My Life on the… Lounge

Cloeboa48k
Anne here, with Chloe-dog. 

There is a TV show called "Your Life on the Lawn" where people whose houses have become too cluttered carry all their possessions out onto the lawn, and then carry back inside only what they really, really need. Whatever is left behind they dispose of, by garage sale, charity donation or rubbish skip.

They have to do this because there are TV people there to make them do it, and there are thousands of people watching, going, "Oh good grief, what a lot of rubbish! How ever could they live like that? Tsk tsk!"

 

Yes, it's a horror show. About torturing innocent and hapless hoarders.

"Embarrassment on the Lawn" or whatever it's called isn't quite my cup of tea, you'll have gathered. You couldn't pay me to be on a show like that. I would face the cameras with sharpened pikes and boiling oil and put a muzzle on my dog to pretend she's a fierce guard dog, and warn them that all that wiggling and wagging were Menacing Moves.

However early in the new year my beloved old computer died a gentle death β€” actually it's in a coma β€” and I had to get a new one. So I thought, okay, this is a good time to get a new desk as well. But the new desk inevitably led to the need to rearrange my study and, well, the moment you start rearranging furniture, feng shui creeps in, doesn't it?

As I heaved furniture around, I realized my study had become quite cramped and full of Stuff. No idea how. I suspect that it, too, creeps in.

Feng shui isn't too keen on Stuff, so I decided to commit a private Life on the Lawn exercise. And since there was rather an embarrassing amount of Stuff and a lot of it's paper, and likely to blow around the neighborhood, the lawn didn't seem like the best place for it. So I carried it all out and dumped it in the living room (I don't really have a lounge, but the alliteration was better). It's a long room with a couch and big comfy chairs and TV and coffee table at one end and dining table and dresser and chairs at the other. 


Officecleanout1

One end of the room now looks like this.

The other contains this (below right), rather perturbed by all the activity.

Couchchlo

I'm determined to have a good purge. But it's so hard. Apart from the hoarder genes I inherited from both parents, there is the historian gene from my father's side, and it whispers in my ear, "These are historical records you're throwing out. Whole PhD's have been written on a box of household receipts found in an attic years." 

"You have no attic," I mutter to Historian Gene. "Nobody's ever going to look at this as anything except rubbish."  Gene sniffs.

So, there go all my notes from years of being a teacher. I left the most useful stuff behind when I left. These files and folders and boxes represent years of work, lesson preparation and assignments I sweated over, but I'll never use them again, so out they must go.

There go all my romance writing magazines, RWR and HeartsTalk (aussie mag) and NINK from years back. Sob. But I haven't read them in ages. And besides, NINK at least is archived on the web. Thank you NINC. So I'll just cut out the Barbara Samuel GITB columms, right… Because they never go out of date.

I come to my old records β€” remember records? β€”those big vinyl disks I haven't played in years… but oh, the memories they evoke. And all my cassette tapes. But I haven't played them in years, either. Goodbye, records and tapes. I must be strong, invincible and woman. And clutter free, or if not, at least slightly feng shuied.

Records
Oh dear, willpower wavering. I pulled out a fistful of records to take a photo for the blog, and I cannot get rid of these ones… Maybe I'll just keep a few. Or see if I can get them in CDs. Yes, I know, it's the thin end of the wedge…

And then there are the books. The study is lined with books. The living room, hall and bedrooms all contain large bookcases stuffed with books. I have just carried out of the study several boxes of books and I have no shelf-room for them anywhere. So I must get rid of books… I tell myself that someone in a charity shop will love these books… but it's torture, I tell you, torture! 

Nobody told me a new computer would lead to this!

And the thing is, there is a Rule of the Universe that the minute you throw something out, you will need it again. It's true.  Years after I had stopped wearing my old platform soled shoes, I finally tossed them out. A month or two later, my friends and I formed a band and what did we call it? Platform Souls. I had to scour the charity shops for shoes.

I go to wikipedia and look up compulsive hoarding and compare the pictures there with the sight of my dining room. Ulp! I'm not there yet, but… oh dear…

Feng Shiu tells me to remove everything in my room that is broken, is not useful or does not please the eye. Okay. I swallow, straighten shoulders, take a deep breath. That's my mission, and I choose to accept it.

So… are you a hoarder? What do you hoard? What useless item could you never throw out, and why?

And if you're a purger, what's your secret? 

(A signed book will go to one intrepid commenter. One less book πŸ˜‰

235 thoughts on “My Life on the… Lounge”

  1. I finally threw away my size 2 pants I’d been saving since the birth of my daughter 30 years ago.
    I hoard, hoard, hoard. Books are the biggest problem. I have boxes and boxes of romance books from the 70’s on up. Fawcetts, Signets, Penquin…authors that I just can’t throw away, Mira Stables, Constance Gluyas, Valancy Hunter, Constance Heaven, Maggie MacKeever, Freda Michaels, Sheila Holland, Blanche Chenier, Margaret Sebastian…on and on and on. I’m not sure why I still have them, except they are like my old friends. And, besides you never know when you might want to read one again, of course, one has to remember which box it’s in

    Reply
  2. I finally threw away my size 2 pants I’d been saving since the birth of my daughter 30 years ago.
    I hoard, hoard, hoard. Books are the biggest problem. I have boxes and boxes of romance books from the 70’s on up. Fawcetts, Signets, Penquin…authors that I just can’t throw away, Mira Stables, Constance Gluyas, Valancy Hunter, Constance Heaven, Maggie MacKeever, Freda Michaels, Sheila Holland, Blanche Chenier, Margaret Sebastian…on and on and on. I’m not sure why I still have them, except they are like my old friends. And, besides you never know when you might want to read one again, of course, one has to remember which box it’s in

    Reply
  3. I finally threw away my size 2 pants I’d been saving since the birth of my daughter 30 years ago.
    I hoard, hoard, hoard. Books are the biggest problem. I have boxes and boxes of romance books from the 70’s on up. Fawcetts, Signets, Penquin…authors that I just can’t throw away, Mira Stables, Constance Gluyas, Valancy Hunter, Constance Heaven, Maggie MacKeever, Freda Michaels, Sheila Holland, Blanche Chenier, Margaret Sebastian…on and on and on. I’m not sure why I still have them, except they are like my old friends. And, besides you never know when you might want to read one again, of course, one has to remember which box it’s in

    Reply
  4. I finally threw away my size 2 pants I’d been saving since the birth of my daughter 30 years ago.
    I hoard, hoard, hoard. Books are the biggest problem. I have boxes and boxes of romance books from the 70’s on up. Fawcetts, Signets, Penquin…authors that I just can’t throw away, Mira Stables, Constance Gluyas, Valancy Hunter, Constance Heaven, Maggie MacKeever, Freda Michaels, Sheila Holland, Blanche Chenier, Margaret Sebastian…on and on and on. I’m not sure why I still have them, except they are like my old friends. And, besides you never know when you might want to read one again, of course, one has to remember which box it’s in

    Reply
  5. I finally threw away my size 2 pants I’d been saving since the birth of my daughter 30 years ago.
    I hoard, hoard, hoard. Books are the biggest problem. I have boxes and boxes of romance books from the 70’s on up. Fawcetts, Signets, Penquin…authors that I just can’t throw away, Mira Stables, Constance Gluyas, Valancy Hunter, Constance Heaven, Maggie MacKeever, Freda Michaels, Sheila Holland, Blanche Chenier, Margaret Sebastian…on and on and on. I’m not sure why I still have them, except they are like my old friends. And, besides you never know when you might want to read one again, of course, one has to remember which box it’s in

    Reply
  6. I tend to alternate back and forth. I think it comes from having never lived in the same house for more than 2 years growing up. Thus, I hoard things for a couple of years and then I feel the need for a purge.
    I think the secret is to keep asking yourself: have I used this in the last year or two? Followed closely by: How hard will this be to replace? If the answers are no and fairly easily, then get rid of it.
    However, books and things with memories and sentamental value are different. I have a horrible time getting rid of books, and I have a couple of hope chests that I keep stuffed with useless stuff that has memories attached to it.

    Reply
  7. I tend to alternate back and forth. I think it comes from having never lived in the same house for more than 2 years growing up. Thus, I hoard things for a couple of years and then I feel the need for a purge.
    I think the secret is to keep asking yourself: have I used this in the last year or two? Followed closely by: How hard will this be to replace? If the answers are no and fairly easily, then get rid of it.
    However, books and things with memories and sentamental value are different. I have a horrible time getting rid of books, and I have a couple of hope chests that I keep stuffed with useless stuff that has memories attached to it.

    Reply
  8. I tend to alternate back and forth. I think it comes from having never lived in the same house for more than 2 years growing up. Thus, I hoard things for a couple of years and then I feel the need for a purge.
    I think the secret is to keep asking yourself: have I used this in the last year or two? Followed closely by: How hard will this be to replace? If the answers are no and fairly easily, then get rid of it.
    However, books and things with memories and sentamental value are different. I have a horrible time getting rid of books, and I have a couple of hope chests that I keep stuffed with useless stuff that has memories attached to it.

    Reply
  9. I tend to alternate back and forth. I think it comes from having never lived in the same house for more than 2 years growing up. Thus, I hoard things for a couple of years and then I feel the need for a purge.
    I think the secret is to keep asking yourself: have I used this in the last year or two? Followed closely by: How hard will this be to replace? If the answers are no and fairly easily, then get rid of it.
    However, books and things with memories and sentamental value are different. I have a horrible time getting rid of books, and I have a couple of hope chests that I keep stuffed with useless stuff that has memories attached to it.

    Reply
  10. I tend to alternate back and forth. I think it comes from having never lived in the same house for more than 2 years growing up. Thus, I hoard things for a couple of years and then I feel the need for a purge.
    I think the secret is to keep asking yourself: have I used this in the last year or two? Followed closely by: How hard will this be to replace? If the answers are no and fairly easily, then get rid of it.
    However, books and things with memories and sentamental value are different. I have a horrible time getting rid of books, and I have a couple of hope chests that I keep stuffed with useless stuff that has memories attached to it.

    Reply
  11. This is one thing I love about living in the UK, we have endless charity shops just a few minutes walk from our flat. We also seem to move every 2-4 years and that combination has made it much harder for me to horde. Being able to donate the clothes I never wear to Oxfam or a cancer charity on a walk down the hill to the library makes it much easier to de-clutter stuff. Although I agree old paper is hard to get rid of.

    Reply
  12. This is one thing I love about living in the UK, we have endless charity shops just a few minutes walk from our flat. We also seem to move every 2-4 years and that combination has made it much harder for me to horde. Being able to donate the clothes I never wear to Oxfam or a cancer charity on a walk down the hill to the library makes it much easier to de-clutter stuff. Although I agree old paper is hard to get rid of.

    Reply
  13. This is one thing I love about living in the UK, we have endless charity shops just a few minutes walk from our flat. We also seem to move every 2-4 years and that combination has made it much harder for me to horde. Being able to donate the clothes I never wear to Oxfam or a cancer charity on a walk down the hill to the library makes it much easier to de-clutter stuff. Although I agree old paper is hard to get rid of.

    Reply
  14. This is one thing I love about living in the UK, we have endless charity shops just a few minutes walk from our flat. We also seem to move every 2-4 years and that combination has made it much harder for me to horde. Being able to donate the clothes I never wear to Oxfam or a cancer charity on a walk down the hill to the library makes it much easier to de-clutter stuff. Although I agree old paper is hard to get rid of.

    Reply
  15. This is one thing I love about living in the UK, we have endless charity shops just a few minutes walk from our flat. We also seem to move every 2-4 years and that combination has made it much harder for me to horde. Being able to donate the clothes I never wear to Oxfam or a cancer charity on a walk down the hill to the library makes it much easier to de-clutter stuff. Although I agree old paper is hard to get rid of.

    Reply
  16. Here in the states we have a similar show- I used to watch it all the time. It was like a train wreck- you were horrified but couldn’t look away. I am a compulsive collector- if I get one or two of something, the next thing is, I have twelve of it. Dolls, Teapots, vintage hats and jewelry, blue and white china, figurines, it goes on and on. But I am really trying to edit- it’s just that I love my stuff. I really like my vintage kitchen tins, my vintage hankies, my plates, my etchings, and my BOOKS! I have filled a three bedroom house with so much stuff that I couldn’t fit another person in if I wanted to- and that is what finally made me resolve that this is the year to pitch out things. Because if a friend had a fire, or my daughter needed to move back home, there is no place to put anyone, and I hate the thought that I can’t even offer a place of refuge to someone I love. So this is the year I pass my stuff on to someone else to enjoy. I might need the room.

    Reply
  17. Here in the states we have a similar show- I used to watch it all the time. It was like a train wreck- you were horrified but couldn’t look away. I am a compulsive collector- if I get one or two of something, the next thing is, I have twelve of it. Dolls, Teapots, vintage hats and jewelry, blue and white china, figurines, it goes on and on. But I am really trying to edit- it’s just that I love my stuff. I really like my vintage kitchen tins, my vintage hankies, my plates, my etchings, and my BOOKS! I have filled a three bedroom house with so much stuff that I couldn’t fit another person in if I wanted to- and that is what finally made me resolve that this is the year to pitch out things. Because if a friend had a fire, or my daughter needed to move back home, there is no place to put anyone, and I hate the thought that I can’t even offer a place of refuge to someone I love. So this is the year I pass my stuff on to someone else to enjoy. I might need the room.

    Reply
  18. Here in the states we have a similar show- I used to watch it all the time. It was like a train wreck- you were horrified but couldn’t look away. I am a compulsive collector- if I get one or two of something, the next thing is, I have twelve of it. Dolls, Teapots, vintage hats and jewelry, blue and white china, figurines, it goes on and on. But I am really trying to edit- it’s just that I love my stuff. I really like my vintage kitchen tins, my vintage hankies, my plates, my etchings, and my BOOKS! I have filled a three bedroom house with so much stuff that I couldn’t fit another person in if I wanted to- and that is what finally made me resolve that this is the year to pitch out things. Because if a friend had a fire, or my daughter needed to move back home, there is no place to put anyone, and I hate the thought that I can’t even offer a place of refuge to someone I love. So this is the year I pass my stuff on to someone else to enjoy. I might need the room.

    Reply
  19. Here in the states we have a similar show- I used to watch it all the time. It was like a train wreck- you were horrified but couldn’t look away. I am a compulsive collector- if I get one or two of something, the next thing is, I have twelve of it. Dolls, Teapots, vintage hats and jewelry, blue and white china, figurines, it goes on and on. But I am really trying to edit- it’s just that I love my stuff. I really like my vintage kitchen tins, my vintage hankies, my plates, my etchings, and my BOOKS! I have filled a three bedroom house with so much stuff that I couldn’t fit another person in if I wanted to- and that is what finally made me resolve that this is the year to pitch out things. Because if a friend had a fire, or my daughter needed to move back home, there is no place to put anyone, and I hate the thought that I can’t even offer a place of refuge to someone I love. So this is the year I pass my stuff on to someone else to enjoy. I might need the room.

    Reply
  20. Here in the states we have a similar show- I used to watch it all the time. It was like a train wreck- you were horrified but couldn’t look away. I am a compulsive collector- if I get one or two of something, the next thing is, I have twelve of it. Dolls, Teapots, vintage hats and jewelry, blue and white china, figurines, it goes on and on. But I am really trying to edit- it’s just that I love my stuff. I really like my vintage kitchen tins, my vintage hankies, my plates, my etchings, and my BOOKS! I have filled a three bedroom house with so much stuff that I couldn’t fit another person in if I wanted to- and that is what finally made me resolve that this is the year to pitch out things. Because if a friend had a fire, or my daughter needed to move back home, there is no place to put anyone, and I hate the thought that I can’t even offer a place of refuge to someone I love. So this is the year I pass my stuff on to someone else to enjoy. I might need the room.

    Reply
  21. Good for you, Gretchen! You go, girl! πŸ™‚
    Anne,you crack me up! I’ve watched the U.S. version of that show and really like it, although I know I couldn’t let someone come in and do that to me!
    I had one grandmother who was a hoarder and one who was a tosser. I definitely inherited the hoarder tendency. I blame it on the Great Depression b/c that’s where my grandma got it. πŸ™‚ Thankfully, in this case opposites attract and dh is a tosser, so generally we horde (I’m having trouble spelling that word – oa? e? hmmm) and then after a couple of years, we toss. Of course, we have moved so often I’m amazed that we still have any stuff and I have a constant pile of bags to take to Goodwill, but it still piles up.
    Well, this is the time of year, right at the beginning of the year, to purge and toss, so thanks for this inspiring blog entry! πŸ™‚

    Reply
  22. Good for you, Gretchen! You go, girl! πŸ™‚
    Anne,you crack me up! I’ve watched the U.S. version of that show and really like it, although I know I couldn’t let someone come in and do that to me!
    I had one grandmother who was a hoarder and one who was a tosser. I definitely inherited the hoarder tendency. I blame it on the Great Depression b/c that’s where my grandma got it. πŸ™‚ Thankfully, in this case opposites attract and dh is a tosser, so generally we horde (I’m having trouble spelling that word – oa? e? hmmm) and then after a couple of years, we toss. Of course, we have moved so often I’m amazed that we still have any stuff and I have a constant pile of bags to take to Goodwill, but it still piles up.
    Well, this is the time of year, right at the beginning of the year, to purge and toss, so thanks for this inspiring blog entry! πŸ™‚

    Reply
  23. Good for you, Gretchen! You go, girl! πŸ™‚
    Anne,you crack me up! I’ve watched the U.S. version of that show and really like it, although I know I couldn’t let someone come in and do that to me!
    I had one grandmother who was a hoarder and one who was a tosser. I definitely inherited the hoarder tendency. I blame it on the Great Depression b/c that’s where my grandma got it. πŸ™‚ Thankfully, in this case opposites attract and dh is a tosser, so generally we horde (I’m having trouble spelling that word – oa? e? hmmm) and then after a couple of years, we toss. Of course, we have moved so often I’m amazed that we still have any stuff and I have a constant pile of bags to take to Goodwill, but it still piles up.
    Well, this is the time of year, right at the beginning of the year, to purge and toss, so thanks for this inspiring blog entry! πŸ™‚

    Reply
  24. Good for you, Gretchen! You go, girl! πŸ™‚
    Anne,you crack me up! I’ve watched the U.S. version of that show and really like it, although I know I couldn’t let someone come in and do that to me!
    I had one grandmother who was a hoarder and one who was a tosser. I definitely inherited the hoarder tendency. I blame it on the Great Depression b/c that’s where my grandma got it. πŸ™‚ Thankfully, in this case opposites attract and dh is a tosser, so generally we horde (I’m having trouble spelling that word – oa? e? hmmm) and then after a couple of years, we toss. Of course, we have moved so often I’m amazed that we still have any stuff and I have a constant pile of bags to take to Goodwill, but it still piles up.
    Well, this is the time of year, right at the beginning of the year, to purge and toss, so thanks for this inspiring blog entry! πŸ™‚

    Reply
  25. Good for you, Gretchen! You go, girl! πŸ™‚
    Anne,you crack me up! I’ve watched the U.S. version of that show and really like it, although I know I couldn’t let someone come in and do that to me!
    I had one grandmother who was a hoarder and one who was a tosser. I definitely inherited the hoarder tendency. I blame it on the Great Depression b/c that’s where my grandma got it. πŸ™‚ Thankfully, in this case opposites attract and dh is a tosser, so generally we horde (I’m having trouble spelling that word – oa? e? hmmm) and then after a couple of years, we toss. Of course, we have moved so often I’m amazed that we still have any stuff and I have a constant pile of bags to take to Goodwill, but it still piles up.
    Well, this is the time of year, right at the beginning of the year, to purge and toss, so thanks for this inspiring blog entry! πŸ™‚

    Reply
  26. I’m a hoarder. For a while, it didn’t show because I didn’t buy very much. My husband is even more of a hoarder than I am, so the house filled up with his stuff.
    And then I started to buy books.I have every book I ever bought because I cannot throw one out. They’re all paperbacks, but even paperbacks take up a lot of space if you have enough. Our living room is filling up with books. Only a little of the center is left. Is there such an organizations as Books Anonymous?

