Musing on Tea and Gardens

Tea 4Andrea here, musing today about tea. But first, a bit of backstory—last week MURDER AT THE ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, my latest Wrexford & Sloane Regency mystery, released and like most authors these days, I was madly busy doing various promos on social media. (The introvert in me confesses that such things aren’t my, well, er . . . cup of tea. I would much rather be sitting quietiy with my nose to the keyboard, pecking away at a new story.

MURDER AT THE ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS – Penrose – Ripped Bodice InstaHowever, one of the fun promos my publisher and I put together is with the marvelous Ripped Bodice Bookstore, the first all romance bookstore in America. They are running s special Instagram giveaway of a signed set of all my Wrexford & Sloane mysteries, as well as a Botanical Garden tea set. (It’s free to enter . . . sorry—U. S. only. Just click here, but be sure to hurry as it ends on Oct. 8th)


Tea 6Tea and botanical gardens . . . two of my favorite things! Given that my latest book features several scenes at the Royal Botanical Gardens in Kew, I thought I’d dish out a few small random sips of tea’s history. It’s an apt pairing as tea—its scientific name is Camellia sinensis—was first touted as a medicinal drink on its arrival in Britain, and the Royal Botanic Gardens are famous for their research in botanical medicine and dissemination of specimens to help other areas in the world establish gardens with healing plants.

Joseph_Banks_1773_ReynoldsSir Joseph Banks, the noted botanist/adventurer (and one of my favorite gentlemen from the Georgian/Regency era because of his ebullient curiosity about the world) was instrumental in advising King George III on how to develop the mission of the Royal Botanic Gardens. A longtime President of the Royal Society, one Britain’s leading scientific societies, he was responsible for turning the Gardens into the leading repository of botanical specimens from around the world. It became a center for the study of medicinal plants, and it was also generous in sharing its knowledge—and specimens—with other botanical gardens around the globe.

Tea 9Tea fits in well to this story! The Royal Botanic Gardens had a variety of specimen tea plants brought back by the East India Company for their collections. And early advocates of tea touted it as a “wonder” medicine capable of “ . . . preserving perfect health until extreme old age.”

Here are a few random facts about tea and its history that caught my fancy . . .

Tea 1Chinese legend has it that tea was “discovered” in 2737 BC when the Chinese Emperor Shen Nung was sitting under a Camellia sinensis tree while his servant boiled drinking water. A few leaves from the tree fell into the pot, and the Emperor, well known for his knowledge of herbs, decided to try the accidental tincture.

Thomas Garway, who owned a coffee house in Exchange Alley, was one of the first merchants offer tea in London. He is said to have sold both brewed and dry tea in 1657. And in 1660, he published a broadside extolling tea’s power at 'making the body active and lusty', and 'preserving perfect health until extreme old age'.

Tea 8It was the marriage of the Portuguese princess Catherine of Braganza to King Charles II in 1662 that really lit the fire for tea‘s popularity in Britain. Catherine loved tea, having acquired a taste for it in her native country, which traded traded extensively with the East. Through her, drinking tea became very fashionable at the royal court and the habit soon spread throughout the drawing rooms of aristocratic society.

Screen Shot 2021-10-03 at 8.04.49 PMVauxhall, London’s popular (and slightly naughty) pleasure garden started serving tea along with its famous sliced ham and arrack punch the 1720s. Watching the fireworks and then drinking tea in the wee hours of the morning became de rigueur for the fashionable crowd.

The oh-so British custom of afternoon tea is said to have been started by the 7th Duchess of Bedford in the early 1800s. She must have been prone to peckishness, for she wanted a way to fill the void between the midday meal and the evening meal, which was often served later in the evening in aristocratic households.

All the many varieties of traditional tea that we enjoy—white tea, green tea, oolong, black tea—all come from two varieties: Camellia sinensis; variety sinensis and Camellia sinensis; variety assamic.

Now that I’ve filled your cup with some fun facts, what about you? Are you a tea aficionado? (Or perhaps a tea snob?) Do you have a favorite type of tea? And do you use milk and/or sugar . . . or do you consider that a heresy? Please share!

210 thoughts on “Musing on Tea and Gardens”

  1. Thanks for a fascinating post, Andrea. I only rarely drink tea, generally something lemon related if I’m feeling ill. My husband though is a tea drinker. He generally starts the day with a cup of Earl Grey tea (from the San Francisco Herb Company) with cream and sugar.

    Reply
  2. Thanks for a fascinating post, Andrea. I only rarely drink tea, generally something lemon related if I’m feeling ill. My husband though is a tea drinker. He generally starts the day with a cup of Earl Grey tea (from the San Francisco Herb Company) with cream and sugar.

    Reply
  3. Thanks for a fascinating post, Andrea. I only rarely drink tea, generally something lemon related if I’m feeling ill. My husband though is a tea drinker. He generally starts the day with a cup of Earl Grey tea (from the San Francisco Herb Company) with cream and sugar.

    Reply
  4. Thanks for a fascinating post, Andrea. I only rarely drink tea, generally something lemon related if I’m feeling ill. My husband though is a tea drinker. He generally starts the day with a cup of Earl Grey tea (from the San Francisco Herb Company) with cream and sugar.

    Reply
  5. Thanks for a fascinating post, Andrea. I only rarely drink tea, generally something lemon related if I’m feeling ill. My husband though is a tea drinker. He generally starts the day with a cup of Earl Grey tea (from the San Francisco Herb Company) with cream and sugar.

    Reply
  6. Well this was very interesting, and I love the art work. However, I not a big tea drinker. I do have a couple of cups of coffee in the morning (to jump start my day), but I think I drink more water than anything else.
    But in the wintertime I love to take a break in the afternoon and have a hot cup of tea (Bigalow – Raspberry Royal)with a piece or two of fine chocolate (yum).

    Reply
  7. Well this was very interesting, and I love the art work. However, I not a big tea drinker. I do have a couple of cups of coffee in the morning (to jump start my day), but I think I drink more water than anything else.
    But in the wintertime I love to take a break in the afternoon and have a hot cup of tea (Bigalow – Raspberry Royal)with a piece or two of fine chocolate (yum).

    Reply
  8. Well this was very interesting, and I love the art work. However, I not a big tea drinker. I do have a couple of cups of coffee in the morning (to jump start my day), but I think I drink more water than anything else.
    But in the wintertime I love to take a break in the afternoon and have a hot cup of tea (Bigalow – Raspberry Royal)with a piece or two of fine chocolate (yum).

    Reply
  9. Well this was very interesting, and I love the art work. However, I not a big tea drinker. I do have a couple of cups of coffee in the morning (to jump start my day), but I think I drink more water than anything else.
    But in the wintertime I love to take a break in the afternoon and have a hot cup of tea (Bigalow – Raspberry Royal)with a piece or two of fine chocolate (yum).

