irrelevant — “that which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet”, but for writers it’s not true — at least not for this writer. The name needs to evoke the character for me, or it doesn’t work.

    Reply
  22. Thanks, Theo. Yes, I think you’re right — ” a character’s name is a bit of a reflection of who they are as well.” As the book progresses they become themselves, and their name reflects who they are.
    In some ways a name should be irrelevant — “that which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet”, but for writers it’s not true — at least not for this writer. The name needs to evoke the character for me, or it doesn’t work.

    Reply
  23. Thanks, Theo. Yes, I think you’re right — ” a character’s name is a bit of a reflection of who they are as well.” As the book progresses they become themselves, and their name reflects who they are.
    In some ways a name should be irrelevant — “that which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet”, but for writers it’s not true — at least not for this writer. The name needs to evoke the character for me, or it doesn’t work.

    Reply
  24. Thanks, Theo. Yes, I think you’re right — ” a character’s name is a bit of a reflection of who they are as well.” As the book progresses they become themselves, and their name reflects who they are.
    In some ways a name should be irrelevant — “that which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet”, but for writers it’s not true — at least not for this writer. The name needs to evoke the character for me, or it doesn’t work.

    Reply
  25. Thanks, Theo. Yes, I think you’re right — ” a character’s name is a bit of a reflection of who they are as well.” As the book progresses they become themselves, and their name reflects who they are.
    In some ways a name should be irrelevant — “that which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet”, but for writers it’s not true — at least not for this writer. The name needs to evoke the character for me, or it doesn’t work.

    Reply
  26. Mary yes the internet has made writers’ lives so much easier, I agree. A quick google and most questions can be answered.
    The Molly and Dolly mistake is easily made, alas — especially with a minor character. In my last book I named the same Nanny by three different Scottish names and it was missed not only by me, but also my editor and the copyeditor. It took mary Jo’s eagle eye to spot it — luckily before the book went to print.

    Reply
  27. Mary yes the internet has made writers’ lives so much easier, I agree. A quick google and most questions can be answered.
    The Molly and Dolly mistake is easily made, alas — especially with a minor character. In my last book I named the same Nanny by three different Scottish names and it was missed not only by me, but also my editor and the copyeditor. It took mary Jo’s eagle eye to spot it — luckily before the book went to print.

    Reply
  28. Mary yes the internet has made writers’ lives so much easier, I agree. A quick google and most questions can be answered.
    The Molly and Dolly mistake is easily made, alas — especially with a minor character. In my last book I named the same Nanny by three different Scottish names and it was missed not only by me, but also my editor and the copyeditor. It took mary Jo’s eagle eye to spot it — luckily before the book went to print.

    Reply
  29. Mary yes the internet has made writers’ lives so much easier, I agree. A quick google and most questions can be answered.
    The Molly and Dolly mistake is easily made, alas — especially with a minor character. In my last book I named the same Nanny by three different Scottish names and it was missed not only by me, but also my editor and the copyeditor. It took mary Jo’s eagle eye to spot it — luckily before the book went to print.

    Reply
  30. Mary yes the internet has made writers’ lives so much easier, I agree. A quick google and most questions can be answered.
    The Molly and Dolly mistake is easily made, alas — especially with a minor character. In my last book I named the same Nanny by three different Scottish names and it was missed not only by me, but also my editor and the copyeditor. It took mary Jo’s eagle eye to spot it — luckily before the book went to print.

    Reply
  31. I like those names, Sue. Molly is a particular favorite of mine. Friends of mine who come from large families (10 or more) are often given saints names — makes it easier I guess.

    Reply
  32. I like those names, Sue. Molly is a particular favorite of mine. Friends of mine who come from large families (10 or more) are often given saints names — makes it easier I guess.

    Reply
  33. I like those names, Sue. Molly is a particular favorite of mine. Friends of mine who come from large families (10 or more) are often given saints names — makes it easier I guess.

    Reply
  34. I like those names, Sue. Molly is a particular favorite of mine. Friends of mine who come from large families (10 or more) are often given saints names — makes it easier I guess.

    Reply
  35. I like those names, Sue. Molly is a particular favorite of mine. Friends of mine who come from large families (10 or more) are often given saints names — makes it easier I guess.

    Reply
  36. Thanks, Mary Jo — I used to have a book of baby names, but I’d end up staring at them, making lists, and then picking something quite different. The main thing is it has to feel right.

    Reply
  37. Thanks, Mary Jo — I used to have a book of baby names, but I’d end up staring at them, making lists, and then picking something quite different. The main thing is it has to feel right.

    Reply
  38. Thanks, Mary Jo — I used to have a book of baby names, but I’d end up staring at them, making lists, and then picking something quite different. The main thing is it has to feel right.

    Reply
  39. Thanks, Mary Jo — I used to have a book of baby names, but I’d end up staring at them, making lists, and then picking something quite different. The main thing is it has to feel right.

