My First Computer

Anne here, in a reminiscent mood. I was watching a documentary on TV the other night, about Steve Jobs and the growth of the Apple company and it started me thinking about my first computer and how it changed my life.

I came to computers reluctantly — most reluctantly. I saw no need for them. I didn't like the idea of them. I had nothing to do with them. (Yep, I was something of a Luddite.)

In fact, I remember when I was a student, an enthusiastic friend doing a computer course said that in twenty years every house would have a computer.

"Not mine," I said confidently.  How wrong I was. (So was she — it took a lot less than 20 years.)

For me the change began when a friend of mine bought her first computer, an Apple Macintosh. She raved enthusiastically and kept telling me I'd love it, but her words fell on deaf (and stubborn) ears. 

BabymacBut my friend was cunning, and determined to make me use it — and when it came time for summer holidays, she arranged a computer borrowing schedule for her various friends and put me on the list. I had no interest in it, but when it came to my turn someone delivered the wretched thing to my door.

It sat in its box for a good part of the week, and finally I decided I ought to have a play around with it, only because I knew she'd ask me and I'd feel stupid if I said I hadn't even taken it out of the box. And mean because there were others on the list desperate to have it.

So I took it out and put it together. I was amazed at how simple it was to set up. I knew nothing about computers, and yet  I was able to get it up and working purely by common sense and simple trial and error. 

Just for something to do, I wrote a short story on it. And then I printed it out and Lo! it looked beautiful — so professional.

And with that, I was hooked. See, the previous year, I'd gone traveling (backpacking overseas) and had started writing fiction by hand, in spiral-bound notebooks.  I brought home a hand-written novel and a bunch of short stories and a firm desire to become a writer.(Those are some of my notebooks — the top two I brought home from my travels. The cahier – French for exercise book -was bought in Quebec.)Notebooks

But all of that writing had remained in those notebooks because I was no typist — I've never done a typing course, and can't touch type to save my life. I'm a reasonably fast hunt and peck typist but I make lots of typos. So typing up hundreds of pages by hand was out of the question — for some reason the mistakes always happened in the last few paragraphs of a page, and then I'd have to start the whole page again or produce pages heavy with liquid paper. And these were rough drafts and needed a lot more work before I could pay someone to type them up. So there they sat, quietly rotting. . .

But with a computer, I could fix the typos on screen and when it came to printing, with one click, out it would come: one perfectly typed professional-looking document. 

So I went out and bought my first Apple Mac — it was the model before the Mac Classic. It was small with a tiny screen and no memory, but I loved it. 

Every night after my work was finished, I'd switch on the computer and start on the next bit of my novel. I'd told nobody about my new ambitions to write at that point, so it was a secret between my little Mac and me.

As my novel got longer, I realized I was going to need more memory — at that point everything was saved on one of those little "floppy" disks. So I went to the computer shop, and bought an external hard disk. I well remember the salesman saying "This disk has got more memory than you and I will be able to get through in a lifetime."

It was 20 megabytes. My, how things have changed. 

I sold that first book, and on the fax the editor sent me saying they wanted to buy it, she said, have you got email? You should go on email. Which was pretty new at that point. So I did, and that meant getting a new computer. I was sad to lose my little baby Mac, but going on email for the first time was a heady experience. And I loved my new Mac and what it could do.

GreenmacI've gone through a number of computers since that first one — all Macs — and I've been fond of all of them. But it was that first one that really changed my life. If I hadn't bought a computer I don't think I would ever have become a writer. Any stories I came up with would probably have stayed in the spiral bound notebooks.

It's hard to imagine being without email and the internet these days, but even though I love the connectivity and so much of my interaction with friends is over the web, in a way, I miss the relative isolation I had, as well. 

With my first computer, there was just me, the computer and the story — no other distractions. Now on my computer there's email, facebook, twitter, and endless fascinating research and other internet time-sinks. And I admit it — I'm distractible. 

These days my whole writing world — friends, colleagues, readers, all sorts of people and worlds come to me through my computer, so now, in a bizarre twist, I've gone back to writing by hand a lot, in spiral bound notebooks, returning to the isolation of me, the story and the pen. 

So what about you — do you remember your first computer? How did it change your life?  And what's your biggest internet time-sink?

155 thoughts on “My First Computer”

  1. Our first computer was a Heathkit Zenith DOS one that my husband assembled himself. It cost an outrageous amount of money, but if you live with an engineer geek, you have to make sacrifices to keep him happy. We’ve always been PC folks – because I have an in-house technical guy. Otherwise, I’m sure we would have gotten on the Apple bandwagon. As it is, I’m sitting here looking at an iPad I won as a gift and wondering if I should migrate to the Other Side. I’m sure I’d like it but *sigh* I hate learning about new thingamabobs

    Reply
  2. Our first computer was a Heathkit Zenith DOS one that my husband assembled himself. It cost an outrageous amount of money, but if you live with an engineer geek, you have to make sacrifices to keep him happy. We’ve always been PC folks – because I have an in-house technical guy. Otherwise, I’m sure we would have gotten on the Apple bandwagon. As it is, I’m sitting here looking at an iPad I won as a gift and wondering if I should migrate to the Other Side. I’m sure I’d like it but *sigh* I hate learning about new thingamabobs

    Reply
  3. Our first computer was a Heathkit Zenith DOS one that my husband assembled himself. It cost an outrageous amount of money, but if you live with an engineer geek, you have to make sacrifices to keep him happy. We’ve always been PC folks – because I have an in-house technical guy. Otherwise, I’m sure we would have gotten on the Apple bandwagon. As it is, I’m sitting here looking at an iPad I won as a gift and wondering if I should migrate to the Other Side. I’m sure I’d like it but *sigh* I hate learning about new thingamabobs

    Reply
  4. Our first computer was a Heathkit Zenith DOS one that my husband assembled himself. It cost an outrageous amount of money, but if you live with an engineer geek, you have to make sacrifices to keep him happy. We’ve always been PC folks – because I have an in-house technical guy. Otherwise, I’m sure we would have gotten on the Apple bandwagon. As it is, I’m sitting here looking at an iPad I won as a gift and wondering if I should migrate to the Other Side. I’m sure I’d like it but *sigh* I hate learning about new thingamabobs

    Reply
  5. Our first computer was a Heathkit Zenith DOS one that my husband assembled himself. It cost an outrageous amount of money, but if you live with an engineer geek, you have to make sacrifices to keep him happy. We’ve always been PC folks – because I have an in-house technical guy. Otherwise, I’m sure we would have gotten on the Apple bandwagon. As it is, I’m sitting here looking at an iPad I won as a gift and wondering if I should migrate to the Other Side. I’m sure I’d like it but *sigh* I hate learning about new thingamabobs

    Reply
  6. **So what about you — do you remember your first computer? How did it change your life? And what’s your biggest internet time-sink? ++
    LOL! Asking a writer if she remembers her first computer is like asking a Regency writer if she remembers her first Heyer. *G* Like you, my whole writing career stems from buying a computer. In my case, it was to do billing and a bit of copywriting for my graphic design business. The genius part was that when you fix something, IT STAYS FIXED!!!!
    My first computer was a Leading Edge, and I loved it dearly and wrote many books on it. I was reluctant to upgrade to an internet worthy computer because I knew it would be a hideous time sink.
    And it is. But like any addict, it’s not an addiction I want to surrender. *G*

    Reply
  7. **So what about you — do you remember your first computer? How did it change your life? And what’s your biggest internet time-sink? ++
    LOL! Asking a writer if she remembers her first computer is like asking a Regency writer if she remembers her first Heyer. *G* Like you, my whole writing career stems from buying a computer. In my case, it was to do billing and a bit of copywriting for my graphic design business. The genius part was that when you fix something, IT STAYS FIXED!!!!
    My first computer was a Leading Edge, and I loved it dearly and wrote many books on it. I was reluctant to upgrade to an internet worthy computer because I knew it would be a hideous time sink.
    And it is. But like any addict, it’s not an addiction I want to surrender. *G*

    Reply
  8. **So what about you — do you remember your first computer? How did it change your life? And what’s your biggest internet time-sink? ++
    LOL! Asking a writer if she remembers her first computer is like asking a Regency writer if she remembers her first Heyer. *G* Like you, my whole writing career stems from buying a computer. In my case, it was to do billing and a bit of copywriting for my graphic design business. The genius part was that when you fix something, IT STAYS FIXED!!!!
    My first computer was a Leading Edge, and I loved it dearly and wrote many books on it. I was reluctant to upgrade to an internet worthy computer because I knew it would be a hideous time sink.
    And it is. But like any addict, it’s not an addiction I want to surrender. *G*

    Reply
  9. **So what about you — do you remember your first computer? How did it change your life? And what’s your biggest internet time-sink? ++
    LOL! Asking a writer if she remembers her first computer is like asking a Regency writer if she remembers her first Heyer. *G* Like you, my whole writing career stems from buying a computer. In my case, it was to do billing and a bit of copywriting for my graphic design business. The genius part was that when you fix something, IT STAYS FIXED!!!!
    My first computer was a Leading Edge, and I loved it dearly and wrote many books on it. I was reluctant to upgrade to an internet worthy computer because I knew it would be a hideous time sink.
    And it is. But like any addict, it’s not an addiction I want to surrender. *G*

    Reply
  10. **So what about you — do you remember your first computer? How did it change your life? And what’s your biggest internet time-sink? ++
    LOL! Asking a writer if she remembers her first computer is like asking a Regency writer if she remembers her first Heyer. *G* Like you, my whole writing career stems from buying a computer. In my case, it was to do billing and a bit of copywriting for my graphic design business. The genius part was that when you fix something, IT STAYS FIXED!!!!
    My first computer was a Leading Edge, and I loved it dearly and wrote many books on it. I was reluctant to upgrade to an internet worthy computer because I knew it would be a hideous time sink.
    And it is. But like any addict, it’s not an addiction I want to surrender. *G*

    Reply
  11. First, in about 1980, my dad got a Radio Shack TRS-80 (with cassette tape drive!) It was already known as the trash-80 for a reason…
    THEN, when Macs were first coming out, my dad got…. An Apple IIG. With no internal memory, just constant disk-swapping. We all screamed NOOOOOOOOO!
    And he said “They said at the store there was a lot of new software coming out.”
    Yeah, Dad, they lied and were trying to unload a giant paperweight.
    So I didn’t have much experience with computers until I got to college in 1988 and we had to use the mainframe system to type up our papers. And we discovered email! And instant chat! All on low-resolution orangey screens.
    A friend in the dorms had a Mac, though my experience with it was almost all Tetris 😉
    I still type with 4 fingers, but I’m pretty fast now.