    Reply
  27. I’m a hoarder. For a while, it didn’t show because I didn’t buy very much. My husband is even more of a hoarder than I am, so the house filled up with his stuff.
    And then I started to buy books.I have every book I ever bought because I cannot throw one out. They’re all paperbacks, but even paperbacks take up a lot of space if you have enough. Our living room is filling up with books. Only a little of the center is left. Is there such an organizations as Books Anonymous?

    Reply
  28. I’m a hoarder. For a while, it didn’t show because I didn’t buy very much. My husband is even more of a hoarder than I am, so the house filled up with his stuff.
    And then I started to buy books.I have every book I ever bought because I cannot throw one out. They’re all paperbacks, but even paperbacks take up a lot of space if you have enough. Our living room is filling up with books. Only a little of the center is left. Is there such an organizations as Books Anonymous?

    Reply
  29. I’m a hoarder. For a while, it didn’t show because I didn’t buy very much. My husband is even more of a hoarder than I am, so the house filled up with his stuff.
    And then I started to buy books.I have every book I ever bought because I cannot throw one out. They’re all paperbacks, but even paperbacks take up a lot of space if you have enough. Our living room is filling up with books. Only a little of the center is left. Is there such an organizations as Books Anonymous?

    Reply
  30. I’m a hoarder. For a while, it didn’t show because I didn’t buy very much. My husband is even more of a hoarder than I am, so the house filled up with his stuff.
    And then I started to buy books.I have every book I ever bought because I cannot throw one out. They’re all paperbacks, but even paperbacks take up a lot of space if you have enough. Our living room is filling up with books. Only a little of the center is left. Is there such an organizations as Books Anonymous?

    Reply
  31. Not going to lie I don’t like to hoard. I am the total opposite except that there is one thing I can’t throw away.
    My grandmother keeps EVERYTHING. Whenever she redoes a room or wall she never takes anything down. She keeps all her holiday stuff from twenty years ago. I went threw one of her closets that has loads of stuff and I threw away five large bags of stuff……and she still doesn’t know I did that πŸ™‚ naughty I know. I had to clean out the closet to fit my obsession and hoarding of books.
    Books are the only thing that I keep large amounts of and don’t like to give or throw away, but I am sure everyone here understands that here.

    Reply
  32. Not going to lie I don’t like to hoard. I am the total opposite except that there is one thing I can’t throw away.
    My grandmother keeps EVERYTHING. Whenever she redoes a room or wall she never takes anything down. She keeps all her holiday stuff from twenty years ago. I went threw one of her closets that has loads of stuff and I threw away five large bags of stuff……and she still doesn’t know I did that πŸ™‚ naughty I know. I had to clean out the closet to fit my obsession and hoarding of books.
    Books are the only thing that I keep large amounts of and don’t like to give or throw away, but I am sure everyone here understands that here.

    Reply
  33. Not going to lie I don’t like to hoard. I am the total opposite except that there is one thing I can’t throw away.
    My grandmother keeps EVERYTHING. Whenever she redoes a room or wall she never takes anything down. She keeps all her holiday stuff from twenty years ago. I went threw one of her closets that has loads of stuff and I threw away five large bags of stuff……and she still doesn’t know I did that πŸ™‚ naughty I know. I had to clean out the closet to fit my obsession and hoarding of books.
    Books are the only thing that I keep large amounts of and don’t like to give or throw away, but I am sure everyone here understands that here.

    Reply
  34. Not going to lie I don’t like to hoard. I am the total opposite except that there is one thing I can’t throw away.
    My grandmother keeps EVERYTHING. Whenever she redoes a room or wall she never takes anything down. She keeps all her holiday stuff from twenty years ago. I went threw one of her closets that has loads of stuff and I threw away five large bags of stuff……and she still doesn’t know I did that πŸ™‚ naughty I know. I had to clean out the closet to fit my obsession and hoarding of books.
    Books are the only thing that I keep large amounts of and don’t like to give or throw away, but I am sure everyone here understands that here.

    Reply
  35. Not going to lie I don’t like to hoard. I am the total opposite except that there is one thing I can’t throw away.
    My grandmother keeps EVERYTHING. Whenever she redoes a room or wall she never takes anything down. She keeps all her holiday stuff from twenty years ago. I went threw one of her closets that has loads of stuff and I threw away five large bags of stuff……and she still doesn’t know I did that πŸ™‚ naughty I know. I had to clean out the closet to fit my obsession and hoarding of books.
    Books are the only thing that I keep large amounts of and don’t like to give or throw away, but I am sure everyone here understands that here.

    Reply
  36. I’m a pack-rat (sounds terrible), er, hoarder (sounds too Silas Marnerish). This year, I’ve been determinedly attacking three boxes of paperwork that have been around since 2001. In the attic, is stored dried flowers, bits of ribbon, cards, candles, and goodness-knows-what from my college years. I haven’t opened those boxes since I sealed them to move cross-country for my first job. No idea why I keep carting them around. Just the thought of them and all those things in them is, er, comforting, I s’pose.

    Reply
  37. I’m a pack-rat (sounds terrible), er, hoarder (sounds too Silas Marnerish). This year, I’ve been determinedly attacking three boxes of paperwork that have been around since 2001. In the attic, is stored dried flowers, bits of ribbon, cards, candles, and goodness-knows-what from my college years. I haven’t opened those boxes since I sealed them to move cross-country for my first job. No idea why I keep carting them around. Just the thought of them and all those things in them is, er, comforting, I s’pose.

    Reply
  38. I’m a pack-rat (sounds terrible), er, hoarder (sounds too Silas Marnerish). This year, I’ve been determinedly attacking three boxes of paperwork that have been around since 2001. In the attic, is stored dried flowers, bits of ribbon, cards, candles, and goodness-knows-what from my college years. I haven’t opened those boxes since I sealed them to move cross-country for my first job. No idea why I keep carting them around. Just the thought of them and all those things in them is, er, comforting, I s’pose.

    Reply
  39. I’m a pack-rat (sounds terrible), er, hoarder (sounds too Silas Marnerish). This year, I’ve been determinedly attacking three boxes of paperwork that have been around since 2001. In the attic, is stored dried flowers, bits of ribbon, cards, candles, and goodness-knows-what from my college years. I haven’t opened those boxes since I sealed them to move cross-country for my first job. No idea why I keep carting them around. Just the thought of them and all those things in them is, er, comforting, I s’pose.

    Reply
  40. I’m a pack-rat (sounds terrible), er, hoarder (sounds too Silas Marnerish). This year, I’ve been determinedly attacking three boxes of paperwork that have been around since 2001. In the attic, is stored dried flowers, bits of ribbon, cards, candles, and goodness-knows-what from my college years. I haven’t opened those boxes since I sealed them to move cross-country for my first job. No idea why I keep carting them around. Just the thought of them and all those things in them is, er, comforting, I s’pose.

    Reply
  41. Anne
    I am such a horder myself I have all of my old records in the top of a wardrobe and so many things I try to sort things out and get rid of some of it but to no avail and with having had 4 children I have lots of their things as well and we won’t mention the books I could never seperate myself from them but I do need to get rid of some things soon LOL
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  42. Anne
    I am such a horder myself I have all of my old records in the top of a wardrobe and so many things I try to sort things out and get rid of some of it but to no avail and with having had 4 children I have lots of their things as well and we won’t mention the books I could never seperate myself from them but I do need to get rid of some things soon LOL
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  43. Anne
    I am such a horder myself I have all of my old records in the top of a wardrobe and so many things I try to sort things out and get rid of some of it but to no avail and with having had 4 children I have lots of their things as well and we won’t mention the books I could never seperate myself from them but I do need to get rid of some things soon LOL
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  44. Anne
    I am such a horder myself I have all of my old records in the top of a wardrobe and so many things I try to sort things out and get rid of some of it but to no avail and with having had 4 children I have lots of their things as well and we won’t mention the books I could never seperate myself from them but I do need to get rid of some things soon LOL
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  45. Anne
    I am such a horder myself I have all of my old records in the top of a wardrobe and so many things I try to sort things out and get rid of some of it but to no avail and with having had 4 children I have lots of their things as well and we won’t mention the books I could never seperate myself from them but I do need to get rid of some things soon LOL
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  46. When my kids were yonger I was a hoarder. Part of the problem was that I would think that they might need something so I would hang on to things they didn’t use anymore. Then as they grew so did my need to get rid of all that stuff. I haven’t cleared everything out yet but I have made a good dent over the past couple of years. The one thing I think of that I am keepine but we never use is my mother’s piano.

    Reply
  47. When my kids were yonger I was a hoarder. Part of the problem was that I would think that they might need something so I would hang on to things they didn’t use anymore. Then as they grew so did my need to get rid of all that stuff. I haven’t cleared everything out yet but I have made a good dent over the past couple of years. The one thing I think of that I am keepine but we never use is my mother’s piano.

    Reply
  48. When my kids were yonger I was a hoarder. Part of the problem was that I would think that they might need something so I would hang on to things they didn’t use anymore. Then as they grew so did my need to get rid of all that stuff. I haven’t cleared everything out yet but I have made a good dent over the past couple of years. The one thing I think of that I am keepine but we never use is my mother’s piano.

    Reply
  49. When my kids were yonger I was a hoarder. Part of the problem was that I would think that they might need something so I would hang on to things they didn’t use anymore. Then as they grew so did my need to get rid of all that stuff. I haven’t cleared everything out yet but I have made a good dent over the past couple of years. The one thing I think of that I am keepine but we never use is my mother’s piano.

    Reply
  50. When my kids were yonger I was a hoarder. Part of the problem was that I would think that they might need something so I would hang on to things they didn’t use anymore. Then as they grew so did my need to get rid of all that stuff. I haven’t cleared everything out yet but I have made a good dent over the past couple of years. The one thing I think of that I am keepine but we never use is my mother’s piano.

    Reply
  51. So, Anne–you’re a hoarder and Chloe is herder. πŸ™‚ Makes sense.
    I definitely have some pack rat tendencies, though part of it is that I also hate sitting down and sorting. It’s just so BORING!
    Books? We don’t talk about getting rid of books–they’re Sacred Relics, non negotiable. But there’s other Stuff that can and should go. I’ll get to it as soon as I finish this book I’m writing…..
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  52. So, Anne–you’re a hoarder and Chloe is herder. πŸ™‚ Makes sense.
    I definitely have some pack rat tendencies, though part of it is that I also hate sitting down and sorting. It’s just so BORING!
    Books? We don’t talk about getting rid of books–they’re Sacred Relics, non negotiable. But there’s other Stuff that can and should go. I’ll get to it as soon as I finish this book I’m writing…..
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  53. So, Anne–you’re a hoarder and Chloe is herder. πŸ™‚ Makes sense.
    I definitely have some pack rat tendencies, though part of it is that I also hate sitting down and sorting. It’s just so BORING!
    Books? We don’t talk about getting rid of books–they’re Sacred Relics, non negotiable. But there’s other Stuff that can and should go. I’ll get to it as soon as I finish this book I’m writing…..
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  54. So, Anne–you’re a hoarder and Chloe is herder. πŸ™‚ Makes sense.
    I definitely have some pack rat tendencies, though part of it is that I also hate sitting down and sorting. It’s just so BORING!
    Books? We don’t talk about getting rid of books–they’re Sacred Relics, non negotiable. But there’s other Stuff that can and should go. I’ll get to it as soon as I finish this book I’m writing…..
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  55. So, Anne–you’re a hoarder and Chloe is herder. πŸ™‚ Makes sense.
    I definitely have some pack rat tendencies, though part of it is that I also hate sitting down and sorting. It’s just so BORING!
    Books? We don’t talk about getting rid of books–they’re Sacred Relics, non negotiable. But there’s other Stuff that can and should go. I’ll get to it as soon as I finish this book I’m writing…..
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  56. I tend to be a purger, but sometimes I don’t manage to purge things for a few years (income tax returns!!)
    I don’t like clutter, so I need a place for everything and everything needs to be in its place – at least once I have finished working on it. Unfortunately this means things tend to sit for a while on solid surfaces (desks and tables) until I either finish the project or toss it because it is never going to be finished.
    I tossed the LPs 20 years ago, and the CDs 10 or so?
    There’s really no big secret for how I do it (poorly in some respects), but generally I sit down in a room, and gather everything around me and question myself as to whether or not I will ever use said thing again. Then I will see if it should be chucked, or whether it can go to charity. It always feels good to clean out yet another space. Part of what helps me keep doing this is that I hate it when the house looks messy, so I strive to keep it organized, and in such a way that things don’t fall out of closets when I open the doors.

    Reply
  57. I tend to be a purger, but sometimes I don’t manage to purge things for a few years (income tax returns!!)
    I don’t like clutter, so I need a place for everything and everything needs to be in its place – at least once I have finished working on it. Unfortunately this means things tend to sit for a while on solid surfaces (desks and tables) until I either finish the project or toss it because it is never going to be finished.
    I tossed the LPs 20 years ago, and the CDs 10 or so?
    There’s really no big secret for how I do it (poorly in some respects), but generally I sit down in a room, and gather everything around me and question myself as to whether or not I will ever use said thing again. Then I will see if it should be chucked, or whether it can go to charity. It always feels good to clean out yet another space. Part of what helps me keep doing this is that I hate it when the house looks messy, so I strive to keep it organized, and in such a way that things don’t fall out of closets when I open the doors.

    Reply
  58. I tend to be a purger, but sometimes I don’t manage to purge things for a few years (income tax returns!!)
    I don’t like clutter, so I need a place for everything and everything needs to be in its place – at least once I have finished working on it. Unfortunately this means things tend to sit for a while on solid surfaces (desks and tables) until I either finish the project or toss it because it is never going to be finished.
    I tossed the LPs 20 years ago, and the CDs 10 or so?
    There’s really no big secret for how I do it (poorly in some respects), but generally I sit down in a room, and gather everything around me and question myself as to whether or not I will ever use said thing again. Then I will see if it should be chucked, or whether it can go to charity. It always feels good to clean out yet another space. Part of what helps me keep doing this is that I hate it when the house looks messy, so I strive to keep it organized, and in such a way that things don’t fall out of closets when I open the doors.

    Reply
  59. I tend to be a purger, but sometimes I don’t manage to purge things for a few years (income tax returns!!)
    I don’t like clutter, so I need a place for everything and everything needs to be in its place – at least once I have finished working on it. Unfortunately this means things tend to sit for a while on solid surfaces (desks and tables) until I either finish the project or toss it because it is never going to be finished.
    I tossed the LPs 20 years ago, and the CDs 10 or so?
    There’s really no big secret for how I do it (poorly in some respects), but generally I sit down in a room, and gather everything around me and question myself as to whether or not I will ever use said thing again. Then I will see if it should be chucked, or whether it can go to charity. It always feels good to clean out yet another space. Part of what helps me keep doing this is that I hate it when the house looks messy, so I strive to keep it organized, and in such a way that things don’t fall out of closets when I open the doors.

    Reply
  60. I tend to be a purger, but sometimes I don’t manage to purge things for a few years (income tax returns!!)
    I don’t like clutter, so I need a place for everything and everything needs to be in its place – at least once I have finished working on it. Unfortunately this means things tend to sit for a while on solid surfaces (desks and tables) until I either finish the project or toss it because it is never going to be finished.
    I tossed the LPs 20 years ago, and the CDs 10 or so?
    There’s really no big secret for how I do it (poorly in some respects), but generally I sit down in a room, and gather everything around me and question myself as to whether or not I will ever use said thing again. Then I will see if it should be chucked, or whether it can go to charity. It always feels good to clean out yet another space. Part of what helps me keep doing this is that I hate it when the house looks messy, so I strive to keep it organized, and in such a way that things don’t fall out of closets when I open the doors.

    Reply
  61. Oh yeah, I think I get this from my dad, who swears that when he dies he wants the house to be empty except for a cup and a spoon (which as the person who will be cleaning/emptying the house, I appreciate!) My dad lived through the depression, but it certainly didn’t make him a hoarder! (n fact he lives by Ocham’s razor (I know I spelt that wrong!))

    Reply
  62. Oh yeah, I think I get this from my dad, who swears that when he dies he wants the house to be empty except for a cup and a spoon (which as the person who will be cleaning/emptying the house, I appreciate!) My dad lived through the depression, but it certainly didn’t make him a hoarder! (n fact he lives by Ocham’s razor (I know I spelt that wrong!))

    Reply
  63. Oh yeah, I think I get this from my dad, who swears that when he dies he wants the house to be empty except for a cup and a spoon (which as the person who will be cleaning/emptying the house, I appreciate!) My dad lived through the depression, but it certainly didn’t make him a hoarder! (n fact he lives by Ocham’s razor (I know I spelt that wrong!))

    Reply
  64. Oh yeah, I think I get this from my dad, who swears that when he dies he wants the house to be empty except for a cup and a spoon (which as the person who will be cleaning/emptying the house, I appreciate!) My dad lived through the depression, but it certainly didn’t make him a hoarder! (n fact he lives by Ocham’s razor (I know I spelt that wrong!))

    Reply
  65. Oh yeah, I think I get this from my dad, who swears that when he dies he wants the house to be empty except for a cup and a spoon (which as the person who will be cleaning/emptying the house, I appreciate!) My dad lived through the depression, but it certainly didn’t make him a hoarder! (n fact he lives by Ocham’s razor (I know I spelt that wrong!))

