My Writing Process

Anne here, and today I'm answering some more questions I was recently asked — this time about my writing process. I say "my writing process" because every writer's process is different — writing is a uniquely personal process to every writer and there is no "right way" to write a book. I hope it's of interest to you. (And another book goes to Jacque for asking the questions in the first place.)

1) Do you hand write your first draft? GirlWriting332kb

The answer is yes . . . and no.  (That's not me in the photo)

I do a mix of hand-writing and typing direct onto the computer. Sometimes I  will just list the things I want to include in a scene on the back of an envelope, and then I'll write the scene straight onto the computer. After that I'll tweak and edit and rewrite it until it's more or less how I envisaged it. 

But I hand-write a lot of scenes as well, sometimes because I've had a "brilliant" scene come to me, and I've scribbled it down in my notebook, but it's a "scene to come" and I don't want to type it up until I get to that point in the story. (I'll talk more about that in my answer to question 2.)

Often I'll write by hand because I'm a bit stuck as to where to go next in the story. Hand-writing always frees me up. I might start by asking myself how my heroine or hero is feeling at the end of the last scene, and what they're worrying about, what might they do, etc. Somewhere in that process, a spark happens, I write a line of dialogue, then another, and it's off and running.

My "scribble," as I call my handwritten scenes, is almost always dialogue-heavy. I sometimes have to race to keep up with the characters talking in my head. Then when I go to type up the scene, I "choreograph" it — weaving in details of setting, and action and character thoughts — whatever is needed to flesh out the bare dialogue.

Woman-writing-in-cafe_2Towards the end of the book I mostly type straight into the computer, because by then I usually know what each scene is about and what I want it to achieve. But I might still scribble bits.

Ideas also come to me at odd times when I'm not near a computer, and then I'll scribble them down. They can range from a snatch of dialogue or a smart one-liner, to notes to myself about what a scene has to achieve, or how I need to change or deepen a scene I've already written. (That's not me in this photo either, though I wouldn't mind looking that glamorous and mysterious.)

By the time I've finished a book I've usually filled at least one 200 page A4 (US Letter-sized) notebook, often two, with scribble. They might also contain ideas and notes for future books or stories.

2) Do you write your stories chronologically or do you write in sections, leaving gaps to be filled later? 

 I write — as in type up the document — chronologically. The only gaps I leave for later are small bits of relatively unimportant research that I need to do — usually clothes, or a description of a place or looking up what fruits or vegetable might be in season for a meal — that kind of thing.

I don't skip scenes because in each scene something changes, and sometimes the things the characters say or do might surprise me, and the direction of the story changes. 

That's why I don't immediately type up the scribbled "scenes to come" — I don't type them up until I get to that point in the story, and often, in the interim between scribbling down the "brilliant" scene and getting to that place in the book, it no longer fits the character(s) or the plot. And often it isn't brilliant at all — what was I thinking? <g>

3) Does the writing get easier? WomanLyingBack-matisse-drawing

No matter how many novels I've written, it seems to be different every time. Which is good in a way, because it would get boring to do the same thing over and over. But it gets no easier. (And no, that's not me in the drawing either, sadly.)

In some ways I think the actual writing — the construction of sentences, the evoking of a scene or a mood — I'm probably better at some of that than when I started. Experience has to count for something, after all. 

But the construction of a plot, making a story feel fresh and unexpected, the unravelling of a character's motivation, making them come to life on the page, and fall in love with who you want them to when you want them to — that gets no easier. I wrestle with every single story to make it work.

And then there are the expectations of publishers and readers. Will the story I am telling meet their wants and needs? I never know. I remember fretting madly over The Autumn Bride, in which the relationship between the four girls and an old lady dominated the first part of the book — certainly the hero arrived rather late on the page. I was sure readers were going to hate it. Turns out they didn't.

In Marry In Haste, it seemed to take forever for the hero to get to the point of meeting the heroine, let alone proposing a convenient marriage to her — he offered her a job first — and again, I was worried readers would hate it. But that man needed to be driven to the point of marriage — he had an important job to do, and marriage and females were, in his mind, simply a distraction. Luckily, readers didn't hate that one either. But the point is, I can never tell. I just have to write the story as it comes to me. (By the way, the e-book of Marry In Haste is on special at the moment for a few more days, so if you'd like to read it, grab it while it's a bargain price.)

I'm heading towards the end of the book at the moment, and fearing once more that it isn't going to be the kind of story that people want or expect. So, does the writing get easier? Sadly not. 

So, wenchly readers, that's my process. I hope you found it interesting. I can't think of any clever or fun question for you to answer (imminent end-of-book = brain deadness) so I'll just blatantly bribe you and offer a book to someone who leaves a comment. <g>  Thank you.

 

 

 

155 thoughts on “My Writing Process”

  1. Thank you Anne for a really interesting post. I particularly love the idea that something brilliant isn’t when it’s supposed moment comes. I absolutely wouldn’t have a clue where to start to write a book so thank heavens all you word wenches are busily slaving away to keep us reading addicts happy. Please don’t stop!

    Reply
  2. Thank you Anne for a really interesting post. I particularly love the idea that something brilliant isn’t when it’s supposed moment comes. I absolutely wouldn’t have a clue where to start to write a book so thank heavens all you word wenches are busily slaving away to keep us reading addicts happy. Please don’t stop!

    Reply
  3. Thank you Anne for a really interesting post. I particularly love the idea that something brilliant isn’t when it’s supposed moment comes. I absolutely wouldn’t have a clue where to start to write a book so thank heavens all you word wenches are busily slaving away to keep us reading addicts happy. Please don’t stop!

    Reply
  4. Thank you Anne for a really interesting post. I particularly love the idea that something brilliant isn’t when it’s supposed moment comes. I absolutely wouldn’t have a clue where to start to write a book so thank heavens all you word wenches are busily slaving away to keep us reading addicts happy. Please don’t stop!

    Reply
  5. Thank you Anne for a really interesting post. I particularly love the idea that something brilliant isn’t when it’s supposed moment comes. I absolutely wouldn’t have a clue where to start to write a book so thank heavens all you word wenches are busily slaving away to keep us reading addicts happy. Please don’t stop!

    Reply
  6. I did find this interesting. Thank you for the tour of your writing process. And I’ll take a bribe any day if it involves a chance to win one of your books (smile).

    Reply
  7. I did find this interesting. Thank you for the tour of your writing process. And I’ll take a bribe any day if it involves a chance to win one of your books (smile).