    Reply
  12. First, in about 1980, my dad got a Radio Shack TRS-80 (with cassette tape drive!) It was already known as the trash-80 for a reason…
    THEN, when Macs were first coming out, my dad got…. An Apple IIG. With no internal memory, just constant disk-swapping. We all screamed NOOOOOOOOO!
    And he said “They said at the store there was a lot of new software coming out.”
    Yeah, Dad, they lied and were trying to unload a giant paperweight.
    So I didn’t have much experience with computers until I got to college in 1988 and we had to use the mainframe system to type up our papers. And we discovered email! And instant chat! All on low-resolution orangey screens.
    A friend in the dorms had a Mac, though my experience with it was almost all Tetris 😉
    I still type with 4 fingers, but I’m pretty fast now.

    Reply
  13. First, in about 1980, my dad got a Radio Shack TRS-80 (with cassette tape drive!) It was already known as the trash-80 for a reason…
    THEN, when Macs were first coming out, my dad got…. An Apple IIG. With no internal memory, just constant disk-swapping. We all screamed NOOOOOOOOO!
    And he said “They said at the store there was a lot of new software coming out.”
    Yeah, Dad, they lied and were trying to unload a giant paperweight.
    So I didn’t have much experience with computers until I got to college in 1988 and we had to use the mainframe system to type up our papers. And we discovered email! And instant chat! All on low-resolution orangey screens.
    A friend in the dorms had a Mac, though my experience with it was almost all Tetris 😉
    I still type with 4 fingers, but I’m pretty fast now.

    Reply
  14. First, in about 1980, my dad got a Radio Shack TRS-80 (with cassette tape drive!) It was already known as the trash-80 for a reason…
    THEN, when Macs were first coming out, my dad got…. An Apple IIG. With no internal memory, just constant disk-swapping. We all screamed NOOOOOOOOO!
    And he said “They said at the store there was a lot of new software coming out.”
    Yeah, Dad, they lied and were trying to unload a giant paperweight.
    So I didn’t have much experience with computers until I got to college in 1988 and we had to use the mainframe system to type up our papers. And we discovered email! And instant chat! All on low-resolution orangey screens.
    A friend in the dorms had a Mac, though my experience with it was almost all Tetris 😉
    I still type with 4 fingers, but I’m pretty fast now.

    Reply
  15. First, in about 1980, my dad got a Radio Shack TRS-80 (with cassette tape drive!) It was already known as the trash-80 for a reason…
    THEN, when Macs were first coming out, my dad got…. An Apple IIG. With no internal memory, just constant disk-swapping. We all screamed NOOOOOOOOO!
    And he said “They said at the store there was a lot of new software coming out.”
    Yeah, Dad, they lied and were trying to unload a giant paperweight.
    So I didn’t have much experience with computers until I got to college in 1988 and we had to use the mainframe system to type up our papers. And we discovered email! And instant chat! All on low-resolution orangey screens.
    A friend in the dorms had a Mac, though my experience with it was almost all Tetris 😉
    I still type with 4 fingers, but I’m pretty fast now.

    Reply
  16. Ooh, I love that Mac picture on top! I had one like that.
    My trusty Mac Plus, love of my life, who bore my first three children. (Well, my first three fictional children.) He always listened to me, and never left the toilet seat up…and our relationship only hit the rocks when his attention span went and he’d tune me out in the middle of a sentence…first occasionally, and then every ten minutes or so. Crash! There went our relationship. And yet he’s still the Mac I can’t forget…the Mac who makes my heart beat just a little bit harder even today.

    Reply
  17. Ooh, I love that Mac picture on top! I had one like that.
    My trusty Mac Plus, love of my life, who bore my first three children. (Well, my first three fictional children.) He always listened to me, and never left the toilet seat up…and our relationship only hit the rocks when his attention span went and he’d tune me out in the middle of a sentence…first occasionally, and then every ten minutes or so. Crash! There went our relationship. And yet he’s still the Mac I can’t forget…the Mac who makes my heart beat just a little bit harder even today.

    Reply
  18. Ooh, I love that Mac picture on top! I had one like that.
    My trusty Mac Plus, love of my life, who bore my first three children. (Well, my first three fictional children.) He always listened to me, and never left the toilet seat up…and our relationship only hit the rocks when his attention span went and he’d tune me out in the middle of a sentence…first occasionally, and then every ten minutes or so. Crash! There went our relationship. And yet he’s still the Mac I can’t forget…the Mac who makes my heart beat just a little bit harder even today.

    Reply
  19. Ooh, I love that Mac picture on top! I had one like that.
    My trusty Mac Plus, love of my life, who bore my first three children. (Well, my first three fictional children.) He always listened to me, and never left the toilet seat up…and our relationship only hit the rocks when his attention span went and he’d tune me out in the middle of a sentence…first occasionally, and then every ten minutes or so. Crash! There went our relationship. And yet he’s still the Mac I can’t forget…the Mac who makes my heart beat just a little bit harder even today.

    Reply
  20. Ooh, I love that Mac picture on top! I had one like that.
    My trusty Mac Plus, love of my life, who bore my first three children. (Well, my first three fictional children.) He always listened to me, and never left the toilet seat up…and our relationship only hit the rocks when his attention span went and he’d tune me out in the middle of a sentence…first occasionally, and then every ten minutes or so. Crash! There went our relationship. And yet he’s still the Mac I can’t forget…the Mac who makes my heart beat just a little bit harder even today.

    Reply
  21. MJ, try playing with that ipad for a bit and see what you think. The reason I became a staunch Mac person at the start was because it was really intuitive to use — at that time, with pcs, you needed some training to use them. But I could work out how to use the mac with no help. If I’d had a geek in the house, it might have been a different story.
    I think the new learning curve we all have to go on with a new object can be very wearying, after a while, I agree. I have pretty simple needs and I don’t see why it has to be different all the time. 😉

    Reply
  22. MJ, try playing with that ipad for a bit and see what you think. The reason I became a staunch Mac person at the start was because it was really intuitive to use — at that time, with pcs, you needed some training to use them. But I could work out how to use the mac with no help. If I’d had a geek in the house, it might have been a different story.
    I think the new learning curve we all have to go on with a new object can be very wearying, after a while, I agree. I have pretty simple needs and I don’t see why it has to be different all the time. 😉

    Reply
  23. MJ, try playing with that ipad for a bit and see what you think. The reason I became a staunch Mac person at the start was because it was really intuitive to use — at that time, with pcs, you needed some training to use them. But I could work out how to use the mac with no help. If I’d had a geek in the house, it might have been a different story.
    I think the new learning curve we all have to go on with a new object can be very wearying, after a while, I agree. I have pretty simple needs and I don’t see why it has to be different all the time. 😉

    Reply
  24. MJ, try playing with that ipad for a bit and see what you think. The reason I became a staunch Mac person at the start was because it was really intuitive to use — at that time, with pcs, you needed some training to use them. But I could work out how to use the mac with no help. If I’d had a geek in the house, it might have been a different story.
    I think the new learning curve we all have to go on with a new object can be very wearying, after a while, I agree. I have pretty simple needs and I don’t see why it has to be different all the time. 😉

    Reply
  25. MJ, try playing with that ipad for a bit and see what you think. The reason I became a staunch Mac person at the start was because it was really intuitive to use — at that time, with pcs, you needed some training to use them. But I could work out how to use the mac with no help. If I’d had a geek in the house, it might have been a different story.
    I think the new learning curve we all have to go on with a new object can be very wearying, after a while, I agree. I have pretty simple needs and I don’t see why it has to be different all the time. 😉

    Reply
  26. Mary Jo, it iS like remembering your first Heyer! That’s so true. LOL. And I will try very hard not to be distracted and talk about These Old Shades. 😉
    Interesting that you bought a computer for a completely different purpose. I’m pretty sure if my friend hadn’t arranged for me to try her computer out in the holidays, I wouldn’t have bought one for years, and by then I might have given up the idea of becoming a writer. I still have a couple of friends who’ve held out and don’t have computers at home. Me, I can’t imagine it!

    Reply
  27. Mary Jo, it iS like remembering your first Heyer! That’s so true. LOL. And I will try very hard not to be distracted and talk about These Old Shades. 😉
    Interesting that you bought a computer for a completely different purpose. I’m pretty sure if my friend hadn’t arranged for me to try her computer out in the holidays, I wouldn’t have bought one for years, and by then I might have given up the idea of becoming a writer. I still have a couple of friends who’ve held out and don’t have computers at home. Me, I can’t imagine it!