    Reply
  10. Well this was very interesting, and I love the art work. However, I not a big tea drinker. I do have a couple of cups of coffee in the morning (to jump start my day), but I think I drink more water than anything else.
    But in the wintertime I love to take a break in the afternoon and have a hot cup of tea (Bigalow – Raspberry Royal)with a piece or two of fine chocolate (yum).

    Reply
  11. I love tea, it’s my go to beverage. I like many kinds of tea, but black tea is my favorite. Now heading onto the winter I have a favorite Christmas tea flavored with cinnamon, cloves and orange, it smells lovely. A cup of tea and a Wrexford and Sloane book is a perfect way to spend an drizzly afternoon.

    Reply
  12. I love tea, it’s my go to beverage. I like many kinds of tea, but black tea is my favorite. Now heading onto the winter I have a favorite Christmas tea flavored with cinnamon, cloves and orange, it smells lovely. A cup of tea and a Wrexford and Sloane book is a perfect way to spend an drizzly afternoon.

    Reply
  13. I love tea, it’s my go to beverage. I like many kinds of tea, but black tea is my favorite. Now heading onto the winter I have a favorite Christmas tea flavored with cinnamon, cloves and orange, it smells lovely. A cup of tea and a Wrexford and Sloane book is a perfect way to spend an drizzly afternoon.

    Reply
  14. I love tea, it’s my go to beverage. I like many kinds of tea, but black tea is my favorite. Now heading onto the winter I have a favorite Christmas tea flavored with cinnamon, cloves and orange, it smells lovely. A cup of tea and a Wrexford and Sloane book is a perfect way to spend an drizzly afternoon.

    Reply
  15. I love tea, it’s my go to beverage. I like many kinds of tea, but black tea is my favorite. Now heading onto the winter I have a favorite Christmas tea flavored with cinnamon, cloves and orange, it smells lovely. A cup of tea and a Wrexford and Sloane book is a perfect way to spend an drizzly afternoon.

    Reply
  16. I’m not a tea person either. I’m with Kareni – occasionally with lemon & honey if I’m feeling ill. It’s still interesting information though.

    Reply
  17. I’m not a tea person either. I’m with Kareni – occasionally with lemon & honey if I’m feeling ill. It’s still interesting information though.

    Reply
  18. I’m not a tea person either. I’m with Kareni – occasionally with lemon & honey if I’m feeling ill. It’s still interesting information though.

    Reply
  19. I’m not a tea person either. I’m with Kareni – occasionally with lemon & honey if I’m feeling ill. It’s still interesting information though.

    Reply
  20. I’m not a tea person either. I’m with Kareni – occasionally with lemon & honey if I’m feeling ill. It’s still interesting information though.

    Reply
  21. I learned to like tea in college. I now drink black unsweetened iced tea daily. I recently read that Black tea is good to help regulate ones blood sugar. Considering my A1c is within normal range after years of struggling to maintain it, there may be something to it.

    Reply
  22. I learned to like tea in college. I now drink black unsweetened iced tea daily. I recently read that Black tea is good to help regulate ones blood sugar. Considering my A1c is within normal range after years of struggling to maintain it, there may be something to it.

    Reply
  23. I learned to like tea in college. I now drink black unsweetened iced tea daily. I recently read that Black tea is good to help regulate ones blood sugar. Considering my A1c is within normal range after years of struggling to maintain it, there may be something to it.

    Reply
  24. I learned to like tea in college. I now drink black unsweetened iced tea daily. I recently read that Black tea is good to help regulate ones blood sugar. Considering my A1c is within normal range after years of struggling to maintain it, there may be something to it.

    Reply
  25. I learned to like tea in college. I now drink black unsweetened iced tea daily. I recently read that Black tea is good to help regulate ones blood sugar. Considering my A1c is within normal range after years of struggling to maintain it, there may be something to it.

    Reply
  26. I’m about to make a cuppa to take upstairs with the Times cryptic. My morning routine. My tea is Tetley – like most Britishers I define tea by brand rather than variety. When older people like me talk about tea we usually mean Indian tea which we serve with milk – and sometimes sugar. Most of us, including me, now use teabags. There are more refined types of tea readily available and becoming increasingly popular but I’m quite happy with what I’m used to. Thank you for this informative post. I hadn’t realised Joseph Banks was so good looking when he was young. Quite the romantic hero…

    Reply
  27. I’m about to make a cuppa to take upstairs with the Times cryptic. My morning routine. My tea is Tetley – like most Britishers I define tea by brand rather than variety. When older people like me talk about tea we usually mean Indian tea which we serve with milk – and sometimes sugar. Most of us, including me, now use teabags. There are more refined types of tea readily available and becoming increasingly popular but I’m quite happy with what I’m used to. Thank you for this informative post. I hadn’t realised Joseph Banks was so good looking when he was young. Quite the romantic hero…

    Reply
  28. I’m about to make a cuppa to take upstairs with the Times cryptic. My morning routine. My tea is Tetley – like most Britishers I define tea by brand rather than variety. When older people like me talk about tea we usually mean Indian tea which we serve with milk – and sometimes sugar. Most of us, including me, now use teabags. There are more refined types of tea readily available and becoming increasingly popular but I’m quite happy with what I’m used to. Thank you for this informative post. I hadn’t realised Joseph Banks was so good looking when he was young. Quite the romantic hero…

    Reply
  29. I’m about to make a cuppa to take upstairs with the Times cryptic. My morning routine. My tea is Tetley – like most Britishers I define tea by brand rather than variety. When older people like me talk about tea we usually mean Indian tea which we serve with milk – and sometimes sugar. Most of us, including me, now use teabags. There are more refined types of tea readily available and becoming increasingly popular but I’m quite happy with what I’m used to. Thank you for this informative post. I hadn’t realised Joseph Banks was so good looking when he was young. Quite the romantic hero…

    Reply
  30. I’m about to make a cuppa to take upstairs with the Times cryptic. My morning routine. My tea is Tetley – like most Britishers I define tea by brand rather than variety. When older people like me talk about tea we usually mean Indian tea which we serve with milk – and sometimes sugar. Most of us, including me, now use teabags. There are more refined types of tea readily available and becoming increasingly popular but I’m quite happy with what I’m used to. Thank you for this informative post. I hadn’t realised Joseph Banks was so good looking when he was young. Quite the romantic hero…

    Reply
  31. I think that tea properly brewed in a tea pot is a superb beverage … strong ‘Yorkshire tea’ is a favourite. I always add milk for flavour but often wondered why my school teacher frowned on my habit of adding milk after the tea …. I couldn’t detect any difference in flavour and assumed it was some kind of snobbery. Later learned that early cheap crockery could crack when very hot liquid was added so there was some logic to it! I also think that tea bags have destroyed the pleasure of reading the tea leaves. You have to brew your own tea nowadays if you want to observe the patterns the leaves form after drinking the tea. LOL