    Reply
  66. I am a terrible packrat! I save greeting cards, newspaper articles, old clothes (surely I will lose weight and be able to wear them again), and anything that I think I might find a use for. I drive my husband crazy! I also hoard books–if I really enjoy a book, I simply must keep it! My family says they will have a heck of a garage sale when I pass on. πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  67. I am a terrible packrat! I save greeting cards, newspaper articles, old clothes (surely I will lose weight and be able to wear them again), and anything that I think I might find a use for. I drive my husband crazy! I also hoard books–if I really enjoy a book, I simply must keep it! My family says they will have a heck of a garage sale when I pass on. πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  68. I am a terrible packrat! I save greeting cards, newspaper articles, old clothes (surely I will lose weight and be able to wear them again), and anything that I think I might find a use for. I drive my husband crazy! I also hoard books–if I really enjoy a book, I simply must keep it! My family says they will have a heck of a garage sale when I pass on. πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  69. I am a terrible packrat! I save greeting cards, newspaper articles, old clothes (surely I will lose weight and be able to wear them again), and anything that I think I might find a use for. I drive my husband crazy! I also hoard books–if I really enjoy a book, I simply must keep it! My family says they will have a heck of a garage sale when I pass on. πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  70. I am a terrible packrat! I save greeting cards, newspaper articles, old clothes (surely I will lose weight and be able to wear them again), and anything that I think I might find a use for. I drive my husband crazy! I also hoard books–if I really enjoy a book, I simply must keep it! My family says they will have a heck of a garage sale when I pass on. πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  71. Oh I am such a hoarder, although I prefer the term collector! I have a big house that 20 year’s ago I couldn’t imagine full, but it is! Books, Lilliput Lane, LPs, and STUFF. Fortunately my husband is a comic collector and has more volume accumulated than I do. One day I’ll find the time to go through everything and chuck it. The one thing I have to be ruthless about is clothes as my closet is 3′ wide so I will never have something “vintage” for my daughter to wear.
    And Anne, I did exactly the same with shoes, threw away a pair of great platforms and then my daughter needed a pair for a musical and we had to buy some. That cured me of throwing away stuff for a while!

    Reply
  72. Oh I am such a hoarder, although I prefer the term collector! I have a big house that 20 year’s ago I couldn’t imagine full, but it is! Books, Lilliput Lane, LPs, and STUFF. Fortunately my husband is a comic collector and has more volume accumulated than I do. One day I’ll find the time to go through everything and chuck it. The one thing I have to be ruthless about is clothes as my closet is 3′ wide so I will never have something “vintage” for my daughter to wear.
    And Anne, I did exactly the same with shoes, threw away a pair of great platforms and then my daughter needed a pair for a musical and we had to buy some. That cured me of throwing away stuff for a while!

    Reply
  73. Oh I am such a hoarder, although I prefer the term collector! I have a big house that 20 year’s ago I couldn’t imagine full, but it is! Books, Lilliput Lane, LPs, and STUFF. Fortunately my husband is a comic collector and has more volume accumulated than I do. One day I’ll find the time to go through everything and chuck it. The one thing I have to be ruthless about is clothes as my closet is 3′ wide so I will never have something “vintage” for my daughter to wear.
    And Anne, I did exactly the same with shoes, threw away a pair of great platforms and then my daughter needed a pair for a musical and we had to buy some. That cured me of throwing away stuff for a while!

    Reply
  74. Oh I am such a hoarder, although I prefer the term collector! I have a big house that 20 year’s ago I couldn’t imagine full, but it is! Books, Lilliput Lane, LPs, and STUFF. Fortunately my husband is a comic collector and has more volume accumulated than I do. One day I’ll find the time to go through everything and chuck it. The one thing I have to be ruthless about is clothes as my closet is 3′ wide so I will never have something “vintage” for my daughter to wear.
    And Anne, I did exactly the same with shoes, threw away a pair of great platforms and then my daughter needed a pair for a musical and we had to buy some. That cured me of throwing away stuff for a while!

    Reply
  75. Oh I am such a hoarder, although I prefer the term collector! I have a big house that 20 year’s ago I couldn’t imagine full, but it is! Books, Lilliput Lane, LPs, and STUFF. Fortunately my husband is a comic collector and has more volume accumulated than I do. One day I’ll find the time to go through everything and chuck it. The one thing I have to be ruthless about is clothes as my closet is 3′ wide so I will never have something “vintage” for my daughter to wear.
    And Anne, I did exactly the same with shoes, threw away a pair of great platforms and then my daughter needed a pair for a musical and we had to buy some. That cured me of throwing away stuff for a while!

    Reply
  76. I have to admit that while I’d like to be as organized as “Piper” I’m just not and probably never will be. We’ve been involved in a home add-on/renovation project for 7 years. To begin, I donated over 50 boxes of all kinds of books, kitchenware, clothing, dining and living room furniture, and just plain old “stuff.”
    Gosh, it felt like I was emptying my life of ALL I had collected for 25 years. It was one of the hardest things I’ve done. But, our garage was filled with those things we couldn’t give away, for love or money.
    Over the course of the renovation – 6 closets were emptied and renovated – we collected more things that were stored until our addition was completed. Now I’m busy again “cleaning out” the things we lived 7 years without; going through the boxes to see if we can live without the saved books; to top all this, going through Mom’s “stuff” we couldn’t get rid of 5 years ago, after she passed away. So, my “hoarding” traits stay with me and probably I’ll be leaving “stuff” for my heirs to clean out, but I can’t seem to change these habits. Maybe it’s not particularly important to do so. After all, I now have a larger house to keep more things, so why all the fuss! I’ll just be more selective over my remaining years. Bye!
    b

    Reply
  77. I have to admit that while I’d like to be as organized as “Piper” I’m just not and probably never will be. We’ve been involved in a home add-on/renovation project for 7 years. To begin, I donated over 50 boxes of all kinds of books, kitchenware, clothing, dining and living room furniture, and just plain old “stuff.”
    Gosh, it felt like I was emptying my life of ALL I had collected for 25 years. It was one of the hardest things I’ve done. But, our garage was filled with those things we couldn’t give away, for love or money.
    Over the course of the renovation – 6 closets were emptied and renovated – we collected more things that were stored until our addition was completed. Now I’m busy again “cleaning out” the things we lived 7 years without; going through the boxes to see if we can live without the saved books; to top all this, going through Mom’s “stuff” we couldn’t get rid of 5 years ago, after she passed away. So, my “hoarding” traits stay with me and probably I’ll be leaving “stuff” for my heirs to clean out, but I can’t seem to change these habits. Maybe it’s not particularly important to do so. After all, I now have a larger house to keep more things, so why all the fuss! I’ll just be more selective over my remaining years. Bye!
    b

    Reply
  78. I have to admit that while I’d like to be as organized as “Piper” I’m just not and probably never will be. We’ve been involved in a home add-on/renovation project for 7 years. To begin, I donated over 50 boxes of all kinds of books, kitchenware, clothing, dining and living room furniture, and just plain old “stuff.”
    Gosh, it felt like I was emptying my life of ALL I had collected for 25 years. It was one of the hardest things I’ve done. But, our garage was filled with those things we couldn’t give away, for love or money.
    Over the course of the renovation – 6 closets were emptied and renovated – we collected more things that were stored until our addition was completed. Now I’m busy again “cleaning out” the things we lived 7 years without; going through the boxes to see if we can live without the saved books; to top all this, going through Mom’s “stuff” we couldn’t get rid of 5 years ago, after she passed away. So, my “hoarding” traits stay with me and probably I’ll be leaving “stuff” for my heirs to clean out, but I can’t seem to change these habits. Maybe it’s not particularly important to do so. After all, I now have a larger house to keep more things, so why all the fuss! I’ll just be more selective over my remaining years. Bye!
    b

    Reply
  79. I have to admit that while I’d like to be as organized as “Piper” I’m just not and probably never will be. We’ve been involved in a home add-on/renovation project for 7 years. To begin, I donated over 50 boxes of all kinds of books, kitchenware, clothing, dining and living room furniture, and just plain old “stuff.”
    Gosh, it felt like I was emptying my life of ALL I had collected for 25 years. It was one of the hardest things I’ve done. But, our garage was filled with those things we couldn’t give away, for love or money.
    Over the course of the renovation – 6 closets were emptied and renovated – we collected more things that were stored until our addition was completed. Now I’m busy again “cleaning out” the things we lived 7 years without; going through the boxes to see if we can live without the saved books; to top all this, going through Mom’s “stuff” we couldn’t get rid of 5 years ago, after she passed away. So, my “hoarding” traits stay with me and probably I’ll be leaving “stuff” for my heirs to clean out, but I can’t seem to change these habits. Maybe it’s not particularly important to do so. After all, I now have a larger house to keep more things, so why all the fuss! I’ll just be more selective over my remaining years. Bye!
    b

    Reply
  80. I have to admit that while I’d like to be as organized as “Piper” I’m just not and probably never will be. We’ve been involved in a home add-on/renovation project for 7 years. To begin, I donated over 50 boxes of all kinds of books, kitchenware, clothing, dining and living room furniture, and just plain old “stuff.”
    Gosh, it felt like I was emptying my life of ALL I had collected for 25 years. It was one of the hardest things I’ve done. But, our garage was filled with those things we couldn’t give away, for love or money.
    Over the course of the renovation – 6 closets were emptied and renovated – we collected more things that were stored until our addition was completed. Now I’m busy again “cleaning out” the things we lived 7 years without; going through the boxes to see if we can live without the saved books; to top all this, going through Mom’s “stuff” we couldn’t get rid of 5 years ago, after she passed away. So, my “hoarding” traits stay with me and probably I’ll be leaving “stuff” for my heirs to clean out, but I can’t seem to change these habits. Maybe it’s not particularly important to do so. After all, I now have a larger house to keep more things, so why all the fuss! I’ll just be more selective over my remaining years. Bye!
    b

    Reply
  81. Definitely a hoarder–and that was the wonderful thing about moving a few years ago. Practically TRUCKLOADS of stuff went to Oxfam–it got to be that they’d see us coming down the street and open the doors wide! But whenever my husband complains i remind him that my father is worse. He still has essays I wrote in 3rd grade! And my husband and I agree that books are definitely exempt–there is no such thing as too many books, and the pride and joy of our current house is a large library with at last (after 26 years of marriage) really nice bookshelves instead of the cheap ones you put together yourself …

    Reply
  82. Definitely a hoarder–and that was the wonderful thing about moving a few years ago. Practically TRUCKLOADS of stuff went to Oxfam–it got to be that they’d see us coming down the street and open the doors wide! But whenever my husband complains i remind him that my father is worse. He still has essays I wrote in 3rd grade! And my husband and I agree that books are definitely exempt–there is no such thing as too many books, and the pride and joy of our current house is a large library with at last (after 26 years of marriage) really nice bookshelves instead of the cheap ones you put together yourself …

    Reply
  83. Definitely a hoarder–and that was the wonderful thing about moving a few years ago. Practically TRUCKLOADS of stuff went to Oxfam–it got to be that they’d see us coming down the street and open the doors wide! But whenever my husband complains i remind him that my father is worse. He still has essays I wrote in 3rd grade! And my husband and I agree that books are definitely exempt–there is no such thing as too many books, and the pride and joy of our current house is a large library with at last (after 26 years of marriage) really nice bookshelves instead of the cheap ones you put together yourself …

    Reply
  84. Definitely a hoarder–and that was the wonderful thing about moving a few years ago. Practically TRUCKLOADS of stuff went to Oxfam–it got to be that they’d see us coming down the street and open the doors wide! But whenever my husband complains i remind him that my father is worse. He still has essays I wrote in 3rd grade! And my husband and I agree that books are definitely exempt–there is no such thing as too many books, and the pride and joy of our current house is a large library with at last (after 26 years of marriage) really nice bookshelves instead of the cheap ones you put together yourself …

    Reply
  85. Definitely a hoarder–and that was the wonderful thing about moving a few years ago. Practically TRUCKLOADS of stuff went to Oxfam–it got to be that they’d see us coming down the street and open the doors wide! But whenever my husband complains i remind him that my father is worse. He still has essays I wrote in 3rd grade! And my husband and I agree that books are definitely exempt–there is no such thing as too many books, and the pride and joy of our current house is a large library with at last (after 26 years of marriage) really nice bookshelves instead of the cheap ones you put together yourself …

    Reply
  86. A crossbreed here – some things I keep beyond any rational reason to do so, and some things I find it easy to get rid of if I’m not using them. The things I find I have the most trouble disposing of are things my mother gave me that I don’t use (have never used) but can’t bring myself to get rid of because it seems uncaring and disrespectful to her struggle. I take it to mean that it is because she was important to me, and a person who mattered in her own right, and so the things she fought so hard for, as part of making a home, should not be disrespected. So I hang onto the silverplate that was a let-me-come-back gift from my dad, the Green Stamps china, and the single remaining crystal glass (all of which would be very useful if I entertained, but I don’t; my pals are happier with a cup of tea or a diet coke and would rather eat out than endure my cooking).
    One thing you learn as an accountant is the difference between a paper you should keep forever and one you don’t need past a certain use or time. I know people who have garages full of old paper records and I just shake my head; all of mine barely fill one records carton. I used to get sent over to clients’ homes to try to teach them what to keep and what to destroy, and I’d be amazed at how hard it was for them to do that, especially the widows of the “Honey, I’ll take care of it” generation – to some I think tossing these papers their husbands had worked on seemed as disrespectful to them as me smashing my mother’s china would have been.
    It doesn’t bother me at all to get rid of something I don’t want or use anymore if I paid for it with my own money. There’s no weight of sentiment attached to any of that. So I regularly go through my closet for clothes, jewelry, bags & shoes I don’t/can’t wear anymore, or books that I won’t read again (or never finished in the first place, if I’m honest), old movies & music. I feel better knowing that someone else will have the good of it, whether they get it via charity or Ebay or passalong. Waste really bothers me, and I guess I get that from my mom — along with the too-dressy-for-me jeweled pins.

    Reply
  87. A crossbreed here – some things I keep beyond any rational reason to do so, and some things I find it easy to get rid of if I’m not using them. The things I find I have the most trouble disposing of are things my mother gave me that I don’t use (have never used) but can’t bring myself to get rid of because it seems uncaring and disrespectful to her struggle. I take it to mean that it is because she was important to me, and a person who mattered in her own right, and so the things she fought so hard for, as part of making a home, should not be disrespected. So I hang onto the silverplate that was a let-me-come-back gift from my dad, the Green Stamps china, and the single remaining crystal glass (all of which would be very useful if I entertained, but I don’t; my pals are happier with a cup of tea or a diet coke and would rather eat out than endure my cooking).
    One thing you learn as an accountant is the difference between a paper you should keep forever and one you don’t need past a certain use or time. I know people who have garages full of old paper records and I just shake my head; all of mine barely fill one records carton. I used to get sent over to clients’ homes to try to teach them what to keep and what to destroy, and I’d be amazed at how hard it was for them to do that, especially the widows of the “Honey, I’ll take care of it” generation – to some I think tossing these papers their husbands had worked on seemed as disrespectful to them as me smashing my mother’s china would have been.
    It doesn’t bother me at all to get rid of something I don’t want or use anymore if I paid for it with my own money. There’s no weight of sentiment attached to any of that. So I regularly go through my closet for clothes, jewelry, bags & shoes I don’t/can’t wear anymore, or books that I won’t read again (or never finished in the first place, if I’m honest), old movies & music. I feel better knowing that someone else will have the good of it, whether they get it via charity or Ebay or passalong. Waste really bothers me, and I guess I get that from my mom — along with the too-dressy-for-me jeweled pins.

    Reply
  88. A crossbreed here – some things I keep beyond any rational reason to do so, and some things I find it easy to get rid of if I’m not using them. The things I find I have the most trouble disposing of are things my mother gave me that I don’t use (have never used) but can’t bring myself to get rid of because it seems uncaring and disrespectful to her struggle. I take it to mean that it is because she was important to me, and a person who mattered in her own right, and so the things she fought so hard for, as part of making a home, should not be disrespected. So I hang onto the silverplate that was a let-me-come-back gift from my dad, the Green Stamps china, and the single remaining crystal glass (all of which would be very useful if I entertained, but I don’t; my pals are happier with a cup of tea or a diet coke and would rather eat out than endure my cooking).
    One thing you learn as an accountant is the difference between a paper you should keep forever and one you don’t need past a certain use or time. I know people who have garages full of old paper records and I just shake my head; all of mine barely fill one records carton. I used to get sent over to clients’ homes to try to teach them what to keep and what to destroy, and I’d be amazed at how hard it was for them to do that, especially the widows of the “Honey, I’ll take care of it” generation – to some I think tossing these papers their husbands had worked on seemed as disrespectful to them as me smashing my mother’s china would have been.
    It doesn’t bother me at all to get rid of something I don’t want or use anymore if I paid for it with my own money. There’s no weight of sentiment attached to any of that. So I regularly go through my closet for clothes, jewelry, bags & shoes I don’t/can’t wear anymore, or books that I won’t read again (or never finished in the first place, if I’m honest), old movies & music. I feel better knowing that someone else will have the good of it, whether they get it via charity or Ebay or passalong. Waste really bothers me, and I guess I get that from my mom — along with the too-dressy-for-me jeweled pins.

    Reply
  89. A crossbreed here – some things I keep beyond any rational reason to do so, and some things I find it easy to get rid of if I’m not using them. The things I find I have the most trouble disposing of are things my mother gave me that I don’t use (have never used) but can’t bring myself to get rid of because it seems uncaring and disrespectful to her struggle. I take it to mean that it is because she was important to me, and a person who mattered in her own right, and so the things she fought so hard for, as part of making a home, should not be disrespected. So I hang onto the silverplate that was a let-me-come-back gift from my dad, the Green Stamps china, and the single remaining crystal glass (all of which would be very useful if I entertained, but I don’t; my pals are happier with a cup of tea or a diet coke and would rather eat out than endure my cooking).
    One thing you learn as an accountant is the difference between a paper you should keep forever and one you don’t need past a certain use or time. I know people who have garages full of old paper records and I just shake my head; all of mine barely fill one records carton. I used to get sent over to clients’ homes to try to teach them what to keep and what to destroy, and I’d be amazed at how hard it was for them to do that, especially the widows of the “Honey, I’ll take care of it” generation – to some I think tossing these papers their husbands had worked on seemed as disrespectful to them as me smashing my mother’s china would have been.
    It doesn’t bother me at all to get rid of something I don’t want or use anymore if I paid for it with my own money. There’s no weight of sentiment attached to any of that. So I regularly go through my closet for clothes, jewelry, bags & shoes I don’t/can’t wear anymore, or books that I won’t read again (or never finished in the first place, if I’m honest), old movies & music. I feel better knowing that someone else will have the good of it, whether they get it via charity or Ebay or passalong. Waste really bothers me, and I guess I get that from my mom — along with the too-dressy-for-me jeweled pins.