    Reply
  8. I did find this interesting. Thank you for the tour of your writing process. And I’ll take a bribe any day if it involves a chance to win one of your books (smile).

    Reply
  9. I did find this interesting. Thank you for the tour of your writing process. And I’ll take a bribe any day if it involves a chance to win one of your books (smile).

    Reply
  10. I did find this interesting. Thank you for the tour of your writing process. And I’ll take a bribe any day if it involves a chance to win one of your books (smile).

    Reply
  11. Anne–you make great points, particularly “it never gets easier” and also “we are never glamorous in the process!”
    It’s also common to feel that the book is drek and everyone will hate it. (How do I know? I have a book coming out at the end of September. *G*)
    And yet the Muse keeps driving us on to create new stories…

    Reply
  12. Anne–you make great points, particularly “it never gets easier” and also “we are never glamorous in the process!”
    It’s also common to feel that the book is drek and everyone will hate it. (How do I know? I have a book coming out at the end of September. *G*)
    And yet the Muse keeps driving us on to create new stories…

    Reply
  13. Anne–you make great points, particularly “it never gets easier” and also “we are never glamorous in the process!”
    It’s also common to feel that the book is drek and everyone will hate it. (How do I know? I have a book coming out at the end of September. *G*)
    And yet the Muse keeps driving us on to create new stories…

    Reply
  14. Anne–you make great points, particularly “it never gets easier” and also “we are never glamorous in the process!”
    It’s also common to feel that the book is drek and everyone will hate it. (How do I know? I have a book coming out at the end of September. *G*)
    And yet the Muse keeps driving us on to create new stories…

    Reply
  15. Anne–you make great points, particularly “it never gets easier” and also “we are never glamorous in the process!”
    It’s also common to feel that the book is drek and everyone will hate it. (How do I know? I have a book coming out at the end of September. *G*)
    And yet the Muse keeps driving us on to create new stories…

    Reply
  16. Thank you, Anne, for this post. Writing novels is extraordinarily difficult. Some writers say it feels like alchemy in its process. This is from Deanna Raybourn.
    It came into my mind about a non-fiction book by Daniel James Brown, “The Boys of ’36.” He creates an amazing reading experience making real incidents come alive to an astounding degree that creates strong emotion much like a great novel.

    Reply
  17. Thank you, Anne, for this post. Writing novels is extraordinarily difficult. Some writers say it feels like alchemy in its process. This is from Deanna Raybourn.
    It came into my mind about a non-fiction book by Daniel James Brown, “The Boys of ’36.” He creates an amazing reading experience making real incidents come alive to an astounding degree that creates strong emotion much like a great novel.

    Reply
  18. Thank you, Anne, for this post. Writing novels is extraordinarily difficult. Some writers say it feels like alchemy in its process. This is from Deanna Raybourn.
    It came into my mind about a non-fiction book by Daniel James Brown, “The Boys of ’36.” He creates an amazing reading experience making real incidents come alive to an astounding degree that creates strong emotion much like a great novel.

    Reply
  19. Thank you, Anne, for this post. Writing novels is extraordinarily difficult. Some writers say it feels like alchemy in its process. This is from Deanna Raybourn.
    It came into my mind about a non-fiction book by Daniel James Brown, “The Boys of ’36.” He creates an amazing reading experience making real incidents come alive to an astounding degree that creates strong emotion much like a great novel.

    Reply
  20. Thank you, Anne, for this post. Writing novels is extraordinarily difficult. Some writers say it feels like alchemy in its process. This is from Deanna Raybourn.
    It came into my mind about a non-fiction book by Daniel James Brown, “The Boys of ’36.” He creates an amazing reading experience making real incidents come alive to an astounding degree that creates strong emotion much like a great novel.

    Reply
  21. “often, in the interim between scribbling down the “brilliant” scene and getting to that place in the book, it no longer fits the character(s) or the plot.And often it isn’t brilliant at all — what was I thinking? ”
    I really enjoyed those 2 lines! When I was writing articles for newsletters I’d have that happen. I’d write down what I thought was a great idea. Great way of thinking (ie scribble) then when typing the article I’d come up with another way of saying it. But you can’t have 2 “wonderful” sentences with the exact same thought. I would have to cut/combine or totally delete both.
    Thanks for giving us a peak into how you do write your books. I really enjoyed it.

    Reply
  22. “often, in the interim between scribbling down the “brilliant” scene and getting to that place in the book, it no longer fits the character(s) or the plot.And often it isn’t brilliant at all — what was I thinking? ”
    I really enjoyed those 2 lines! When I was writing articles for newsletters I’d have that happen. I’d write down what I thought was a great idea. Great way of thinking (ie scribble) then when typing the article I’d come up with another way of saying it. But you can’t have 2 “wonderful” sentences with the exact same thought. I would have to cut/combine or totally delete both.
    Thanks for giving us a peak into how you do write your books. I really enjoyed it.

    Reply
  23. “often, in the interim between scribbling down the “brilliant” scene and getting to that place in the book, it no longer fits the character(s) or the plot.And often it isn’t brilliant at all — what was I thinking? ”
    I really enjoyed those 2 lines! When I was writing articles for newsletters I’d have that happen. I’d write down what I thought was a great idea. Great way of thinking (ie scribble) then when typing the article I’d come up with another way of saying it. But you can’t have 2 “wonderful” sentences with the exact same thought. I would have to cut/combine or totally delete both.
    Thanks for giving us a peak into how you do write your books. I really enjoyed it.

    Reply
  24. “often, in the interim between scribbling down the “brilliant” scene and getting to that place in the book, it no longer fits the character(s) or the plot.And often it isn’t brilliant at all — what was I thinking? ”
    I really enjoyed those 2 lines! When I was writing articles for newsletters I’d have that happen. I’d write down what I thought was a great idea. Great way of thinking (ie scribble) then when typing the article I’d come up with another way of saying it. But you can’t have 2 “wonderful” sentences with the exact same thought. I would have to cut/combine or totally delete both.
    Thanks for giving us a peak into how you do write your books. I really enjoyed it.

    Reply
  25. “often, in the interim between scribbling down the “brilliant” scene and getting to that place in the book, it no longer fits the character(s) or the plot.And often it isn’t brilliant at all — what was I thinking? ”
    I really enjoyed those 2 lines! When I was writing articles for newsletters I’d have that happen. I’d write down what I thought was a great idea. Great way of thinking (ie scribble) then when typing the article I’d come up with another way of saying it. But you can’t have 2 “wonderful” sentences with the exact same thought. I would have to cut/combine or totally delete both.
    Thanks for giving us a peak into how you do write your books. I really enjoyed it.

