Music for the Writer’s Ear

Bagpiper Thursday, Susan Sarah’s turn!

Seems like we’ve been very busy the last couple of weeks on Word Wenches, lots of pithy and interesting discussions on all sorts of topics. I’m rushing out to some appointments this morning, so I thought I’d go with a lighter blog –

And while I was thinking about this, I was sitting at my computer listening to music. In fact, most of the time when I’m working, whether it’s writing, taking notes, or reading, I listen to music, usually with headphones. I know this doesn’t work for everyone, but for me it’s practically essential for a few reasons. Music helps me block out what’s going on around me, particularly here in the house when my kids are home, or if the neighbors are mowing lawns or blowing leaves, or if the dog is diligently guarding the house from rabbits, squirrels, and the cat who likes to wander across our front lawn and park on the porch (I think this is on purpose just to get the dog riled up).

Even when it’s quiet, I’ll often put on the headphones and listen to CDs while I’m writing. I find it helps me focus. Music with words doesn’t work for me– while working with words, I don’t want to listen to other words that might scramble in my head. I can handle some foreign lyrics, like Gaelic or Italian, but mostly it’s instrumental, and the sort of music that can become a background screen or filter. If I start actually paying attention to the music, that defeats the purpose. Usually what I choose is Celtic, classical or New Age, any sort that will blend with my thinking processes. Harp is great, for example, or quiet violin and poignant fiddle (nothing jumpy, I”ll just want to get up and dance around!). If it has an emotional content, like a movie soundtrack (Last of the Mohicans, Lord of the Rings, or Braveheart are good examples), that can help with writing certain scenes.

I’ll also listen to brain-synchronized tracks, of which I’ve acquired several. I’ve found some of these are great background for writing, reading, taking notes – though some slow me down or make me sleepy, and they get popped out of the stereo right away. Brains, heartbeats, bodies in general will respond to wavelengths and beats in music, and I happen to be very responsive in that way. With the synchronizing sort of music, I find don’t work well in a Beta state, though it’s okay for an editing state. I can write consistently in Alpha, though some of my best writing happens on a Theta level – though this brainwave state will often put people to sleep, it seems to work for me.

So what CDs are in my stereo now, or stacked on the desk?
Alasdair Fraser, Paul Machlis, Legacy of the Scottish Fiddle Volume One (though I skip the reels unless I’m online or editing)
BMG Classics, Pachelbel’s Greatest Hit: the Ultimate Canon
Dougie MacLean, Sunset Song
Dougie MacLean, Perthshire Amber
Dr. Jeffrey Thompson, Brainwave Suite: Alpha
Dr. Jeffrey Thompson, Creative Mind System
R.H. Coxon, Prelude to Infinity
Amy Krupski, Celtic Echoes
Gary Stadler, Fairy of the Woods

There’s probably a hundred more CDs in my office, all music that I’ve collected over the years that’s great for writing — for me. It’s all very, very subjective.

Music in my car…now that’s another matter entirely!!  Lots of Celtic there too, with words and strong beat encouraged.

Though I once got a speeding ticket while listening to a particularly rousing melody of bagpipes and drums — the “Welcome to the City of Glasgow” on Brave Hearts, a song composed for Nelson Mandela’s visit to Scotland years ago–-it’s a fantastic combination of African and Scottish. Don’t turn this up full volume in your car on a sunny day. When I told the police officer the reason, he actually had a good laugh. But he gave me a ticket anyway. *g*137_3786

Irish Princess Barbie and Ken speeding away in the Barbie-mobile….

What about you all — do you listen to music while writing, or while reading? What are some of your favorites?  Or do you prefer diving into the book in silence?

~Susan Sarah

54 thoughts on “Music for the Writer’s Ear”

  1. I’m so interested in those brain-synchronized tracks, but haven’t yet done anything about it. Mainly, I have to write–and read–in silence. I find it nearly impossible to concentrate on more than one thing at a time. It’s hard for me to carry on a conversation, when, for instance, music or TV is on. However, when doing any kind of visual art–anything that doesn’t involve words–I’ll listen to a wide variety of music, from opera to hip-hop.

    Reply
  2. I’m so interested in those brain-synchronized tracks, but haven’t yet done anything about it. Mainly, I have to write–and read–in silence. I find it nearly impossible to concentrate on more than one thing at a time. It’s hard for me to carry on a conversation, when, for instance, music or TV is on. However, when doing any kind of visual art–anything that doesn’t involve words–I’ll listen to a wide variety of music, from opera to hip-hop.