    Reply
  90. A crossbreed here – some things I keep beyond any rational reason to do so, and some things I find it easy to get rid of if I’m not using them. The things I find I have the most trouble disposing of are things my mother gave me that I don’t use (have never used) but can’t bring myself to get rid of because it seems uncaring and disrespectful to her struggle. I take it to mean that it is because she was important to me, and a person who mattered in her own right, and so the things she fought so hard for, as part of making a home, should not be disrespected. So I hang onto the silverplate that was a let-me-come-back gift from my dad, the Green Stamps china, and the single remaining crystal glass (all of which would be very useful if I entertained, but I don’t; my pals are happier with a cup of tea or a diet coke and would rather eat out than endure my cooking).
    One thing you learn as an accountant is the difference between a paper you should keep forever and one you don’t need past a certain use or time. I know people who have garages full of old paper records and I just shake my head; all of mine barely fill one records carton. I used to get sent over to clients’ homes to try to teach them what to keep and what to destroy, and I’d be amazed at how hard it was for them to do that, especially the widows of the “Honey, I’ll take care of it” generation – to some I think tossing these papers their husbands had worked on seemed as disrespectful to them as me smashing my mother’s china would have been.
    It doesn’t bother me at all to get rid of something I don’t want or use anymore if I paid for it with my own money. There’s no weight of sentiment attached to any of that. So I regularly go through my closet for clothes, jewelry, bags & shoes I don’t/can’t wear anymore, or books that I won’t read again (or never finished in the first place, if I’m honest), old movies & music. I feel better knowing that someone else will have the good of it, whether they get it via charity or Ebay or passalong. Waste really bothers me, and I guess I get that from my mom — along with the too-dressy-for-me jeweled pins.

    Reply
  91. Kay, I’m laughing at the “keeping of the skinny clothes for when…” I’m so guilty of that, too, though only with real favorites.
    And yes, books are the hardest thing for me to get rid of, but I have thousands, and nothing beloved will go. Books are and always have been a major part of my life, and yes some are are like old friends, family, even.
    Holly, I think that moving every couple of years during my childhood worsened my inherited packrat tendencies, because being the youngest child, I was rarely consulted about what to keep, so beloved things were tossed, and I only learned about it in the unpacking.
    Robin, it’s even easier for me to get rid of good stuff to charity — Diabetes Australia will collect it from your doorstep, and you just phone to make a day. So they take my stuff, and I’m helping my diabetic friends as well as me. Makes the whole process a lot easier.

    Reply
  92. Kay, I’m laughing at the “keeping of the skinny clothes for when…” I’m so guilty of that, too, though only with real favorites.
    And yes, books are the hardest thing for me to get rid of, but I have thousands, and nothing beloved will go. Books are and always have been a major part of my life, and yes some are are like old friends, family, even.
    Holly, I think that moving every couple of years during my childhood worsened my inherited packrat tendencies, because being the youngest child, I was rarely consulted about what to keep, so beloved things were tossed, and I only learned about it in the unpacking.
    Robin, it’s even easier for me to get rid of good stuff to charity — Diabetes Australia will collect it from your doorstep, and you just phone to make a day. So they take my stuff, and I’m helping my diabetic friends as well as me. Makes the whole process a lot easier.

    Reply
  93. Kay, I’m laughing at the “keeping of the skinny clothes for when…” I’m so guilty of that, too, though only with real favorites.
    And yes, books are the hardest thing for me to get rid of, but I have thousands, and nothing beloved will go. Books are and always have been a major part of my life, and yes some are are like old friends, family, even.
    Holly, I think that moving every couple of years during my childhood worsened my inherited packrat tendencies, because being the youngest child, I was rarely consulted about what to keep, so beloved things were tossed, and I only learned about it in the unpacking.
    Robin, it’s even easier for me to get rid of good stuff to charity — Diabetes Australia will collect it from your doorstep, and you just phone to make a day. So they take my stuff, and I’m helping my diabetic friends as well as me. Makes the whole process a lot easier.

    Reply
  94. Kay, I’m laughing at the “keeping of the skinny clothes for when…” I’m so guilty of that, too, though only with real favorites.
    And yes, books are the hardest thing for me to get rid of, but I have thousands, and nothing beloved will go. Books are and always have been a major part of my life, and yes some are are like old friends, family, even.
    Holly, I think that moving every couple of years during my childhood worsened my inherited packrat tendencies, because being the youngest child, I was rarely consulted about what to keep, so beloved things were tossed, and I only learned about it in the unpacking.
    Robin, it’s even easier for me to get rid of good stuff to charity — Diabetes Australia will collect it from your doorstep, and you just phone to make a day. So they take my stuff, and I’m helping my diabetic friends as well as me. Makes the whole process a lot easier.

    Reply
  95. Kay, I’m laughing at the “keeping of the skinny clothes for when…” I’m so guilty of that, too, though only with real favorites.
    And yes, books are the hardest thing for me to get rid of, but I have thousands, and nothing beloved will go. Books are and always have been a major part of my life, and yes some are are like old friends, family, even.
    Holly, I think that moving every couple of years during my childhood worsened my inherited packrat tendencies, because being the youngest child, I was rarely consulted about what to keep, so beloved things were tossed, and I only learned about it in the unpacking.
    Robin, it’s even easier for me to get rid of good stuff to charity — Diabetes Australia will collect it from your doorstep, and you just phone to make a day. So they take my stuff, and I’m helping my diabetic friends as well as me. Makes the whole process a lot easier.

    Reply
  96. << I couldn't fit another person in if I wanted to- and that is what finally made me resolve that this is the year to pitch out things.>>
    Gretchen, that’s brilliant. People are much more important than stuff. Let’s both make a pact to purge our spare rooms. I need to get the house emptier so I can renovate it.
    Anne, yes, my grandparents lived through the Depression too, and the ‘don’t waste a thing’ tendency has bred with my green recycler tendencies and produced a monster.
    Linda B, I hear you, sister πŸ˜‰ But I have to get rid of some books. It makes no sense to buy more free-standing bookshelves when I’m going to renovate and build more. I have this idea that bookshelves can be built into the wall, between the wall frames, so they sit flush with the plaster. We shall see…

    Reply
  97. << I couldn't fit another person in if I wanted to- and that is what finally made me resolve that this is the year to pitch out things.>>
    Gretchen, that’s brilliant. People are much more important than stuff. Let’s both make a pact to purge our spare rooms. I need to get the house emptier so I can renovate it.
    Anne, yes, my grandparents lived through the Depression too, and the ‘don’t waste a thing’ tendency has bred with my green recycler tendencies and produced a monster.
    Linda B, I hear you, sister πŸ˜‰ But I have to get rid of some books. It makes no sense to buy more free-standing bookshelves when I’m going to renovate and build more. I have this idea that bookshelves can be built into the wall, between the wall frames, so they sit flush with the plaster. We shall see…

    Reply
  98. << I couldn't fit another person in if I wanted to- and that is what finally made me resolve that this is the year to pitch out things.>>
    Gretchen, that’s brilliant. People are much more important than stuff. Let’s both make a pact to purge our spare rooms. I need to get the house emptier so I can renovate it.
    Anne, yes, my grandparents lived through the Depression too, and the ‘don’t waste a thing’ tendency has bred with my green recycler tendencies and produced a monster.
    Linda B, I hear you, sister πŸ˜‰ But I have to get rid of some books. It makes no sense to buy more free-standing bookshelves when I’m going to renovate and build more. I have this idea that bookshelves can be built into the wall, between the wall frames, so they sit flush with the plaster. We shall see…

    Reply
  99. << I couldn't fit another person in if I wanted to- and that is what finally made me resolve that this is the year to pitch out things.>>
    Gretchen, that’s brilliant. People are much more important than stuff. Let’s both make a pact to purge our spare rooms. I need to get the house emptier so I can renovate it.
    Anne, yes, my grandparents lived through the Depression too, and the ‘don’t waste a thing’ tendency has bred with my green recycler tendencies and produced a monster.
    Linda B, I hear you, sister πŸ˜‰ But I have to get rid of some books. It makes no sense to buy more free-standing bookshelves when I’m going to renovate and build more. I have this idea that bookshelves can be built into the wall, between the wall frames, so they sit flush with the plaster. We shall see…

    Reply
  100. << I couldn't fit another person in if I wanted to- and that is what finally made me resolve that this is the year to pitch out things.>>
    Gretchen, that’s brilliant. People are much more important than stuff. Let’s both make a pact to purge our spare rooms. I need to get the house emptier so I can renovate it.
    Anne, yes, my grandparents lived through the Depression too, and the ‘don’t waste a thing’ tendency has bred with my green recycler tendencies and produced a monster.
    Linda B, I hear you, sister πŸ˜‰ But I have to get rid of some books. It makes no sense to buy more free-standing bookshelves when I’m going to renovate and build more. I have this idea that bookshelves can be built into the wall, between the wall frames, so they sit flush with the plaster. We shall see…

    Reply
  101. Mallori, I wish living with packrats had made me like that. Not one of my family has escaped the hoarding tendency except my older sister whose husband is a purger and cured her.
    Keira, we tend not to have attics in Australia, but when we went to Scotland when I was a little girl we had a wonderful one. One half was my brother’s bedroom and I so envied him being able to lie in bed and start at the stars through the slanted windows, though he said it was very cold. But the other half of the attic contained old toys, books, old clothes for dress ups, etc and was a magical place.
    Helen, I was sure I could get rid of all my records, but when I pulled a few out at random for the photo, I just wailed inside at the thought of getting rid of them.

    Reply
  102. Mallori, I wish living with packrats had made me like that. Not one of my family has escaped the hoarding tendency except my older sister whose husband is a purger and cured her.
    Keira, we tend not to have attics in Australia, but when we went to Scotland when I was a little girl we had a wonderful one. One half was my brother’s bedroom and I so envied him being able to lie in bed and start at the stars through the slanted windows, though he said it was very cold. But the other half of the attic contained old toys, books, old clothes for dress ups, etc and was a magical place.
    Helen, I was sure I could get rid of all my records, but when I pulled a few out at random for the photo, I just wailed inside at the thought of getting rid of them.

    Reply
  103. Mallori, I wish living with packrats had made me like that. Not one of my family has escaped the hoarding tendency except my older sister whose husband is a purger and cured her.
    Keira, we tend not to have attics in Australia, but when we went to Scotland when I was a little girl we had a wonderful one. One half was my brother’s bedroom and I so envied him being able to lie in bed and start at the stars through the slanted windows, though he said it was very cold. But the other half of the attic contained old toys, books, old clothes for dress ups, etc and was a magical place.
    Helen, I was sure I could get rid of all my records, but when I pulled a few out at random for the photo, I just wailed inside at the thought of getting rid of them.

    Reply
  104. Mallori, I wish living with packrats had made me like that. Not one of my family has escaped the hoarding tendency except my older sister whose husband is a purger and cured her.
    Keira, we tend not to have attics in Australia, but when we went to Scotland when I was a little girl we had a wonderful one. One half was my brother’s bedroom and I so envied him being able to lie in bed and start at the stars through the slanted windows, though he said it was very cold. But the other half of the attic contained old toys, books, old clothes for dress ups, etc and was a magical place.
    Helen, I was sure I could get rid of all my records, but when I pulled a few out at random for the photo, I just wailed inside at the thought of getting rid of them.

    Reply
  105. Mallori, I wish living with packrats had made me like that. Not one of my family has escaped the hoarding tendency except my older sister whose husband is a purger and cured her.
    Keira, we tend not to have attics in Australia, but when we went to Scotland when I was a little girl we had a wonderful one. One half was my brother’s bedroom and I so envied him being able to lie in bed and start at the stars through the slanted windows, though he said it was very cold. But the other half of the attic contained old toys, books, old clothes for dress ups, etc and was a magical place.
    Helen, I was sure I could get rid of all my records, but when I pulled a few out at random for the photo, I just wailed inside at the thought of getting rid of them.

    Reply
  106. Maureen, that’s the point I’ve reached, I think. The office purge, as yet unfinished, is only the beginning.
    Mary Jo, the last time I had a big purge of the bedroom, I listened to audio books while i did it, and it wasn’t boring. In fact i got a heap of work done, but felt like I’d taken the day off to read. Audio books are wonderful for getting through dreary chores.
    Piper, you tossed your CDs 10 years ago? Wow? I hate to think of what music gets lost with each technological revolution. Some of my favorite records have never been made into CDs, and certainly aren’t around to be downloaded.
    There’s sentimental streak in me that’s part of my problem. I have to tell myself “This cracked old jug is not my grandmother.” (though there’s definitely a metaphor there somewhere πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  107. Maureen, that’s the point I’ve reached, I think. The office purge, as yet unfinished, is only the beginning.
    Mary Jo, the last time I had a big purge of the bedroom, I listened to audio books while i did it, and it wasn’t boring. In fact i got a heap of work done, but felt like I’d taken the day off to read. Audio books are wonderful for getting through dreary chores.
    Piper, you tossed your CDs 10 years ago? Wow? I hate to think of what music gets lost with each technological revolution. Some of my favorite records have never been made into CDs, and certainly aren’t around to be downloaded.
    There’s sentimental streak in me that’s part of my problem. I have to tell myself “This cracked old jug is not my grandmother.” (though there’s definitely a metaphor there somewhere πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  108. Maureen, that’s the point I’ve reached, I think. The office purge, as yet unfinished, is only the beginning.
    Mary Jo, the last time I had a big purge of the bedroom, I listened to audio books while i did it, and it wasn’t boring. In fact i got a heap of work done, but felt like I’d taken the day off to read. Audio books are wonderful for getting through dreary chores.
    Piper, you tossed your CDs 10 years ago? Wow? I hate to think of what music gets lost with each technological revolution. Some of my favorite records have never been made into CDs, and certainly aren’t around to be downloaded.
    There’s sentimental streak in me that’s part of my problem. I have to tell myself “This cracked old jug is not my grandmother.” (though there’s definitely a metaphor there somewhere πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  109. Maureen, that’s the point I’ve reached, I think. The office purge, as yet unfinished, is only the beginning.
    Mary Jo, the last time I had a big purge of the bedroom, I listened to audio books while i did it, and it wasn’t boring. In fact i got a heap of work done, but felt like I’d taken the day off to read. Audio books are wonderful for getting through dreary chores.
    Piper, you tossed your CDs 10 years ago? Wow? I hate to think of what music gets lost with each technological revolution. Some of my favorite records have never been made into CDs, and certainly aren’t around to be downloaded.
    There’s sentimental streak in me that’s part of my problem. I have to tell myself “This cracked old jug is not my grandmother.” (though there’s definitely a metaphor there somewhere πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  110. Maureen, that’s the point I’ve reached, I think. The office purge, as yet unfinished, is only the beginning.
    Mary Jo, the last time I had a big purge of the bedroom, I listened to audio books while i did it, and it wasn’t boring. In fact i got a heap of work done, but felt like I’d taken the day off to read. Audio books are wonderful for getting through dreary chores.
    Piper, you tossed your CDs 10 years ago? Wow? I hate to think of what music gets lost with each technological revolution. Some of my favorite records have never been made into CDs, and certainly aren’t around to be downloaded.
    There’s sentimental streak in me that’s part of my problem. I have to tell myself “This cracked old jug is not my grandmother.” (though there’s definitely a metaphor there somewhere πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  111. Piper a friend of mine once worked with a woman who moved house every five years and took only 2 suitcases with her each time. Can’t imagine it myself.
    Of course, she bought new furniture etc every time, but I could not fit my personal possessions into two suitcases. Oddly, though, I can travel quite light. Lived out of a backpack for a year, no problems.
    There’s a moral there somewhere, I guess.
    See, that’s feng shui for you — metaphors and morals getting into the act!

    Reply
  112. Piper a friend of mine once worked with a woman who moved house every five years and took only 2 suitcases with her each time. Can’t imagine it myself.
    Of course, she bought new furniture etc every time, but I could not fit my personal possessions into two suitcases. Oddly, though, I can travel quite light. Lived out of a backpack for a year, no problems.
    There’s a moral there somewhere, I guess.
    See, that’s feng shui for you — metaphors and morals getting into the act!

    Reply
  113. Piper a friend of mine once worked with a woman who moved house every five years and took only 2 suitcases with her each time. Can’t imagine it myself.
    Of course, she bought new furniture etc every time, but I could not fit my personal possessions into two suitcases. Oddly, though, I can travel quite light. Lived out of a backpack for a year, no problems.
    There’s a moral there somewhere, I guess.
    See, that’s feng shui for you — metaphors and morals getting into the act!

    Reply
  114. Piper a friend of mine once worked with a woman who moved house every five years and took only 2 suitcases with her each time. Can’t imagine it myself.
    Of course, she bought new furniture etc every time, but I could not fit my personal possessions into two suitcases. Oddly, though, I can travel quite light. Lived out of a backpack for a year, no problems.
    There’s a moral there somewhere, I guess.
    See, that’s feng shui for you — metaphors and morals getting into the act!

    Reply
  115. Piper a friend of mine once worked with a woman who moved house every five years and took only 2 suitcases with her each time. Can’t imagine it myself.
    Of course, she bought new furniture etc every time, but I could not fit my personal possessions into two suitcases. Oddly, though, I can travel quite light. Lived out of a backpack for a year, no problems.
    There’s a moral there somewhere, I guess.
    See, that’s feng shui for you — metaphors and morals getting into the act!

    Reply
  116. You can turn your lp’s into digital files – I say while I stockpile almost 3,000 cds.
    I have always been a media packrat. I can get rid of anything but books and music and games and film. when I had the kids I moved my books into storage for the ‘someday’ bookshelves – when I think of what I could buy with the $50 a month spent on storage, it’s difficult. I keep saying this month I’ll clean it out – but then I don’t.
    I did, when I got my cancer call, get rid of about half my belongings. I thought, do I want to go through all of this only to spend my time caretaking my media? I’m down to less than 20 cookbooks (a miracle) even though I only use five.
    I know that even in remission my life isn’t long enough to revisit all the books and films and still enjoy new ones. But it’s a slow process to say which ones won’t see me again.

    Reply
  117. You can turn your lp’s into digital files – I say while I stockpile almost 3,000 cds.
    I have always been a media packrat. I can get rid of anything but books and music and games and film. when I had the kids I moved my books into storage for the ‘someday’ bookshelves – when I think of what I could buy with the $50 a month spent on storage, it’s difficult. I keep saying this month I’ll clean it out – but then I don’t.
    I did, when I got my cancer call, get rid of about half my belongings. I thought, do I want to go through all of this only to spend my time caretaking my media? I’m down to less than 20 cookbooks (a miracle) even though I only use five.
    I know that even in remission my life isn’t long enough to revisit all the books and films and still enjoy new ones. But it’s a slow process to say which ones won’t see me again.