    Reply
  26. I think you and many other authors I like, live in your universe as you write it. You are more character driven than plot driven (although you write great plots). You scribble may truly have been brilliant when you wrote it, but the characters have changed things so much that it no longer fits, so it’s no longer brilliant.
    Like all the above posts have said, this was a fascinating exploration of your writing process. Thank you for the trip.

    Reply
  27. I think you and many other authors I like, live in your universe as you write it. You are more character driven than plot driven (although you write great plots). You scribble may truly have been brilliant when you wrote it, but the characters have changed things so much that it no longer fits, so it’s no longer brilliant.
    Like all the above posts have said, this was a fascinating exploration of your writing process. Thank you for the trip.

    Reply
  28. I think you and many other authors I like, live in your universe as you write it. You are more character driven than plot driven (although you write great plots). You scribble may truly have been brilliant when you wrote it, but the characters have changed things so much that it no longer fits, so it’s no longer brilliant.
    Like all the above posts have said, this was a fascinating exploration of your writing process. Thank you for the trip.

    Reply
  29. I think you and many other authors I like, live in your universe as you write it. You are more character driven than plot driven (although you write great plots). You scribble may truly have been brilliant when you wrote it, but the characters have changed things so much that it no longer fits, so it’s no longer brilliant.
    Like all the above posts have said, this was a fascinating exploration of your writing process. Thank you for the trip.

    Reply
  30. I think you and many other authors I like, live in your universe as you write it. You are more character driven than plot driven (although you write great plots). You scribble may truly have been brilliant when you wrote it, but the characters have changed things so much that it no longer fits, so it’s no longer brilliant.
    Like all the above posts have said, this was a fascinating exploration of your writing process. Thank you for the trip.

    Reply
  31. Thanks, Alice — yes, sadly “brilliance” is all in the context. It’s a bit like after you’ve had a verbal exchange of some sort with someone that stays on your mind and later you think of the absolutely perfect response. But . . . too late, she cries. LOL

    Reply
  32. Thanks, Alice — yes, sadly “brilliance” is all in the context. It’s a bit like after you’ve had a verbal exchange of some sort with someone that stays on your mind and later you think of the absolutely perfect response. But . . . too late, she cries. LOL

    Reply
  33. Thanks, Alice — yes, sadly “brilliance” is all in the context. It’s a bit like after you’ve had a verbal exchange of some sort with someone that stays on your mind and later you think of the absolutely perfect response. But . . . too late, she cries. LOL

    Reply
  34. Thanks, Alice — yes, sadly “brilliance” is all in the context. It’s a bit like after you’ve had a verbal exchange of some sort with someone that stays on your mind and later you think of the absolutely perfect response. But . . . too late, she cries. LOL

    Reply
  35. Thanks, Alice — yes, sadly “brilliance” is all in the context. It’s a bit like after you’ve had a verbal exchange of some sort with someone that stays on your mind and later you think of the absolutely perfect response. But . . . too late, she cries. LOL

    Reply
  36. Thanks, Mary Jo. As for your book that comes out at the end of September — Once Dishonored — I’ve read the advance copy twice now and thoroughly enjoyed it both times. Readers are going to love it.

    Reply
  37. Thanks, Mary Jo. As for your book that comes out at the end of September — Once Dishonored — I’ve read the advance copy twice now and thoroughly enjoyed it both times. Readers are going to love it.

    Reply
  38. Thanks, Mary Jo. As for your book that comes out at the end of September — Once Dishonored — I’ve read the advance copy twice now and thoroughly enjoyed it both times. Readers are going to love it.

    Reply
  39. Thanks, Mary Jo. As for your book that comes out at the end of September — Once Dishonored — I’ve read the advance copy twice now and thoroughly enjoyed it both times. Readers are going to love it.

    Reply
  40. Thanks, Mary Jo. As for your book that comes out at the end of September — Once Dishonored — I’ve read the advance copy twice now and thoroughly enjoyed it both times. Readers are going to love it.

    Reply
  41. LOL Kareni — I have a friend who uses her bathroom mirror as a white board for things like that. But writing in the shower isn’t for me, I’m afraid. I can hang onto the thought long enough to dry myself and get to a notebook.

    Reply
  42. LOL Kareni — I have a friend who uses her bathroom mirror as a white board for things like that. But writing in the shower isn’t for me, I’m afraid. I can hang onto the thought long enough to dry myself and get to a notebook.

    Reply
  43. LOL Kareni — I have a friend who uses her bathroom mirror as a white board for things like that. But writing in the shower isn’t for me, I’m afraid. I can hang onto the thought long enough to dry myself and get to a notebook.

    Reply
  44. LOL Kareni — I have a friend who uses her bathroom mirror as a white board for things like that. But writing in the shower isn’t for me, I’m afraid. I can hang onto the thought long enough to dry myself and get to a notebook.

    Reply
  45. LOL Kareni — I have a friend who uses her bathroom mirror as a white board for things like that. But writing in the shower isn’t for me, I’m afraid. I can hang onto the thought long enough to dry myself and get to a notebook.

    Reply
  46. Thanks, Patricia. I like the Deanna Raybourn quote — it is a bit like alchemy. I haven’t read Daniel James Brown but I think the best non-fiction often brings things to life. Or is that called “faction”? I’m not sure. But it sounds interesting.

    Reply
  47. Thanks, Patricia. I like the Deanna Raybourn quote — it is a bit like alchemy. I haven’t read Daniel James Brown but I think the best non-fiction often brings things to life. Or is that called “faction”? I’m not sure. But it sounds interesting.

    Reply
  48. Thanks, Patricia. I like the Deanna Raybourn quote — it is a bit like alchemy. I haven’t read Daniel James Brown but I think the best non-fiction often brings things to life. Or is that called “faction”? I’m not sure. But it sounds interesting.

    Reply
  49. Thanks, Patricia. I like the Deanna Raybourn quote — it is a bit like alchemy. I haven’t read Daniel James Brown but I think the best non-fiction often brings things to life. Or is that called “faction”? I’m not sure. But it sounds interesting.