    Reply
  3. I’m so interested in those brain-synchronized tracks, but haven’t yet done anything about it. Mainly, I have to write–and read–in silence. I find it nearly impossible to concentrate on more than one thing at a time. It’s hard for me to carry on a conversation, when, for instance, music or TV is on. However, when doing any kind of visual art–anything that doesn’t involve words–I’ll listen to a wide variety of music, from opera to hip-hop.

    Reply
  4. I love clssical or celtic music when I need to focus. If I listen to rock and roll in the car, I’m liable to get a speeding ticket. I’ve not heard of brain synchronized tracks- they sound interesting.

    Reply
  5. I love clssical or celtic music when I need to focus. If I listen to rock and roll in the car, I’m liable to get a speeding ticket. I’ve not heard of brain synchronized tracks- they sound interesting.

    Reply
  6. I love clssical or celtic music when I need to focus. If I listen to rock and roll in the car, I’m liable to get a speeding ticket. I’ve not heard of brain synchronized tracks- they sound interesting.

    Reply
  7. From Sherrie:
    Susan Sarah, you’re a woman after my own heart. I can’t live without music, and I have certain CDs I listen to when writing. They are instrumentals, and mostly of the quiet classical variety.
    My favorite writing CD is called “Thundering Rainstorm” http://www.full-albums.net/albums_review-relaxing-sounds-of-nature.asp#B000005T8C (6th from top). The sound quality is excellent, and there is the very slight hint of New Age-type music in the background. I like it because it is continuous, with no breaks for different songs–it’s one hour of pattering rainstorm with loooong, rolling thunder and faint musical sounds in the background.
    This CD and one other (Bach and Beethoven) are my Pavlovs–I’ve used them so much as background music when I write that now all I have to do is pop them in the stereo and I’m instantly in Deep Writing Mode.

    Reply
  8. From Sherrie:
    Susan Sarah, you’re a woman after my own heart. I can’t live without music, and I have certain CDs I listen to when writing. They are instrumentals, and mostly of the quiet classical variety.
    My favorite writing CD is called “Thundering Rainstorm” http://www.full-albums.net/albums_review-relaxing-sounds-of-nature.asp#B000005T8C (6th from top). The sound quality is excellent, and there is the very slight hint of New Age-type music in the background. I like it because it is continuous, with no breaks for different songs–it’s one hour of pattering rainstorm with loooong, rolling thunder and faint musical sounds in the background.
    This CD and one other (Bach and Beethoven) are my Pavlovs–I’ve used them so much as background music when I write that now all I have to do is pop them in the stereo and I’m instantly in Deep Writing Mode.

    Reply
  9. From Sherrie:
    Susan Sarah, you’re a woman after my own heart. I can’t live without music, and I have certain CDs I listen to when writing. They are instrumentals, and mostly of the quiet classical variety.
    My favorite writing CD is called “Thundering Rainstorm” http://www.full-albums.net/albums_review-relaxing-sounds-of-nature.asp#B000005T8C (6th from top). The sound quality is excellent, and there is the very slight hint of New Age-type music in the background. I like it because it is continuous, with no breaks for different songs–it’s one hour of pattering rainstorm with loooong, rolling thunder and faint musical sounds in the background.
    This CD and one other (Bach and Beethoven) are my Pavlovs–I’ve used them so much as background music when I write that now all I have to do is pop them in the stereo and I’m instantly in Deep Writing Mode.

    Reply
  10. My brain is like a sack of mexican jumping beans, hopping randomly about in 30 directions at once. To focus I have to still it, and music often does the trick. What music depends on my mood and what I’m doing. Right now I’m listening to the LOTR soundtrack (ROTK) fairly low, because I’m not doing anything that needs complete focus. When I’m pulling late nights on a deadline, it’s 70s rock full blast – Lynard Skynard, Journey, Aerosmith, Foreigner, Heart. But somehow wearing earphones makes it too immediate and the same music can be distracting. I do wear them if I’m on deadline and at work during the day, though.
    I love to sing, and when I’m futzing about cleaning or quilting, I listen to country, bluegrass, easy listening so I can sing with it. Alison Krauss rocks! And I listen to hymns, usually a cappella. I love unaccompanied voices in harmony; Gregorian chants are great too. But when I’m intensely focused on a specific delicate task, I have to have silence. I even turn the radio off when I have to weave through traffic.
    I have a wide range of Celtic music too – including Dougie MacLean! – and a couple of bagpipe CDs that are great for focusing. I do find that my internal rhythm synchs with the music, so if I’m doing something requiring slower movement or thought than the music’s beat, I can’t listen to it. I should check out the brain synchronized tracks!