    Reply
  40. Thanks, Mary Jo — I used to have a book of baby names, but I’d end up staring at them, making lists, and then picking something quite different. The main thing is it has to feel right.

    Reply
  41. Fascinating read,I remember names, except often in Russian stories. I recently read a fascinating, well written book and 2 of the major characters had the names Sarah and Grace. I have no idea whether it was the same number of letters, the era in which the names were popular but I constantly got the names mixed up, I thought it was just me but My sister said she had the same problem. It did not ruin my enjoyment but it was slightly disconcerting. I never thought about the naming of characters before.my one aunt upon retirement went to Scotland to research the McCaslin history. One name in particular surprised me because in 1798 one of my ancestors had the name Joselyn. I had thought that was a modern name

    Reply
  42. Fascinating read,I remember names, except often in Russian stories. I recently read a fascinating, well written book and 2 of the major characters had the names Sarah and Grace. I have no idea whether it was the same number of letters, the era in which the names were popular but I constantly got the names mixed up, I thought it was just me but My sister said she had the same problem. It did not ruin my enjoyment but it was slightly disconcerting. I never thought about the naming of characters before.my one aunt upon retirement went to Scotland to research the McCaslin history. One name in particular surprised me because in 1798 one of my ancestors had the name Joselyn. I had thought that was a modern name

    Reply
  43. Fascinating read,I remember names, except often in Russian stories. I recently read a fascinating, well written book and 2 of the major characters had the names Sarah and Grace. I have no idea whether it was the same number of letters, the era in which the names were popular but I constantly got the names mixed up, I thought it was just me but My sister said she had the same problem. It did not ruin my enjoyment but it was slightly disconcerting. I never thought about the naming of characters before.my one aunt upon retirement went to Scotland to research the McCaslin history. One name in particular surprised me because in 1798 one of my ancestors had the name Joselyn. I had thought that was a modern name

    Reply
  44. Fascinating read,I remember names, except often in Russian stories. I recently read a fascinating, well written book and 2 of the major characters had the names Sarah and Grace. I have no idea whether it was the same number of letters, the era in which the names were popular but I constantly got the names mixed up, I thought it was just me but My sister said she had the same problem. It did not ruin my enjoyment but it was slightly disconcerting. I never thought about the naming of characters before.my one aunt upon retirement went to Scotland to research the McCaslin history. One name in particular surprised me because in 1798 one of my ancestors had the name Joselyn. I had thought that was a modern name

    Reply
  45. Fascinating read,I remember names, except often in Russian stories. I recently read a fascinating, well written book and 2 of the major characters had the names Sarah and Grace. I have no idea whether it was the same number of letters, the era in which the names were popular but I constantly got the names mixed up, I thought it was just me but My sister said she had the same problem. It did not ruin my enjoyment but it was slightly disconcerting. I never thought about the naming of characters before.my one aunt upon retirement went to Scotland to research the McCaslin history. One name in particular surprised me because in 1798 one of my ancestors had the name Joselyn. I had thought that was a modern name

    Reply
  46. “One name in particular surprised me because in 1798 one of my ancestors had the name Joselyn. I had thought that was a modern name.”
    Was it a man, Janice? Because I think Jocelyn was a man’s name until modern times when it was adopted as a name for a female. As many other names have been.

    Reply
  47. “One name in particular surprised me because in 1798 one of my ancestors had the name Joselyn. I had thought that was a modern name.”
    Was it a man, Janice? Because I think Jocelyn was a man’s name until modern times when it was adopted as a name for a female. As many other names have been.

    Reply
  48. “One name in particular surprised me because in 1798 one of my ancestors had the name Joselyn. I had thought that was a modern name.”
    Was it a man, Janice? Because I think Jocelyn was a man’s name until modern times when it was adopted as a name for a female. As many other names have been.

    Reply
  49. “One name in particular surprised me because in 1798 one of my ancestors had the name Joselyn. I had thought that was a modern name.”
    Was it a man, Janice? Because I think Jocelyn was a man’s name until modern times when it was adopted as a name for a female. As many other names have been.

    Reply
  50. “One name in particular surprised me because in 1798 one of my ancestors had the name Joselyn. I had thought that was a modern name.”
    Was it a man, Janice? Because I think Jocelyn was a man’s name until modern times when it was adopted as a name for a female. As many other names have been.

    Reply
  51. Well, as far as I know, Horrible Histories was a TV series “intended to pique young children’s interest in history via short, factually based but humorously told anecdotes highlighting aspects of the subject not usually covered in more traditional educational sources,” so I guess all those weird names were once some poor kids names.

    Reply
  52. Well, as far as I know, Horrible Histories was a TV series “intended to pique young children’s interest in history via short, factually based but humorously told anecdotes highlighting aspects of the subject not usually covered in more traditional educational sources,” so I guess all those weird names were once some poor kids names.