    Reply
  32. I think that tea properly brewed in a tea pot is a superb beverage … strong ‘Yorkshire tea’ is a favourite. I always add milk for flavour but often wondered why my school teacher frowned on my habit of adding milk after the tea …. I couldn’t detect any difference in flavour and assumed it was some kind of snobbery. Later learned that early cheap crockery could crack when very hot liquid was added so there was some logic to it! I also think that tea bags have destroyed the pleasure of reading the tea leaves. You have to brew your own tea nowadays if you want to observe the patterns the leaves form after drinking the tea. LOL

    Reply
  33. I think that tea properly brewed in a tea pot is a superb beverage … strong ‘Yorkshire tea’ is a favourite. I always add milk for flavour but often wondered why my school teacher frowned on my habit of adding milk after the tea …. I couldn’t detect any difference in flavour and assumed it was some kind of snobbery. Later learned that early cheap crockery could crack when very hot liquid was added so there was some logic to it! I also think that tea bags have destroyed the pleasure of reading the tea leaves. You have to brew your own tea nowadays if you want to observe the patterns the leaves form after drinking the tea. LOL

    Reply
  34. I think that tea properly brewed in a tea pot is a superb beverage … strong ‘Yorkshire tea’ is a favourite. I always add milk for flavour but often wondered why my school teacher frowned on my habit of adding milk after the tea …. I couldn’t detect any difference in flavour and assumed it was some kind of snobbery. Later learned that early cheap crockery could crack when very hot liquid was added so there was some logic to it! I also think that tea bags have destroyed the pleasure of reading the tea leaves. You have to brew your own tea nowadays if you want to observe the patterns the leaves form after drinking the tea. LOL

    Reply
  35. I think that tea properly brewed in a tea pot is a superb beverage … strong ‘Yorkshire tea’ is a favourite. I always add milk for flavour but often wondered why my school teacher frowned on my habit of adding milk after the tea …. I couldn’t detect any difference in flavour and assumed it was some kind of snobbery. Later learned that early cheap crockery could crack when very hot liquid was added so there was some logic to it! I also think that tea bags have destroyed the pleasure of reading the tea leaves. You have to brew your own tea nowadays if you want to observe the patterns the leaves form after drinking the tea. LOL

    Reply
  36. Lovely post, Andrea! I’m not much of a tea drinker but it’s wonderful when you’re either feeling cold or have the flu! I prefer the simple varieties, like English Breakfast, and I want lots of milk and sugar (probably too much as I have a very sweet tooth :-D).

    Reply
  37. Lovely post, Andrea! I’m not much of a tea drinker but it’s wonderful when you’re either feeling cold or have the flu! I prefer the simple varieties, like English Breakfast, and I want lots of milk and sugar (probably too much as I have a very sweet tooth :-D).

    Reply
  38. Lovely post, Andrea! I’m not much of a tea drinker but it’s wonderful when you’re either feeling cold or have the flu! I prefer the simple varieties, like English Breakfast, and I want lots of milk and sugar (probably too much as I have a very sweet tooth :-D).

    Reply
  39. Lovely post, Andrea! I’m not much of a tea drinker but it’s wonderful when you’re either feeling cold or have the flu! I prefer the simple varieties, like English Breakfast, and I want lots of milk and sugar (probably too much as I have a very sweet tooth :-D).

    Reply
  40. Lovely post, Andrea! I’m not much of a tea drinker but it’s wonderful when you’re either feeling cold or have the flu! I prefer the simple varieties, like English Breakfast, and I want lots of milk and sugar (probably too much as I have a very sweet tooth :-D).

    Reply
  41. While in China, my tour group visited a tea plantation. Very interesting. A strong memory for me is of watching a young woman roasting tea leaves by moving them around the roasting wok with her bare hands. The rest is all positive, though.
    Tea leaves are picked by hand. The guide/presenter told us that the first (smallest) two leaves were used for white tea, the second pair for green tea, and the third for black tea. Someone asked, what about the rest? “Lipton’s!” It got quite a laugh, but Lipton’s is a preferred brand for many in southeast Asia. (Note: I have no idea if any of what he said is true, but it made an entertaining story.)
    I like my tea strong and flavorful with nothing else in it, unless it’s intentionally green tea chai. I like dragon well and pu’er, but I’m also fond of Gold Kili chai with ginger and honey as an evening pick me up.

    Reply
  42. While in China, my tour group visited a tea plantation. Very interesting. A strong memory for me is of watching a young woman roasting tea leaves by moving them around the roasting wok with her bare hands. The rest is all positive, though.
    Tea leaves are picked by hand. The guide/presenter told us that the first (smallest) two leaves were used for white tea, the second pair for green tea, and the third for black tea. Someone asked, what about the rest? “Lipton’s!” It got quite a laugh, but Lipton’s is a preferred brand for many in southeast Asia. (Note: I have no idea if any of what he said is true, but it made an entertaining story.)
    I like my tea strong and flavorful with nothing else in it, unless it’s intentionally green tea chai. I like dragon well and pu’er, but I’m also fond of Gold Kili chai with ginger and honey as an evening pick me up.

    Reply
  43. While in China, my tour group visited a tea plantation. Very interesting. A strong memory for me is of watching a young woman roasting tea leaves by moving them around the roasting wok with her bare hands. The rest is all positive, though.
    Tea leaves are picked by hand. The guide/presenter told us that the first (smallest) two leaves were used for white tea, the second pair for green tea, and the third for black tea. Someone asked, what about the rest? “Lipton’s!” It got quite a laugh, but Lipton’s is a preferred brand for many in southeast Asia. (Note: I have no idea if any of what he said is true, but it made an entertaining story.)
    I like my tea strong and flavorful with nothing else in it, unless it’s intentionally green tea chai. I like dragon well and pu’er, but I’m also fond of Gold Kili chai with ginger and honey as an evening pick me up.

    Reply
  44. While in China, my tour group visited a tea plantation. Very interesting. A strong memory for me is of watching a young woman roasting tea leaves by moving them around the roasting wok with her bare hands. The rest is all positive, though.
    Tea leaves are picked by hand. The guide/presenter told us that the first (smallest) two leaves were used for white tea, the second pair for green tea, and the third for black tea. Someone asked, what about the rest? “Lipton’s!” It got quite a laugh, but Lipton’s is a preferred brand for many in southeast Asia. (Note: I have no idea if any of what he said is true, but it made an entertaining story.)
    I like my tea strong and flavorful with nothing else in it, unless it’s intentionally green tea chai. I like dragon well and pu’er, but I’m also fond of Gold Kili chai with ginger and honey as an evening pick me up.

    Reply
  45. While in China, my tour group visited a tea plantation. Very interesting. A strong memory for me is of watching a young woman roasting tea leaves by moving them around the roasting wok with her bare hands. The rest is all positive, though.
    Tea leaves are picked by hand. The guide/presenter told us that the first (smallest) two leaves were used for white tea, the second pair for green tea, and the third for black tea. Someone asked, what about the rest? “Lipton’s!” It got quite a laugh, but Lipton’s is a preferred brand for many in southeast Asia. (Note: I have no idea if any of what he said is true, but it made an entertaining story.)
    I like my tea strong and flavorful with nothing else in it, unless it’s intentionally green tea chai. I like dragon well and pu’er, but I’m also fond of Gold Kili chai with ginger and honey as an evening pick me up.