    Reply
  28. Mary Jo, it iS like remembering your first Heyer! That’s so true. LOL. And I will try very hard not to be distracted and talk about These Old Shades. 😉
    Interesting that you bought a computer for a completely different purpose. I’m pretty sure if my friend hadn’t arranged for me to try her computer out in the holidays, I wouldn’t have bought one for years, and by then I might have given up the idea of becoming a writer. I still have a couple of friends who’ve held out and don’t have computers at home. Me, I can’t imagine it!

    Reply
  29. Mary Jo, it iS like remembering your first Heyer! That’s so true. LOL. And I will try very hard not to be distracted and talk about These Old Shades. 😉
    Interesting that you bought a computer for a completely different purpose. I’m pretty sure if my friend hadn’t arranged for me to try her computer out in the holidays, I wouldn’t have bought one for years, and by then I might have given up the idea of becoming a writer. I still have a couple of friends who’ve held out and don’t have computers at home. Me, I can’t imagine it!

    Reply
  30. Mary Jo, it iS like remembering your first Heyer! That’s so true. LOL. And I will try very hard not to be distracted and talk about These Old Shades. 😉
    Interesting that you bought a computer for a completely different purpose. I’m pretty sure if my friend hadn’t arranged for me to try her computer out in the holidays, I wouldn’t have bought one for years, and by then I might have given up the idea of becoming a writer. I still have a couple of friends who’ve held out and don’t have computers at home. Me, I can’t imagine it!

    Reply
  31. Phyllis, I’m the same kind of typist. I’m fast but the moment I take my eyes off the keyboard, or my brain races ahead of the fingers, the typos start. So fast, but not accurate.
    Those early computers with no memory were a pain, weren’t they? But at the time, it was just what you did.

    Reply
  32. Phyllis, I’m the same kind of typist. I’m fast but the moment I take my eyes off the keyboard, or my brain races ahead of the fingers, the typos start. So fast, but not accurate.
    Those early computers with no memory were a pain, weren’t they? But at the time, it was just what you did.

    Reply
  33. Phyllis, I’m the same kind of typist. I’m fast but the moment I take my eyes off the keyboard, or my brain races ahead of the fingers, the typos start. So fast, but not accurate.
    Those early computers with no memory were a pain, weren’t they? But at the time, it was just what you did.

    Reply
  34. Phyllis, I’m the same kind of typist. I’m fast but the moment I take my eyes off the keyboard, or my brain races ahead of the fingers, the typos start. So fast, but not accurate.
    Those early computers with no memory were a pain, weren’t they? But at the time, it was just what you did.

    Reply
  35. Phyllis, I’m the same kind of typist. I’m fast but the moment I take my eyes off the keyboard, or my brain races ahead of the fingers, the typos start. So fast, but not accurate.
    Those early computers with no memory were a pain, weren’t they? But at the time, it was just what you did.

    Reply
  36. Cara, I’m so surprised your Mac kept crashing. It almost never happened to me. It was one of the things that kept me forking out the extra money to buy Macs — at work, we used PCs and they crashed all the time. Drove me mad. I couldn’t wait to get home and use my own, non-crashing computer.

    Reply
  37. Cara, I’m so surprised your Mac kept crashing. It almost never happened to me. It was one of the things that kept me forking out the extra money to buy Macs — at work, we used PCs and they crashed all the time. Drove me mad. I couldn’t wait to get home and use my own, non-crashing computer.

    Reply
  38. Cara, I’m so surprised your Mac kept crashing. It almost never happened to me. It was one of the things that kept me forking out the extra money to buy Macs — at work, we used PCs and they crashed all the time. Drove me mad. I couldn’t wait to get home and use my own, non-crashing computer.

    Reply
  39. Cara, I’m so surprised your Mac kept crashing. It almost never happened to me. It was one of the things that kept me forking out the extra money to buy Macs — at work, we used PCs and they crashed all the time. Drove me mad. I couldn’t wait to get home and use my own, non-crashing computer.

    Reply
  40. Cara, I’m so surprised your Mac kept crashing. It almost never happened to me. It was one of the things that kept me forking out the extra money to buy Macs — at work, we used PCs and they crashed all the time. Drove me mad. I couldn’t wait to get home and use my own, non-crashing computer.

    Reply
  41. Anne, it was only after it got old, and developed a motherboard issue. I was told it would cost more to fix the motherboard than to replace the computer…so I replaced my darling Plus.

    Reply
  42. Anne, it was only after it got old, and developed a motherboard issue. I was told it would cost more to fix the motherboard than to replace the computer…so I replaced my darling Plus.

    Reply
  43. Anne, it was only after it got old, and developed a motherboard issue. I was told it would cost more to fix the motherboard than to replace the computer…so I replaced my darling Plus.

    Reply
  44. Anne, it was only after it got old, and developed a motherboard issue. I was told it would cost more to fix the motherboard than to replace the computer…so I replaced my darling Plus.

    Reply
  45. Anne, it was only after it got old, and developed a motherboard issue. I was told it would cost more to fix the motherboard than to replace the computer…so I replaced my darling Plus.

    Reply
  46. I have used computers all my working life, but I remember that little Mac, Anne! Not yours, obviously, but the same model. I remember learning how to program in high school, when computers were new and exciting and read punch cards and cassette tapes. And when memory was counted in k. Now, a terrabyte is a small external hard drive.
    You’re right about the intrusion of the ‘net’ though. I combat that by keeping my laptop internet-free. It’s just for work. Which is what I need to go and do now! Thanks for sharing. It was fun to walk done that lane of memories!

    Reply
  47. I have used computers all my working life, but I remember that little Mac, Anne! Not yours, obviously, but the same model. I remember learning how to program in high school, when computers were new and exciting and read punch cards and cassette tapes. And when memory was counted in k. Now, a terrabyte is a small external hard drive.
    You’re right about the intrusion of the ‘net’ though. I combat that by keeping my laptop internet-free. It’s just for work. Which is what I need to go and do now! Thanks for sharing. It was fun to walk done that lane of memories!

    Reply
  48. I have used computers all my working life, but I remember that little Mac, Anne! Not yours, obviously, but the same model. I remember learning how to program in high school, when computers were new and exciting and read punch cards and cassette tapes. And when memory was counted in k. Now, a terrabyte is a small external hard drive.
    You’re right about the intrusion of the ‘net’ though. I combat that by keeping my laptop internet-free. It’s just for work. Which is what I need to go and do now! Thanks for sharing. It was fun to walk done that lane of memories!

    Reply
  49. I have used computers all my working life, but I remember that little Mac, Anne! Not yours, obviously, but the same model. I remember learning how to program in high school, when computers were new and exciting and read punch cards and cassette tapes. And when memory was counted in k. Now, a terrabyte is a small external hard drive.
    You’re right about the intrusion of the ‘net’ though. I combat that by keeping my laptop internet-free. It’s just for work. Which is what I need to go and do now! Thanks for sharing. It was fun to walk done that lane of memories!

    Reply
  50. I have used computers all my working life, but I remember that little Mac, Anne! Not yours, obviously, but the same model. I remember learning how to program in high school, when computers were new and exciting and read punch cards and cassette tapes. And when memory was counted in k. Now, a terrabyte is a small external hard drive.
    You’re right about the intrusion of the ‘net’ though. I combat that by keeping my laptop internet-free. It’s just for work. Which is what I need to go and do now! Thanks for sharing. It was fun to walk done that lane of memories!

    Reply
  51. The first computer I worked on was the size of a small car, all written in binary language, had a black screen with green or gray letters depending on your preference and needed 27, 6-1/2″ disks to back everything up to every night. That took 45 minutes to do. When I bought my first at home computer, I bought a Gateway because I thought the cowie spots were cute.
    Okay, so don’t go there. I was just thrilled to get something that did more than two things!
    Anyway, that was over 20 years ago and though I’m still on a PC, it now sits on my lap instead of taking up half the room. It amazes me how technology has changed.
    But the thing that stands out in my mind the most was watching my dad try to poke around on that old Gateway. Born at the turn of the century, can you imagine what he must have thought?

    Reply
  52. The first computer I worked on was the size of a small car, all written in binary language, had a black screen with green or gray letters depending on your preference and needed 27, 6-1/2″ disks to back everything up to every night. That took 45 minutes to do. When I bought my first at home computer, I bought a Gateway because I thought the cowie spots were cute.
    Okay, so don’t go there. I was just thrilled to get something that did more than two things!
    Anyway, that was over 20 years ago and though I’m still on a PC, it now sits on my lap instead of taking up half the room. It amazes me how technology has changed.
    But the thing that stands out in my mind the most was watching my dad try to poke around on that old Gateway. Born at the turn of the century, can you imagine what he must have thought?

    Reply
  53. The first computer I worked on was the size of a small car, all written in binary language, had a black screen with green or gray letters depending on your preference and needed 27, 6-1/2″ disks to back everything up to every night. That took 45 minutes to do. When I bought my first at home computer, I bought a Gateway because I thought the cowie spots were cute.
    Okay, so don’t go there. I was just thrilled to get something that did more than two things!
    Anyway, that was over 20 years ago and though I’m still on a PC, it now sits on my lap instead of taking up half the room. It amazes me how technology has changed.
    But the thing that stands out in my mind the most was watching my dad try to poke around on that old Gateway. Born at the turn of the century, can you imagine what he must have thought?