    Reply
  118. You can turn your lp’s into digital files – I say while I stockpile almost 3,000 cds.
    I have always been a media packrat. I can get rid of anything but books and music and games and film. when I had the kids I moved my books into storage for the ‘someday’ bookshelves – when I think of what I could buy with the $50 a month spent on storage, it’s difficult. I keep saying this month I’ll clean it out – but then I don’t.
    I did, when I got my cancer call, get rid of about half my belongings. I thought, do I want to go through all of this only to spend my time caretaking my media? I’m down to less than 20 cookbooks (a miracle) even though I only use five.
    I know that even in remission my life isn’t long enough to revisit all the books and films and still enjoy new ones. But it’s a slow process to say which ones won’t see me again.

    Reply
  119. You can turn your lp’s into digital files – I say while I stockpile almost 3,000 cds.
    I have always been a media packrat. I can get rid of anything but books and music and games and film. when I had the kids I moved my books into storage for the ‘someday’ bookshelves – when I think of what I could buy with the $50 a month spent on storage, it’s difficult. I keep saying this month I’ll clean it out – but then I don’t.
    I did, when I got my cancer call, get rid of about half my belongings. I thought, do I want to go through all of this only to spend my time caretaking my media? I’m down to less than 20 cookbooks (a miracle) even though I only use five.
    I know that even in remission my life isn’t long enough to revisit all the books and films and still enjoy new ones. But it’s a slow process to say which ones won’t see me again.

    Reply
  120. You can turn your lp’s into digital files – I say while I stockpile almost 3,000 cds.
    I have always been a media packrat. I can get rid of anything but books and music and games and film. when I had the kids I moved my books into storage for the ‘someday’ bookshelves – when I think of what I could buy with the $50 a month spent on storage, it’s difficult. I keep saying this month I’ll clean it out – but then I don’t.
    I did, when I got my cancer call, get rid of about half my belongings. I thought, do I want to go through all of this only to spend my time caretaking my media? I’m down to less than 20 cookbooks (a miracle) even though I only use five.
    I know that even in remission my life isn’t long enough to revisit all the books and films and still enjoy new ones. But it’s a slow process to say which ones won’t see me again.

    Reply
  121. “I tend to alternate back and forth. I think it comes from having never lived in the same house for more than 2 years growing up. Thus, I hoard things for a couple of years and then I feel the need for a purge.”
    Oh, I could have written that. We moved all the time and I was always losing things. I was a serious horder for a long time because of that, but I also needed space — both real space and psychic space.
    Some things I have learned about decluttering are: 1) Watch out for objects that are no longer really relevant to the person you are now, that you’re just keeping out of habit. 2) Save memories in less space-consuming ways, like take pictures of sentimental objects and then get rid of them. Perhaps most important is 3) That thing you’re only saving because it might be worth money? It isn’t. And even if it was, you wouldn’t do anything about it, so just get rid of it already.

    Reply
  122. “I tend to alternate back and forth. I think it comes from having never lived in the same house for more than 2 years growing up. Thus, I hoard things for a couple of years and then I feel the need for a purge.”
    Oh, I could have written that. We moved all the time and I was always losing things. I was a serious horder for a long time because of that, but I also needed space — both real space and psychic space.
    Some things I have learned about decluttering are: 1) Watch out for objects that are no longer really relevant to the person you are now, that you’re just keeping out of habit. 2) Save memories in less space-consuming ways, like take pictures of sentimental objects and then get rid of them. Perhaps most important is 3) That thing you’re only saving because it might be worth money? It isn’t. And even if it was, you wouldn’t do anything about it, so just get rid of it already.

    Reply
  123. “I tend to alternate back and forth. I think it comes from having never lived in the same house for more than 2 years growing up. Thus, I hoard things for a couple of years and then I feel the need for a purge.”
    Oh, I could have written that. We moved all the time and I was always losing things. I was a serious horder for a long time because of that, but I also needed space — both real space and psychic space.
    Some things I have learned about decluttering are: 1) Watch out for objects that are no longer really relevant to the person you are now, that you’re just keeping out of habit. 2) Save memories in less space-consuming ways, like take pictures of sentimental objects and then get rid of them. Perhaps most important is 3) That thing you’re only saving because it might be worth money? It isn’t. And even if it was, you wouldn’t do anything about it, so just get rid of it already.

    Reply
  124. “I tend to alternate back and forth. I think it comes from having never lived in the same house for more than 2 years growing up. Thus, I hoard things for a couple of years and then I feel the need for a purge.”
    Oh, I could have written that. We moved all the time and I was always losing things. I was a serious horder for a long time because of that, but I also needed space — both real space and psychic space.
    Some things I have learned about decluttering are: 1) Watch out for objects that are no longer really relevant to the person you are now, that you’re just keeping out of habit. 2) Save memories in less space-consuming ways, like take pictures of sentimental objects and then get rid of them. Perhaps most important is 3) That thing you’re only saving because it might be worth money? It isn’t. And even if it was, you wouldn’t do anything about it, so just get rid of it already.

    Reply
  125. “I tend to alternate back and forth. I think it comes from having never lived in the same house for more than 2 years growing up. Thus, I hoard things for a couple of years and then I feel the need for a purge.”
    Oh, I could have written that. We moved all the time and I was always losing things. I was a serious horder for a long time because of that, but I also needed space — both real space and psychic space.
    Some things I have learned about decluttering are: 1) Watch out for objects that are no longer really relevant to the person you are now, that you’re just keeping out of habit. 2) Save memories in less space-consuming ways, like take pictures of sentimental objects and then get rid of them. Perhaps most important is 3) That thing you’re only saving because it might be worth money? It isn’t. And even if it was, you wouldn’t do anything about it, so just get rid of it already.

    Reply
  126. I cleaned out my study earlier this year. Best thing i ever did!
    A friend loaned me a fabulous (yet tiny) book called Clear Your Clutter with Feng Shui by Karen Kingston. It was fantastic – so practical, yet all about how it’s not just our houses we’re cluttering up with our stuff (said she with a wardrobe you can’t even open the door of).
    My theory is that by clearing out your study – you’re making room for new ideas and creative things to come in…it sure felt like that to me. But then I didn’t have that really cool looking collection of vinyl πŸ™‚

    Reply
  127. I cleaned out my study earlier this year. Best thing i ever did!
    A friend loaned me a fabulous (yet tiny) book called Clear Your Clutter with Feng Shui by Karen Kingston. It was fantastic – so practical, yet all about how it’s not just our houses we’re cluttering up with our stuff (said she with a wardrobe you can’t even open the door of).
    My theory is that by clearing out your study – you’re making room for new ideas and creative things to come in…it sure felt like that to me. But then I didn’t have that really cool looking collection of vinyl πŸ™‚

    Reply
  128. I cleaned out my study earlier this year. Best thing i ever did!
    A friend loaned me a fabulous (yet tiny) book called Clear Your Clutter with Feng Shui by Karen Kingston. It was fantastic – so practical, yet all about how it’s not just our houses we’re cluttering up with our stuff (said she with a wardrobe you can’t even open the door of).
    My theory is that by clearing out your study – you’re making room for new ideas and creative things to come in…it sure felt like that to me. But then I didn’t have that really cool looking collection of vinyl πŸ™‚

    Reply
  129. I cleaned out my study earlier this year. Best thing i ever did!
    A friend loaned me a fabulous (yet tiny) book called Clear Your Clutter with Feng Shui by Karen Kingston. It was fantastic – so practical, yet all about how it’s not just our houses we’re cluttering up with our stuff (said she with a wardrobe you can’t even open the door of).
    My theory is that by clearing out your study – you’re making room for new ideas and creative things to come in…it sure felt like that to me. But then I didn’t have that really cool looking collection of vinyl πŸ™‚

    Reply
  130. I cleaned out my study earlier this year. Best thing i ever did!
    A friend loaned me a fabulous (yet tiny) book called Clear Your Clutter with Feng Shui by Karen Kingston. It was fantastic – so practical, yet all about how it’s not just our houses we’re cluttering up with our stuff (said she with a wardrobe you can’t even open the door of).
    My theory is that by clearing out your study – you’re making room for new ideas and creative things to come in…it sure felt like that to me. But then I didn’t have that really cool looking collection of vinyl πŸ™‚

    Reply
  131. I lean towards the purging side and would like to purge even more. Of course, I’ve wound up married to a hoarder, so we compromise and meet in the middle πŸ˜‰ Purging doesn’t mean I’m neat! The stuff I do have is scattered everywhere.
    I think purging comes from moving a lot my whole life and mostly feeling suffocated when I have too many “things” to take care of. To me extra “stuff” feels like a burden rather than a treasure. I dream of the day I can hire a professional organizer to straighten us out. If only my husband would agree!

    Reply
  132. I lean towards the purging side and would like to purge even more. Of course, I’ve wound up married to a hoarder, so we compromise and meet in the middle πŸ˜‰ Purging doesn’t mean I’m neat! The stuff I do have is scattered everywhere.
    I think purging comes from moving a lot my whole life and mostly feeling suffocated when I have too many “things” to take care of. To me extra “stuff” feels like a burden rather than a treasure. I dream of the day I can hire a professional organizer to straighten us out. If only my husband would agree!

    Reply
  133. I lean towards the purging side and would like to purge even more. Of course, I’ve wound up married to a hoarder, so we compromise and meet in the middle πŸ˜‰ Purging doesn’t mean I’m neat! The stuff I do have is scattered everywhere.
    I think purging comes from moving a lot my whole life and mostly feeling suffocated when I have too many “things” to take care of. To me extra “stuff” feels like a burden rather than a treasure. I dream of the day I can hire a professional organizer to straighten us out. If only my husband would agree!

    Reply
  134. I lean towards the purging side and would like to purge even more. Of course, I’ve wound up married to a hoarder, so we compromise and meet in the middle πŸ˜‰ Purging doesn’t mean I’m neat! The stuff I do have is scattered everywhere.
    I think purging comes from moving a lot my whole life and mostly feeling suffocated when I have too many “things” to take care of. To me extra “stuff” feels like a burden rather than a treasure. I dream of the day I can hire a professional organizer to straighten us out. If only my husband would agree!

    Reply
  135. I lean towards the purging side and would like to purge even more. Of course, I’ve wound up married to a hoarder, so we compromise and meet in the middle πŸ˜‰ Purging doesn’t mean I’m neat! The stuff I do have is scattered everywhere.
    I think purging comes from moving a lot my whole life and mostly feeling suffocated when I have too many “things” to take care of. To me extra “stuff” feels like a burden rather than a treasure. I dream of the day I can hire a professional organizer to straighten us out. If only my husband would agree!

    Reply
  136. I’m a selective hoarder, I guess. Books cannot be thrown out. I recently had to line another wall completely with bookcases because of that. Things that come from my family, like my grandmother’s sewing machine (which I don’t use), and anything that my grandpa made in his carpentry shop, will remain with me until I die. But anything else that I’m pretty sure I won’t use or can’t enjoy goes into the Good Will box that I keep in the hall closet, before it has a chance to entrench itself into my home. I had to start doing that–throwing things in there right away–because I found that I was storing them for months or years and then finally throwing them out, without ever having used them. So now, when a friend brings me something back from a trip that he’s sure I’ll love (but I don’t), it goes in the box.
    Yesterday I threw out my sofa, but that was for an entirely different reason. There was a dead pigmy rattlesnake inside the bottom of it. (Gotta love those cats:-)

    Reply
  137. I’m a selective hoarder, I guess. Books cannot be thrown out. I recently had to line another wall completely with bookcases because of that. Things that come from my family, like my grandmother’s sewing machine (which I don’t use), and anything that my grandpa made in his carpentry shop, will remain with me until I die. But anything else that I’m pretty sure I won’t use or can’t enjoy goes into the Good Will box that I keep in the hall closet, before it has a chance to entrench itself into my home. I had to start doing that–throwing things in there right away–because I found that I was storing them for months or years and then finally throwing them out, without ever having used them. So now, when a friend brings me something back from a trip that he’s sure I’ll love (but I don’t), it goes in the box.
    Yesterday I threw out my sofa, but that was for an entirely different reason. There was a dead pigmy rattlesnake inside the bottom of it. (Gotta love those cats:-)

    Reply
  138. I’m a selective hoarder, I guess. Books cannot be thrown out. I recently had to line another wall completely with bookcases because of that. Things that come from my family, like my grandmother’s sewing machine (which I don’t use), and anything that my grandpa made in his carpentry shop, will remain with me until I die. But anything else that I’m pretty sure I won’t use or can’t enjoy goes into the Good Will box that I keep in the hall closet, before it has a chance to entrench itself into my home. I had to start doing that–throwing things in there right away–because I found that I was storing them for months or years and then finally throwing them out, without ever having used them. So now, when a friend brings me something back from a trip that he’s sure I’ll love (but I don’t), it goes in the box.
    Yesterday I threw out my sofa, but that was for an entirely different reason. There was a dead pigmy rattlesnake inside the bottom of it. (Gotta love those cats:-)

    Reply
  139. I’m a selective hoarder, I guess. Books cannot be thrown out. I recently had to line another wall completely with bookcases because of that. Things that come from my family, like my grandmother’s sewing machine (which I don’t use), and anything that my grandpa made in his carpentry shop, will remain with me until I die. But anything else that I’m pretty sure I won’t use or can’t enjoy goes into the Good Will box that I keep in the hall closet, before it has a chance to entrench itself into my home. I had to start doing that–throwing things in there right away–because I found that I was storing them for months or years and then finally throwing them out, without ever having used them. So now, when a friend brings me something back from a trip that he’s sure I’ll love (but I don’t), it goes in the box.
    Yesterday I threw out my sofa, but that was for an entirely different reason. There was a dead pigmy rattlesnake inside the bottom of it. (Gotta love those cats:-)

    Reply
  140. I’m a selective hoarder, I guess. Books cannot be thrown out. I recently had to line another wall completely with bookcases because of that. Things that come from my family, like my grandmother’s sewing machine (which I don’t use), and anything that my grandpa made in his carpentry shop, will remain with me until I die. But anything else that I’m pretty sure I won’t use or can’t enjoy goes into the Good Will box that I keep in the hall closet, before it has a chance to entrench itself into my home. I had to start doing that–throwing things in there right away–because I found that I was storing them for months or years and then finally throwing them out, without ever having used them. So now, when a friend brings me something back from a trip that he’s sure I’ll love (but I don’t), it goes in the box.
    Yesterday I threw out my sofa, but that was for an entirely different reason. There was a dead pigmy rattlesnake inside the bottom of it. (Gotta love those cats:-)

    Reply
  141. I’m a bookaholic, I have a very hard time getting rid of books, any books. I also like stuff, my stuff. I unwillingly purged quite a bit of stuff when I moved across the country. The UHaul people gave away my large truck I had reserved and only had a smaller one available. My son said, this will work – so whatever didn’t fit got left behind. No books though, they all came. Oh it was painful, but I started fresh in the new place and have managed to build up quite a lot of stuff again.

    Reply
  142. I’m a bookaholic, I have a very hard time getting rid of books, any books. I also like stuff, my stuff. I unwillingly purged quite a bit of stuff when I moved across the country. The UHaul people gave away my large truck I had reserved and only had a smaller one available. My son said, this will work – so whatever didn’t fit got left behind. No books though, they all came. Oh it was painful, but I started fresh in the new place and have managed to build up quite a lot of stuff again.

    Reply
  143. I’m a bookaholic, I have a very hard time getting rid of books, any books. I also like stuff, my stuff. I unwillingly purged quite a bit of stuff when I moved across the country. The UHaul people gave away my large truck I had reserved and only had a smaller one available. My son said, this will work – so whatever didn’t fit got left behind. No books though, they all came. Oh it was painful, but I started fresh in the new place and have managed to build up quite a lot of stuff again.

    Reply
  144. I’m a bookaholic, I have a very hard time getting rid of books, any books. I also like stuff, my stuff. I unwillingly purged quite a bit of stuff when I moved across the country. The UHaul people gave away my large truck I had reserved and only had a smaller one available. My son said, this will work – so whatever didn’t fit got left behind. No books though, they all came. Oh it was painful, but I started fresh in the new place and have managed to build up quite a lot of stuff again.

    Reply
  145. I’m a bookaholic, I have a very hard time getting rid of books, any books. I also like stuff, my stuff. I unwillingly purged quite a bit of stuff when I moved across the country. The UHaul people gave away my large truck I had reserved and only had a smaller one available. My son said, this will work – so whatever didn’t fit got left behind. No books though, they all came. Oh it was painful, but I started fresh in the new place and have managed to build up quite a lot of stuff again.

    Reply
  146. Oh, I forgot another tip. Clothes do not keep well. You’ll save it for years and then find that it’s torn or stained or just looks ridiculous.
    I’ve actually lost a tremendous amount of weight and can now fit into the very few clothes I sentimentally kept from when I was a teenager and I don’t regret in the slightest letting all the other clothes go. Much more fun to get new clothes than reflect the person I am now.

    Reply
  147. Oh, I forgot another tip. Clothes do not keep well. You’ll save it for years and then find that it’s torn or stained or just looks ridiculous.
    I’ve actually lost a tremendous amount of weight and can now fit into the very few clothes I sentimentally kept from when I was a teenager and I don’t regret in the slightest letting all the other clothes go. Much more fun to get new clothes than reflect the person I am now.

    Reply
  148. Oh, I forgot another tip. Clothes do not keep well. You’ll save it for years and then find that it’s torn or stained or just looks ridiculous.
    I’ve actually lost a tremendous amount of weight and can now fit into the very few clothes I sentimentally kept from when I was a teenager and I don’t regret in the slightest letting all the other clothes go. Much more fun to get new clothes than reflect the person I am now.

    Reply
  149. Oh, I forgot another tip. Clothes do not keep well. You’ll save it for years and then find that it’s torn or stained or just looks ridiculous.
    I’ve actually lost a tremendous amount of weight and can now fit into the very few clothes I sentimentally kept from when I was a teenager and I don’t regret in the slightest letting all the other clothes go. Much more fun to get new clothes than reflect the person I am now.

    Reply
  150. Oh, I forgot another tip. Clothes do not keep well. You’ll save it for years and then find that it’s torn or stained or just looks ridiculous.
    I’ve actually lost a tremendous amount of weight and can now fit into the very few clothes I sentimentally kept from when I was a teenager and I don’t regret in the slightest letting all the other clothes go. Much more fun to get new clothes than reflect the person I am now.