    Reply
  46. Ann, you are a braver soul than I to tackle the Times cryptic! Milk and sugar does seem a very popular British tradition. Here in the States, I have a number of friends who insist tea must be appreciated unadulturated by such additions. I’ve learned to drink it straight, but for coffe I need it very light.
    Yes, isn’t the young Joseph Banks a looker. I think I would have enjoyed his company immensely. Such a fascinating man.

    Reply
  47. Ann, you are a braver soul than I to tackle the Times cryptic! Milk and sugar does seem a very popular British tradition. Here in the States, I have a number of friends who insist tea must be appreciated unadulturated by such additions. I’ve learned to drink it straight, but for coffe I need it very light.
    Yes, isn’t the young Joseph Banks a looker. I think I would have enjoyed his company immensely. Such a fascinating man.

    Reply
  48. Ann, you are a braver soul than I to tackle the Times cryptic! Milk and sugar does seem a very popular British tradition. Here in the States, I have a number of friends who insist tea must be appreciated unadulturated by such additions. I’ve learned to drink it straight, but for coffe I need it very light.
    Yes, isn’t the young Joseph Banks a looker. I think I would have enjoyed his company immensely. Such a fascinating man.

    Reply
  49. Ann, you are a braver soul than I to tackle the Times cryptic! Milk and sugar does seem a very popular British tradition. Here in the States, I have a number of friends who insist tea must be appreciated unadulturated by such additions. I’ve learned to drink it straight, but for coffe I need it very light.
    Yes, isn’t the young Joseph Banks a looker. I think I would have enjoyed his company immensely. Such a fascinating man.

    Reply
  50. Ann, you are a braver soul than I to tackle the Times cryptic! Milk and sugar does seem a very popular British tradition. Here in the States, I have a number of friends who insist tea must be appreciated unadulturated by such additions. I’ve learned to drink it straight, but for coffe I need it very light.
    Yes, isn’t the young Joseph Banks a looker. I think I would have enjoyed his company immensely. Such a fascinating man.

    Reply
  51. How wonderful that you got to visit a tea plantation, Mary! That must have been really fascination. I love to see how something is made (I visited a boutique olive oil place that pressed a local harvest in Tuscany, and really enjoyed seeing the process.)
    How interesting that Lipton is a favorite in Asia!
    Ginger and honey in tea is a perfect winter night drink!

    Reply
  52. How wonderful that you got to visit a tea plantation, Mary! That must have been really fascination. I love to see how something is made (I visited a boutique olive oil place that pressed a local harvest in Tuscany, and really enjoyed seeing the process.)
    How interesting that Lipton is a favorite in Asia!
    Ginger and honey in tea is a perfect winter night drink!

    Reply
  53. How wonderful that you got to visit a tea plantation, Mary! That must have been really fascination. I love to see how something is made (I visited a boutique olive oil place that pressed a local harvest in Tuscany, and really enjoyed seeing the process.)
    How interesting that Lipton is a favorite in Asia!
    Ginger and honey in tea is a perfect winter night drink!

    Reply
  54. How wonderful that you got to visit a tea plantation, Mary! That must have been really fascination. I love to see how something is made (I visited a boutique olive oil place that pressed a local harvest in Tuscany, and really enjoyed seeing the process.)
    How interesting that Lipton is a favorite in Asia!
    Ginger and honey in tea is a perfect winter night drink!

    Reply
  55. How wonderful that you got to visit a tea plantation, Mary! That must have been really fascination. I love to see how something is made (I visited a boutique olive oil place that pressed a local harvest in Tuscany, and really enjoyed seeing the process.)
    How interesting that Lipton is a favorite in Asia!
    Ginger and honey in tea is a perfect winter night drink!

    Reply
  56. I am a coffee drinker first thing in the morning, but a big tea drinker the rest of the day. There is no variety I don’t like; green tea, oolong, Earl Grey, jasmine, chai spiced tea, regular black tea, I drink them all. Ceylon teas are my favorite, they are somehow crisper tasting than Indian tea. It’s true that Lipton tea is very popular in Asia and the Middle East, but I’ve had it there, and the Lipton tea that they have is much better quality than American Lipton tea.

    Reply
  57. I am a coffee drinker first thing in the morning, but a big tea drinker the rest of the day. There is no variety I don’t like; green tea, oolong, Earl Grey, jasmine, chai spiced tea, regular black tea, I drink them all. Ceylon teas are my favorite, they are somehow crisper tasting than Indian tea. It’s true that Lipton tea is very popular in Asia and the Middle East, but I’ve had it there, and the Lipton tea that they have is much better quality than American Lipton tea.

    Reply
  58. I am a coffee drinker first thing in the morning, but a big tea drinker the rest of the day. There is no variety I don’t like; green tea, oolong, Earl Grey, jasmine, chai spiced tea, regular black tea, I drink them all. Ceylon teas are my favorite, they are somehow crisper tasting than Indian tea. It’s true that Lipton tea is very popular in Asia and the Middle East, but I’ve had it there, and the Lipton tea that they have is much better quality than American Lipton tea.

    Reply
  59. I am a coffee drinker first thing in the morning, but a big tea drinker the rest of the day. There is no variety I don’t like; green tea, oolong, Earl Grey, jasmine, chai spiced tea, regular black tea, I drink them all. Ceylon teas are my favorite, they are somehow crisper tasting than Indian tea. It’s true that Lipton tea is very popular in Asia and the Middle East, but I’ve had it there, and the Lipton tea that they have is much better quality than American Lipton tea.

    Reply
  60. I am a coffee drinker first thing in the morning, but a big tea drinker the rest of the day. There is no variety I don’t like; green tea, oolong, Earl Grey, jasmine, chai spiced tea, regular black tea, I drink them all. Ceylon teas are my favorite, they are somehow crisper tasting than Indian tea. It’s true that Lipton tea is very popular in Asia and the Middle East, but I’ve had it there, and the Lipton tea that they have is much better quality than American Lipton tea.