    Reply
  11. My brain is like a sack of mexican jumping beans, hopping randomly about in 30 directions at once. To focus I have to still it, and music often does the trick. What music depends on my mood and what I’m doing. Right now I’m listening to the LOTR soundtrack (ROTK) fairly low, because I’m not doing anything that needs complete focus. When I’m pulling late nights on a deadline, it’s 70s rock full blast – Lynard Skynard, Journey, Aerosmith, Foreigner, Heart. But somehow wearing earphones makes it too immediate and the same music can be distracting. I do wear them if I’m on deadline and at work during the day, though.
    I love to sing, and when I’m futzing about cleaning or quilting, I listen to country, bluegrass, easy listening so I can sing with it. Alison Krauss rocks! And I listen to hymns, usually a cappella. I love unaccompanied voices in harmony; Gregorian chants are great too. But when I’m intensely focused on a specific delicate task, I have to have silence. I even turn the radio off when I have to weave through traffic.
    I have a wide range of Celtic music too – including Dougie MacLean! – and a couple of bagpipe CDs that are great for focusing. I do find that my internal rhythm synchs with the music, so if I’m doing something requiring slower movement or thought than the music’s beat, I can’t listen to it. I should check out the brain synchronized tracks!

    Reply
  12. My brain is like a sack of mexican jumping beans, hopping randomly about in 30 directions at once. To focus I have to still it, and music often does the trick. What music depends on my mood and what I’m doing. Right now I’m listening to the LOTR soundtrack (ROTK) fairly low, because I’m not doing anything that needs complete focus. When I’m pulling late nights on a deadline, it’s 70s rock full blast – Lynard Skynard, Journey, Aerosmith, Foreigner, Heart. But somehow wearing earphones makes it too immediate and the same music can be distracting. I do wear them if I’m on deadline and at work during the day, though.
    I love to sing, and when I’m futzing about cleaning or quilting, I listen to country, bluegrass, easy listening so I can sing with it. Alison Krauss rocks! And I listen to hymns, usually a cappella. I love unaccompanied voices in harmony; Gregorian chants are great too. But when I’m intensely focused on a specific delicate task, I have to have silence. I even turn the radio off when I have to weave through traffic.
    I have a wide range of Celtic music too – including Dougie MacLean! – and a couple of bagpipe CDs that are great for focusing. I do find that my internal rhythm synchs with the music, so if I’m doing something requiring slower movement or thought than the music’s beat, I can’t listen to it. I should check out the brain synchronized tracks!

    Reply
  13. Great picture of you and the piper, Susan! I’m another who likes flowing New Age or Celtic music in the background when I’m working. And, coincidentally, I’m also currently listening to the Return of the King soundtrack!
    I have a compact sound system that takes 5 CDs sitting right next to my monitor.Sometimes I’ll recycle the same music for days, until I feel bored enough to change. I’ve tried the Brain sync music, and it never does the least thing for my focus or creativity, unfortunately, though it can still be nice to listen to.
    Mary Jo, chuckling over the speeding ticket and the Irish princess running off with Ken. 🙂

    Reply
  14. Great picture of you and the piper, Susan! I’m another who likes flowing New Age or Celtic music in the background when I’m working. And, coincidentally, I’m also currently listening to the Return of the King soundtrack!
    I have a compact sound system that takes 5 CDs sitting right next to my monitor.Sometimes I’ll recycle the same music for days, until I feel bored enough to change. I’ve tried the Brain sync music, and it never does the least thing for my focus or creativity, unfortunately, though it can still be nice to listen to.
    Mary Jo, chuckling over the speeding ticket and the Irish princess running off with Ken. 🙂

    Reply
  15. Great picture of you and the piper, Susan! I’m another who likes flowing New Age or Celtic music in the background when I’m working. And, coincidentally, I’m also currently listening to the Return of the King soundtrack!
    I have a compact sound system that takes 5 CDs sitting right next to my monitor.Sometimes I’ll recycle the same music for days, until I feel bored enough to change. I’ve tried the Brain sync music, and it never does the least thing for my focus or creativity, unfortunately, though it can still be nice to listen to.
    Mary Jo, chuckling over the speeding ticket and the Irish princess running off with Ken. 🙂

    Reply
  16. Love the picture of you and your mad piper, Susan!
    I can’t write with music — I start paying too much attention to it, and that’s the end of THAT. *g* But if there’s a football/baseball/basketball/hockey game on, I’ll often have the tv on without the sound to sneak a peak when the words flag. How that works, I do not know, but it does.
    Otherwise, since my dh is a musician, there’s ALWAYS music in our house, of every possible description….