    Reply
  151. I hoard everything. I still have all my papers and books from school. I can’t see to throw away my assortment of baseball and hockey trading cards. I also have a box of receipts that are over ten years old. My reasoning is that I might need them.

    Reply
  152. I hoard everything. I still have all my papers and books from school. I can’t see to throw away my assortment of baseball and hockey trading cards. I also have a box of receipts that are over ten years old. My reasoning is that I might need them.

    Reply
  153. I hoard everything. I still have all my papers and books from school. I can’t see to throw away my assortment of baseball and hockey trading cards. I also have a box of receipts that are over ten years old. My reasoning is that I might need them.

    Reply
  154. I hoard everything. I still have all my papers and books from school. I can’t see to throw away my assortment of baseball and hockey trading cards. I also have a box of receipts that are over ten years old. My reasoning is that I might need them.

    Reply
  155. I hoard everything. I still have all my papers and books from school. I can’t see to throw away my assortment of baseball and hockey trading cards. I also have a box of receipts that are over ten years old. My reasoning is that I might need them.

    Reply
  156. Hmmm…I’m a three year hoarder. Still, it takes my daughter coming home and saying, “Mom, that shirt never looked good on you.” or “Those pants make your stomach look HUGE.” sigh…
    I put them in the DAV bag and rationalize that I can get tax credit.
    Anne, I commend you for at least dragging it out to look at the mess. (I also LOVE your books. Glad that you’re a wench.)
    I also save stacks of books. And boxes. And I’m thinking about a new bookcase.
    I think that biblioholics like it sounds we all are cannot be reformed. or want to.

    Reply
  157. Hmmm…I’m a three year hoarder. Still, it takes my daughter coming home and saying, “Mom, that shirt never looked good on you.” or “Those pants make your stomach look HUGE.” sigh…
    I put them in the DAV bag and rationalize that I can get tax credit.
    Anne, I commend you for at least dragging it out to look at the mess. (I also LOVE your books. Glad that you’re a wench.)
    I also save stacks of books. And boxes. And I’m thinking about a new bookcase.
    I think that biblioholics like it sounds we all are cannot be reformed. or want to.

    Reply
  158. Hmmm…I’m a three year hoarder. Still, it takes my daughter coming home and saying, “Mom, that shirt never looked good on you.” or “Those pants make your stomach look HUGE.” sigh…
    I put them in the DAV bag and rationalize that I can get tax credit.
    Anne, I commend you for at least dragging it out to look at the mess. (I also LOVE your books. Glad that you’re a wench.)
    I also save stacks of books. And boxes. And I’m thinking about a new bookcase.
    I think that biblioholics like it sounds we all are cannot be reformed. or want to.

    Reply
  159. Hmmm…I’m a three year hoarder. Still, it takes my daughter coming home and saying, “Mom, that shirt never looked good on you.” or “Those pants make your stomach look HUGE.” sigh…
    I put them in the DAV bag and rationalize that I can get tax credit.
    Anne, I commend you for at least dragging it out to look at the mess. (I also LOVE your books. Glad that you’re a wench.)
    I also save stacks of books. And boxes. And I’m thinking about a new bookcase.
    I think that biblioholics like it sounds we all are cannot be reformed. or want to.

    Reply
  160. Hmmm…I’m a three year hoarder. Still, it takes my daughter coming home and saying, “Mom, that shirt never looked good on you.” or “Those pants make your stomach look HUGE.” sigh…
    I put them in the DAV bag and rationalize that I can get tax credit.
    Anne, I commend you for at least dragging it out to look at the mess. (I also LOVE your books. Glad that you’re a wench.)
    I also save stacks of books. And boxes. And I’m thinking about a new bookcase.
    I think that biblioholics like it sounds we all are cannot be reformed. or want to.

    Reply
  161. Liz, I know it’s possible to turn the LPs into digital files, but I’ve never investigate it. perhaps I should. I hear you on the “look at what’s important message” and looking after Stuff isn’t, I agree.
    Cookbooks… I read somewhere that Australians have one of the highest rates of cookbook ownership in the world. The reason is our cookbooks all have masses of color pictures — so really, it’s just food porn;)
    Willaful, great advice. I do think some of my stuff is to do with the person I was. I never save stuff to make money, though –in fact at the garage sale we had when we were cleaning out my parents’ house, my sister sacked me for selling everything too cheaply. LOL. Stuff is never worth as much as you think it is, so you feel ripped off. Far better to give it to charity to make any money off it.
    Robyn e, thanks for the book recommendation . I’ll see if my library has it. You have no idea how much mileage my friends would make of it if I bought a book about clutter to help me get rid of book. πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  162. Liz, I know it’s possible to turn the LPs into digital files, but I’ve never investigate it. perhaps I should. I hear you on the “look at what’s important message” and looking after Stuff isn’t, I agree.
    Cookbooks… I read somewhere that Australians have one of the highest rates of cookbook ownership in the world. The reason is our cookbooks all have masses of color pictures — so really, it’s just food porn;)
    Willaful, great advice. I do think some of my stuff is to do with the person I was. I never save stuff to make money, though –in fact at the garage sale we had when we were cleaning out my parents’ house, my sister sacked me for selling everything too cheaply. LOL. Stuff is never worth as much as you think it is, so you feel ripped off. Far better to give it to charity to make any money off it.
    Robyn e, thanks for the book recommendation . I’ll see if my library has it. You have no idea how much mileage my friends would make of it if I bought a book about clutter to help me get rid of book. πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  163. Liz, I know it’s possible to turn the LPs into digital files, but I’ve never investigate it. perhaps I should. I hear you on the “look at what’s important message” and looking after Stuff isn’t, I agree.
    Cookbooks… I read somewhere that Australians have one of the highest rates of cookbook ownership in the world. The reason is our cookbooks all have masses of color pictures — so really, it’s just food porn;)
    Willaful, great advice. I do think some of my stuff is to do with the person I was. I never save stuff to make money, though –in fact at the garage sale we had when we were cleaning out my parents’ house, my sister sacked me for selling everything too cheaply. LOL. Stuff is never worth as much as you think it is, so you feel ripped off. Far better to give it to charity to make any money off it.
    Robyn e, thanks for the book recommendation . I’ll see if my library has it. You have no idea how much mileage my friends would make of it if I bought a book about clutter to help me get rid of book. πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  164. Liz, I know it’s possible to turn the LPs into digital files, but I’ve never investigate it. perhaps I should. I hear you on the “look at what’s important message” and looking after Stuff isn’t, I agree.
    Cookbooks… I read somewhere that Australians have one of the highest rates of cookbook ownership in the world. The reason is our cookbooks all have masses of color pictures — so really, it’s just food porn;)
    Willaful, great advice. I do think some of my stuff is to do with the person I was. I never save stuff to make money, though –in fact at the garage sale we had when we were cleaning out my parents’ house, my sister sacked me for selling everything too cheaply. LOL. Stuff is never worth as much as you think it is, so you feel ripped off. Far better to give it to charity to make any money off it.
    Robyn e, thanks for the book recommendation . I’ll see if my library has it. You have no idea how much mileage my friends would make of it if I bought a book about clutter to help me get rid of book. πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  165. Liz, I know it’s possible to turn the LPs into digital files, but I’ve never investigate it. perhaps I should. I hear you on the “look at what’s important message” and looking after Stuff isn’t, I agree.
    Cookbooks… I read somewhere that Australians have one of the highest rates of cookbook ownership in the world. The reason is our cookbooks all have masses of color pictures — so really, it’s just food porn;)
    Willaful, great advice. I do think some of my stuff is to do with the person I was. I never save stuff to make money, though –in fact at the garage sale we had when we were cleaning out my parents’ house, my sister sacked me for selling everything too cheaply. LOL. Stuff is never worth as much as you think it is, so you feel ripped off. Far better to give it to charity to make any money off it.
    Robyn e, thanks for the book recommendation . I’ll see if my library has it. You have no idea how much mileage my friends would make of it if I bought a book about clutter to help me get rid of book. πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  166. Jill, that’s how I felt with my study stuff — suffocated. It’s painful tossing it, but afterwards I felt so much better.
    And hopefully Robyn is right and i’ll be more creative in here.
    Stephie, I’m about to give away an old treadle that I’ve never used. I found that a friend of mine had been looking for one and when I said she could have mine, she was thrilled. So that’s both of us happy. Love the cat gifts. My old cat died a couple of years ago, so we haven’t had any of those surprises for a while.
    Giving away gifts I don’t like or want is also something I have to learn to do. The guilt…
    Barbara, I think we’re a community of bookaholics here. This house was beautifully bare when I moved here, too (apart from lots of books) but now it’s not. I’ve made a resolution that for every bag or box I bring in, I’ll take two out.

    Reply
  167. Jill, that’s how I felt with my study stuff — suffocated. It’s painful tossing it, but afterwards I felt so much better.
    And hopefully Robyn is right and i’ll be more creative in here.
    Stephie, I’m about to give away an old treadle that I’ve never used. I found that a friend of mine had been looking for one and when I said she could have mine, she was thrilled. So that’s both of us happy. Love the cat gifts. My old cat died a couple of years ago, so we haven’t had any of those surprises for a while.
    Giving away gifts I don’t like or want is also something I have to learn to do. The guilt…
    Barbara, I think we’re a community of bookaholics here. This house was beautifully bare when I moved here, too (apart from lots of books) but now it’s not. I’ve made a resolution that for every bag or box I bring in, I’ll take two out.

    Reply
  168. Jill, that’s how I felt with my study stuff — suffocated. It’s painful tossing it, but afterwards I felt so much better.
    And hopefully Robyn is right and i’ll be more creative in here.
    Stephie, I’m about to give away an old treadle that I’ve never used. I found that a friend of mine had been looking for one and when I said she could have mine, she was thrilled. So that’s both of us happy. Love the cat gifts. My old cat died a couple of years ago, so we haven’t had any of those surprises for a while.
    Giving away gifts I don’t like or want is also something I have to learn to do. The guilt…
    Barbara, I think we’re a community of bookaholics here. This house was beautifully bare when I moved here, too (apart from lots of books) but now it’s not. I’ve made a resolution that for every bag or box I bring in, I’ll take two out.

    Reply
  169. Jill, that’s how I felt with my study stuff — suffocated. It’s painful tossing it, but afterwards I felt so much better.
    And hopefully Robyn is right and i’ll be more creative in here.
    Stephie, I’m about to give away an old treadle that I’ve never used. I found that a friend of mine had been looking for one and when I said she could have mine, she was thrilled. So that’s both of us happy. Love the cat gifts. My old cat died a couple of years ago, so we haven’t had any of those surprises for a while.
    Giving away gifts I don’t like or want is also something I have to learn to do. The guilt…
    Barbara, I think we’re a community of bookaholics here. This house was beautifully bare when I moved here, too (apart from lots of books) but now it’s not. I’ve made a resolution that for every bag or box I bring in, I’ll take two out.

    Reply
  170. Jill, that’s how I felt with my study stuff — suffocated. It’s painful tossing it, but afterwards I felt so much better.
    And hopefully Robyn is right and i’ll be more creative in here.
    Stephie, I’m about to give away an old treadle that I’ve never used. I found that a friend of mine had been looking for one and when I said she could have mine, she was thrilled. So that’s both of us happy. Love the cat gifts. My old cat died a couple of years ago, so we haven’t had any of those surprises for a while.
    Giving away gifts I don’t like or want is also something I have to learn to do. The guilt…
    Barbara, I think we’re a community of bookaholics here. This house was beautifully bare when I moved here, too (apart from lots of books) but now it’s not. I’ve made a resolution that for every bag or box I bring in, I’ll take two out.

    Reply
  171. Willaful, congratulations on the weight loss. Must be fun putting on those teenage clothes — but yes, it’s great to reward yourself with new ones.
    Cyclops8, we’re supposed to keep my tax stuff for 5 years, but I’ve just filled a box with receipts old enough to vote! The history gene is whimpering, but I’m ignoring him.
    Suzy, thanks — I’m glad to be a wench, too. Still feeling thrilled about it, actually.
    And re dragging out the mess, I had unexpected visitors yesterday and you should have seen them recoil at the mess at the end of the living room. And then poke though the stuff I’d tossed, saying about this or that, “Oh, you can’t throw this out.”

    Reply
  172. Willaful, congratulations on the weight loss. Must be fun putting on those teenage clothes — but yes, it’s great to reward yourself with new ones.
    Cyclops8, we’re supposed to keep my tax stuff for 5 years, but I’ve just filled a box with receipts old enough to vote! The history gene is whimpering, but I’m ignoring him.
    Suzy, thanks — I’m glad to be a wench, too. Still feeling thrilled about it, actually.
    And re dragging out the mess, I had unexpected visitors yesterday and you should have seen them recoil at the mess at the end of the living room. And then poke though the stuff I’d tossed, saying about this or that, “Oh, you can’t throw this out.”

    Reply
  173. Willaful, congratulations on the weight loss. Must be fun putting on those teenage clothes — but yes, it’s great to reward yourself with new ones.
    Cyclops8, we’re supposed to keep my tax stuff for 5 years, but I’ve just filled a box with receipts old enough to vote! The history gene is whimpering, but I’m ignoring him.
    Suzy, thanks — I’m glad to be a wench, too. Still feeling thrilled about it, actually.
    And re dragging out the mess, I had unexpected visitors yesterday and you should have seen them recoil at the mess at the end of the living room. And then poke though the stuff I’d tossed, saying about this or that, “Oh, you can’t throw this out.”

    Reply
  174. Willaful, congratulations on the weight loss. Must be fun putting on those teenage clothes — but yes, it’s great to reward yourself with new ones.
    Cyclops8, we’re supposed to keep my tax stuff for 5 years, but I’ve just filled a box with receipts old enough to vote! The history gene is whimpering, but I’m ignoring him.
    Suzy, thanks — I’m glad to be a wench, too. Still feeling thrilled about it, actually.
    And re dragging out the mess, I had unexpected visitors yesterday and you should have seen them recoil at the mess at the end of the living room. And then poke though the stuff I’d tossed, saying about this or that, “Oh, you can’t throw this out.”

    Reply
  175. Willaful, congratulations on the weight loss. Must be fun putting on those teenage clothes — but yes, it’s great to reward yourself with new ones.
    Cyclops8, we’re supposed to keep my tax stuff for 5 years, but I’ve just filled a box with receipts old enough to vote! The history gene is whimpering, but I’m ignoring him.
    Suzy, thanks — I’m glad to be a wench, too. Still feeling thrilled about it, actually.
    And re dragging out the mess, I had unexpected visitors yesterday and you should have seen them recoil at the mess at the end of the living room. And then poke though the stuff I’d tossed, saying about this or that, “Oh, you can’t throw this out.”

    Reply
  176. Cheryl C, Sue, Barbara, JudiDW, you’re all in good company here, I think.
    And yes, moving house is a good way to enforce a purge. As are renovations.
    As for recycling old clothes, when my niece when to live with my parents while she was doing a course nearby, she had a great time digging through Nan’s closet and coming up with all sorts of cool 60’s clothes.

    Reply
  177. Cheryl C, Sue, Barbara, JudiDW, you’re all in good company here, I think.
    And yes, moving house is a good way to enforce a purge. As are renovations.
    As for recycling old clothes, when my niece when to live with my parents while she was doing a course nearby, she had a great time digging through Nan’s closet and coming up with all sorts of cool 60’s clothes.

    Reply
  178. Cheryl C, Sue, Barbara, JudiDW, you’re all in good company here, I think.
    And yes, moving house is a good way to enforce a purge. As are renovations.
    As for recycling old clothes, when my niece when to live with my parents while she was doing a course nearby, she had a great time digging through Nan’s closet and coming up with all sorts of cool 60’s clothes.

    Reply
  179. Cheryl C, Sue, Barbara, JudiDW, you’re all in good company here, I think.
    And yes, moving house is a good way to enforce a purge. As are renovations.
    As for recycling old clothes, when my niece when to live with my parents while she was doing a course nearby, she had a great time digging through Nan’s closet and coming up with all sorts of cool 60’s clothes.

    Reply
  180. Cheryl C, Sue, Barbara, JudiDW, you’re all in good company here, I think.
    And yes, moving house is a good way to enforce a purge. As are renovations.
    As for recycling old clothes, when my niece when to live with my parents while she was doing a course nearby, she had a great time digging through Nan’s closet and coming up with all sorts of cool 60’s clothes.

    Reply
  181. Janice, what a great post.
    … “especially the widows of the “honey, I’ll take care of it” generations – to some I think tossing these papers their husbands had worked on seemed as disrespectful to them as me smashing my mother’s china would have been.”
    I think that’s the problem with so much stuff — we have personal associations with it, and it’s those associations we’re unable to toss.
    I have a dresser full of beautiful china that my mother gave me, or came from my grandmother, and I never use them. I’ve been toying with the idea of passing on my everyday china and using the “good” china instead.

    Reply
  182. Janice, what a great post.
    … “especially the widows of the “honey, I’ll take care of it” generations – to some I think tossing these papers their husbands had worked on seemed as disrespectful to them as me smashing my mother’s china would have been.”
    I think that’s the problem with so much stuff — we have personal associations with it, and it’s those associations we’re unable to toss.
    I have a dresser full of beautiful china that my mother gave me, or came from my grandmother, and I never use them. I’ve been toying with the idea of passing on my everyday china and using the “good” china instead.

    Reply
  183. Janice, what a great post.
    … “especially the widows of the “honey, I’ll take care of it” generations – to some I think tossing these papers their husbands had worked on seemed as disrespectful to them as me smashing my mother’s china would have been.”
    I think that’s the problem with so much stuff — we have personal associations with it, and it’s those associations we’re unable to toss.
    I have a dresser full of beautiful china that my mother gave me, or came from my grandmother, and I never use them. I’ve been toying with the idea of passing on my everyday china and using the “good” china instead.

    Reply
  184. Janice, what a great post.
    … “especially the widows of the “honey, I’ll take care of it” generations – to some I think tossing these papers their husbands had worked on seemed as disrespectful to them as me smashing my mother’s china would have been.”
    I think that’s the problem with so much stuff — we have personal associations with it, and it’s those associations we’re unable to toss.
    I have a dresser full of beautiful china that my mother gave me, or came from my grandmother, and I never use them. I’ve been toying with the idea of passing on my everyday china and using the “good” china instead.

    Reply
  185. Janice, what a great post.
    … “especially the widows of the “honey, I’ll take care of it” generations – to some I think tossing these papers their husbands had worked on seemed as disrespectful to them as me smashing my mother’s china would have been.”
    I think that’s the problem with so much stuff — we have personal associations with it, and it’s those associations we’re unable to toss.
    I have a dresser full of beautiful china that my mother gave me, or came from my grandmother, and I never use them. I’ve been toying with the idea of passing on my everyday china and using the “good” china instead.