    Reply
  61. I love tea. I drink at least one glass of black iced tea every day….generally more than one. I use one sugar. I like some other teas too. I especially enjoy Earl Grey. And I know that there are all sorts of wonderful things that tea can do for people.
    Thanks for the lovely post. It is good to realize that all the love I have for tea is because of one very adventurous gentleman.
    Hope everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  62. I love tea. I drink at least one glass of black iced tea every day….generally more than one. I use one sugar. I like some other teas too. I especially enjoy Earl Grey. And I know that there are all sorts of wonderful things that tea can do for people.
    Thanks for the lovely post. It is good to realize that all the love I have for tea is because of one very adventurous gentleman.
    Hope everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  63. I love tea. I drink at least one glass of black iced tea every day….generally more than one. I use one sugar. I like some other teas too. I especially enjoy Earl Grey. And I know that there are all sorts of wonderful things that tea can do for people.
    Thanks for the lovely post. It is good to realize that all the love I have for tea is because of one very adventurous gentleman.
    Hope everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  64. I love tea. I drink at least one glass of black iced tea every day….generally more than one. I use one sugar. I like some other teas too. I especially enjoy Earl Grey. And I know that there are all sorts of wonderful things that tea can do for people.
    Thanks for the lovely post. It is good to realize that all the love I have for tea is because of one very adventurous gentleman.
    Hope everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  65. I love tea. I drink at least one glass of black iced tea every day….generally more than one. I use one sugar. I like some other teas too. I especially enjoy Earl Grey. And I know that there are all sorts of wonderful things that tea can do for people.
    Thanks for the lovely post. It is good to realize that all the love I have for tea is because of one very adventurous gentleman.
    Hope everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  66. I am a coffee drinker in the mornings. Tea upsets my empty stomach! As the weather cools I will start indulging in hot tea in the afternoons. English breakfast, Irish breakfast, Assam, plus a few blends that have been given to me. I add only sugar, which is more than I add to my coffee!

    Reply
  67. I am a coffee drinker in the mornings. Tea upsets my empty stomach! As the weather cools I will start indulging in hot tea in the afternoons. English breakfast, Irish breakfast, Assam, plus a few blends that have been given to me. I add only sugar, which is more than I add to my coffee!

    Reply
  68. I am a coffee drinker in the mornings. Tea upsets my empty stomach! As the weather cools I will start indulging in hot tea in the afternoons. English breakfast, Irish breakfast, Assam, plus a few blends that have been given to me. I add only sugar, which is more than I add to my coffee!

    Reply
  69. I am a coffee drinker in the mornings. Tea upsets my empty stomach! As the weather cools I will start indulging in hot tea in the afternoons. English breakfast, Irish breakfast, Assam, plus a few blends that have been given to me. I add only sugar, which is more than I add to my coffee!

    Reply
  70. I am a coffee drinker in the mornings. Tea upsets my empty stomach! As the weather cools I will start indulging in hot tea in the afternoons. English breakfast, Irish breakfast, Assam, plus a few blends that have been given to me. I add only sugar, which is more than I add to my coffee!

    Reply
  71. I loved this post, Andrea, as I love all things tea-related. Having grown up in the southern US, I knew only sweet iced tea (we just called it tea, because no one drank it any other way) until I moved to New England. Now, many years later, my teapot collection is way too large, but at least it’s in constant rotation. I agree with Quantum that brewed loose tea is best, but keep tea bags in my office. I favor Yorkshire Tea with a little sugar in the morning and Lapsang Souchong with a slice of lemon in the afternoon. Twinings Christmas Tea (only available in teabags here) is a seasonal favorite that often crosses seasons. Mugs in the office and the garden; inherited and tag sale porcelain cups in the house. And there’s nothing wrong with a few pieces of shortbread sitting on the saucer!

    Reply
  72. I loved this post, Andrea, as I love all things tea-related. Having grown up in the southern US, I knew only sweet iced tea (we just called it tea, because no one drank it any other way) until I moved to New England. Now, many years later, my teapot collection is way too large, but at least it’s in constant rotation. I agree with Quantum that brewed loose tea is best, but keep tea bags in my office. I favor Yorkshire Tea with a little sugar in the morning and Lapsang Souchong with a slice of lemon in the afternoon. Twinings Christmas Tea (only available in teabags here) is a seasonal favorite that often crosses seasons. Mugs in the office and the garden; inherited and tag sale porcelain cups in the house. And there’s nothing wrong with a few pieces of shortbread sitting on the saucer!

    Reply
  73. I loved this post, Andrea, as I love all things tea-related. Having grown up in the southern US, I knew only sweet iced tea (we just called it tea, because no one drank it any other way) until I moved to New England. Now, many years later, my teapot collection is way too large, but at least it’s in constant rotation. I agree with Quantum that brewed loose tea is best, but keep tea bags in my office. I favor Yorkshire Tea with a little sugar in the morning and Lapsang Souchong with a slice of lemon in the afternoon. Twinings Christmas Tea (only available in teabags here) is a seasonal favorite that often crosses seasons. Mugs in the office and the garden; inherited and tag sale porcelain cups in the house. And there’s nothing wrong with a few pieces of shortbread sitting on the saucer!

    Reply
  74. I loved this post, Andrea, as I love all things tea-related. Having grown up in the southern US, I knew only sweet iced tea (we just called it tea, because no one drank it any other way) until I moved to New England. Now, many years later, my teapot collection is way too large, but at least it’s in constant rotation. I agree with Quantum that brewed loose tea is best, but keep tea bags in my office. I favor Yorkshire Tea with a little sugar in the morning and Lapsang Souchong with a slice of lemon in the afternoon. Twinings Christmas Tea (only available in teabags here) is a seasonal favorite that often crosses seasons. Mugs in the office and the garden; inherited and tag sale porcelain cups in the house. And there’s nothing wrong with a few pieces of shortbread sitting on the saucer!

    Reply
  75. I loved this post, Andrea, as I love all things tea-related. Having grown up in the southern US, I knew only sweet iced tea (we just called it tea, because no one drank it any other way) until I moved to New England. Now, many years later, my teapot collection is way too large, but at least it’s in constant rotation. I agree with Quantum that brewed loose tea is best, but keep tea bags in my office. I favor Yorkshire Tea with a little sugar in the morning and Lapsang Souchong with a slice of lemon in the afternoon. Twinings Christmas Tea (only available in teabags here) is a seasonal favorite that often crosses seasons. Mugs in the office and the garden; inherited and tag sale porcelain cups in the house. And there’s nothing wrong with a few pieces of shortbread sitting on the saucer!

    Reply
  76. I used to love a nice hot cup of tea but when I developed an intolerance to cow’s milk about nine years ago I couldn’t stomach the black tea. So now I drink nettle and fennel tea. I really grew to like them especially the nettle.
    Some very interesting facts in this post Andrea.

    Reply
  77. I used to love a nice hot cup of tea but when I developed an intolerance to cow’s milk about nine years ago I couldn’t stomach the black tea. So now I drink nettle and fennel tea. I really grew to like them especially the nettle.
    Some very interesting facts in this post Andrea.

    Reply
  78. I used to love a nice hot cup of tea but when I developed an intolerance to cow’s milk about nine years ago I couldn’t stomach the black tea. So now I drink nettle and fennel tea. I really grew to like them especially the nettle.
    Some very interesting facts in this post Andrea.