    Reply
  54. The first computer I worked on was the size of a small car, all written in binary language, had a black screen with green or gray letters depending on your preference and needed 27, 6-1/2″ disks to back everything up to every night. That took 45 minutes to do. When I bought my first at home computer, I bought a Gateway because I thought the cowie spots were cute.
    Okay, so don’t go there. I was just thrilled to get something that did more than two things!
    Anyway, that was over 20 years ago and though I’m still on a PC, it now sits on my lap instead of taking up half the room. It amazes me how technology has changed.
    But the thing that stands out in my mind the most was watching my dad try to poke around on that old Gateway. Born at the turn of the century, can you imagine what he must have thought?

    Reply
  55. The first computer I worked on was the size of a small car, all written in binary language, had a black screen with green or gray letters depending on your preference and needed 27, 6-1/2″ disks to back everything up to every night. That took 45 minutes to do. When I bought my first at home computer, I bought a Gateway because I thought the cowie spots were cute.
    Okay, so don’t go there. I was just thrilled to get something that did more than two things!
    Anyway, that was over 20 years ago and though I’m still on a PC, it now sits on my lap instead of taking up half the room. It amazes me how technology has changed.
    But the thing that stands out in my mind the most was watching my dad try to poke around on that old Gateway. Born at the turn of the century, can you imagine what he must have thought?

    Reply
  56. Around ten years ago I moved in with my Mom for a few years. (She supposedly needed my help. My brothers’ idea. She is now 76 and STILL doesn’t need my help!)
    She had a computer she and my late father had bought for the grandchildren to enjoy. It was an HP desk top. Whilst staying with her, I got online from time to time and wandered onto a fan fiction site for my favorite soap opera. I’d always wanted to write so I gave it a go. I wrote on legal pads at work on my breaks and lunch, typed it onto the computer at night and I was hooked. I wrote fan fiction for two years.
    Once I moved onto my place here I bought a eMachine and stumbled upon a sort of FanFic contest sponsored by Avon books. The rest, as they say, is history. I’ve been trying to break into the ranks of published historical romance authors ever since. I went through another desktop before I bought my current laptop – another Compaq.
    I still go back to pen and legal pad from time to time. There is something about writing by hand that jogs my creativity up a notch sometimes when I need it.

    Reply
  57. Around ten years ago I moved in with my Mom for a few years. (She supposedly needed my help. My brothers’ idea. She is now 76 and STILL doesn’t need my help!)
    She had a computer she and my late father had bought for the grandchildren to enjoy. It was an HP desk top. Whilst staying with her, I got online from time to time and wandered onto a fan fiction site for my favorite soap opera. I’d always wanted to write so I gave it a go. I wrote on legal pads at work on my breaks and lunch, typed it onto the computer at night and I was hooked. I wrote fan fiction for two years.
    Once I moved onto my place here I bought a eMachine and stumbled upon a sort of FanFic contest sponsored by Avon books. The rest, as they say, is history. I’ve been trying to break into the ranks of published historical romance authors ever since. I went through another desktop before I bought my current laptop – another Compaq.
    I still go back to pen and legal pad from time to time. There is something about writing by hand that jogs my creativity up a notch sometimes when I need it.

    Reply
  58. Around ten years ago I moved in with my Mom for a few years. (She supposedly needed my help. My brothers’ idea. She is now 76 and STILL doesn’t need my help!)
    She had a computer she and my late father had bought for the grandchildren to enjoy. It was an HP desk top. Whilst staying with her, I got online from time to time and wandered onto a fan fiction site for my favorite soap opera. I’d always wanted to write so I gave it a go. I wrote on legal pads at work on my breaks and lunch, typed it onto the computer at night and I was hooked. I wrote fan fiction for two years.
    Once I moved onto my place here I bought a eMachine and stumbled upon a sort of FanFic contest sponsored by Avon books. The rest, as they say, is history. I’ve been trying to break into the ranks of published historical romance authors ever since. I went through another desktop before I bought my current laptop – another Compaq.
    I still go back to pen and legal pad from time to time. There is something about writing by hand that jogs my creativity up a notch sometimes when I need it.

    Reply
  59. Around ten years ago I moved in with my Mom for a few years. (She supposedly needed my help. My brothers’ idea. She is now 76 and STILL doesn’t need my help!)
    She had a computer she and my late father had bought for the grandchildren to enjoy. It was an HP desk top. Whilst staying with her, I got online from time to time and wandered onto a fan fiction site for my favorite soap opera. I’d always wanted to write so I gave it a go. I wrote on legal pads at work on my breaks and lunch, typed it onto the computer at night and I was hooked. I wrote fan fiction for two years.
    Once I moved onto my place here I bought a eMachine and stumbled upon a sort of FanFic contest sponsored by Avon books. The rest, as they say, is history. I’ve been trying to break into the ranks of published historical romance authors ever since. I went through another desktop before I bought my current laptop – another Compaq.
    I still go back to pen and legal pad from time to time. There is something about writing by hand that jogs my creativity up a notch sometimes when I need it.

    Reply
  60. Around ten years ago I moved in with my Mom for a few years. (She supposedly needed my help. My brothers’ idea. She is now 76 and STILL doesn’t need my help!)
    She had a computer she and my late father had bought for the grandchildren to enjoy. It was an HP desk top. Whilst staying with her, I got online from time to time and wandered onto a fan fiction site for my favorite soap opera. I’d always wanted to write so I gave it a go. I wrote on legal pads at work on my breaks and lunch, typed it onto the computer at night and I was hooked. I wrote fan fiction for two years.
    Once I moved onto my place here I bought a eMachine and stumbled upon a sort of FanFic contest sponsored by Avon books. The rest, as they say, is history. I’ve been trying to break into the ranks of published historical romance authors ever since. I went through another desktop before I bought my current laptop – another Compaq.
    I still go back to pen and legal pad from time to time. There is something about writing by hand that jogs my creativity up a notch sometimes when I need it.

    Reply
  61. Ah, that makes more sense to me, Cara. One of the few times mine crashed was when it was getting very old, too. However it was such a bad time for me —is there ever a good time for a computer to crash?— as I was just finishing a book due in that week. And for a while I thought I’d lost the whole thing. Talk about panic. I’d backed it up on another disk, but I couldn’t tell if that had corrupted or not.
    Luckily it hadn’t and in any case, they were able to retrieve all the files from the computer. Phew!

    Reply
  62. Ah, that makes more sense to me, Cara. One of the few times mine crashed was when it was getting very old, too. However it was such a bad time for me —is there ever a good time for a computer to crash?— as I was just finishing a book due in that week. And for a while I thought I’d lost the whole thing. Talk about panic. I’d backed it up on another disk, but I couldn’t tell if that had corrupted or not.
    Luckily it hadn’t and in any case, they were able to retrieve all the files from the computer. Phew!

    Reply
  63. Ah, that makes more sense to me, Cara. One of the few times mine crashed was when it was getting very old, too. However it was such a bad time for me —is there ever a good time for a computer to crash?— as I was just finishing a book due in that week. And for a while I thought I’d lost the whole thing. Talk about panic. I’d backed it up on another disk, but I couldn’t tell if that had corrupted or not.
    Luckily it hadn’t and in any case, they were able to retrieve all the files from the computer. Phew!

    Reply
  64. Ah, that makes more sense to me, Cara. One of the few times mine crashed was when it was getting very old, too. However it was such a bad time for me —is there ever a good time for a computer to crash?— as I was just finishing a book due in that week. And for a while I thought I’d lost the whole thing. Talk about panic. I’d backed it up on another disk, but I couldn’t tell if that had corrupted or not.
    Luckily it hadn’t and in any case, they were able to retrieve all the files from the computer. Phew!

    Reply
  65. Ah, that makes more sense to me, Cara. One of the few times mine crashed was when it was getting very old, too. However it was such a bad time for me —is there ever a good time for a computer to crash?— as I was just finishing a book due in that week. And for a while I thought I’d lost the whole thing. Talk about panic. I’d backed it up on another disk, but I couldn’t tell if that had corrupted or not.
    Luckily it hadn’t and in any case, they were able to retrieve all the files from the computer. Phew!

    Reply
  66. Imelda, I remember, my first ever computer experience was on punch cards, too — ghastly process, especially for a bad typist like me. One tiny typo and the whole program went haywire.
    It’s probably what soured me on the things and made me a luddite in the first place. 😉

    Reply
  67. Imelda, I remember, my first ever computer experience was on punch cards, too — ghastly process, especially for a bad typist like me. One tiny typo and the whole program went haywire.
    It’s probably what soured me on the things and made me a luddite in the first place. 😉

    Reply
  68. Imelda, I remember, my first ever computer experience was on punch cards, too — ghastly process, especially for a bad typist like me. One tiny typo and the whole program went haywire.
    It’s probably what soured me on the things and made me a luddite in the first place. 😉

    Reply
  69. Imelda, I remember, my first ever computer experience was on punch cards, too — ghastly process, especially for a bad typist like me. One tiny typo and the whole program went haywire.
    It’s probably what soured me on the things and made me a luddite in the first place. 😉

    Reply
  70. Imelda, I remember, my first ever computer experience was on punch cards, too — ghastly process, especially for a bad typist like me. One tiny typo and the whole program went haywire.
    It’s probably what soured me on the things and made me a luddite in the first place. 😉

    Reply
  71. Theo, the punch card experience I mentioned in the previous comment was with a giant computer too. So hard to wrap my head around the idea that my little iphone can do more than that giant one.
    As for what older people make of computers, I’m amazed and impressed at how some I know have taken to them. I have an elderly relative in her 90’s who sends out regular emails to her relations across the globe. In fact, she’s put quite a few cousins and second cousins in touch with each other. I have a distant cousin in Florida I never knew about until this.