    Reply
  186. I hoard my children’s art, all the little stick figures and popsicle masterpieces and dried-noodle-with-glitter-glue objects, because I’m afraid they’ll stop creating from one day to the next. I also keep old personal correspondence – I love the proof that someone thought enough of me to make the effort of putting pen to paper with personalized thoughts.
    I’ve found those purging shows follow one of two paths – the kind of friend of mine was on (and is still embittered about and shaken by) where the host is absolutely ruthless about sacrificing everything to create space (was friend was forced to sacrifice child art), and the kind where the host recognizes that for some kinds of hoarding, there is more at stake than mere logic. I remember an episode where a woman’s home was impassibly cluttered with items from her deceased parents that were more or less unusable (broken etc) and the host found the key to her agreement to give it up by keeping tiny bits for new uses, like a piece of tattered quilt as an insert on the front cover of a photo album. I really love it when people on these shows aren’t ridiculed.

    Reply
  187. I hoard my children’s art, all the little stick figures and popsicle masterpieces and dried-noodle-with-glitter-glue objects, because I’m afraid they’ll stop creating from one day to the next. I also keep old personal correspondence – I love the proof that someone thought enough of me to make the effort of putting pen to paper with personalized thoughts.
    I’ve found those purging shows follow one of two paths – the kind of friend of mine was on (and is still embittered about and shaken by) where the host is absolutely ruthless about sacrificing everything to create space (was friend was forced to sacrifice child art), and the kind where the host recognizes that for some kinds of hoarding, there is more at stake than mere logic. I remember an episode where a woman’s home was impassibly cluttered with items from her deceased parents that were more or less unusable (broken etc) and the host found the key to her agreement to give it up by keeping tiny bits for new uses, like a piece of tattered quilt as an insert on the front cover of a photo album. I really love it when people on these shows aren’t ridiculed.

    Reply
  188. I hoard my children’s art, all the little stick figures and popsicle masterpieces and dried-noodle-with-glitter-glue objects, because I’m afraid they’ll stop creating from one day to the next. I also keep old personal correspondence – I love the proof that someone thought enough of me to make the effort of putting pen to paper with personalized thoughts.
    I’ve found those purging shows follow one of two paths – the kind of friend of mine was on (and is still embittered about and shaken by) where the host is absolutely ruthless about sacrificing everything to create space (was friend was forced to sacrifice child art), and the kind where the host recognizes that for some kinds of hoarding, there is more at stake than mere logic. I remember an episode where a woman’s home was impassibly cluttered with items from her deceased parents that were more or less unusable (broken etc) and the host found the key to her agreement to give it up by keeping tiny bits for new uses, like a piece of tattered quilt as an insert on the front cover of a photo album. I really love it when people on these shows aren’t ridiculed.

    Reply
  189. I hoard my children’s art, all the little stick figures and popsicle masterpieces and dried-noodle-with-glitter-glue objects, because I’m afraid they’ll stop creating from one day to the next. I also keep old personal correspondence – I love the proof that someone thought enough of me to make the effort of putting pen to paper with personalized thoughts.
    I’ve found those purging shows follow one of two paths – the kind of friend of mine was on (and is still embittered about and shaken by) where the host is absolutely ruthless about sacrificing everything to create space (was friend was forced to sacrifice child art), and the kind where the host recognizes that for some kinds of hoarding, there is more at stake than mere logic. I remember an episode where a woman’s home was impassibly cluttered with items from her deceased parents that were more or less unusable (broken etc) and the host found the key to her agreement to give it up by keeping tiny bits for new uses, like a piece of tattered quilt as an insert on the front cover of a photo album. I really love it when people on these shows aren’t ridiculed.

    Reply
  190. I hoard my children’s art, all the little stick figures and popsicle masterpieces and dried-noodle-with-glitter-glue objects, because I’m afraid they’ll stop creating from one day to the next. I also keep old personal correspondence – I love the proof that someone thought enough of me to make the effort of putting pen to paper with personalized thoughts.
    I’ve found those purging shows follow one of two paths – the kind of friend of mine was on (and is still embittered about and shaken by) where the host is absolutely ruthless about sacrificing everything to create space (was friend was forced to sacrifice child art), and the kind where the host recognizes that for some kinds of hoarding, there is more at stake than mere logic. I remember an episode where a woman’s home was impassibly cluttered with items from her deceased parents that were more or less unusable (broken etc) and the host found the key to her agreement to give it up by keeping tiny bits for new uses, like a piece of tattered quilt as an insert on the front cover of a photo album. I really love it when people on these shows aren’t ridiculed.

    Reply
  191. I too, am a selective hoarder. I keep things that are beyond reason and toss things others would think are gold.
    I have textbooks from my last three years in school, oh…35+ years ago now, along with every book I’ve ever bought since then. When we moved in 2001, we had to rent an extra storage unit just for my books and bears and other collectibles because there wasn’t enough room in the big unit.
    I was cured of throwing anything out during that move though. I’d gone through and faithfully weeded out everything I thought I wouldn’t need, and I was proud of how brutal I was about it all. I had a huge stack of boxes and bags to take to the curb and a small stack to go into storage. I explained to the DH to take the huge stack to the curb, the smaller stack to the truck. He took both to the curb while I was gone just in time for the garbage pick up.
    *sigh* Our wedding pictures were in that smaller stack.
    I have one picture now. It’s a big one in a frame and it’s in my bedroom. The only one I have left. And the worst part is, my dad had a stroke the day we married and things were so busy, I don’t really remember much about the wedding itself or the reception. Just the hospital before and after, and my mother having to take my dad’s place walking me down the aisle. The only things I had to remind me were those pictures.
    I don’t throw much of anything out now, and the DH touches NOTHING!
    Good thing I love him so much. He’d have gone out in the next batch of boxes…

    Reply
  192. I too, am a selective hoarder. I keep things that are beyond reason and toss things others would think are gold.
    I have textbooks from my last three years in school, oh…35+ years ago now, along with every book I’ve ever bought since then. When we moved in 2001, we had to rent an extra storage unit just for my books and bears and other collectibles because there wasn’t enough room in the big unit.
    I was cured of throwing anything out during that move though. I’d gone through and faithfully weeded out everything I thought I wouldn’t need, and I was proud of how brutal I was about it all. I had a huge stack of boxes and bags to take to the curb and a small stack to go into storage. I explained to the DH to take the huge stack to the curb, the smaller stack to the truck. He took both to the curb while I was gone just in time for the garbage pick up.
    *sigh* Our wedding pictures were in that smaller stack.
    I have one picture now. It’s a big one in a frame and it’s in my bedroom. The only one I have left. And the worst part is, my dad had a stroke the day we married and things were so busy, I don’t really remember much about the wedding itself or the reception. Just the hospital before and after, and my mother having to take my dad’s place walking me down the aisle. The only things I had to remind me were those pictures.
    I don’t throw much of anything out now, and the DH touches NOTHING!
    Good thing I love him so much. He’d have gone out in the next batch of boxes…

    Reply
  193. I too, am a selective hoarder. I keep things that are beyond reason and toss things others would think are gold.
    I have textbooks from my last three years in school, oh…35+ years ago now, along with every book I’ve ever bought since then. When we moved in 2001, we had to rent an extra storage unit just for my books and bears and other collectibles because there wasn’t enough room in the big unit.
    I was cured of throwing anything out during that move though. I’d gone through and faithfully weeded out everything I thought I wouldn’t need, and I was proud of how brutal I was about it all. I had a huge stack of boxes and bags to take to the curb and a small stack to go into storage. I explained to the DH to take the huge stack to the curb, the smaller stack to the truck. He took both to the curb while I was gone just in time for the garbage pick up.
    *sigh* Our wedding pictures were in that smaller stack.
    I have one picture now. It’s a big one in a frame and it’s in my bedroom. The only one I have left. And the worst part is, my dad had a stroke the day we married and things were so busy, I don’t really remember much about the wedding itself or the reception. Just the hospital before and after, and my mother having to take my dad’s place walking me down the aisle. The only things I had to remind me were those pictures.
    I don’t throw much of anything out now, and the DH touches NOTHING!
    Good thing I love him so much. He’d have gone out in the next batch of boxes…

    Reply
  194. I too, am a selective hoarder. I keep things that are beyond reason and toss things others would think are gold.
    I have textbooks from my last three years in school, oh…35+ years ago now, along with every book I’ve ever bought since then. When we moved in 2001, we had to rent an extra storage unit just for my books and bears and other collectibles because there wasn’t enough room in the big unit.
    I was cured of throwing anything out during that move though. I’d gone through and faithfully weeded out everything I thought I wouldn’t need, and I was proud of how brutal I was about it all. I had a huge stack of boxes and bags to take to the curb and a small stack to go into storage. I explained to the DH to take the huge stack to the curb, the smaller stack to the truck. He took both to the curb while I was gone just in time for the garbage pick up.
    *sigh* Our wedding pictures were in that smaller stack.
    I have one picture now. It’s a big one in a frame and it’s in my bedroom. The only one I have left. And the worst part is, my dad had a stroke the day we married and things were so busy, I don’t really remember much about the wedding itself or the reception. Just the hospital before and after, and my mother having to take my dad’s place walking me down the aisle. The only things I had to remind me were those pictures.
    I don’t throw much of anything out now, and the DH touches NOTHING!
    Good thing I love him so much. He’d have gone out in the next batch of boxes…

    Reply
  195. I too, am a selective hoarder. I keep things that are beyond reason and toss things others would think are gold.
    I have textbooks from my last three years in school, oh…35+ years ago now, along with every book I’ve ever bought since then. When we moved in 2001, we had to rent an extra storage unit just for my books and bears and other collectibles because there wasn’t enough room in the big unit.
    I was cured of throwing anything out during that move though. I’d gone through and faithfully weeded out everything I thought I wouldn’t need, and I was proud of how brutal I was about it all. I had a huge stack of boxes and bags to take to the curb and a small stack to go into storage. I explained to the DH to take the huge stack to the curb, the smaller stack to the truck. He took both to the curb while I was gone just in time for the garbage pick up.
    *sigh* Our wedding pictures were in that smaller stack.
    I have one picture now. It’s a big one in a frame and it’s in my bedroom. The only one I have left. And the worst part is, my dad had a stroke the day we married and things were so busy, I don’t really remember much about the wedding itself or the reception. Just the hospital before and after, and my mother having to take my dad’s place walking me down the aisle. The only things I had to remind me were those pictures.
    I don’t throw much of anything out now, and the DH touches NOTHING!
    Good thing I love him so much. He’d have gone out in the next batch of boxes…

    Reply
  196. Maya, I have several boxes of old letters. When we were clearing out my parent’s house, I found some cards I’d made my dad when I was around 5 or 6 and he’d kept them all these years. I was so touched. And we found some letters, too which were precious, including some beautiful love letters Dad wrote to my mother.
    I’m with you on those shows. I think the ruthless ones are rude and insulting, and also counter-productive. All they do is rob the person and leave them feeling traumatized and I’m sure they’ll go back to collecting clutter. It’s a process, and you have to take in individual differences and help them (us?) create a system that works for them.
    Re the typos, it is another rule of the universe that you can check a post several times and the only time you’ll spot the typos are when you’ve clicked “post” or “send.” And for some reason the typo is the only thing you can see as it fades off the screen… taunting you…
    Theo, how awful to lose your wedding photos. Especially a wedding in such difficult and upsetting circumstances. But the comforting thing is that it took — the wedding, I mean. It obviously worked.

    Reply
  197. Maya, I have several boxes of old letters. When we were clearing out my parent’s house, I found some cards I’d made my dad when I was around 5 or 6 and he’d kept them all these years. I was so touched. And we found some letters, too which were precious, including some beautiful love letters Dad wrote to my mother.
    I’m with you on those shows. I think the ruthless ones are rude and insulting, and also counter-productive. All they do is rob the person and leave them feeling traumatized and I’m sure they’ll go back to collecting clutter. It’s a process, and you have to take in individual differences and help them (us?) create a system that works for them.
    Re the typos, it is another rule of the universe that you can check a post several times and the only time you’ll spot the typos are when you’ve clicked “post” or “send.” And for some reason the typo is the only thing you can see as it fades off the screen… taunting you…
    Theo, how awful to lose your wedding photos. Especially a wedding in such difficult and upsetting circumstances. But the comforting thing is that it took — the wedding, I mean. It obviously worked.

    Reply
  198. Maya, I have several boxes of old letters. When we were clearing out my parent’s house, I found some cards I’d made my dad when I was around 5 or 6 and he’d kept them all these years. I was so touched. And we found some letters, too which were precious, including some beautiful love letters Dad wrote to my mother.
    I’m with you on those shows. I think the ruthless ones are rude and insulting, and also counter-productive. All they do is rob the person and leave them feeling traumatized and I’m sure they’ll go back to collecting clutter. It’s a process, and you have to take in individual differences and help them (us?) create a system that works for them.
    Re the typos, it is another rule of the universe that you can check a post several times and the only time you’ll spot the typos are when you’ve clicked “post” or “send.” And for some reason the typo is the only thing you can see as it fades off the screen… taunting you…
    Theo, how awful to lose your wedding photos. Especially a wedding in such difficult and upsetting circumstances. But the comforting thing is that it took — the wedding, I mean. It obviously worked.

    Reply
  199. Maya, I have several boxes of old letters. When we were clearing out my parent’s house, I found some cards I’d made my dad when I was around 5 or 6 and he’d kept them all these years. I was so touched. And we found some letters, too which were precious, including some beautiful love letters Dad wrote to my mother.
    I’m with you on those shows. I think the ruthless ones are rude and insulting, and also counter-productive. All they do is rob the person and leave them feeling traumatized and I’m sure they’ll go back to collecting clutter. It’s a process, and you have to take in individual differences and help them (us?) create a system that works for them.
    Re the typos, it is another rule of the universe that you can check a post several times and the only time you’ll spot the typos are when you’ve clicked “post” or “send.” And for some reason the typo is the only thing you can see as it fades off the screen… taunting you…
    Theo, how awful to lose your wedding photos. Especially a wedding in such difficult and upsetting circumstances. But the comforting thing is that it took — the wedding, I mean. It obviously worked.

    Reply
  200. Maya, I have several boxes of old letters. When we were clearing out my parent’s house, I found some cards I’d made my dad when I was around 5 or 6 and he’d kept them all these years. I was so touched. And we found some letters, too which were precious, including some beautiful love letters Dad wrote to my mother.
    I’m with you on those shows. I think the ruthless ones are rude and insulting, and also counter-productive. All they do is rob the person and leave them feeling traumatized and I’m sure they’ll go back to collecting clutter. It’s a process, and you have to take in individual differences and help them (us?) create a system that works for them.
    Re the typos, it is another rule of the universe that you can check a post several times and the only time you’ll spot the typos are when you’ve clicked “post” or “send.” And for some reason the typo is the only thing you can see as it fades off the screen… taunting you…
    Theo, how awful to lose your wedding photos. Especially a wedding in such difficult and upsetting circumstances. But the comforting thing is that it took — the wedding, I mean. It obviously worked.

    Reply
  201. I don’t know. It was touch-and-go when I found out he’d tossed the pictures! πŸ˜› Really though, we’ll be married 28 years this March, together for 31, I suppose I can cut him a little slack πŸ˜‰
    One of the other shows I find interesting is “What not to wear” which you probably don’t have there. But the client is recommended by their friends or relatives for a complete do-over, given a $5,000 shopping card and trip to NYC and then they’re walked through changing their style from trainwreck hobo to ‘now’. I wonder if they go back to their old ways within a few weeks of having the make-over.

    Reply
  202. I don’t know. It was touch-and-go when I found out he’d tossed the pictures! πŸ˜› Really though, we’ll be married 28 years this March, together for 31, I suppose I can cut him a little slack πŸ˜‰
    One of the other shows I find interesting is “What not to wear” which you probably don’t have there. But the client is recommended by their friends or relatives for a complete do-over, given a $5,000 shopping card and trip to NYC and then they’re walked through changing their style from trainwreck hobo to ‘now’. I wonder if they go back to their old ways within a few weeks of having the make-over.

    Reply
  203. I don’t know. It was touch-and-go when I found out he’d tossed the pictures! πŸ˜› Really though, we’ll be married 28 years this March, together for 31, I suppose I can cut him a little slack πŸ˜‰
    One of the other shows I find interesting is “What not to wear” which you probably don’t have there. But the client is recommended by their friends or relatives for a complete do-over, given a $5,000 shopping card and trip to NYC and then they’re walked through changing their style from trainwreck hobo to ‘now’. I wonder if they go back to their old ways within a few weeks of having the make-over.

    Reply
  204. I don’t know. It was touch-and-go when I found out he’d tossed the pictures! πŸ˜› Really though, we’ll be married 28 years this March, together for 31, I suppose I can cut him a little slack πŸ˜‰
    One of the other shows I find interesting is “What not to wear” which you probably don’t have there. But the client is recommended by their friends or relatives for a complete do-over, given a $5,000 shopping card and trip to NYC and then they’re walked through changing their style from trainwreck hobo to ‘now’. I wonder if they go back to their old ways within a few weeks of having the make-over.

    Reply
  205. I don’t know. It was touch-and-go when I found out he’d tossed the pictures! πŸ˜› Really though, we’ll be married 28 years this March, together for 31, I suppose I can cut him a little slack πŸ˜‰
    One of the other shows I find interesting is “What not to wear” which you probably don’t have there. But the client is recommended by their friends or relatives for a complete do-over, given a $5,000 shopping card and trip to NYC and then they’re walked through changing their style from trainwreck hobo to ‘now’. I wonder if they go back to their old ways within a few weeks of having the make-over.

    Reply
  206. I am a hoarder. It definitely comes from having a mother who was a tosser- a BIG TIME tosser. If it was in her house, it was hers to toss. While I was away at college, she tossed MY stuff that *she* didn’t think I needed anymore.
    She tossed my complete collection of Cherry Ames books. She tossed my high school uniform. She tossed a FIRST EDITION of Mary Poppins! (Her defense? “It’s a kid’s book.”)
    Then there’s the story of the funny little peach colored piece of plastic in the kitchen drawer that I tossed because I could NOT figure out what it was. Next time I reached for my BEAUTIFUL, GORGEOUS special umbrella? Voila! That little thing on the tip was missing- and the umbrella now really would “poke your eye out”.
    Add in a major crafty gene- crochet (storing yarn), scrapbooking (albums,tools and paper supplies galore), needlework (fabric and threads and scroll rods and fancy scissors) and quilting (more fabric, hoops and frames, more tools and gizmos), plus some tatting, some painting, etc, etc….well what can I say?
    All THAT explains my cluttered, overcrowded house!