    Reply
  79. I used to love a nice hot cup of tea but when I developed an intolerance to cow’s milk about nine years ago I couldn’t stomach the black tea. So now I drink nettle and fennel tea. I really grew to like them especially the nettle.
    Some very interesting facts in this post Andrea.

    Reply
  80. I used to love a nice hot cup of tea but when I developed an intolerance to cow’s milk about nine years ago I couldn’t stomach the black tea. So now I drink nettle and fennel tea. I really grew to like them especially the nettle.
    Some very interesting facts in this post Andrea.

    Reply
  81. Great post as I could not imagine my life without tea! I drink water with supper but all the rest of the day it’s tea. When I was a kid I had milk and sugar in my tea – starting first thing in the morning when Dad woke me with a cuppa. My husband weaned me off the sugar (he didn’t like sugar and I wasn’t about to put honey in my tea!) and so for 50 years I have just put milk in. Lactose intolerant now so it’s lactose free in my Tetley’s. I often say, as I’m making my tea, thank heaven for the person who invented tea bags! My husband always knows when I’m sick because I don’t want a cup of tea.
    Just finished Murder at Queen’s Landing so cannot wait for the new one!!!

    Reply
  82. Great post as I could not imagine my life without tea! I drink water with supper but all the rest of the day it’s tea. When I was a kid I had milk and sugar in my tea – starting first thing in the morning when Dad woke me with a cuppa. My husband weaned me off the sugar (he didn’t like sugar and I wasn’t about to put honey in my tea!) and so for 50 years I have just put milk in. Lactose intolerant now so it’s lactose free in my Tetley’s. I often say, as I’m making my tea, thank heaven for the person who invented tea bags! My husband always knows when I’m sick because I don’t want a cup of tea.
    Just finished Murder at Queen’s Landing so cannot wait for the new one!!!

    Reply
  83. Great post as I could not imagine my life without tea! I drink water with supper but all the rest of the day it’s tea. When I was a kid I had milk and sugar in my tea – starting first thing in the morning when Dad woke me with a cuppa. My husband weaned me off the sugar (he didn’t like sugar and I wasn’t about to put honey in my tea!) and so for 50 years I have just put milk in. Lactose intolerant now so it’s lactose free in my Tetley’s. I often say, as I’m making my tea, thank heaven for the person who invented tea bags! My husband always knows when I’m sick because I don’t want a cup of tea.
    Just finished Murder at Queen’s Landing so cannot wait for the new one!!!

    Reply
  84. Great post as I could not imagine my life without tea! I drink water with supper but all the rest of the day it’s tea. When I was a kid I had milk and sugar in my tea – starting first thing in the morning when Dad woke me with a cuppa. My husband weaned me off the sugar (he didn’t like sugar and I wasn’t about to put honey in my tea!) and so for 50 years I have just put milk in. Lactose intolerant now so it’s lactose free in my Tetley’s. I often say, as I’m making my tea, thank heaven for the person who invented tea bags! My husband always knows when I’m sick because I don’t want a cup of tea.
    Just finished Murder at Queen’s Landing so cannot wait for the new one!!!

    Reply
  85. Great post as I could not imagine my life without tea! I drink water with supper but all the rest of the day it’s tea. When I was a kid I had milk and sugar in my tea – starting first thing in the morning when Dad woke me with a cuppa. My husband weaned me off the sugar (he didn’t like sugar and I wasn’t about to put honey in my tea!) and so for 50 years I have just put milk in. Lactose intolerant now so it’s lactose free in my Tetley’s. I often say, as I’m making my tea, thank heaven for the person who invented tea bags! My husband always knows when I’m sick because I don’t want a cup of tea.
    Just finished Murder at Queen’s Landing so cannot wait for the new one!!!

    Reply
  86. Another tea aficionado! I used to drink mine light and sweet too, but have weaned off sugar ((except for occasional “comfort” binges!) I also learned to like it “black”, so that most what I have now.
    And yes, teabags are one f those marvelous everyday inventions that make life easier.
    SO glad you enjoyed Murder at Queen’s Landing!

    Reply
  87. Another tea aficionado! I used to drink mine light and sweet too, but have weaned off sugar ((except for occasional “comfort” binges!) I also learned to like it “black”, so that most what I have now.
    And yes, teabags are one f those marvelous everyday inventions that make life easier.
    SO glad you enjoyed Murder at Queen’s Landing!

    Reply
  88. Another tea aficionado! I used to drink mine light and sweet too, but have weaned off sugar ((except for occasional “comfort” binges!) I also learned to like it “black”, so that most what I have now.
    And yes, teabags are one f those marvelous everyday inventions that make life easier.
    SO glad you enjoyed Murder at Queen’s Landing!

    Reply
  89. Another tea aficionado! I used to drink mine light and sweet too, but have weaned off sugar ((except for occasional “comfort” binges!) I also learned to like it “black”, so that most what I have now.
    And yes, teabags are one f those marvelous everyday inventions that make life easier.
    SO glad you enjoyed Murder at Queen’s Landing!

    Reply
  90. Another tea aficionado! I used to drink mine light and sweet too, but have weaned off sugar ((except for occasional “comfort” binges!) I also learned to like it “black”, so that most what I have now.
    And yes, teabags are one f those marvelous everyday inventions that make life easier.
    SO glad you enjoyed Murder at Queen’s Landing!

    Reply
  91. If other followers have been following my posts you will know that I grew up in St. Louis, home of another great Botanical Garden. I don’t believe Henry Shaw had as dedicated a purpose as did Sir Joseph Banks, and the current administrators of the garden also show a wider interest. But it’s a wonderful place to visit.
    As for tea, I love it; however, I go against tradition by preferring a very weak tea. And since I began trying to decafinate myself (except for chocolate), I’ve switched to herbal teas.

    Reply
  92. If other followers have been following my posts you will know that I grew up in St. Louis, home of another great Botanical Garden. I don’t believe Henry Shaw had as dedicated a purpose as did Sir Joseph Banks, and the current administrators of the garden also show a wider interest. But it’s a wonderful place to visit.
    As for tea, I love it; however, I go against tradition by preferring a very weak tea. And since I began trying to decafinate myself (except for chocolate), I’ve switched to herbal teas.

    Reply
  93. If other followers have been following my posts you will know that I grew up in St. Louis, home of another great Botanical Garden. I don’t believe Henry Shaw had as dedicated a purpose as did Sir Joseph Banks, and the current administrators of the garden also show a wider interest. But it’s a wonderful place to visit.
    As for tea, I love it; however, I go against tradition by preferring a very weak tea. And since I began trying to decafinate myself (except for chocolate), I’ve switched to herbal teas.

    Reply
  94. If other followers have been following my posts you will know that I grew up in St. Louis, home of another great Botanical Garden. I don’t believe Henry Shaw had as dedicated a purpose as did Sir Joseph Banks, and the current administrators of the garden also show a wider interest. But it’s a wonderful place to visit.
    As for tea, I love it; however, I go against tradition by preferring a very weak tea. And since I began trying to decafinate myself (except for chocolate), I’ve switched to herbal teas.