    Reply
  53. Well, as far as I know, Horrible Histories was a TV series “intended to pique young children’s interest in history via short, factually based but humorously told anecdotes highlighting aspects of the subject not usually covered in more traditional educational sources,” so I guess all those weird names were once some poor kids names.

    Reply
  54. Well, as far as I know, Horrible Histories was a TV series “intended to pique young children’s interest in history via short, factually based but humorously told anecdotes highlighting aspects of the subject not usually covered in more traditional educational sources,” so I guess all those weird names were once some poor kids names.

    Reply
  55. Well, as far as I know, Horrible Histories was a TV series “intended to pique young children’s interest in history via short, factually based but humorously told anecdotes highlighting aspects of the subject not usually covered in more traditional educational sources,” so I guess all those weird names were once some poor kids names.

    Reply
  56. You’re right, Minna. I was mostly doubtful of names like Bovril and OK because they came in quite late, but the Victorian era isn’t really my era. But I can imagine people naming their child Bovril, I suppose.

    Reply
  57. You’re right, Minna. I was mostly doubtful of names like Bovril and OK because they came in quite late, but the Victorian era isn’t really my era. But I can imagine people naming their child Bovril, I suppose.

    Reply
  58. You’re right, Minna. I was mostly doubtful of names like Bovril and OK because they came in quite late, but the Victorian era isn’t really my era. But I can imagine people naming their child Bovril, I suppose.

    Reply
  59. You’re right, Minna. I was mostly doubtful of names like Bovril and OK because they came in quite late, but the Victorian era isn’t really my era. But I can imagine people naming their child Bovril, I suppose.

    Reply
  60. You’re right, Minna. I was mostly doubtful of names like Bovril and OK because they came in quite late, but the Victorian era isn’t really my era. But I can imagine people naming their child Bovril, I suppose.

    Reply
  61. Bovril isn’t quite as bad as Toilet, Baboon and Evil. I don’t know about other countries, but here in Finland we have laws that prevent parents naming their kids with terrible names. Or someone might actually still name their kid (and yes, this was a real Finnish name once) Naima Muisto Matilda, which basically means “Memento of Having S** Matilda.

    Reply
  62. Bovril isn’t quite as bad as Toilet, Baboon and Evil. I don’t know about other countries, but here in Finland we have laws that prevent parents naming their kids with terrible names. Or someone might actually still name their kid (and yes, this was a real Finnish name once) Naima Muisto Matilda, which basically means “Memento of Having S** Matilda.

    Reply
  63. Bovril isn’t quite as bad as Toilet, Baboon and Evil. I don’t know about other countries, but here in Finland we have laws that prevent parents naming their kids with terrible names. Or someone might actually still name their kid (and yes, this was a real Finnish name once) Naima Muisto Matilda, which basically means “Memento of Having S** Matilda.

    Reply
  64. Bovril isn’t quite as bad as Toilet, Baboon and Evil. I don’t know about other countries, but here in Finland we have laws that prevent parents naming their kids with terrible names. Or someone might actually still name their kid (and yes, this was a real Finnish name once) Naima Muisto Matilda, which basically means “Memento of Having S** Matilda.

    Reply
  65. Bovril isn’t quite as bad as Toilet, Baboon and Evil. I don’t know about other countries, but here in Finland we have laws that prevent parents naming their kids with terrible names. Or someone might actually still name their kid (and yes, this was a real Finnish name once) Naima Muisto Matilda, which basically means “Memento of Having S** Matilda.

    Reply
  66. Heavens, Minna, what appalling parents to name their children so. I don’t know if there are laws here that prevent such things, but wow! There should be. Thanks for bringing this to our attention. I knew there were some strange names in the past — I have a good friend who’s a genealogist and who delights in passing on oddities to me, but some of these names are simply criminal to give a baby.

    Reply
  67. Heavens, Minna, what appalling parents to name their children so. I don’t know if there are laws here that prevent such things, but wow! There should be. Thanks for bringing this to our attention. I knew there were some strange names in the past — I have a good friend who’s a genealogist and who delights in passing on oddities to me, but some of these names are simply criminal to give a baby.

    Reply
  68. Heavens, Minna, what appalling parents to name their children so. I don’t know if there are laws here that prevent such things, but wow! There should be. Thanks for bringing this to our attention. I knew there were some strange names in the past — I have a good friend who’s a genealogist and who delights in passing on oddities to me, but some of these names are simply criminal to give a baby.

    Reply
  69. Heavens, Minna, what appalling parents to name their children so. I don’t know if there are laws here that prevent such things, but wow! There should be. Thanks for bringing this to our attention. I knew there were some strange names in the past — I have a good friend who’s a genealogist and who delights in passing on oddities to me, but some of these names are simply criminal to give a baby.

    Reply
  70. Heavens, Minna, what appalling parents to name their children so. I don’t know if there are laws here that prevent such things, but wow! There should be. Thanks for bringing this to our attention. I knew there were some strange names in the past — I have a good friend who’s a genealogist and who delights in passing on oddities to me, but some of these names are simply criminal to give a baby.