    Reply
  50. Thanks, Patricia. I like the Deanna Raybourn quote — it is a bit like alchemy. I haven’t read Daniel James Brown but I think the best non-fiction often brings things to life. Or is that called “faction”? I’m not sure. But it sounds interesting.

    Reply
  51. Thanks, Vicki — yes those two “wonderful” sentences with the exact same thought. I’m very familiar with that. And yes, the only solution is to be ruthless. Glad you enjoyed the post.

    Reply
  52. Thanks, Vicki — yes those two “wonderful” sentences with the exact same thought. I’m very familiar with that. And yes, the only solution is to be ruthless. Glad you enjoyed the post.

    Reply
  53. Thanks, Vicki — yes those two “wonderful” sentences with the exact same thought. I’m very familiar with that. And yes, the only solution is to be ruthless. Glad you enjoyed the post.

    Reply
  54. Thanks, Vicki — yes those two “wonderful” sentences with the exact same thought. I’m very familiar with that. And yes, the only solution is to be ruthless. Glad you enjoyed the post.

    Reply
  55. Thanks, Vicki — yes those two “wonderful” sentences with the exact same thought. I’m very familiar with that. And yes, the only solution is to be ruthless. Glad you enjoyed the post.

    Reply
  56. Sue, that’s very true about living in the universe of the book while we’re writing it, especially towards the end of the book, where I am now. Bits come to me all day and night, whether I’m writing or shopping or trying to sleep. For the latter the notebook is by my bed,
    I once had a very well known bestselling writer openly scoff at me when I confessed this in a writing workshop that we were presenting together. She snorted loudly and said that it was pathetic to have a notebook by my bed like that. She writes daily to fixed hours in a fixed routine and not a word gets written outside that time. But as I said, we all write differently.

    Reply
  57. Sue, that’s very true about living in the universe of the book while we’re writing it, especially towards the end of the book, where I am now. Bits come to me all day and night, whether I’m writing or shopping or trying to sleep. For the latter the notebook is by my bed,
    I once had a very well known bestselling writer openly scoff at me when I confessed this in a writing workshop that we were presenting together. She snorted loudly and said that it was pathetic to have a notebook by my bed like that. She writes daily to fixed hours in a fixed routine and not a word gets written outside that time. But as I said, we all write differently.

    Reply
  58. Sue, that’s very true about living in the universe of the book while we’re writing it, especially towards the end of the book, where I am now. Bits come to me all day and night, whether I’m writing or shopping or trying to sleep. For the latter the notebook is by my bed,
    I once had a very well known bestselling writer openly scoff at me when I confessed this in a writing workshop that we were presenting together. She snorted loudly and said that it was pathetic to have a notebook by my bed like that. She writes daily to fixed hours in a fixed routine and not a word gets written outside that time. But as I said, we all write differently.

    Reply
  59. Sue, that’s very true about living in the universe of the book while we’re writing it, especially towards the end of the book, where I am now. Bits come to me all day and night, whether I’m writing or shopping or trying to sleep. For the latter the notebook is by my bed,
    I once had a very well known bestselling writer openly scoff at me when I confessed this in a writing workshop that we were presenting together. She snorted loudly and said that it was pathetic to have a notebook by my bed like that. She writes daily to fixed hours in a fixed routine and not a word gets written outside that time. But as I said, we all write differently.

    Reply
  60. Sue, that’s very true about living in the universe of the book while we’re writing it, especially towards the end of the book, where I am now. Bits come to me all day and night, whether I’m writing or shopping or trying to sleep. For the latter the notebook is by my bed,
    I once had a very well known bestselling writer openly scoff at me when I confessed this in a writing workshop that we were presenting together. She snorted loudly and said that it was pathetic to have a notebook by my bed like that. She writes daily to fixed hours in a fixed routine and not a word gets written outside that time. But as I said, we all write differently.

    Reply
  61. Anne – very interesting post. I used to write (scribble) my short stories on index cards. I always had some kind of paper with me in case I got an idea. the first line in my first book happened to me on a bus on my way to work. The hero had a certain physical disability. I scribbled Qs all the way to work. What had happened to him? How did he live with it? How did others react? I kept asking Qs – and eventually the book was published. (A very long eventually – but still) I always have paper nearby just in case. You never know. Keep scribbling Anne. I hope you can read your scribbles better than I can read mine…

    Reply
  62. Anne – very interesting post. I used to write (scribble) my short stories on index cards. I always had some kind of paper with me in case I got an idea. the first line in my first book happened to me on a bus on my way to work. The hero had a certain physical disability. I scribbled Qs all the way to work. What had happened to him? How did he live with it? How did others react? I kept asking Qs – and eventually the book was published. (A very long eventually – but still) I always have paper nearby just in case. You never know. Keep scribbling Anne. I hope you can read your scribbles better than I can read mine…

    Reply
  63. Anne – very interesting post. I used to write (scribble) my short stories on index cards. I always had some kind of paper with me in case I got an idea. the first line in my first book happened to me on a bus on my way to work. The hero had a certain physical disability. I scribbled Qs all the way to work. What had happened to him? How did he live with it? How did others react? I kept asking Qs – and eventually the book was published. (A very long eventually – but still) I always have paper nearby just in case. You never know. Keep scribbling Anne. I hope you can read your scribbles better than I can read mine…

    Reply
  64. Anne – very interesting post. I used to write (scribble) my short stories on index cards. I always had some kind of paper with me in case I got an idea. the first line in my first book happened to me on a bus on my way to work. The hero had a certain physical disability. I scribbled Qs all the way to work. What had happened to him? How did he live with it? How did others react? I kept asking Qs – and eventually the book was published. (A very long eventually – but still) I always have paper nearby just in case. You never know. Keep scribbling Anne. I hope you can read your scribbles better than I can read mine…

    Reply
  65. Anne – very interesting post. I used to write (scribble) my short stories on index cards. I always had some kind of paper with me in case I got an idea. the first line in my first book happened to me on a bus on my way to work. The hero had a certain physical disability. I scribbled Qs all the way to work. What had happened to him? How did he live with it? How did others react? I kept asking Qs – and eventually the book was published. (A very long eventually – but still) I always have paper nearby just in case. You never know. Keep scribbling Anne. I hope you can read your scribbles better than I can read mine…

    Reply
  66. I notice that no mention is made of technological writing aids. Googling ‘best writing apps’ throws up dozens of possibilities but until we learn how to program creativity into robots I guess that paper and pencil still works best!
    Writing thoughts down does seem to crystallize ideas and I imagined that writing a novel would be like building a pyramid. Lots of independent ideas somehow combining through subconscious processing to erect an edifice with the HEA forming the peak. Somehow your process seems rather more random than that …. nice theory though!
    When reading your books I often wonder whether you imagined yourself as the heroine while writing, imbuing her with qualities that you have or would like to have. Daisy the seamstress is a favorite and perhaps you are stitching ideas together like Daisy making dresses.
    Thanks for the insights into ‘real’ novel writing.