    Reply
  95. If other followers have been following my posts you will know that I grew up in St. Louis, home of another great Botanical Garden. I don’t believe Henry Shaw had as dedicated a purpose as did Sir Joseph Banks, and the current administrators of the garden also show a wider interest. But it’s a wonderful place to visit.
    As for tea, I love it; however, I go against tradition by preferring a very weak tea. And since I began trying to decafinate myself (except for chocolate), I’ve switched to herbal teas.

    Reply
  96. Unfortunately for me, my taste buds only taste grass!! No matter what kind of tea I try. I can smell all the lovely flavors of tea but …they all taste the same. I have a sister with the same taste bud problem als.
    Now my parents and other 3 sister’s love tea and drink it. My Dad drinks a hot cup of tea frequently. He never was a coffee drinker.
    I’m not a coffee drinker either…probably those bad taste buds! Grin.

    Reply
  97. Unfortunately for me, my taste buds only taste grass!! No matter what kind of tea I try. I can smell all the lovely flavors of tea but …they all taste the same. I have a sister with the same taste bud problem als.
    Now my parents and other 3 sister’s love tea and drink it. My Dad drinks a hot cup of tea frequently. He never was a coffee drinker.
    I’m not a coffee drinker either…probably those bad taste buds! Grin.

    Reply
  98. Unfortunately for me, my taste buds only taste grass!! No matter what kind of tea I try. I can smell all the lovely flavors of tea but …they all taste the same. I have a sister with the same taste bud problem als.
    Now my parents and other 3 sister’s love tea and drink it. My Dad drinks a hot cup of tea frequently. He never was a coffee drinker.
    I’m not a coffee drinker either…probably those bad taste buds! Grin.

    Reply
  99. Unfortunately for me, my taste buds only taste grass!! No matter what kind of tea I try. I can smell all the lovely flavors of tea but …they all taste the same. I have a sister with the same taste bud problem als.
    Now my parents and other 3 sister’s love tea and drink it. My Dad drinks a hot cup of tea frequently. He never was a coffee drinker.
    I’m not a coffee drinker either…probably those bad taste buds! Grin.

    Reply
  100. Unfortunately for me, my taste buds only taste grass!! No matter what kind of tea I try. I can smell all the lovely flavors of tea but …they all taste the same. I have a sister with the same taste bud problem als.
    Now my parents and other 3 sister’s love tea and drink it. My Dad drinks a hot cup of tea frequently. He never was a coffee drinker.
    I’m not a coffee drinker either…probably those bad taste buds! Grin.

    Reply
  101. I have always been a tea drinker and recently started drinking Matcha Green Tea. When steeped just long enough, it’s not bitter and has a smooth taste just the way it is.
    I had high tea pre-covid, of course, and I loved Jasmin Tea. It has such great flavor to have with all the snacks piled onto the tray to nibble on.
    Growing up my family only bought the orange pekoe variety, so milk was added to offset the bitterness.

    Reply
  102. I have always been a tea drinker and recently started drinking Matcha Green Tea. When steeped just long enough, it’s not bitter and has a smooth taste just the way it is.
    I had high tea pre-covid, of course, and I loved Jasmin Tea. It has such great flavor to have with all the snacks piled onto the tray to nibble on.
    Growing up my family only bought the orange pekoe variety, so milk was added to offset the bitterness.

    Reply
  103. I have always been a tea drinker and recently started drinking Matcha Green Tea. When steeped just long enough, it’s not bitter and has a smooth taste just the way it is.
    I had high tea pre-covid, of course, and I loved Jasmin Tea. It has such great flavor to have with all the snacks piled onto the tray to nibble on.
    Growing up my family only bought the orange pekoe variety, so milk was added to offset the bitterness.

    Reply
  104. I have always been a tea drinker and recently started drinking Matcha Green Tea. When steeped just long enough, it’s not bitter and has a smooth taste just the way it is.
    I had high tea pre-covid, of course, and I loved Jasmin Tea. It has such great flavor to have with all the snacks piled onto the tray to nibble on.
    Growing up my family only bought the orange pekoe variety, so milk was added to offset the bitterness.

    Reply
  105. I have always been a tea drinker and recently started drinking Matcha Green Tea. When steeped just long enough, it’s not bitter and has a smooth taste just the way it is.
    I had high tea pre-covid, of course, and I loved Jasmin Tea. It has such great flavor to have with all the snacks piled onto the tray to nibble on.
    Growing up my family only bought the orange pekoe variety, so milk was added to offset the bitterness.

    Reply
  106. I need my cup of Darjeeling, drunk straight, to get the day off to a good start.
    Mid-morning coffee with milk and a little sugar is invigorating, but tea is my drink of choice.
    I shift over to decaf tea in the afternoon and often add a pinch of rose petal tea to the pot.
    My son grows his own mint in two varieties. I had to cut, dry and ship him more during the last college term.
    I always enjoy author’s descriptions of characters taking tea. I can easily imagine myself in the scene.

    Reply
  107. I need my cup of Darjeeling, drunk straight, to get the day off to a good start.
    Mid-morning coffee with milk and a little sugar is invigorating, but tea is my drink of choice.
    I shift over to decaf tea in the afternoon and often add a pinch of rose petal tea to the pot.
    My son grows his own mint in two varieties. I had to cut, dry and ship him more during the last college term.
    I always enjoy author’s descriptions of characters taking tea. I can easily imagine myself in the scene.

    Reply
  108. I need my cup of Darjeeling, drunk straight, to get the day off to a good start.
    Mid-morning coffee with milk and a little sugar is invigorating, but tea is my drink of choice.
    I shift over to decaf tea in the afternoon and often add a pinch of rose petal tea to the pot.
    My son grows his own mint in two varieties. I had to cut, dry and ship him more during the last college term.
    I always enjoy author’s descriptions of characters taking tea. I can easily imagine myself in the scene.

    Reply
  109. I need my cup of Darjeeling, drunk straight, to get the day off to a good start.
    Mid-morning coffee with milk and a little sugar is invigorating, but tea is my drink of choice.
    I shift over to decaf tea in the afternoon and often add a pinch of rose petal tea to the pot.
    My son grows his own mint in two varieties. I had to cut, dry and ship him more during the last college term.
    I always enjoy author’s descriptions of characters taking tea. I can easily imagine myself in the scene.

    Reply
  110. I need my cup of Darjeeling, drunk straight, to get the day off to a good start.
    Mid-morning coffee with milk and a little sugar is invigorating, but tea is my drink of choice.
    I shift over to decaf tea in the afternoon and often add a pinch of rose petal tea to the pot.
    My son grows his own mint in two varieties. I had to cut, dry and ship him more during the last college term.
    I always enjoy author’s descriptions of characters taking tea. I can easily imagine myself in the scene.