    Reply
  71. Apparently, it was a single, unmarried mother who gave this name to her kid. Either way, a horrible thing to do to your kid.

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  72. Apparently, it was a single, unmarried mother who gave this name to her kid. Either way, a horrible thing to do to your kid.

    Reply
  73. Apparently, it was a single, unmarried mother who gave this name to her kid. Either way, a horrible thing to do to your kid.

    Reply
  74. Apparently, it was a single, unmarried mother who gave this name to her kid. Either way, a horrible thing to do to your kid.

    Reply
  75. Apparently, it was a single, unmarried mother who gave this name to her kid. Either way, a horrible thing to do to your kid.

    Reply
  76. I love naming my characters – it’s one of the best parts of writing for me! I apply some of the same methods as you do, Anne, and also keep a list of favourite names as and when I hear them in case they’ll come in useful. You’re right that the name has to fit, otherwise if just feels wrong when you’re writing. I’ve managed to find the right name for all my heroines except one and I still don’t like the one she ended up with – weird!

    Reply
  77. I love naming my characters – it’s one of the best parts of writing for me! I apply some of the same methods as you do, Anne, and also keep a list of favourite names as and when I hear them in case they’ll come in useful. You’re right that the name has to fit, otherwise if just feels wrong when you’re writing. I’ve managed to find the right name for all my heroines except one and I still don’t like the one she ended up with – weird!

    Reply
  78. I love naming my characters – it’s one of the best parts of writing for me! I apply some of the same methods as you do, Anne, and also keep a list of favourite names as and when I hear them in case they’ll come in useful. You’re right that the name has to fit, otherwise if just feels wrong when you’re writing. I’ve managed to find the right name for all my heroines except one and I still don’t like the one she ended up with – weird!

    Reply
  79. I love naming my characters – it’s one of the best parts of writing for me! I apply some of the same methods as you do, Anne, and also keep a list of favourite names as and when I hear them in case they’ll come in useful. You’re right that the name has to fit, otherwise if just feels wrong when you’re writing. I’ve managed to find the right name for all my heroines except one and I still don’t like the one she ended up with – weird!

    Reply
  80. I love naming my characters – it’s one of the best parts of writing for me! I apply some of the same methods as you do, Anne, and also keep a list of favourite names as and when I hear them in case they’ll come in useful. You’re right that the name has to fit, otherwise if just feels wrong when you’re writing. I’ve managed to find the right name for all my heroines except one and I still don’t like the one she ended up with – weird!

    Reply
  81. Anne – Naming is always a fascinating process, IMHO.In my first story (which later became a book) the heroine was “Karen” and the hero was “David.” When the story was published in Woman’s World, they were suddenly (to my shock!) Maren and Drew. And no, the editor never asked for my input. When the book was later published by Harlequin Temptation, they were once again Karen and David, to my satisfaction. It’s interesting how names can effect the reader. I once got a book from a NY Times bestselling romance author at a library conference. I didn’t read the book for several years, because I simply couldn’t abide the name of the heroine. Finally, when the TBR was waning, I gave up and read it. And it was a really enjoyable book. BTW – too bad about Lord Carrington. That name is quite yummy! Thanks for a most enjoyable post.

    Reply
  82. Anne – Naming is always a fascinating process, IMHO.In my first story (which later became a book) the heroine was “Karen” and the hero was “David.” When the story was published in Woman’s World, they were suddenly (to my shock!) Maren and Drew. And no, the editor never asked for my input. When the book was later published by Harlequin Temptation, they were once again Karen and David, to my satisfaction. It’s interesting how names can effect the reader. I once got a book from a NY Times bestselling romance author at a library conference. I didn’t read the book for several years, because I simply couldn’t abide the name of the heroine. Finally, when the TBR was waning, I gave up and read it. And it was a really enjoyable book. BTW – too bad about Lord Carrington. That name is quite yummy! Thanks for a most enjoyable post.

    Reply
  83. Anne – Naming is always a fascinating process, IMHO.In my first story (which later became a book) the heroine was “Karen” and the hero was “David.” When the story was published in Woman’s World, they were suddenly (to my shock!) Maren and Drew. And no, the editor never asked for my input. When the book was later published by Harlequin Temptation, they were once again Karen and David, to my satisfaction. It’s interesting how names can effect the reader. I once got a book from a NY Times bestselling romance author at a library conference. I didn’t read the book for several years, because I simply couldn’t abide the name of the heroine. Finally, when the TBR was waning, I gave up and read it. And it was a really enjoyable book. BTW – too bad about Lord Carrington. That name is quite yummy! Thanks for a most enjoyable post.