    Reply
  72. Theo, the punch card experience I mentioned in the previous comment was with a giant computer too. So hard to wrap my head around the idea that my little iphone can do more than that giant one.
    As for what older people make of computers, I’m amazed and impressed at how some I know have taken to them. I have an elderly relative in her 90’s who sends out regular emails to her relations across the globe. In fact, she’s put quite a few cousins and second cousins in touch with each other. I have a distant cousin in Florida I never knew about until this.

    Reply
  73. Theo, the punch card experience I mentioned in the previous comment was with a giant computer too. So hard to wrap my head around the idea that my little iphone can do more than that giant one.
    As for what older people make of computers, I’m amazed and impressed at how some I know have taken to them. I have an elderly relative in her 90’s who sends out regular emails to her relations across the globe. In fact, she’s put quite a few cousins and second cousins in touch with each other. I have a distant cousin in Florida I never knew about until this.

    Reply
  74. Theo, the punch card experience I mentioned in the previous comment was with a giant computer too. So hard to wrap my head around the idea that my little iphone can do more than that giant one.
    As for what older people make of computers, I’m amazed and impressed at how some I know have taken to them. I have an elderly relative in her 90’s who sends out regular emails to her relations across the globe. In fact, she’s put quite a few cousins and second cousins in touch with each other. I have a distant cousin in Florida I never knew about until this.

    Reply
  75. Theo, the punch card experience I mentioned in the previous comment was with a giant computer too. So hard to wrap my head around the idea that my little iphone can do more than that giant one.
    As for what older people make of computers, I’m amazed and impressed at how some I know have taken to them. I have an elderly relative in her 90’s who sends out regular emails to her relations across the globe. In fact, she’s put quite a few cousins and second cousins in touch with each other. I have a distant cousin in Florida I never knew about until this.

    Reply
  76. Louisa, lovely story. Perhaps having a computer there and usable and no pressure enticed quite a few people into their first computer.
    Does your mother use the computer now?
    As for the handwriting thing — I think there are studies that show that direct hand to pen writing skips a process in the brain — or a step, perhaps — that makes creativity flow better.
    But that’s because I was brought up with handwriting, so it’s an extension of myself. I wonder if the kids who’ve grown up on keyboards also skip that extra step while using a keyboard? I must look it up some time .;)

    Reply
  77. Louisa, lovely story. Perhaps having a computer there and usable and no pressure enticed quite a few people into their first computer.
    Does your mother use the computer now?
    As for the handwriting thing — I think there are studies that show that direct hand to pen writing skips a process in the brain — or a step, perhaps — that makes creativity flow better.
    But that’s because I was brought up with handwriting, so it’s an extension of myself. I wonder if the kids who’ve grown up on keyboards also skip that extra step while using a keyboard? I must look it up some time .;)

    Reply
  78. Louisa, lovely story. Perhaps having a computer there and usable and no pressure enticed quite a few people into their first computer.
    Does your mother use the computer now?
    As for the handwriting thing — I think there are studies that show that direct hand to pen writing skips a process in the brain — or a step, perhaps — that makes creativity flow better.
    But that’s because I was brought up with handwriting, so it’s an extension of myself. I wonder if the kids who’ve grown up on keyboards also skip that extra step while using a keyboard? I must look it up some time .;)

    Reply
  79. Louisa, lovely story. Perhaps having a computer there and usable and no pressure enticed quite a few people into their first computer.
    Does your mother use the computer now?
    As for the handwriting thing — I think there are studies that show that direct hand to pen writing skips a process in the brain — or a step, perhaps — that makes creativity flow better.
    But that’s because I was brought up with handwriting, so it’s an extension of myself. I wonder if the kids who’ve grown up on keyboards also skip that extra step while using a keyboard? I must look it up some time .;)

    Reply
  80. Louisa, lovely story. Perhaps having a computer there and usable and no pressure enticed quite a few people into their first computer.
    Does your mother use the computer now?
    As for the handwriting thing — I think there are studies that show that direct hand to pen writing skips a process in the brain — or a step, perhaps — that makes creativity flow better.
    But that’s because I was brought up with handwriting, so it’s an extension of myself. I wonder if the kids who’ve grown up on keyboards also skip that extra step while using a keyboard? I must look it up some time .;)

    Reply
  81. Anne, I don’t remember my first computer, but I do remember taking a typing class in high school -on a manual typewriter. Our teacher, Mrs. Keene, told us that soon everyone would have word processors in their home, and our typewriters would become obsolete. Of course, no one believed her!
    Oh, and I recognize the cahier! I’m from Montreal, and I wrote many a story in one of those! 🙂

    Reply
  82. Anne, I don’t remember my first computer, but I do remember taking a typing class in high school -on a manual typewriter. Our teacher, Mrs. Keene, told us that soon everyone would have word processors in their home, and our typewriters would become obsolete. Of course, no one believed her!
    Oh, and I recognize the cahier! I’m from Montreal, and I wrote many a story in one of those! 🙂

    Reply
  83. Anne, I don’t remember my first computer, but I do remember taking a typing class in high school -on a manual typewriter. Our teacher, Mrs. Keene, told us that soon everyone would have word processors in their home, and our typewriters would become obsolete. Of course, no one believed her!
    Oh, and I recognize the cahier! I’m from Montreal, and I wrote many a story in one of those! 🙂

    Reply
  84. Anne, I don’t remember my first computer, but I do remember taking a typing class in high school -on a manual typewriter. Our teacher, Mrs. Keene, told us that soon everyone would have word processors in their home, and our typewriters would become obsolete. Of course, no one believed her!
    Oh, and I recognize the cahier! I’m from Montreal, and I wrote many a story in one of those! 🙂

    Reply
  85. Anne, I don’t remember my first computer, but I do remember taking a typing class in high school -on a manual typewriter. Our teacher, Mrs. Keene, told us that soon everyone would have word processors in their home, and our typewriters would become obsolete. Of course, no one believed her!
    Oh, and I recognize the cahier! I’m from Montreal, and I wrote many a story in one of those! 🙂

    Reply
  86. Back in the 1980s, I was editing a newspaper. The publisher decided computers were the wave of the future, bought some Mac SEs, and sent me and the other editor to a two-day crash course in Quark Xpress. On the third day, we were back in the office, editing and formating our newspapers. And we did it! Our Macs were that easy to use.
    I’ve been in love with Macs ever since.

    Reply
  87. Back in the 1980s, I was editing a newspaper. The publisher decided computers were the wave of the future, bought some Mac SEs, and sent me and the other editor to a two-day crash course in Quark Xpress. On the third day, we were back in the office, editing and formating our newspapers. And we did it! Our Macs were that easy to use.
    I’ve been in love with Macs ever since.

    Reply
  88. Back in the 1980s, I was editing a newspaper. The publisher decided computers were the wave of the future, bought some Mac SEs, and sent me and the other editor to a two-day crash course in Quark Xpress. On the third day, we were back in the office, editing and formating our newspapers. And we did it! Our Macs were that easy to use.
    I’ve been in love with Macs ever since.

    Reply
  89. Back in the 1980s, I was editing a newspaper. The publisher decided computers were the wave of the future, bought some Mac SEs, and sent me and the other editor to a two-day crash course in Quark Xpress. On the third day, we were back in the office, editing and formating our newspapers. And we did it! Our Macs were that easy to use.
    I’ve been in love with Macs ever since.

    Reply
  90. Back in the 1980s, I was editing a newspaper. The publisher decided computers were the wave of the future, bought some Mac SEs, and sent me and the other editor to a two-day crash course in Quark Xpress. On the third day, we were back in the office, editing and formating our newspapers. And we did it! Our Macs were that easy to use.
    I’ve been in love with Macs ever since.

    Reply
  91. I’m using the my first computer (ie the first one I owned personally). I got it in 2008. Before that I resisted having a computer at home. I was a mainframe computer programmer & didn’t want to see a computer outside of work (I did have a laptop I brought home for systems support, but it was useless for anything else).

    Reply
  92. I’m using the my first computer (ie the first one I owned personally). I got it in 2008. Before that I resisted having a computer at home. I was a mainframe computer programmer & didn’t want to see a computer outside of work (I did have a laptop I brought home for systems support, but it was useless for anything else).

    Reply
  93. I’m using the my first computer (ie the first one I owned personally). I got it in 2008. Before that I resisted having a computer at home. I was a mainframe computer programmer & didn’t want to see a computer outside of work (I did have a laptop I brought home for systems support, but it was useless for anything else).

    Reply
  94. I’m using the my first computer (ie the first one I owned personally). I got it in 2008. Before that I resisted having a computer at home. I was a mainframe computer programmer & didn’t want to see a computer outside of work (I did have a laptop I brought home for systems support, but it was useless for anything else).

    Reply
  95. I’m using the my first computer (ie the first one I owned personally). I got it in 2008. Before that I resisted having a computer at home. I was a mainframe computer programmer & didn’t want to see a computer outside of work (I did have a laptop I brought home for systems support, but it was useless for anything else).