    Reply
  111. Tea with milk is something we Brits know from childhood. “A nice cup of tea” is the cure for all ills. I often wonder who first thought of adding milk. It’s a bit of an abomination and masks the flavour of the tea. I add it more from habit than anything else. When I run out of milk I drink it black or with lemon. My pet hate is Earl Grey – far too floral for me. During the war we didn’t have coffee at all. I don’t think it was available. Then in the ’50s we had instant coffee from Nescafe. I still hate instant coffee. My coffee making skills are hopeless so every afternoon I head across the road to the Italian cafe which makes the best coffee in town. I enjoy your writing very much and I look forward to reading your new book. Maybe one day I’ll get to Kew again – it’s been 50 years since I was there last. I rarely leave Wales these days.

    Reply
  112. Tea with milk is something we Brits know from childhood. “A nice cup of tea” is the cure for all ills. I often wonder who first thought of adding milk. It’s a bit of an abomination and masks the flavour of the tea. I add it more from habit than anything else. When I run out of milk I drink it black or with lemon. My pet hate is Earl Grey – far too floral for me. During the war we didn’t have coffee at all. I don’t think it was available. Then in the ’50s we had instant coffee from Nescafe. I still hate instant coffee. My coffee making skills are hopeless so every afternoon I head across the road to the Italian cafe which makes the best coffee in town. I enjoy your writing very much and I look forward to reading your new book. Maybe one day I’ll get to Kew again – it’s been 50 years since I was there last. I rarely leave Wales these days.

    Reply
  113. Tea with milk is something we Brits know from childhood. “A nice cup of tea” is the cure for all ills. I often wonder who first thought of adding milk. It’s a bit of an abomination and masks the flavour of the tea. I add it more from habit than anything else. When I run out of milk I drink it black or with lemon. My pet hate is Earl Grey – far too floral for me. During the war we didn’t have coffee at all. I don’t think it was available. Then in the ’50s we had instant coffee from Nescafe. I still hate instant coffee. My coffee making skills are hopeless so every afternoon I head across the road to the Italian cafe which makes the best coffee in town. I enjoy your writing very much and I look forward to reading your new book. Maybe one day I’ll get to Kew again – it’s been 50 years since I was there last. I rarely leave Wales these days.

    Reply
  114. Tea with milk is something we Brits know from childhood. “A nice cup of tea” is the cure for all ills. I often wonder who first thought of adding milk. It’s a bit of an abomination and masks the flavour of the tea. I add it more from habit than anything else. When I run out of milk I drink it black or with lemon. My pet hate is Earl Grey – far too floral for me. During the war we didn’t have coffee at all. I don’t think it was available. Then in the ’50s we had instant coffee from Nescafe. I still hate instant coffee. My coffee making skills are hopeless so every afternoon I head across the road to the Italian cafe which makes the best coffee in town. I enjoy your writing very much and I look forward to reading your new book. Maybe one day I’ll get to Kew again – it’s been 50 years since I was there last. I rarely leave Wales these days.

    Reply
  115. Tea with milk is something we Brits know from childhood. “A nice cup of tea” is the cure for all ills. I often wonder who first thought of adding milk. It’s a bit of an abomination and masks the flavour of the tea. I add it more from habit than anything else. When I run out of milk I drink it black or with lemon. My pet hate is Earl Grey – far too floral for me. During the war we didn’t have coffee at all. I don’t think it was available. Then in the ’50s we had instant coffee from Nescafe. I still hate instant coffee. My coffee making skills are hopeless so every afternoon I head across the road to the Italian cafe which makes the best coffee in town. I enjoy your writing very much and I look forward to reading your new book. Maybe one day I’ll get to Kew again – it’s been 50 years since I was there last. I rarely leave Wales these days.

    Reply
  116. Karin, thanks so much for this info. I did wonder …
    I’ve been looking for a good everyday tea, so I just ordered this on Amazon. Tricky, because there’s Yellow, and Yellow International. Easy to think you’re ordering the latter, but the shopping cart shows the cheaper one. Several commenters evidently missed that detail and got the wrong one.

    Reply
  117. Karin, thanks so much for this info. I did wonder …
    I’ve been looking for a good everyday tea, so I just ordered this on Amazon. Tricky, because there’s Yellow, and Yellow International. Easy to think you’re ordering the latter, but the shopping cart shows the cheaper one. Several commenters evidently missed that detail and got the wrong one.

    Reply
  118. Karin, thanks so much for this info. I did wonder …
    I’ve been looking for a good everyday tea, so I just ordered this on Amazon. Tricky, because there’s Yellow, and Yellow International. Easy to think you’re ordering the latter, but the shopping cart shows the cheaper one. Several commenters evidently missed that detail and got the wrong one.

    Reply
  119. Karin, thanks so much for this info. I did wonder …
    I’ve been looking for a good everyday tea, so I just ordered this on Amazon. Tricky, because there’s Yellow, and Yellow International. Easy to think you’re ordering the latter, but the shopping cart shows the cheaper one. Several commenters evidently missed that detail and got the wrong one.

    Reply
  120. Karin, thanks so much for this info. I did wonder …
    I’ve been looking for a good everyday tea, so I just ordered this on Amazon. Tricky, because there’s Yellow, and Yellow International. Easy to think you’re ordering the latter, but the shopping cart shows the cheaper one. Several commenters evidently missed that detail and got the wrong one.

    Reply
  121. Sue, your botanical garden sounds especially wonderful. (All gardens are wonderful—that goes without saying!)
    I think it used to be that if one wanted to avoid caffeine and choose herbal teas, the choices weren’t always inspiring. These days there are so many interesting and sophisticated flavors that it doesn’t feel like one is giving up taste for for health.

    Reply
  122. Sue, your botanical garden sounds especially wonderful. (All gardens are wonderful—that goes without saying!)
    I think it used to be that if one wanted to avoid caffeine and choose herbal teas, the choices weren’t always inspiring. These days there are so many interesting and sophisticated flavors that it doesn’t feel like one is giving up taste for for health.

    Reply
  123. Sue, your botanical garden sounds especially wonderful. (All gardens are wonderful—that goes without saying!)
    I think it used to be that if one wanted to avoid caffeine and choose herbal teas, the choices weren’t always inspiring. These days there are so many interesting and sophisticated flavors that it doesn’t feel like one is giving up taste for for health.

    Reply
  124. Sue, your botanical garden sounds especially wonderful. (All gardens are wonderful—that goes without saying!)
    I think it used to be that if one wanted to avoid caffeine and choose herbal teas, the choices weren’t always inspiring. These days there are so many interesting and sophisticated flavors that it doesn’t feel like one is giving up taste for for health.

    Reply
  125. Sue, your botanical garden sounds especially wonderful. (All gardens are wonderful—that goes without saying!)
    I think it used to be that if one wanted to avoid caffeine and choose herbal teas, the choices weren’t always inspiring. These days there are so many interesting and sophisticated flavors that it doesn’t feel like one is giving up taste for for health.

    Reply

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