    Reply
  84. Anne – Naming is always a fascinating process, IMHO.In my first story (which later became a book) the heroine was “Karen” and the hero was “David.” When the story was published in Woman’s World, they were suddenly (to my shock!) Maren and Drew. And no, the editor never asked for my input. When the book was later published by Harlequin Temptation, they were once again Karen and David, to my satisfaction. It’s interesting how names can effect the reader. I once got a book from a NY Times bestselling romance author at a library conference. I didn’t read the book for several years, because I simply couldn’t abide the name of the heroine. Finally, when the TBR was waning, I gave up and read it. And it was a really enjoyable book. BTW – too bad about Lord Carrington. That name is quite yummy! Thanks for a most enjoyable post.

    Reply
  85. Anne – Naming is always a fascinating process, IMHO.In my first story (which later became a book) the heroine was “Karen” and the hero was “David.” When the story was published in Woman’s World, they were suddenly (to my shock!) Maren and Drew. And no, the editor never asked for my input. When the book was later published by Harlequin Temptation, they were once again Karen and David, to my satisfaction. It’s interesting how names can effect the reader. I once got a book from a NY Times bestselling romance author at a library conference. I didn’t read the book for several years, because I simply couldn’t abide the name of the heroine. Finally, when the TBR was waning, I gave up and read it. And it was a really enjoyable book. BTW – too bad about Lord Carrington. That name is quite yummy! Thanks for a most enjoyable post.

    Reply
  86. Thanks for this post. Very educational. I believe that it would be wonderful to take the name of someone I dislike, and use it for a villain.
    In another life, Mr Wonderful (I call him that because if I used his actual name he would have lightning strike me I am sure) and I showed dogs. I got to name puppies. I used literary authors and characters. We had Nick and Nora, Agatha, and the best two were brothers….Dudley Do Right and Snidely Whiplash. I had two sisters, Lillian Russel and Lotta Crabtree. As you see, at times I got carried away.
    Hope everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  87. Thanks for this post. Very educational. I believe that it would be wonderful to take the name of someone I dislike, and use it for a villain.
    In another life, Mr Wonderful (I call him that because if I used his actual name he would have lightning strike me I am sure) and I showed dogs. I got to name puppies. I used literary authors and characters. We had Nick and Nora, Agatha, and the best two were brothers….Dudley Do Right and Snidely Whiplash. I had two sisters, Lillian Russel and Lotta Crabtree. As you see, at times I got carried away.
    Hope everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  88. Thanks for this post. Very educational. I believe that it would be wonderful to take the name of someone I dislike, and use it for a villain.
    In another life, Mr Wonderful (I call him that because if I used his actual name he would have lightning strike me I am sure) and I showed dogs. I got to name puppies. I used literary authors and characters. We had Nick and Nora, Agatha, and the best two were brothers….Dudley Do Right and Snidely Whiplash. I had two sisters, Lillian Russel and Lotta Crabtree. As you see, at times I got carried away.
    Hope everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  89. Thanks for this post. Very educational. I believe that it would be wonderful to take the name of someone I dislike, and use it for a villain.
    In another life, Mr Wonderful (I call him that because if I used his actual name he would have lightning strike me I am sure) and I showed dogs. I got to name puppies. I used literary authors and characters. We had Nick and Nora, Agatha, and the best two were brothers….Dudley Do Right and Snidely Whiplash. I had two sisters, Lillian Russel and Lotta Crabtree. As you see, at times I got carried away.
    Hope everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  90. Thanks for this post. Very educational. I believe that it would be wonderful to take the name of someone I dislike, and use it for a villain.
    In another life, Mr Wonderful (I call him that because if I used his actual name he would have lightning strike me I am sure) and I showed dogs. I got to name puppies. I used literary authors and characters. We had Nick and Nora, Agatha, and the best two were brothers….Dudley Do Right and Snidely Whiplash. I had two sisters, Lillian Russel and Lotta Crabtree. As you see, at times I got carried away.
    Hope everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  91. I think some authors are so good that their character names enter the vernacular. Thinking here perhaps of Bertie Wooster and Jeeves, Agatha is now a name that brings shivers to my spine and grins to my face:
    “This was not Aunt Dahlia, my good and kindly aunt, but my Aunt Agatha, the one who chews broken bottles and kills rats with her teeth … P G Wodehouse”
    By the way, I think lord Carrington would have felt honoured to feature in one of your novels,especially if you had him drinking pink champagne … though vintage scotch might have been better! LOL

    Reply
  92. I think some authors are so good that their character names enter the vernacular. Thinking here perhaps of Bertie Wooster and Jeeves, Agatha is now a name that brings shivers to my spine and grins to my face:
    “This was not Aunt Dahlia, my good and kindly aunt, but my Aunt Agatha, the one who chews broken bottles and kills rats with her teeth … P G Wodehouse”
    By the way, I think lord Carrington would have felt honoured to feature in one of your novels,especially if you had him drinking pink champagne … though vintage scotch might have been better! LOL