    Reply
  96. Cynthia, yes, I remember my friend insiting we’d all have computers at home and I was soooooo sure she was wrong. Now I have 4 computers and an i-phone.
    I have been reading the Louise Penny stories set in Quebec and really wanting to go back to Canada. I loved Montreal, and Quebec, but didn’t see nearly enough of the country. And I’ve fallen in love with the sad seal song by Beau Dommage. 🙂

    Reply
  97. Cynthia, yes, I remember my friend insiting we’d all have computers at home and I was soooooo sure she was wrong. Now I have 4 computers and an i-phone.
    I have been reading the Louise Penny stories set in Quebec and really wanting to go back to Canada. I loved Montreal, and Quebec, but didn’t see nearly enough of the country. And I’ve fallen in love with the sad seal song by Beau Dommage. 🙂

    Reply
  98. Cynthia, yes, I remember my friend insiting we’d all have computers at home and I was soooooo sure she was wrong. Now I have 4 computers and an i-phone.
    I have been reading the Louise Penny stories set in Quebec and really wanting to go back to Canada. I loved Montreal, and Quebec, but didn’t see nearly enough of the country. And I’ve fallen in love with the sad seal song by Beau Dommage. 🙂

    Reply
  99. Cynthia, yes, I remember my friend insiting we’d all have computers at home and I was soooooo sure she was wrong. Now I have 4 computers and an i-phone.
    I have been reading the Louise Penny stories set in Quebec and really wanting to go back to Canada. I loved Montreal, and Quebec, but didn’t see nearly enough of the country. And I’ve fallen in love with the sad seal song by Beau Dommage. 🙂

    Reply
  100. Cynthia, yes, I remember my friend insiting we’d all have computers at home and I was soooooo sure she was wrong. Now I have 4 computers and an i-phone.
    I have been reading the Louise Penny stories set in Quebec and really wanting to go back to Canada. I loved Montreal, and Quebec, but didn’t see nearly enough of the country. And I’ve fallen in love with the sad seal song by Beau Dommage. 🙂

    Reply
  101. Jane, yes, I think the cleverness of the design that made it so user friendly and intuitive won my loyalty forever, too, even through the years when everyone was predicting the demise of the macs. It was so interesting listening to Stephen Fry talking about it in that Steve Jobs documentary — sounds like he had the same kind of feelings about his mac as I did.

    Reply
  102. Jane, yes, I think the cleverness of the design that made it so user friendly and intuitive won my loyalty forever, too, even through the years when everyone was predicting the demise of the macs. It was so interesting listening to Stephen Fry talking about it in that Steve Jobs documentary — sounds like he had the same kind of feelings about his mac as I did.

    Reply
  103. Jane, yes, I think the cleverness of the design that made it so user friendly and intuitive won my loyalty forever, too, even through the years when everyone was predicting the demise of the macs. It was so interesting listening to Stephen Fry talking about it in that Steve Jobs documentary — sounds like he had the same kind of feelings about his mac as I did.

    Reply
  104. Jane, yes, I think the cleverness of the design that made it so user friendly and intuitive won my loyalty forever, too, even through the years when everyone was predicting the demise of the macs. It was so interesting listening to Stephen Fry talking about it in that Steve Jobs documentary — sounds like he had the same kind of feelings about his mac as I did.

    Reply
  105. Jane, yes, I think the cleverness of the design that made it so user friendly and intuitive won my loyalty forever, too, even through the years when everyone was predicting the demise of the macs. It was so interesting listening to Stephen Fry talking about it in that Steve Jobs documentary — sounds like he had the same kind of feelings about his mac as I did.

    Reply
  106. Diane, I understand you wanting to resist bringing your work home.
    But these days a computer is so much part of our play that the line has blurred considerably. It’s interesting that a number of people are starting to separate their computers into play ones and work ones – the work ones being not on line.

    Reply
  107. Diane, I understand you wanting to resist bringing your work home.
    But these days a computer is so much part of our play that the line has blurred considerably. It’s interesting that a number of people are starting to separate their computers into play ones and work ones – the work ones being not on line.

    Reply
  108. Diane, I understand you wanting to resist bringing your work home.
    But these days a computer is so much part of our play that the line has blurred considerably. It’s interesting that a number of people are starting to separate their computers into play ones and work ones – the work ones being not on line.

    Reply
  109. Diane, I understand you wanting to resist bringing your work home.
    But these days a computer is so much part of our play that the line has blurred considerably. It’s interesting that a number of people are starting to separate their computers into play ones and work ones – the work ones being not on line.

    Reply
  110. Diane, I understand you wanting to resist bringing your work home.
    But these days a computer is so much part of our play that the line has blurred considerably. It’s interesting that a number of people are starting to separate their computers into play ones and work ones – the work ones being not on line.

    Reply
  111. My first computer came bundled with a husband! Well, I married the man that built my computer 1 year later, that is…
    It was an 286 PC with a 40mb hard drive, 2 megs of RAM. Today’s machine has a 1 terrabyte (!) hard drive and 12 MB of RAM… I have it and a laptop and a notebook and two Kindles… I’m all about the electronics.
    Biggest internet time sink is Goodreads.com. However, I spend so much time at work on a computer now, that when I’m home, it’s in my chair and reading. Or knitting and listening to an audiobook.

    Reply
  112. My first computer came bundled with a husband! Well, I married the man that built my computer 1 year later, that is…
    It was an 286 PC with a 40mb hard drive, 2 megs of RAM. Today’s machine has a 1 terrabyte (!) hard drive and 12 MB of RAM… I have it and a laptop and a notebook and two Kindles… I’m all about the electronics.
    Biggest internet time sink is Goodreads.com. However, I spend so much time at work on a computer now, that when I’m home, it’s in my chair and reading. Or knitting and listening to an audiobook.

    Reply
  113. My first computer came bundled with a husband! Well, I married the man that built my computer 1 year later, that is…
    It was an 286 PC with a 40mb hard drive, 2 megs of RAM. Today’s machine has a 1 terrabyte (!) hard drive and 12 MB of RAM… I have it and a laptop and a notebook and two Kindles… I’m all about the electronics.
    Biggest internet time sink is Goodreads.com. However, I spend so much time at work on a computer now, that when I’m home, it’s in my chair and reading. Or knitting and listening to an audiobook.

    Reply
  114. My first computer came bundled with a husband! Well, I married the man that built my computer 1 year later, that is…
    It was an 286 PC with a 40mb hard drive, 2 megs of RAM. Today’s machine has a 1 terrabyte (!) hard drive and 12 MB of RAM… I have it and a laptop and a notebook and two Kindles… I’m all about the electronics.
    Biggest internet time sink is Goodreads.com. However, I spend so much time at work on a computer now, that when I’m home, it’s in my chair and reading. Or knitting and listening to an audiobook.

    Reply
  115. My first computer came bundled with a husband! Well, I married the man that built my computer 1 year later, that is…
    It was an 286 PC with a 40mb hard drive, 2 megs of RAM. Today’s machine has a 1 terrabyte (!) hard drive and 12 MB of RAM… I have it and a laptop and a notebook and two Kindles… I’m all about the electronics.
    Biggest internet time sink is Goodreads.com. However, I spend so much time at work on a computer now, that when I’m home, it’s in my chair and reading. Or knitting and listening to an audiobook.

    Reply
  116. Hubby and I bought ourselves a Commodore 64 shortly after we married, mostly because he wanted a new toy. 64k memory and floppy game disks galore. He liked writing on it, because his handwriting to this day looks like chicken scratches. I mostly played games.
    I’m firmly in the PC universe, as I had to use Macs at a previous job and loathed them. Evidently I am not on their wavelength, lol. The first thing I bought with my first advance was a laptop for my own use, a lovely Toshiba that I’m typing on right now.

    Reply
  117. Hubby and I bought ourselves a Commodore 64 shortly after we married, mostly because he wanted a new toy. 64k memory and floppy game disks galore. He liked writing on it, because his handwriting to this day looks like chicken scratches. I mostly played games.
    I’m firmly in the PC universe, as I had to use Macs at a previous job and loathed them. Evidently I am not on their wavelength, lol. The first thing I bought with my first advance was a laptop for my own use, a lovely Toshiba that I’m typing on right now.

    Reply
  118. Hubby and I bought ourselves a Commodore 64 shortly after we married, mostly because he wanted a new toy. 64k memory and floppy game disks galore. He liked writing on it, because his handwriting to this day looks like chicken scratches. I mostly played games.
    I’m firmly in the PC universe, as I had to use Macs at a previous job and loathed them. Evidently I am not on their wavelength, lol. The first thing I bought with my first advance was a laptop for my own use, a lovely Toshiba that I’m typing on right now.

    Reply
  119. Hubby and I bought ourselves a Commodore 64 shortly after we married, mostly because he wanted a new toy. 64k memory and floppy game disks galore. He liked writing on it, because his handwriting to this day looks like chicken scratches. I mostly played games.
    I’m firmly in the PC universe, as I had to use Macs at a previous job and loathed them. Evidently I am not on their wavelength, lol. The first thing I bought with my first advance was a laptop for my own use, a lovely Toshiba that I’m typing on right now.

    Reply
  120. Hubby and I bought ourselves a Commodore 64 shortly after we married, mostly because he wanted a new toy. 64k memory and floppy game disks galore. He liked writing on it, because his handwriting to this day looks like chicken scratches. I mostly played games.
    I’m firmly in the PC universe, as I had to use Macs at a previous job and loathed them. Evidently I am not on their wavelength, lol. The first thing I bought with my first advance was a laptop for my own use, a lovely Toshiba that I’m typing on right now.

    Reply
  121. LOL, Susan, I’m sure that would be a VERY popular bundle — husband included. 🙂 Also very useful that he can build computers. Great story. And yes, amazing how our homes and lives are now filled with electronics.
    Goodreads is a great site, isn’t it? I know if I’ve heard of a new to me author, I’ll often pop over there to see which book I should try first.
    Audio books are fab. I also prefer to do two things at once — I usually do some kind of craft work when I watch TV. Being read to is a pleasure that’s only come back in my life in the last 10 years when I discovered audio books. In the past before radio and TV it was part of people’s daily entertainment. I have a scene in my current book where people are enjoying being read to. I’m having such fun with it.