    Reply
  67. I notice that no mention is made of technological writing aids. Googling ‘best writing apps’ throws up dozens of possibilities but until we learn how to program creativity into robots I guess that paper and pencil still works best!
    Writing thoughts down does seem to crystallize ideas and I imagined that writing a novel would be like building a pyramid. Lots of independent ideas somehow combining through subconscious processing to erect an edifice with the HEA forming the peak. Somehow your process seems rather more random than that …. nice theory though!
    When reading your books I often wonder whether you imagined yourself as the heroine while writing, imbuing her with qualities that you have or would like to have. Daisy the seamstress is a favorite and perhaps you are stitching ideas together like Daisy making dresses.
    Thanks for the insights into ‘real’ novel writing.

    Reply
  68. I notice that no mention is made of technological writing aids. Googling ‘best writing apps’ throws up dozens of possibilities but until we learn how to program creativity into robots I guess that paper and pencil still works best!
    Writing thoughts down does seem to crystallize ideas and I imagined that writing a novel would be like building a pyramid. Lots of independent ideas somehow combining through subconscious processing to erect an edifice with the HEA forming the peak. Somehow your process seems rather more random than that …. nice theory though!
    When reading your books I often wonder whether you imagined yourself as the heroine while writing, imbuing her with qualities that you have or would like to have. Daisy the seamstress is a favorite and perhaps you are stitching ideas together like Daisy making dresses.
    Thanks for the insights into ‘real’ novel writing.

    Reply
  69. I notice that no mention is made of technological writing aids. Googling ‘best writing apps’ throws up dozens of possibilities but until we learn how to program creativity into robots I guess that paper and pencil still works best!
    Writing thoughts down does seem to crystallize ideas and I imagined that writing a novel would be like building a pyramid. Lots of independent ideas somehow combining through subconscious processing to erect an edifice with the HEA forming the peak. Somehow your process seems rather more random than that …. nice theory though!
    When reading your books I often wonder whether you imagined yourself as the heroine while writing, imbuing her with qualities that you have or would like to have. Daisy the seamstress is a favorite and perhaps you are stitching ideas together like Daisy making dresses.
    Thanks for the insights into ‘real’ novel writing.

    Reply
  70. I notice that no mention is made of technological writing aids. Googling ‘best writing apps’ throws up dozens of possibilities but until we learn how to program creativity into robots I guess that paper and pencil still works best!
    Writing thoughts down does seem to crystallize ideas and I imagined that writing a novel would be like building a pyramid. Lots of independent ideas somehow combining through subconscious processing to erect an edifice with the HEA forming the peak. Somehow your process seems rather more random than that …. nice theory though!
    When reading your books I often wonder whether you imagined yourself as the heroine while writing, imbuing her with qualities that you have or would like to have. Daisy the seamstress is a favorite and perhaps you are stitching ideas together like Daisy making dresses.
    Thanks for the insights into ‘real’ novel writing.

    Reply
  71. Thanks for sharing your writing process, Anne. I’m a scribbler too…on the back of envelopes, in notebooks, on the reverse side of old dockets, and sometimes even on serviettes! The worst part about this is the chance that it will be lost or forgotten or (horror of horrors) thrown out by a husband trying to clear the mess off the table! lol.

    Reply
  72. Thanks for sharing your writing process, Anne. I’m a scribbler too…on the back of envelopes, in notebooks, on the reverse side of old dockets, and sometimes even on serviettes! The worst part about this is the chance that it will be lost or forgotten or (horror of horrors) thrown out by a husband trying to clear the mess off the table! lol.

    Reply
  73. Thanks for sharing your writing process, Anne. I’m a scribbler too…on the back of envelopes, in notebooks, on the reverse side of old dockets, and sometimes even on serviettes! The worst part about this is the chance that it will be lost or forgotten or (horror of horrors) thrown out by a husband trying to clear the mess off the table! lol.

    Reply
  74. Thanks for sharing your writing process, Anne. I’m a scribbler too…on the back of envelopes, in notebooks, on the reverse side of old dockets, and sometimes even on serviettes! The worst part about this is the chance that it will be lost or forgotten or (horror of horrors) thrown out by a husband trying to clear the mess off the table! lol.

    Reply
  75. Thanks for sharing your writing process, Anne. I’m a scribbler too…on the back of envelopes, in notebooks, on the reverse side of old dockets, and sometimes even on serviettes! The worst part about this is the chance that it will be lost or forgotten or (horror of horrors) thrown out by a husband trying to clear the mess off the table! lol.

    Reply
  76. I’m with JCassandra, Anne. I’ve never read one of your books and not loved it, so whatever you’ve done each and every time has been right for that book. So many writers, and probably all good ones, were, and often remain, readers first. I think if you read over what you’re writing, and you feel like you’re in a good book you want to keep READING, then you know you’re on the right track.

    Reply
  77. I’m with JCassandra, Anne. I’ve never read one of your books and not loved it, so whatever you’ve done each and every time has been right for that book. So many writers, and probably all good ones, were, and often remain, readers first. I think if you read over what you’re writing, and you feel like you’re in a good book you want to keep READING, then you know you’re on the right track.

    Reply
  78. I’m with JCassandra, Anne. I’ve never read one of your books and not loved it, so whatever you’ve done each and every time has been right for that book. So many writers, and probably all good ones, were, and often remain, readers first. I think if you read over what you’re writing, and you feel like you’re in a good book you want to keep READING, then you know you’re on the right track.

    Reply
  79. I’m with JCassandra, Anne. I’ve never read one of your books and not loved it, so whatever you’ve done each and every time has been right for that book. So many writers, and probably all good ones, were, and often remain, readers first. I think if you read over what you’re writing, and you feel like you’re in a good book you want to keep READING, then you know you’re on the right track.

    Reply
  80. I’m with JCassandra, Anne. I’ve never read one of your books and not loved it, so whatever you’ve done each and every time has been right for that book. So many writers, and probably all good ones, were, and often remain, readers first. I think if you read over what you’re writing, and you feel like you’re in a good book you want to keep READING, then you know you’re on the right track.