    Reply
  17. Love the picture of you and your mad piper, Susan!
    I can’t write with music — I start paying too much attention to it, and that’s the end of THAT. *g* But if there’s a football/baseball/basketball/hockey game on, I’ll often have the tv on without the sound to sneak a peak when the words flag. How that works, I do not know, but it does.
    Otherwise, since my dh is a musician, there’s ALWAYS music in our house, of every possible description….

    Reply
  18. Love the picture of you and your mad piper, Susan!
    I can’t write with music — I start paying too much attention to it, and that’s the end of THAT. *g* But if there’s a football/baseball/basketball/hockey game on, I’ll often have the tv on without the sound to sneak a peak when the words flag. How that works, I do not know, but it does.
    Otherwise, since my dh is a musician, there’s ALWAYS music in our house, of every possible description….

    Reply
  19. I don’t usually listen to music at work because I spend a lot of time on the phone.
    At home, I like to listen to XM Radio’s “Audio Visions” channel (77).
    In the car, I mostly listen to opera. I love it, and I usually have a CD going or XM Radio’s VOX channel. A side benefit of this is that whenever I volunteer to drive to group lunches, everyone quickly steps up and says that their car has more room. I’ve saved lots of gas….

    Reply
  20. I don’t usually listen to music at work because I spend a lot of time on the phone.
    At home, I like to listen to XM Radio’s “Audio Visions” channel (77).
    In the car, I mostly listen to opera. I love it, and I usually have a CD going or XM Radio’s VOX channel. A side benefit of this is that whenever I volunteer to drive to group lunches, everyone quickly steps up and says that their car has more room. I’ve saved lots of gas….

    Reply
  21. I don’t usually listen to music at work because I spend a lot of time on the phone.
    At home, I like to listen to XM Radio’s “Audio Visions” channel (77).
    In the car, I mostly listen to opera. I love it, and I usually have a CD going or XM Radio’s VOX channel. A side benefit of this is that whenever I volunteer to drive to group lunches, everyone quickly steps up and says that their car has more room. I’ve saved lots of gas….

    Reply
  22. Interesting how ‘Celtic’, to those across the Atlantic, tends to mean chiefly Irish and Scottish. The Welsh have some good music too, you know.
    😉

    Reply
  23. Interesting how ‘Celtic’, to those across the Atlantic, tends to mean chiefly Irish and Scottish. The Welsh have some good music too, you know.
    😉

    Reply
  24. Interesting how ‘Celtic’, to those across the Atlantic, tends to mean chiefly Irish and Scottish. The Welsh have some good music too, you know.
    😉

    Reply
  25. Lots of different sorts of music, and approaches to working with and without sound and/or tv — interesting!
    Of course Celtic music is not just Scottish and Irish! There’s a very wide range, including Breton and Cornish. I have Scottish friends who are musicians, and I write Scotland, so my collection tends to lean that way, but I love all sorts of Celtic.
    Interesting thing about the pic of me and the bagpiper (who happened to be standing for photo ops on a scenic hill as people drove past)–I’m not even five feet tall, so he must be about five two. He was so cute. *g*
    ~Susan Sarah

    Reply
  26. Lots of different sorts of music, and approaches to working with and without sound and/or tv — interesting!
    Of course Celtic music is not just Scottish and Irish! There’s a very wide range, including Breton and Cornish. I have Scottish friends who are musicians, and I write Scotland, so my collection tends to lean that way, but I love all sorts of Celtic.
    Interesting thing about the pic of me and the bagpiper (who happened to be standing for photo ops on a scenic hill as people drove past)–I’m not even five feet tall, so he must be about five two. He was so cute. *g*
    ~Susan Sarah

    Reply
  27. Lots of different sorts of music, and approaches to working with and without sound and/or tv — interesting!
    Of course Celtic music is not just Scottish and Irish! There’s a very wide range, including Breton and Cornish. I have Scottish friends who are musicians, and I write Scotland, so my collection tends to lean that way, but I love all sorts of Celtic.
    Interesting thing about the pic of me and the bagpiper (who happened to be standing for photo ops on a scenic hill as people drove past)–I’m not even five feet tall, so he must be about five two. He was so cute. *g*
    ~Susan Sarah