    Reply
  122. LOL, Susan, I’m sure that would be a VERY popular bundle — husband included. 🙂 Also very useful that he can build computers. Great story. And yes, amazing how our homes and lives are now filled with electronics.
    Goodreads is a great site, isn’t it? I know if I’ve heard of a new to me author, I’ll often pop over there to see which book I should try first.
    Audio books are fab. I also prefer to do two things at once — I usually do some kind of craft work when I watch TV. Being read to is a pleasure that’s only come back in my life in the last 10 years when I discovered audio books. In the past before radio and TV it was part of people’s daily entertainment. I have a scene in my current book where people are enjoying being read to. I’m having such fun with it.

    Reply
  123. LOL, Susan, I’m sure that would be a VERY popular bundle — husband included. 🙂 Also very useful that he can build computers. Great story. And yes, amazing how our homes and lives are now filled with electronics.
    Goodreads is a great site, isn’t it? I know if I’ve heard of a new to me author, I’ll often pop over there to see which book I should try first.
    Audio books are fab. I also prefer to do two things at once — I usually do some kind of craft work when I watch TV. Being read to is a pleasure that’s only come back in my life in the last 10 years when I discovered audio books. In the past before radio and TV it was part of people’s daily entertainment. I have a scene in my current book where people are enjoying being read to. I’m having such fun with it.

    Reply
  124. LOL, Susan, I’m sure that would be a VERY popular bundle — husband included. 🙂 Also very useful that he can build computers. Great story. And yes, amazing how our homes and lives are now filled with electronics.
    Goodreads is a great site, isn’t it? I know if I’ve heard of a new to me author, I’ll often pop over there to see which book I should try first.
    Audio books are fab. I also prefer to do two things at once — I usually do some kind of craft work when I watch TV. Being read to is a pleasure that’s only come back in my life in the last 10 years when I discovered audio books. In the past before radio and TV it was part of people’s daily entertainment. I have a scene in my current book where people are enjoying being read to. I’m having such fun with it.

    Reply
  125. LOL, Susan, I’m sure that would be a VERY popular bundle — husband included. 🙂 Also very useful that he can build computers. Great story. And yes, amazing how our homes and lives are now filled with electronics.
    Goodreads is a great site, isn’t it? I know if I’ve heard of a new to me author, I’ll often pop over there to see which book I should try first.
    Audio books are fab. I also prefer to do two things at once — I usually do some kind of craft work when I watch TV. Being read to is a pleasure that’s only come back in my life in the last 10 years when I discovered audio books. In the past before radio and TV it was part of people’s daily entertainment. I have a scene in my current book where people are enjoying being read to. I’m having such fun with it.

    Reply
  126. Ann, a friend of mine is the proud possessor of various electronic gadgets given to her as presents by her husband who just lovvvves clever electronic gadgetry. She’s always having to learn to work new things because of it.
    Funny about the PC/Mac divide. It was the opposite with me — PCs aren’t my cuppa. I just think it’s great that there are so many choices out there. It would be a bad day if we had to choose one or the other.

    Reply
  127. Ann, a friend of mine is the proud possessor of various electronic gadgets given to her as presents by her husband who just lovvvves clever electronic gadgetry. She’s always having to learn to work new things because of it.
    Funny about the PC/Mac divide. It was the opposite with me — PCs aren’t my cuppa. I just think it’s great that there are so many choices out there. It would be a bad day if we had to choose one or the other.

    Reply
  128. Ann, a friend of mine is the proud possessor of various electronic gadgets given to her as presents by her husband who just lovvvves clever electronic gadgetry. She’s always having to learn to work new things because of it.
    Funny about the PC/Mac divide. It was the opposite with me — PCs aren’t my cuppa. I just think it’s great that there are so many choices out there. It would be a bad day if we had to choose one or the other.

    Reply
  129. Ann, a friend of mine is the proud possessor of various electronic gadgets given to her as presents by her husband who just lovvvves clever electronic gadgetry. She’s always having to learn to work new things because of it.
    Funny about the PC/Mac divide. It was the opposite with me — PCs aren’t my cuppa. I just think it’s great that there are so many choices out there. It would be a bad day if we had to choose one or the other.

    Reply
  130. Ann, a friend of mine is the proud possessor of various electronic gadgets given to her as presents by her husband who just lovvvves clever electronic gadgetry. She’s always having to learn to work new things because of it.
    Funny about the PC/Mac divide. It was the opposite with me — PCs aren’t my cuppa. I just think it’s great that there are so many choices out there. It would be a bad day if we had to choose one or the other.

    Reply
  131. I took typing in college in the 80s, and did all right. Then I worked for the airlines in the 80s and 80s and used a computer, improving my typing skills exponentially. I also went back to college. I couldn’t have done it without a computer. So, in a way, it’s because of the computer I’m writing. Hadn’t thought of it that way before. First computer I used was a Mac, but first one I owned was a PC, so I could do my transcribing. Then Mac Office finally meshed with PC Office, and I bought a Mac again, a few years ago. It was like coming home. 🙂 Biggest time-sink… probably checking emails… I check them more often than is necessary. I mean, the joy of email is I don’t have to answer right away, but I also start to panic when there are too many there. I need to get over that.

    Reply
  132. I took typing in college in the 80s, and did all right. Then I worked for the airlines in the 80s and 80s and used a computer, improving my typing skills exponentially. I also went back to college. I couldn’t have done it without a computer. So, in a way, it’s because of the computer I’m writing. Hadn’t thought of it that way before. First computer I used was a Mac, but first one I owned was a PC, so I could do my transcribing. Then Mac Office finally meshed with PC Office, and I bought a Mac again, a few years ago. It was like coming home. 🙂 Biggest time-sink… probably checking emails… I check them more often than is necessary. I mean, the joy of email is I don’t have to answer right away, but I also start to panic when there are too many there. I need to get over that.

    Reply
  133. I took typing in college in the 80s, and did all right. Then I worked for the airlines in the 80s and 80s and used a computer, improving my typing skills exponentially. I also went back to college. I couldn’t have done it without a computer. So, in a way, it’s because of the computer I’m writing. Hadn’t thought of it that way before. First computer I used was a Mac, but first one I owned was a PC, so I could do my transcribing. Then Mac Office finally meshed with PC Office, and I bought a Mac again, a few years ago. It was like coming home. 🙂 Biggest time-sink… probably checking emails… I check them more often than is necessary. I mean, the joy of email is I don’t have to answer right away, but I also start to panic when there are too many there. I need to get over that.

    Reply
  134. I took typing in college in the 80s, and did all right. Then I worked for the airlines in the 80s and 80s and used a computer, improving my typing skills exponentially. I also went back to college. I couldn’t have done it without a computer. So, in a way, it’s because of the computer I’m writing. Hadn’t thought of it that way before. First computer I used was a Mac, but first one I owned was a PC, so I could do my transcribing. Then Mac Office finally meshed with PC Office, and I bought a Mac again, a few years ago. It was like coming home. 🙂 Biggest time-sink… probably checking emails… I check them more often than is necessary. I mean, the joy of email is I don’t have to answer right away, but I also start to panic when there are too many there. I need to get over that.

    Reply
  135. I took typing in college in the 80s, and did all right. Then I worked for the airlines in the 80s and 80s and used a computer, improving my typing skills exponentially. I also went back to college. I couldn’t have done it without a computer. So, in a way, it’s because of the computer I’m writing. Hadn’t thought of it that way before. First computer I used was a Mac, but first one I owned was a PC, so I could do my transcribing. Then Mac Office finally meshed with PC Office, and I bought a Mac again, a few years ago. It was like coming home. 🙂 Biggest time-sink… probably checking emails… I check them more often than is necessary. I mean, the joy of email is I don’t have to answer right away, but I also start to panic when there are too many there. I need to get over that.

    Reply
  136. I took computer programming courses back in college in the 70s. I fell in love with the logic and problem-solving, so even though I majored in English Lit, I got a job as a programmer right out of college. Back then, I would tell people what I did and they were impressed. By the time I quit in 1989, when I told people what I did they started chatting about their PC at home. And I worked on mainframes and didn’t want to get on the computer when I got home.
    Now our family has lots of computers. The one I am using now is a desktop Mac, but I also have a Windows laptop and so does my husband. I keep looking at iPads/tablets, but have a hard time justifying a third platform. I like a lot of things about the Mac, and think it is really great for people who “just want it to work”. As for me, I am sometimes annoyed because I want it to work MY way, and the Mac thinks it should go a little differently. I expect if I learned enough, I could figure it out. But I am again spending most of my day in front of a computer at work, and just want to spend my time on reading blogs, playing Soduku and Solitaire, and catching up on Facebook when I get home. Also somehow I ended up with 4 email addresses – and use them all.
    My biggest time-waster is Freecell.

    Reply
  137. I took computer programming courses back in college in the 70s. I fell in love with the logic and problem-solving, so even though I majored in English Lit, I got a job as a programmer right out of college. Back then, I would tell people what I did and they were impressed. By the time I quit in 1989, when I told people what I did they started chatting about their PC at home. And I worked on mainframes and didn’t want to get on the computer when I got home.
    Now our family has lots of computers. The one I am using now is a desktop Mac, but I also have a Windows laptop and so does my husband. I keep looking at iPads/tablets, but have a hard time justifying a third platform. I like a lot of things about the Mac, and think it is really great for people who “just want it to work”. As for me, I am sometimes annoyed because I want it to work MY way, and the Mac thinks it should go a little differently. I expect if I learned enough, I could figure it out. But I am again spending most of my day in front of a computer at work, and just want to spend my time on reading blogs, playing Soduku and Solitaire, and catching up on Facebook when I get home. Also somehow I ended up with 4 email addresses – and use them all.
    My biggest time-waster is Freecell.