    Reply
  81. I’ve always wanted to be a writer but I just know I wouldn’t have the discipline or the ability actually. I don’t know how you can write so many books and make each one so different. Writers are definitely on a higher plane than us earthly mortals :):)

    Reply
  82. I’ve always wanted to be a writer but I just know I wouldn’t have the discipline or the ability actually. I don’t know how you can write so many books and make each one so different. Writers are definitely on a higher plane than us earthly mortals :):)

    Reply
  83. I’ve always wanted to be a writer but I just know I wouldn’t have the discipline or the ability actually. I don’t know how you can write so many books and make each one so different. Writers are definitely on a higher plane than us earthly mortals :):)

    Reply
  84. I’ve always wanted to be a writer but I just know I wouldn’t have the discipline or the ability actually. I don’t know how you can write so many books and make each one so different. Writers are definitely on a higher plane than us earthly mortals :):)

    Reply
  85. I’ve always wanted to be a writer but I just know I wouldn’t have the discipline or the ability actually. I don’t know how you can write so many books and make each one so different. Writers are definitely on a higher plane than us earthly mortals :):)

    Reply
  86. Thanks, Binnie — yes, I always carry a notebook. I find scraps of paper aren’t nearly as useful. They tend to get lost. And brainstorming like that on paper can be very helpful.

    Reply
  87. Thanks, Binnie — yes, I always carry a notebook. I find scraps of paper aren’t nearly as useful. They tend to get lost. And brainstorming like that on paper can be very helpful.

    Reply
  88. Thanks, Binnie — yes, I always carry a notebook. I find scraps of paper aren’t nearly as useful. They tend to get lost. And brainstorming like that on paper can be very helpful.

    Reply
  89. Thanks, Binnie — yes, I always carry a notebook. I find scraps of paper aren’t nearly as useful. They tend to get lost. And brainstorming like that on paper can be very helpful.

    Reply
  90. Thanks, Binnie — yes, I always carry a notebook. I find scraps of paper aren’t nearly as useful. They tend to get lost. And brainstorming like that on paper can be very helpful.

    Reply
  91. Hi Quantum, no I don’t use any writing apps. The one most people I know who do like tech things use is Scrivener, but I’ve never tried it. As for grammar apps, I was blessed (cursed?) with parents who were grammar pedants — of the “Yes, you can leave the table but no, you may not” type. I would also take issue with your use of “random” to describe my method — I prefer “organic.” *g*
    Also I never learnt to type — I’m fast now, but I still tend to watch the keyboard and only use a few fingers. And I make typos, and always have to stop to fix them, which interrupts the flow. But the handwriting is more than that — as I said, it often helps to unblock me.
    You once asked a question about ‘stream-of-consciousness’ writing, and I think when I hand write, I seem to dive into the world of the characters and the story much easier. Once I start writing with paper and pen, it seems to flow without conscious effort. Not quite ‘stream-of-consciousness’ but something similar I think.
    There have been lots of scientific and psychological studies about the effect of handwriting compared with typing, and it seems to be that the brain-hand connection brings added value.
    https://neeramahajan.com/5-benefits-of-writing-by-hand/
    As for imagining myself as the heroine — that’s complicated. I think in a way I imagine myself into all the characters — not that the characters are me in any way, but that to access them, I have to imagine my way into them and how they are feeling, thinking etc. It’s not much different to the way I imagine myself into the places in the books. I do know when I was first published a good friend who’s right into psychology, examined my first book with an assumption that the heroine was some form of me, and then she read the second book, and I’m not sure when she gave up looking for evidence that they were some version of me, but she has. But I might explore this notion more in a future post. Thanks.

    Reply
  92. Hi Quantum, no I don’t use any writing apps. The one most people I know who do like tech things use is Scrivener, but I’ve never tried it. As for grammar apps, I was blessed (cursed?) with parents who were grammar pedants — of the “Yes, you can leave the table but no, you may not” type. I would also take issue with your use of “random” to describe my method — I prefer “organic.” *g*
    Also I never learnt to type — I’m fast now, but I still tend to watch the keyboard and only use a few fingers. And I make typos, and always have to stop to fix them, which interrupts the flow. But the handwriting is more than that — as I said, it often helps to unblock me.
    You once asked a question about ‘stream-of-consciousness’ writing, and I think when I hand write, I seem to dive into the world of the characters and the story much easier. Once I start writing with paper and pen, it seems to flow without conscious effort. Not quite ‘stream-of-consciousness’ but something similar I think.
    There have been lots of scientific and psychological studies about the effect of handwriting compared with typing, and it seems to be that the brain-hand connection brings added value.
    https://neeramahajan.com/5-benefits-of-writing-by-hand/
    As for imagining myself as the heroine — that’s complicated. I think in a way I imagine myself into all the characters — not that the characters are me in any way, but that to access them, I have to imagine my way into them and how they are feeling, thinking etc. It’s not much different to the way I imagine myself into the places in the books. I do know when I was first published a good friend who’s right into psychology, examined my first book with an assumption that the heroine was some form of me, and then she read the second book, and I’m not sure when she gave up looking for evidence that they were some version of me, but she has. But I might explore this notion more in a future post. Thanks.

    Reply
  93. Hi Quantum, no I don’t use any writing apps. The one most people I know who do like tech things use is Scrivener, but I’ve never tried it. As for grammar apps, I was blessed (cursed?) with parents who were grammar pedants — of the “Yes, you can leave the table but no, you may not” type. I would also take issue with your use of “random” to describe my method — I prefer “organic.” *g*
    Also I never learnt to type — I’m fast now, but I still tend to watch the keyboard and only use a few fingers. And I make typos, and always have to stop to fix them, which interrupts the flow. But the handwriting is more than that — as I said, it often helps to unblock me.
    You once asked a question about ‘stream-of-consciousness’ writing, and I think when I hand write, I seem to dive into the world of the characters and the story much easier. Once I start writing with paper and pen, it seems to flow without conscious effort. Not quite ‘stream-of-consciousness’ but something similar I think.
    There have been lots of scientific and psychological studies about the effect of handwriting compared with typing, and it seems to be that the brain-hand connection brings added value.
    https://neeramahajan.com/5-benefits-of-writing-by-hand/
    As for imagining myself as the heroine — that’s complicated. I think in a way I imagine myself into all the characters — not that the characters are me in any way, but that to access them, I have to imagine my way into them and how they are feeling, thinking etc. It’s not much different to the way I imagine myself into the places in the books. I do know when I was first published a good friend who’s right into psychology, examined my first book with an assumption that the heroine was some form of me, and then she read the second book, and I’m not sure when she gave up looking for evidence that they were some version of me, but she has. But I might explore this notion more in a future post. Thanks.