    Reply
  93. I think some authors are so good that their character names enter the vernacular. Thinking here perhaps of Bertie Wooster and Jeeves, Agatha is now a name that brings shivers to my spine and grins to my face:
    “This was not Aunt Dahlia, my good and kindly aunt, but my Aunt Agatha, the one who chews broken bottles and kills rats with her teeth … P G Wodehouse”
    By the way, I think lord Carrington would have felt honoured to feature in one of your novels,especially if you had him drinking pink champagne … though vintage scotch might have been better! LOL

    Reply
  94. I think some authors are so good that their character names enter the vernacular. Thinking here perhaps of Bertie Wooster and Jeeves, Agatha is now a name that brings shivers to my spine and grins to my face:
    “This was not Aunt Dahlia, my good and kindly aunt, but my Aunt Agatha, the one who chews broken bottles and kills rats with her teeth … P G Wodehouse”
    By the way, I think lord Carrington would have felt honoured to feature in one of your novels,especially if you had him drinking pink champagne … though vintage scotch might have been better! LOL

    Reply
  95. I think some authors are so good that their character names enter the vernacular. Thinking here perhaps of Bertie Wooster and Jeeves, Agatha is now a name that brings shivers to my spine and grins to my face:
    “This was not Aunt Dahlia, my good and kindly aunt, but my Aunt Agatha, the one who chews broken bottles and kills rats with her teeth … P G Wodehouse”
    By the way, I think lord Carrington would have felt honoured to feature in one of your novels,especially if you had him drinking pink champagne … though vintage scotch might have been better! LOL

    Reply
  96. It’s the vowels. Matching vowels, similar placement of vowels in syllables, even the consonants around the vowels can be very confusing to the reader’s mind. I, too, would have a hard time keeping Sarah and Grace straight.

    Reply
  97. It’s the vowels. Matching vowels, similar placement of vowels in syllables, even the consonants around the vowels can be very confusing to the reader’s mind. I, too, would have a hard time keeping Sarah and Grace straight.

    Reply
  98. It’s the vowels. Matching vowels, similar placement of vowels in syllables, even the consonants around the vowels can be very confusing to the reader’s mind. I, too, would have a hard time keeping Sarah and Grace straight.

    Reply
  99. It’s the vowels. Matching vowels, similar placement of vowels in syllables, even the consonants around the vowels can be very confusing to the reader’s mind. I, too, would have a hard time keeping Sarah and Grace straight.

    Reply
  100. It’s the vowels. Matching vowels, similar placement of vowels in syllables, even the consonants around the vowels can be very confusing to the reader’s mind. I, too, would have a hard time keeping Sarah and Grace straight.

    Reply
  101. I’ve read that the writer Evelyn Waugh was once married to a female Evelyn. Their friends called them He-Evelyn and She-Evelyn to keep them straight.

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  102. I’ve read that the writer Evelyn Waugh was once married to a female Evelyn. Their friends called them He-Evelyn and She-Evelyn to keep them straight.

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  103. I’ve read that the writer Evelyn Waugh was once married to a female Evelyn. Their friends called them He-Evelyn and She-Evelyn to keep them straight.

    Reply
  104. I’ve read that the writer Evelyn Waugh was once married to a female Evelyn. Their friends called them He-Evelyn and She-Evelyn to keep them straight.

    Reply
  105. I’ve read that the writer Evelyn Waugh was once married to a female Evelyn. Their friends called them He-Evelyn and She-Evelyn to keep them straight.

    Reply
  106. I enjoy seeing the different names that authors pick. I think if I was writing a Regency, I would stick to names in the British royal family, and names that authors of that era used. So I’d be pretty safe with Jane, Elizabeth, Kitty, Mary, and Lydia!

    Reply
  107. I enjoy seeing the different names that authors pick. I think if I was writing a Regency, I would stick to names in the British royal family, and names that authors of that era used. So I’d be pretty safe with Jane, Elizabeth, Kitty, Mary, and Lydia!

    Reply
  108. I enjoy seeing the different names that authors pick. I think if I was writing a Regency, I would stick to names in the British royal family, and names that authors of that era used. So I’d be pretty safe with Jane, Elizabeth, Kitty, Mary, and Lydia!

    Reply
  109. I enjoy seeing the different names that authors pick. I think if I was writing a Regency, I would stick to names in the British royal family, and names that authors of that era used. So I’d be pretty safe with Jane, Elizabeth, Kitty, Mary, and Lydia!

    Reply
  110. I enjoy seeing the different names that authors pick. I think if I was writing a Regency, I would stick to names in the British royal family, and names that authors of that era used. So I’d be pretty safe with Jane, Elizabeth, Kitty, Mary, and Lydia!

    Reply
  111. I have seen regencies whose heroines had names such as Star, Courtney and Krystal with a K. No, they weren’t timeslip stories 🙂 Instant wallbanger!

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  112. I have seen regencies whose heroines had names such as Star, Courtney and Krystal with a K. No, they weren’t timeslip stories 🙂 Instant wallbanger!