    Reply
  207. I am a hoarder. It definitely comes from having a mother who was a tosser- a BIG TIME tosser. If it was in her house, it was hers to toss. While I was away at college, she tossed MY stuff that *she* didn’t think I needed anymore.
    She tossed my complete collection of Cherry Ames books. She tossed my high school uniform. She tossed a FIRST EDITION of Mary Poppins! (Her defense? “It’s a kid’s book.”)
    Then there’s the story of the funny little peach colored piece of plastic in the kitchen drawer that I tossed because I could NOT figure out what it was. Next time I reached for my BEAUTIFUL, GORGEOUS special umbrella? Voila! That little thing on the tip was missing- and the umbrella now really would “poke your eye out”.
    Add in a major crafty gene- crochet (storing yarn), scrapbooking (albums,tools and paper supplies galore), needlework (fabric and threads and scroll rods and fancy scissors) and quilting (more fabric, hoops and frames, more tools and gizmos), plus some tatting, some painting, etc, etc….well what can I say?
    All THAT explains my cluttered, overcrowded house!

    Reply
  208. I am a hoarder. It definitely comes from having a mother who was a tosser- a BIG TIME tosser. If it was in her house, it was hers to toss. While I was away at college, she tossed MY stuff that *she* didn’t think I needed anymore.
    She tossed my complete collection of Cherry Ames books. She tossed my high school uniform. She tossed a FIRST EDITION of Mary Poppins! (Her defense? “It’s a kid’s book.”)
    Then there’s the story of the funny little peach colored piece of plastic in the kitchen drawer that I tossed because I could NOT figure out what it was. Next time I reached for my BEAUTIFUL, GORGEOUS special umbrella? Voila! That little thing on the tip was missing- and the umbrella now really would “poke your eye out”.
    Add in a major crafty gene- crochet (storing yarn), scrapbooking (albums,tools and paper supplies galore), needlework (fabric and threads and scroll rods and fancy scissors) and quilting (more fabric, hoops and frames, more tools and gizmos), plus some tatting, some painting, etc, etc….well what can I say?
    All THAT explains my cluttered, overcrowded house!

    Reply
  209. I am a hoarder. It definitely comes from having a mother who was a tosser- a BIG TIME tosser. If it was in her house, it was hers to toss. While I was away at college, she tossed MY stuff that *she* didn’t think I needed anymore.
    She tossed my complete collection of Cherry Ames books. She tossed my high school uniform. She tossed a FIRST EDITION of Mary Poppins! (Her defense? “It’s a kid’s book.”)
    Then there’s the story of the funny little peach colored piece of plastic in the kitchen drawer that I tossed because I could NOT figure out what it was. Next time I reached for my BEAUTIFUL, GORGEOUS special umbrella? Voila! That little thing on the tip was missing- and the umbrella now really would “poke your eye out”.
    Add in a major crafty gene- crochet (storing yarn), scrapbooking (albums,tools and paper supplies galore), needlework (fabric and threads and scroll rods and fancy scissors) and quilting (more fabric, hoops and frames, more tools and gizmos), plus some tatting, some painting, etc, etc….well what can I say?
    All THAT explains my cluttered, overcrowded house!

    Reply
  210. I am a hoarder. It definitely comes from having a mother who was a tosser- a BIG TIME tosser. If it was in her house, it was hers to toss. While I was away at college, she tossed MY stuff that *she* didn’t think I needed anymore.
    She tossed my complete collection of Cherry Ames books. She tossed my high school uniform. She tossed a FIRST EDITION of Mary Poppins! (Her defense? “It’s a kid’s book.”)
    Then there’s the story of the funny little peach colored piece of plastic in the kitchen drawer that I tossed because I could NOT figure out what it was. Next time I reached for my BEAUTIFUL, GORGEOUS special umbrella? Voila! That little thing on the tip was missing- and the umbrella now really would “poke your eye out”.
    Add in a major crafty gene- crochet (storing yarn), scrapbooking (albums,tools and paper supplies galore), needlework (fabric and threads and scroll rods and fancy scissors) and quilting (more fabric, hoops and frames, more tools and gizmos), plus some tatting, some painting, etc, etc….well what can I say?
    All THAT explains my cluttered, overcrowded house!

    Reply
  211. Not only am I a hoarder, but my husband is as well! Just recently my parents moved to a new house and asked me to come and collect all the boxes that I couldn’t throw out but had no room for during my apartment years. Several boxes of toys and magazines and university notes and papers now are stacked in our basement. Bad enough, but I still might NEED some of it… Then my husband’s mother announced that she was also moving… You guessed it, now we have 2 lifetimes worth of papers, toys and miscellaneous stuff in our basement. Once in awhile I feel that we should do something about it, but then I go to look through a box and get lost in memories. So my husband and I have decided to accept the clutter and be at peace with our disasterous basement!

    Reply
  212. Not only am I a hoarder, but my husband is as well! Just recently my parents moved to a new house and asked me to come and collect all the boxes that I couldn’t throw out but had no room for during my apartment years. Several boxes of toys and magazines and university notes and papers now are stacked in our basement. Bad enough, but I still might NEED some of it… Then my husband’s mother announced that she was also moving… You guessed it, now we have 2 lifetimes worth of papers, toys and miscellaneous stuff in our basement. Once in awhile I feel that we should do something about it, but then I go to look through a box and get lost in memories. So my husband and I have decided to accept the clutter and be at peace with our disasterous basement!

    Reply
  213. Not only am I a hoarder, but my husband is as well! Just recently my parents moved to a new house and asked me to come and collect all the boxes that I couldn’t throw out but had no room for during my apartment years. Several boxes of toys and magazines and university notes and papers now are stacked in our basement. Bad enough, but I still might NEED some of it… Then my husband’s mother announced that she was also moving… You guessed it, now we have 2 lifetimes worth of papers, toys and miscellaneous stuff in our basement. Once in awhile I feel that we should do something about it, but then I go to look through a box and get lost in memories. So my husband and I have decided to accept the clutter and be at peace with our disasterous basement!

    Reply
  214. Not only am I a hoarder, but my husband is as well! Just recently my parents moved to a new house and asked me to come and collect all the boxes that I couldn’t throw out but had no room for during my apartment years. Several boxes of toys and magazines and university notes and papers now are stacked in our basement. Bad enough, but I still might NEED some of it… Then my husband’s mother announced that she was also moving… You guessed it, now we have 2 lifetimes worth of papers, toys and miscellaneous stuff in our basement. Once in awhile I feel that we should do something about it, but then I go to look through a box and get lost in memories. So my husband and I have decided to accept the clutter and be at peace with our disasterous basement!

    Reply
  215. Not only am I a hoarder, but my husband is as well! Just recently my parents moved to a new house and asked me to come and collect all the boxes that I couldn’t throw out but had no room for during my apartment years. Several boxes of toys and magazines and university notes and papers now are stacked in our basement. Bad enough, but I still might NEED some of it… Then my husband’s mother announced that she was also moving… You guessed it, now we have 2 lifetimes worth of papers, toys and miscellaneous stuff in our basement. Once in awhile I feel that we should do something about it, but then I go to look through a box and get lost in memories. So my husband and I have decided to accept the clutter and be at peace with our disasterous basement!

    Reply
  216. Oh, Lady Doc, I do empathize and sympathize. The same thing happened to me; my mother was a hoarder who tried to control it in me by purging my stuff. Ironic, really. Had the opposite effect.
    My heart bleeds for your tossed books, especially. I have so many of my childhood books here in this study, and they’re like old friends.
    When I sold my first book, one of my aunts read it and said she thought my grandmother (who died when I was 12) would have liked it. Apparently my grandmother adored Heyer and had bought every book the moment it came out.
    What happened to them? I asked breathlessly, imagining a family set of Heyer first editions sitting in a box somewhere.
    Oh we threw them out after Nana had her stroke. She couldn’t read them any more… sob.
    Oh, Jana, double the Stuff! And yes, the memories sidetrack me, too — guess who’s playing her way through the old record collection? πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  217. Oh, Lady Doc, I do empathize and sympathize. The same thing happened to me; my mother was a hoarder who tried to control it in me by purging my stuff. Ironic, really. Had the opposite effect.
    My heart bleeds for your tossed books, especially. I have so many of my childhood books here in this study, and they’re like old friends.
    When I sold my first book, one of my aunts read it and said she thought my grandmother (who died when I was 12) would have liked it. Apparently my grandmother adored Heyer and had bought every book the moment it came out.
    What happened to them? I asked breathlessly, imagining a family set of Heyer first editions sitting in a box somewhere.
    Oh we threw them out after Nana had her stroke. She couldn’t read them any more… sob.
    Oh, Jana, double the Stuff! And yes, the memories sidetrack me, too — guess who’s playing her way through the old record collection? πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  218. Oh, Lady Doc, I do empathize and sympathize. The same thing happened to me; my mother was a hoarder who tried to control it in me by purging my stuff. Ironic, really. Had the opposite effect.
    My heart bleeds for your tossed books, especially. I have so many of my childhood books here in this study, and they’re like old friends.
    When I sold my first book, one of my aunts read it and said she thought my grandmother (who died when I was 12) would have liked it. Apparently my grandmother adored Heyer and had bought every book the moment it came out.
    What happened to them? I asked breathlessly, imagining a family set of Heyer first editions sitting in a box somewhere.
    Oh we threw them out after Nana had her stroke. She couldn’t read them any more… sob.
    Oh, Jana, double the Stuff! And yes, the memories sidetrack me, too — guess who’s playing her way through the old record collection? πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  219. Oh, Lady Doc, I do empathize and sympathize. The same thing happened to me; my mother was a hoarder who tried to control it in me by purging my stuff. Ironic, really. Had the opposite effect.
    My heart bleeds for your tossed books, especially. I have so many of my childhood books here in this study, and they’re like old friends.
    When I sold my first book, one of my aunts read it and said she thought my grandmother (who died when I was 12) would have liked it. Apparently my grandmother adored Heyer and had bought every book the moment it came out.
    What happened to them? I asked breathlessly, imagining a family set of Heyer first editions sitting in a box somewhere.
    Oh we threw them out after Nana had her stroke. She couldn’t read them any more… sob.
    Oh, Jana, double the Stuff! And yes, the memories sidetrack me, too — guess who’s playing her way through the old record collection? πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  220. Oh, Lady Doc, I do empathize and sympathize. The same thing happened to me; my mother was a hoarder who tried to control it in me by purging my stuff. Ironic, really. Had the opposite effect.
    My heart bleeds for your tossed books, especially. I have so many of my childhood books here in this study, and they’re like old friends.
    When I sold my first book, one of my aunts read it and said she thought my grandmother (who died when I was 12) would have liked it. Apparently my grandmother adored Heyer and had bought every book the moment it came out.
    What happened to them? I asked breathlessly, imagining a family set of Heyer first editions sitting in a box somewhere.
    Oh we threw them out after Nana had her stroke. She couldn’t read them any more… sob.
    Oh, Jana, double the Stuff! And yes, the memories sidetrack me, too — guess who’s playing her way through the old record collection? πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  221. Wish I’d had time to drop in on this conversation dear to my heart sooner!
    When I first married, we had nothing. Our parents had very little to give and our friends were all poor. So when we were able to buy, we bought “good” stuff that we could pass on to our kids. Who are now half way across the country and around the world. Right.
    So we’ve been ditching stuff as we move back and forth from midwest to east and back again. I HATE it. And just recently, after carting them around for thousands of miles, I finally gave up on those ancient tax returns. I’m an accountant. I know I don’t need them. But I’m an accountant. I love all those cute little numbers from decades ago. They’re historical!
    LPs–someday, when I’m old and gray and have nothing better to do, I’ll record them onto something usable. Really. Just the good songs.

    Reply
  222. Wish I’d had time to drop in on this conversation dear to my heart sooner!
    When I first married, we had nothing. Our parents had very little to give and our friends were all poor. So when we were able to buy, we bought “good” stuff that we could pass on to our kids. Who are now half way across the country and around the world. Right.
    So we’ve been ditching stuff as we move back and forth from midwest to east and back again. I HATE it. And just recently, after carting them around for thousands of miles, I finally gave up on those ancient tax returns. I’m an accountant. I know I don’t need them. But I’m an accountant. I love all those cute little numbers from decades ago. They’re historical!
    LPs–someday, when I’m old and gray and have nothing better to do, I’ll record them onto something usable. Really. Just the good songs.

    Reply
  223. Wish I’d had time to drop in on this conversation dear to my heart sooner!
    When I first married, we had nothing. Our parents had very little to give and our friends were all poor. So when we were able to buy, we bought “good” stuff that we could pass on to our kids. Who are now half way across the country and around the world. Right.
    So we’ve been ditching stuff as we move back and forth from midwest to east and back again. I HATE it. And just recently, after carting them around for thousands of miles, I finally gave up on those ancient tax returns. I’m an accountant. I know I don’t need them. But I’m an accountant. I love all those cute little numbers from decades ago. They’re historical!
    LPs–someday, when I’m old and gray and have nothing better to do, I’ll record them onto something usable. Really. Just the good songs.

    Reply
  224. Wish I’d had time to drop in on this conversation dear to my heart sooner!
    When I first married, we had nothing. Our parents had very little to give and our friends were all poor. So when we were able to buy, we bought “good” stuff that we could pass on to our kids. Who are now half way across the country and around the world. Right.
    So we’ve been ditching stuff as we move back and forth from midwest to east and back again. I HATE it. And just recently, after carting them around for thousands of miles, I finally gave up on those ancient tax returns. I’m an accountant. I know I don’t need them. But I’m an accountant. I love all those cute little numbers from decades ago. They’re historical!
    LPs–someday, when I’m old and gray and have nothing better to do, I’ll record them onto something usable. Really. Just the good songs.

    Reply
  225. Wish I’d had time to drop in on this conversation dear to my heart sooner!
    When I first married, we had nothing. Our parents had very little to give and our friends were all poor. So when we were able to buy, we bought “good” stuff that we could pass on to our kids. Who are now half way across the country and around the world. Right.
    So we’ve been ditching stuff as we move back and forth from midwest to east and back again. I HATE it. And just recently, after carting them around for thousands of miles, I finally gave up on those ancient tax returns. I’m an accountant. I know I don’t need them. But I’m an accountant. I love all those cute little numbers from decades ago. They’re historical!
    LPs–someday, when I’m old and gray and have nothing better to do, I’ll record them onto something usable. Really. Just the good songs.

    Reply
  226. “And just recently, after carting them around for thousands of miles, I finally gave up on those ancient tax returns. I’m an accountant. I know I don’t need them. But I’m an accountant. I love all those cute little numbers from decades ago. They’re historical!”
    I know the feeling, Pat πŸ™‚ I still have mine back to 1963, but as I only keep the first 4 pages or so, they don’t take up much room. You’re right, they are history – my history – I can look back & see that I worked for such and such a company then, and remember people I knew and incidents that happened. They’re as good as a diary – better, because they tell me much but wouldn’t tell another person anything interesting at all πŸ˜€
    I’m not sentimental about supporting documentation and I toss that – but I have been with clients who would look at an old cancelled check or receipt and it would bring back memories for them too.
    However, I have found, that once the stuff is tossed, and the wrench is over – you don’t really miss it. The only “stuff” I’d never toss would be family letters and pictures – those truly are irreplaceable.

    Reply
  227. “And just recently, after carting them around for thousands of miles, I finally gave up on those ancient tax returns. I’m an accountant. I know I don’t need them. But I’m an accountant. I love all those cute little numbers from decades ago. They’re historical!”
    I know the feeling, Pat πŸ™‚ I still have mine back to 1963, but as I only keep the first 4 pages or so, they don’t take up much room. You’re right, they are history – my history – I can look back & see that I worked for such and such a company then, and remember people I knew and incidents that happened. They’re as good as a diary – better, because they tell me much but wouldn’t tell another person anything interesting at all πŸ˜€
    I’m not sentimental about supporting documentation and I toss that – but I have been with clients who would look at an old cancelled check or receipt and it would bring back memories for them too.
    However, I have found, that once the stuff is tossed, and the wrench is over – you don’t really miss it. The only “stuff” I’d never toss would be family letters and pictures – those truly are irreplaceable.

    Reply
  228. “And just recently, after carting them around for thousands of miles, I finally gave up on those ancient tax returns. I’m an accountant. I know I don’t need them. But I’m an accountant. I love all those cute little numbers from decades ago. They’re historical!”
    I know the feeling, Pat πŸ™‚ I still have mine back to 1963, but as I only keep the first 4 pages or so, they don’t take up much room. You’re right, they are history – my history – I can look back & see that I worked for such and such a company then, and remember people I knew and incidents that happened. They’re as good as a diary – better, because they tell me much but wouldn’t tell another person anything interesting at all πŸ˜€
    I’m not sentimental about supporting documentation and I toss that – but I have been with clients who would look at an old cancelled check or receipt and it would bring back memories for them too.
    However, I have found, that once the stuff is tossed, and the wrench is over – you don’t really miss it. The only “stuff” I’d never toss would be family letters and pictures – those truly are irreplaceable.

    Reply
  229. “And just recently, after carting them around for thousands of miles, I finally gave up on those ancient tax returns. I’m an accountant. I know I don’t need them. But I’m an accountant. I love all those cute little numbers from decades ago. They’re historical!”
    I know the feeling, Pat πŸ™‚ I still have mine back to 1963, but as I only keep the first 4 pages or so, they don’t take up much room. You’re right, they are history – my history – I can look back & see that I worked for such and such a company then, and remember people I knew and incidents that happened. They’re as good as a diary – better, because they tell me much but wouldn’t tell another person anything interesting at all πŸ˜€
    I’m not sentimental about supporting documentation and I toss that – but I have been with clients who would look at an old cancelled check or receipt and it would bring back memories for them too.
    However, I have found, that once the stuff is tossed, and the wrench is over – you don’t really miss it. The only “stuff” I’d never toss would be family letters and pictures – those truly are irreplaceable.

    Reply
  230. “And just recently, after carting them around for thousands of miles, I finally gave up on those ancient tax returns. I’m an accountant. I know I don’t need them. But I’m an accountant. I love all those cute little numbers from decades ago. They’re historical!”
    I know the feeling, Pat πŸ™‚ I still have mine back to 1963, but as I only keep the first 4 pages or so, they don’t take up much room. You’re right, they are history – my history – I can look back & see that I worked for such and such a company then, and remember people I knew and incidents that happened. They’re as good as a diary – better, because they tell me much but wouldn’t tell another person anything interesting at all πŸ˜€
    I’m not sentimental about supporting documentation and I toss that – but I have been with clients who would look at an old cancelled check or receipt and it would bring back memories for them too.
    However, I have found, that once the stuff is tossed, and the wrench is over – you don’t really miss it. The only “stuff” I’d never toss would be family letters and pictures – those truly are irreplaceable.

    Reply

Leave a Comment