    Reply
  94. Hi Quantum, no I don’t use any writing apps. The one most people I know who do like tech things use is Scrivener, but I’ve never tried it. As for grammar apps, I was blessed (cursed?) with parents who were grammar pedants — of the “Yes, you can leave the table but no, you may not” type. I would also take issue with your use of “random” to describe my method — I prefer “organic.” *g*
    Also I never learnt to type — I’m fast now, but I still tend to watch the keyboard and only use a few fingers. And I make typos, and always have to stop to fix them, which interrupts the flow. But the handwriting is more than that — as I said, it often helps to unblock me.
    You once asked a question about ‘stream-of-consciousness’ writing, and I think when I hand write, I seem to dive into the world of the characters and the story much easier. Once I start writing with paper and pen, it seems to flow without conscious effort. Not quite ‘stream-of-consciousness’ but something similar I think.
    There have been lots of scientific and psychological studies about the effect of handwriting compared with typing, and it seems to be that the brain-hand connection brings added value.
    https://neeramahajan.com/5-benefits-of-writing-by-hand/
    As for imagining myself as the heroine — that’s complicated. I think in a way I imagine myself into all the characters — not that the characters are me in any way, but that to access them, I have to imagine my way into them and how they are feeling, thinking etc. It’s not much different to the way I imagine myself into the places in the books. I do know when I was first published a good friend who’s right into psychology, examined my first book with an assumption that the heroine was some form of me, and then she read the second book, and I’m not sure when she gave up looking for evidence that they were some version of me, but she has. But I might explore this notion more in a future post. Thanks.

    Reply
  95. Hi Quantum, no I don’t use any writing apps. The one most people I know who do like tech things use is Scrivener, but I’ve never tried it. As for grammar apps, I was blessed (cursed?) with parents who were grammar pedants — of the “Yes, you can leave the table but no, you may not” type. I would also take issue with your use of “random” to describe my method — I prefer “organic.” *g*
    Also I never learnt to type — I’m fast now, but I still tend to watch the keyboard and only use a few fingers. And I make typos, and always have to stop to fix them, which interrupts the flow. But the handwriting is more than that — as I said, it often helps to unblock me.
    You once asked a question about ‘stream-of-consciousness’ writing, and I think when I hand write, I seem to dive into the world of the characters and the story much easier. Once I start writing with paper and pen, it seems to flow without conscious effort. Not quite ‘stream-of-consciousness’ but something similar I think.
    There have been lots of scientific and psychological studies about the effect of handwriting compared with typing, and it seems to be that the brain-hand connection brings added value.
    https://neeramahajan.com/5-benefits-of-writing-by-hand/
    As for imagining myself as the heroine — that’s complicated. I think in a way I imagine myself into all the characters — not that the characters are me in any way, but that to access them, I have to imagine my way into them and how they are feeling, thinking etc. It’s not much different to the way I imagine myself into the places in the books. I do know when I was first published a good friend who’s right into psychology, examined my first book with an assumption that the heroine was some form of me, and then she read the second book, and I’m not sure when she gave up looking for evidence that they were some version of me, but she has. But I might explore this notion more in a future post. Thanks.

    Reply
  96. Oh, yes, Laree, the dangers of writing brilliant ideas on scraps of paper — because they’re always brilliant, especially when they’re lost— been there done that, wailed a lot while looking for them later. *g*

    Reply
  97. Oh, yes, Laree, the dangers of writing brilliant ideas on scraps of paper — because they’re always brilliant, especially when they’re lost— been there done that, wailed a lot while looking for them later. *g*

    Reply
  98. Oh, yes, Laree, the dangers of writing brilliant ideas on scraps of paper — because they’re always brilliant, especially when they’re lost— been there done that, wailed a lot while looking for them later. *g*

    Reply
  99. Oh, yes, Laree, the dangers of writing brilliant ideas on scraps of paper — because they’re always brilliant, especially when they’re lost— been there done that, wailed a lot while looking for them later. *g*

    Reply
  100. Oh, yes, Laree, the dangers of writing brilliant ideas on scraps of paper — because they’re always brilliant, especially when they’re lost— been there done that, wailed a lot while looking for them later. *g*

    Reply
  101. Thanks so much for that, Margaret — love of you to say so. And yes, I always have been and still am a prolific reader. And it’s funny that you say that about reading over what I’m writing — I *never* think “Oh that’s good” while I’m writing a book, but sometimes when I go back over books long published (usually because I’m looking for some detail I need for the current book, like a butler’s name or something) I can get caught up reading it. But then I come away thinking “Oh dear, I used to be quite good back then. Maybe I’ve lost it.” LOL But so many writers think that way— I’m far from the exception.

    Reply
  102. Thanks so much for that, Margaret — love of you to say so. And yes, I always have been and still am a prolific reader. And it’s funny that you say that about reading over what I’m writing — I *never* think “Oh that’s good” while I’m writing a book, but sometimes when I go back over books long published (usually because I’m looking for some detail I need for the current book, like a butler’s name or something) I can get caught up reading it. But then I come away thinking “Oh dear, I used to be quite good back then. Maybe I’ve lost it.” LOL But so many writers think that way— I’m far from the exception.

    Reply
  103. Thanks so much for that, Margaret — love of you to say so. And yes, I always have been and still am a prolific reader. And it’s funny that you say that about reading over what I’m writing — I *never* think “Oh that’s good” while I’m writing a book, but sometimes when I go back over books long published (usually because I’m looking for some detail I need for the current book, like a butler’s name or something) I can get caught up reading it. But then I come away thinking “Oh dear, I used to be quite good back then. Maybe I’ve lost it.” LOL But so many writers think that way— I’m far from the exception.

    Reply
  104. Thanks so much for that, Margaret — love of you to say so. And yes, I always have been and still am a prolific reader. And it’s funny that you say that about reading over what I’m writing — I *never* think “Oh that’s good” while I’m writing a book, but sometimes when I go back over books long published (usually because I’m looking for some detail I need for the current book, like a butler’s name or something) I can get caught up reading it. But then I come away thinking “Oh dear, I used to be quite good back then. Maybe I’ve lost it.” LOL But so many writers think that way— I’m far from the exception.