    Reply
  138. I took computer programming courses back in college in the 70s. I fell in love with the logic and problem-solving, so even though I majored in English Lit, I got a job as a programmer right out of college. Back then, I would tell people what I did and they were impressed. By the time I quit in 1989, when I told people what I did they started chatting about their PC at home. And I worked on mainframes and didn’t want to get on the computer when I got home.
    Now our family has lots of computers. The one I am using now is a desktop Mac, but I also have a Windows laptop and so does my husband. I keep looking at iPads/tablets, but have a hard time justifying a third platform. I like a lot of things about the Mac, and think it is really great for people who “just want it to work”. As for me, I am sometimes annoyed because I want it to work MY way, and the Mac thinks it should go a little differently. I expect if I learned enough, I could figure it out. But I am again spending most of my day in front of a computer at work, and just want to spend my time on reading blogs, playing Soduku and Solitaire, and catching up on Facebook when I get home. Also somehow I ended up with 4 email addresses – and use them all.
    My biggest time-waster is Freecell.

    Reply
  139. I took computer programming courses back in college in the 70s. I fell in love with the logic and problem-solving, so even though I majored in English Lit, I got a job as a programmer right out of college. Back then, I would tell people what I did and they were impressed. By the time I quit in 1989, when I told people what I did they started chatting about their PC at home. And I worked on mainframes and didn’t want to get on the computer when I got home.
    Now our family has lots of computers. The one I am using now is a desktop Mac, but I also have a Windows laptop and so does my husband. I keep looking at iPads/tablets, but have a hard time justifying a third platform. I like a lot of things about the Mac, and think it is really great for people who “just want it to work”. As for me, I am sometimes annoyed because I want it to work MY way, and the Mac thinks it should go a little differently. I expect if I learned enough, I could figure it out. But I am again spending most of my day in front of a computer at work, and just want to spend my time on reading blogs, playing Soduku and Solitaire, and catching up on Facebook when I get home. Also somehow I ended up with 4 email addresses – and use them all.
    My biggest time-waster is Freecell.

    Reply
  140. I took computer programming courses back in college in the 70s. I fell in love with the logic and problem-solving, so even though I majored in English Lit, I got a job as a programmer right out of college. Back then, I would tell people what I did and they were impressed. By the time I quit in 1989, when I told people what I did they started chatting about their PC at home. And I worked on mainframes and didn’t want to get on the computer when I got home.
    Now our family has lots of computers. The one I am using now is a desktop Mac, but I also have a Windows laptop and so does my husband. I keep looking at iPads/tablets, but have a hard time justifying a third platform. I like a lot of things about the Mac, and think it is really great for people who “just want it to work”. As for me, I am sometimes annoyed because I want it to work MY way, and the Mac thinks it should go a little differently. I expect if I learned enough, I could figure it out. But I am again spending most of my day in front of a computer at work, and just want to spend my time on reading blogs, playing Soduku and Solitaire, and catching up on Facebook when I get home. Also somehow I ended up with 4 email addresses – and use them all.
    My biggest time-waster is Freecell.

    Reply
  141. I started on a manual portable typewriter, went to an electric, then the IBM Selectric, eventually to an Exxon product called Qyx. Dedicated word processing came in and I learned why it is called a “cursor” (because you curse at it). My first real course was on a Tandy at Radio Shack. I worked on an Apple at a temp job – very frustrating, poor leadership, totally at sea. But the first real computer I worked with was an AT&T: dual floppy drives and all. Lotus 123 and Multimate. Next job, after a few years, a LAN and Microsoft. Big sigh. Mama was home. The rest is history.
    I don’t consider any time on the computer as “wasted.”

    Reply
  142. I started on a manual portable typewriter, went to an electric, then the IBM Selectric, eventually to an Exxon product called Qyx. Dedicated word processing came in and I learned why it is called a “cursor” (because you curse at it). My first real course was on a Tandy at Radio Shack. I worked on an Apple at a temp job – very frustrating, poor leadership, totally at sea. But the first real computer I worked with was an AT&T: dual floppy drives and all. Lotus 123 and Multimate. Next job, after a few years, a LAN and Microsoft. Big sigh. Mama was home. The rest is history.
    I don’t consider any time on the computer as “wasted.”

    Reply
  143. I started on a manual portable typewriter, went to an electric, then the IBM Selectric, eventually to an Exxon product called Qyx. Dedicated word processing came in and I learned why it is called a “cursor” (because you curse at it). My first real course was on a Tandy at Radio Shack. I worked on an Apple at a temp job – very frustrating, poor leadership, totally at sea. But the first real computer I worked with was an AT&T: dual floppy drives and all. Lotus 123 and Multimate. Next job, after a few years, a LAN and Microsoft. Big sigh. Mama was home. The rest is history.
    I don’t consider any time on the computer as “wasted.”

    Reply
  144. I started on a manual portable typewriter, went to an electric, then the IBM Selectric, eventually to an Exxon product called Qyx. Dedicated word processing came in and I learned why it is called a “cursor” (because you curse at it). My first real course was on a Tandy at Radio Shack. I worked on an Apple at a temp job – very frustrating, poor leadership, totally at sea. But the first real computer I worked with was an AT&T: dual floppy drives and all. Lotus 123 and Multimate. Next job, after a few years, a LAN and Microsoft. Big sigh. Mama was home. The rest is history.
    I don’t consider any time on the computer as “wasted.”

    Reply
  145. I started on a manual portable typewriter, went to an electric, then the IBM Selectric, eventually to an Exxon product called Qyx. Dedicated word processing came in and I learned why it is called a “cursor” (because you curse at it). My first real course was on a Tandy at Radio Shack. I worked on an Apple at a temp job – very frustrating, poor leadership, totally at sea. But the first real computer I worked with was an AT&T: dual floppy drives and all. Lotus 123 and Multimate. Next job, after a few years, a LAN and Microsoft. Big sigh. Mama was home. The rest is history.
    I don’t consider any time on the computer as “wasted.”

    Reply
  146. I was looking back at a couple of comments on typing speed. Some of the typewriters used in my school should have been in a museum – we fought for the electric one. My WPM was awful. I cheated in typing class in business school! But when I hit the buffered keyboard on a computer, I took off. It wasn’t that I was slow; it was the typewriters.

    Reply
  147. I was looking back at a couple of comments on typing speed. Some of the typewriters used in my school should have been in a museum – we fought for the electric one. My WPM was awful. I cheated in typing class in business school! But when I hit the buffered keyboard on a computer, I took off. It wasn’t that I was slow; it was the typewriters.

    Reply
  148. I was looking back at a couple of comments on typing speed. Some of the typewriters used in my school should have been in a museum – we fought for the electric one. My WPM was awful. I cheated in typing class in business school! But when I hit the buffered keyboard on a computer, I took off. It wasn’t that I was slow; it was the typewriters.

    Reply
  149. I was looking back at a couple of comments on typing speed. Some of the typewriters used in my school should have been in a museum – we fought for the electric one. My WPM was awful. I cheated in typing class in business school! But when I hit the buffered keyboard on a computer, I took off. It wasn’t that I was slow; it was the typewriters.

    Reply
  150. I was looking back at a couple of comments on typing speed. Some of the typewriters used in my school should have been in a museum – we fought for the electric one. My WPM was awful. I cheated in typing class in business school! But when I hit the buffered keyboard on a computer, I took off. It wasn’t that I was slow; it was the typewriters.

    Reply
  151. Wow! Everyone was just so eager to share about their first computers. 😀 I, too, am a typewriter baby. He-he. I wouldn’t prefer the typing experience before though. Many people, the older crowd particularly, haven’t really foreseen the possible impact of computers on our daily lives. But looking at how people have become so reliant on computers now, they have probably forgotten about the challenges of using a typewriter. 🙂

    Reply
  152. Wow! Everyone was just so eager to share about their first computers. 😀 I, too, am a typewriter baby. He-he. I wouldn’t prefer the typing experience before though. Many people, the older crowd particularly, haven’t really foreseen the possible impact of computers on our daily lives. But looking at how people have become so reliant on computers now, they have probably forgotten about the challenges of using a typewriter. 🙂

    Reply
  153. Wow! Everyone was just so eager to share about their first computers. 😀 I, too, am a typewriter baby. He-he. I wouldn’t prefer the typing experience before though. Many people, the older crowd particularly, haven’t really foreseen the possible impact of computers on our daily lives. But looking at how people have become so reliant on computers now, they have probably forgotten about the challenges of using a typewriter. 🙂

    Reply
  154. Wow! Everyone was just so eager to share about their first computers. 😀 I, too, am a typewriter baby. He-he. I wouldn’t prefer the typing experience before though. Many people, the older crowd particularly, haven’t really foreseen the possible impact of computers on our daily lives. But looking at how people have become so reliant on computers now, they have probably forgotten about the challenges of using a typewriter. 🙂

    Reply
  155. Wow! Everyone was just so eager to share about their first computers. 😀 I, too, am a typewriter baby. He-he. I wouldn’t prefer the typing experience before though. Many people, the older crowd particularly, haven’t really foreseen the possible impact of computers on our daily lives. But looking at how people have become so reliant on computers now, they have probably forgotten about the challenges of using a typewriter. 🙂

    Reply

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