    Reply
  113. I have seen regencies whose heroines had names such as Star, Courtney and Krystal with a K. No, they weren’t timeslip stories 🙂 Instant wallbanger!

    Reply
  114. I have seen regencies whose heroines had names such as Star, Courtney and Krystal with a K. No, they weren’t timeslip stories 🙂 Instant wallbanger!

    Reply
  115. I have seen regencies whose heroines had names such as Star, Courtney and Krystal with a K. No, they weren’t timeslip stories 🙂 Instant wallbanger!

    Reply
  116. This was a fascinating post Anne. One thing that bugs me with names in books, is if I don’t know how to pronounce them! I find myself stumbling over them each time I get to them. It really puts me off a story.

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  117. This was a fascinating post Anne. One thing that bugs me with names in books, is if I don’t know how to pronounce them! I find myself stumbling over them each time I get to them. It really puts me off a story.

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  118. This was a fascinating post Anne. One thing that bugs me with names in books, is if I don’t know how to pronounce them! I find myself stumbling over them each time I get to them. It really puts me off a story.

    Reply
  119. This was a fascinating post Anne. One thing that bugs me with names in books, is if I don’t know how to pronounce them! I find myself stumbling over them each time I get to them. It really puts me off a story.

    Reply
  120. This was a fascinating post Anne. One thing that bugs me with names in books, is if I don’t know how to pronounce them! I find myself stumbling over them each time I get to them. It really puts me off a story.

    Reply
  121. Thanks, Christina — how funny that your heroine didn’t grow into her name in the end. I forgot to mention that I also keep lists of potential character names. I’ve even collected some from the credits at the end of a TV show or movie.

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  122. Thanks, Christina — how funny that your heroine didn’t grow into her name in the end. I forgot to mention that I also keep lists of potential character names. I’ve even collected some from the credits at the end of a TV show or movie.

    Reply
  123. Thanks, Christina — how funny that your heroine didn’t grow into her name in the end. I forgot to mention that I also keep lists of potential character names. I’ve even collected some from the credits at the end of a TV show or movie.

    Reply
  124. Thanks, Christina — how funny that your heroine didn’t grow into her name in the end. I forgot to mention that I also keep lists of potential character names. I’ve even collected some from the credits at the end of a TV show or movie.

    Reply
  125. Thanks, Christina — how funny that your heroine didn’t grow into her name in the end. I forgot to mention that I also keep lists of potential character names. I’ve even collected some from the credits at the end of a TV show or movie.

    Reply
  126. Binnie, how infuriating to have your characters’ names changed without consultation. I once had a short story butchered by a magazine editor and the next time I sold them a story did it on the condition that any changes would be made with my permission only. But no — the next one was butchered worse than ever — some sentences didn’t even make sense, as if she’d started changing a sentence and then come back next day and forgot. Or something. So that was it for me — never again.

    Reply
  127. Binnie, how infuriating to have your characters’ names changed without consultation. I once had a short story butchered by a magazine editor and the next time I sold them a story did it on the condition that any changes would be made with my permission only. But no — the next one was butchered worse than ever — some sentences didn’t even make sense, as if she’d started changing a sentence and then come back next day and forgot. Or something. So that was it for me — never again.

    Reply
  128. Binnie, how infuriating to have your characters’ names changed without consultation. I once had a short story butchered by a magazine editor and the next time I sold them a story did it on the condition that any changes would be made with my permission only. But no — the next one was butchered worse than ever — some sentences didn’t even make sense, as if she’d started changing a sentence and then come back next day and forgot. Or something. So that was it for me — never again.

    Reply
  129. Binnie, how infuriating to have your characters’ names changed without consultation. I once had a short story butchered by a magazine editor and the next time I sold them a story did it on the condition that any changes would be made with my permission only. But no — the next one was butchered worse than ever — some sentences didn’t even make sense, as if she’d started changing a sentence and then come back next day and forgot. Or something. So that was it for me — never again.

    Reply
  130. Binnie, how infuriating to have your characters’ names changed without consultation. I once had a short story butchered by a magazine editor and the next time I sold them a story did it on the condition that any changes would be made with my permission only. But no — the next one was butchered worse than ever — some sentences didn’t even make sense, as if she’d started changing a sentence and then come back next day and forgot. Or something. So that was it for me — never again.

    Reply
  131. Thanks, Annette. The trouble with using a real person’s name for anything even slightly important — and a villain is important — is that it affects the character and the story. I don’t like my everyday reality to bleed into my Regency=era fiction. But I love your dog names.

    Reply
  132. Thanks, Annette. The trouble with using a real person’s name for anything even slightly important — and a villain is important — is that it affects the character and the story. I don’t like my everyday reality to bleed into my Regency=era fiction. But I love your dog names.

    Reply
  133. Thanks, Annette. The trouble with using a real person’s name for anything even slightly important — and a villain is important — is that it affects the character and the story. I don’t like my everyday reality to bleed into my Regency=era fiction. But I love your dog names.