    Reply
  105. Thanks so much for that, Margaret — love of you to say so. And yes, I always have been and still am a prolific reader. And it’s funny that you say that about reading over what I’m writing — I *never* think “Oh that’s good” while I’m writing a book, but sometimes when I go back over books long published (usually because I’m looking for some detail I need for the current book, like a butler’s name or something) I can get caught up reading it. But then I come away thinking “Oh dear, I used to be quite good back then. Maybe I’ve lost it.” LOL But so many writers think that way— I’m far from the exception.

    Reply
  106. Thanks Teresa, I don’t know about higher plane — I suspect it’s a form of escapism. And having a story spinning in your brain. I didn’t think I’d ever be a writer — I used to think writers were some rarified creatures, not someone ordinary like me. But all it took was being alone in foreign countries with stories spinning in the brain —and time to write them —to start me off.

    Reply
  107. Thanks Teresa, I don’t know about higher plane — I suspect it’s a form of escapism. And having a story spinning in your brain. I didn’t think I’d ever be a writer — I used to think writers were some rarified creatures, not someone ordinary like me. But all it took was being alone in foreign countries with stories spinning in the brain —and time to write them —to start me off.

    Reply
  108. Thanks Teresa, I don’t know about higher plane — I suspect it’s a form of escapism. And having a story spinning in your brain. I didn’t think I’d ever be a writer — I used to think writers were some rarified creatures, not someone ordinary like me. But all it took was being alone in foreign countries with stories spinning in the brain —and time to write them —to start me off.

    Reply
  109. Thanks Teresa, I don’t know about higher plane — I suspect it’s a form of escapism. And having a story spinning in your brain. I didn’t think I’d ever be a writer — I used to think writers were some rarified creatures, not someone ordinary like me. But all it took was being alone in foreign countries with stories spinning in the brain —and time to write them —to start me off.

    Reply
  110. Thanks Teresa, I don’t know about higher plane — I suspect it’s a form of escapism. And having a story spinning in your brain. I didn’t think I’d ever be a writer — I used to think writers were some rarified creatures, not someone ordinary like me. But all it took was being alone in foreign countries with stories spinning in the brain —and time to write them —to start me off.

    Reply
  111. “I would also take issue with your use of “random” to describe my method — I prefer “organic.” *g* ”
    OK perhaps an organic random walk. 😊
    Interesting thoughts about hand writing in the link … thanks

    Reply
  112. “I would also take issue with your use of “random” to describe my method — I prefer “organic.” *g* ”
    OK perhaps an organic random walk. 😊
    Interesting thoughts about hand writing in the link … thanks

    Reply
  113. “I would also take issue with your use of “random” to describe my method — I prefer “organic.” *g* ”
    OK perhaps an organic random walk. 😊
    Interesting thoughts about hand writing in the link … thanks

    Reply
  114. “I would also take issue with your use of “random” to describe my method — I prefer “organic.” *g* ”
    OK perhaps an organic random walk. 😊
    Interesting thoughts about hand writing in the link … thanks

    Reply
  115. “I would also take issue with your use of “random” to describe my method — I prefer “organic.” *g* ”
    OK perhaps an organic random walk. 😊
    Interesting thoughts about hand writing in the link … thanks

    Reply
  116. I know when I’m in “work” mode nothing distracts me and I have a hard time focusing on anything else. It’s draining sometimes!

    Reply
  117. I know when I’m in “work” mode nothing distracts me and I have a hard time focusing on anything else. It’s draining sometimes!

    Reply
  118. I know when I’m in “work” mode nothing distracts me and I have a hard time focusing on anything else. It’s draining sometimes!

    Reply
  119. I know when I’m in “work” mode nothing distracts me and I have a hard time focusing on anything else. It’s draining sometimes!

    Reply
  120. I know when I’m in “work” mode nothing distracts me and I have a hard time focusing on anything else. It’s draining sometimes!

    Reply
  121. I appreciate reading here how you go about writing a book. I am not a writer of stories, cannot even tell a story very well. My friends say they like my personal hand written letters but that is like chatting with them so I guess it works.
    I appreciate knowing the difficulties you face as you write and I agree with the others who have said that they have enjoyed every book of yours. I have most of your books now and love reading them more than once. I like the characters, their relationships, their life issues and how they deal with them.
    Must be hard to please yourself, the readers and your publishers.
    Thank you for sharing your talent.

    Reply
  122. I appreciate reading here how you go about writing a book. I am not a writer of stories, cannot even tell a story very well. My friends say they like my personal hand written letters but that is like chatting with them so I guess it works.
    I appreciate knowing the difficulties you face as you write and I agree with the others who have said that they have enjoyed every book of yours. I have most of your books now and love reading them more than once. I like the characters, their relationships, their life issues and how they deal with them.
    Must be hard to please yourself, the readers and your publishers.
    Thank you for sharing your talent.

    Reply
  123. I appreciate reading here how you go about writing a book. I am not a writer of stories, cannot even tell a story very well. My friends say they like my personal hand written letters but that is like chatting with them so I guess it works.
    I appreciate knowing the difficulties you face as you write and I agree with the others who have said that they have enjoyed every book of yours. I have most of your books now and love reading them more than once. I like the characters, their relationships, their life issues and how they deal with them.
    Must be hard to please yourself, the readers and your publishers.
    Thank you for sharing your talent.

    Reply
  124. I appreciate reading here how you go about writing a book. I am not a writer of stories, cannot even tell a story very well. My friends say they like my personal hand written letters but that is like chatting with them so I guess it works.
    I appreciate knowing the difficulties you face as you write and I agree with the others who have said that they have enjoyed every book of yours. I have most of your books now and love reading them more than once. I like the characters, their relationships, their life issues and how they deal with them.
    Must be hard to please yourself, the readers and your publishers.
    Thank you for sharing your talent.

    Reply
  125. I appreciate reading here how you go about writing a book. I am not a writer of stories, cannot even tell a story very well. My friends say they like my personal hand written letters but that is like chatting with them so I guess it works.
    I appreciate knowing the difficulties you face as you write and I agree with the others who have said that they have enjoyed every book of yours. I have most of your books now and love reading them more than once. I like the characters, their relationships, their life issues and how they deal with them.
    Must be hard to please yourself, the readers and your publishers.
    Thank you for sharing your talent.

    Reply

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