    Reply
  134. Thanks, Annette. The trouble with using a real person’s name for anything even slightly important — and a villain is important — is that it affects the character and the story. I don’t like my everyday reality to bleed into my Regency=era fiction. But I love your dog names.

    Reply
  135. Thanks, Annette. The trouble with using a real person’s name for anything even slightly important — and a villain is important — is that it affects the character and the story. I don’t like my everyday reality to bleed into my Regency=era fiction. But I love your dog names.

    Reply
  136. I absolutely agree with you, Quantum. In fact I was going to include a long paragraph about how some of Dickens’s character names entered the vernacular — for instance Scrooge which became a byword for a miser. I deleted it because my post was already getting quite long.
    And I do love the PG Wodehouse characters and some of the names he uses for his characters. And I adore his aunts. And the pig-breeding Lord Emsworth and his beloved Empress.

    Reply
  137. I absolutely agree with you, Quantum. In fact I was going to include a long paragraph about how some of Dickens’s character names entered the vernacular — for instance Scrooge which became a byword for a miser. I deleted it because my post was already getting quite long.
    And I do love the PG Wodehouse characters and some of the names he uses for his characters. And I adore his aunts. And the pig-breeding Lord Emsworth and his beloved Empress.

    Reply
  138. I absolutely agree with you, Quantum. In fact I was going to include a long paragraph about how some of Dickens’s character names entered the vernacular — for instance Scrooge which became a byword for a miser. I deleted it because my post was already getting quite long.
    And I do love the PG Wodehouse characters and some of the names he uses for his characters. And I adore his aunts. And the pig-breeding Lord Emsworth and his beloved Empress.

    Reply
  139. I absolutely agree with you, Quantum. In fact I was going to include a long paragraph about how some of Dickens’s character names entered the vernacular — for instance Scrooge which became a byword for a miser. I deleted it because my post was already getting quite long.
    And I do love the PG Wodehouse characters and some of the names he uses for his characters. And I adore his aunts. And the pig-breeding Lord Emsworth and his beloved Empress.

    Reply
  140. I absolutely agree with you, Quantum. In fact I was going to include a long paragraph about how some of Dickens’s character names entered the vernacular — for instance Scrooge which became a byword for a miser. I deleted it because my post was already getting quite long.
    And I do love the PG Wodehouse characters and some of the names he uses for his characters. And I adore his aunts. And the pig-breeding Lord Emsworth and his beloved Empress.

    Reply
  141. Thanks, Karin, and I think that a lot of us have used up many of the British royal family names — trouble was they also recycled the names over and over — all those Georges.

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  142. Thanks, Karin, and I think that a lot of us have used up many of the British royal family names — trouble was they also recycled the names over and over — all those Georges.

    Reply
  143. Thanks, Karin, and I think that a lot of us have used up many of the British royal family names — trouble was they also recycled the names over and over — all those Georges.

    Reply
  144. Thanks, Karin, and I think that a lot of us have used up many of the British royal family names — trouble was they also recycled the names over and over — all those Georges.

    Reply
  145. Thanks, Karin, and I think that a lot of us have used up many of the British royal family names — trouble was they also recycled the names over and over — all those Georges.

    Reply
  146. Thanks, Teresa. Complicated names are tricky, I agree, and I’m not good with some of the Irish names where people have returned to the Irish spelling rather than the English. But as a kid I read a lot of books with characters that had tricky names, and I just skipped over the pronunciation and just registered them as that character with the Pftzlkf name. I don’t tend to think names aloud anyway when reading.

    Reply
  147. Thanks, Teresa. Complicated names are tricky, I agree, and I’m not good with some of the Irish names where people have returned to the Irish spelling rather than the English. But as a kid I read a lot of books with characters that had tricky names, and I just skipped over the pronunciation and just registered them as that character with the Pftzlkf name. I don’t tend to think names aloud anyway when reading.

    Reply
  148. Thanks, Teresa. Complicated names are tricky, I agree, and I’m not good with some of the Irish names where people have returned to the Irish spelling rather than the English. But as a kid I read a lot of books with characters that had tricky names, and I just skipped over the pronunciation and just registered them as that character with the Pftzlkf name. I don’t tend to think names aloud anyway when reading.

    Reply
  149. Thanks, Teresa. Complicated names are tricky, I agree, and I’m not good with some of the Irish names where people have returned to the Irish spelling rather than the English. But as a kid I read a lot of books with characters that had tricky names, and I just skipped over the pronunciation and just registered them as that character with the Pftzlkf name. I don’t tend to think names aloud anyway when reading.

    Reply
  150. Thanks, Teresa. Complicated names are tricky, I agree, and I’m not good with some of the Irish names where people have returned to the Irish spelling rather than the English. But as a kid I read a lot of books with characters that had tricky names, and I just skipped over the pronunciation and just registered them as that character with the Pftzlkf name. I don’t tend to think names aloud anyway when reading.

    Reply

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