    Reply
  28. Cornish and Breton, eh? Well, at least they speak (or spoke, in the case of Cornish) P-Celtic languages. But still no Welsh… Ho hum.
    Seriously, when speaking to Americans about ‘Celtic’ subjects (about which I have rather strong views, for a number of reasons), they really do tend seldom to think beyond Irish and Scots, probably because Irish and Scottish immigrants into the USA have had a more widespread socio-cultural impact than the Welsh, notwithstanding the 17thC Welsh Quakers of Pennsylvania.
    😉 😀

    Reply
  29. Cornish and Breton, eh? Well, at least they speak (or spoke, in the case of Cornish) P-Celtic languages. But still no Welsh… Ho hum.
    Seriously, when speaking to Americans about ‘Celtic’ subjects (about which I have rather strong views, for a number of reasons), they really do tend seldom to think beyond Irish and Scots, probably because Irish and Scottish immigrants into the USA have had a more widespread socio-cultural impact than the Welsh, notwithstanding the 17thC Welsh Quakers of Pennsylvania.
    😉 😀

    Reply
  30. Cornish and Breton, eh? Well, at least they speak (or spoke, in the case of Cornish) P-Celtic languages. But still no Welsh… Ho hum.
    Seriously, when speaking to Americans about ‘Celtic’ subjects (about which I have rather strong views, for a number of reasons), they really do tend seldom to think beyond Irish and Scots, probably because Irish and Scottish immigrants into the USA have had a more widespread socio-cultural impact than the Welsh, notwithstanding the 17thC Welsh Quakers of Pennsylvania.
    😉 😀

    Reply
  31. I use music in different ways. I have period music for if I feel I need to get into my historical period and I also have some brain stuff if I need help focussing.
    I keep to a narrow selection, however, because I think the music puts me into writing zone. If I kept varying it, I don’t think it would do that.
    A lot of the time I write without, however. My loudspeakers come off a 100 CD changer in the living room, but as I say, I only use about 5 normally.
    These days I mostly use my mp3 player, but the selection of music is much the same except that any brain stuff is on there because it doesn’t work without headphones.
    My favorite is Hemi-sync, though there are only a couple that work for creative stuff for me. We have lots of it for general playing, however, preferably with headphones, but some is enjoyable just as music.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  32. I use music in different ways. I have period music for if I feel I need to get into my historical period and I also have some brain stuff if I need help focussing.
    I keep to a narrow selection, however, because I think the music puts me into writing zone. If I kept varying it, I don’t think it would do that.
    A lot of the time I write without, however. My loudspeakers come off a 100 CD changer in the living room, but as I say, I only use about 5 normally.
    These days I mostly use my mp3 player, but the selection of music is much the same except that any brain stuff is on there because it doesn’t work without headphones.
    My favorite is Hemi-sync, though there are only a couple that work for creative stuff for me. We have lots of it for general playing, however, preferably with headphones, but some is enjoyable just as music.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  33. I use music in different ways. I have period music for if I feel I need to get into my historical period and I also have some brain stuff if I need help focussing.
    I keep to a narrow selection, however, because I think the music puts me into writing zone. If I kept varying it, I don’t think it would do that.
    A lot of the time I write without, however. My loudspeakers come off a 100 CD changer in the living room, but as I say, I only use about 5 normally.
    These days I mostly use my mp3 player, but the selection of music is much the same except that any brain stuff is on there because it doesn’t work without headphones.
    My favorite is Hemi-sync, though there are only a couple that work for creative stuff for me. We have lots of it for general playing, however, preferably with headphones, but some is enjoyable just as music.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  34. Love that picture of you Susan Sarah. I bet if you’d not been standing down hill from the piper, you would have looked taller. *g*
    I listen to tween music while driving. If you sneaked a peek at the collection of CD’s tucked in my visor, you’d find Jessie McCartney, AJ & Ally, Jo-Jo and Zoe Girl. It’s actually pretty good stuff. My daughter hates that I like her music. Ah, well…
    I use to like to listen to hard core classical music when I wrote. Then the Harry Potter CDs. Then I moved on to a bit of New Age. Diane Arkenstone’s LIQUID BLUE is really nice. Right now I’m on a MEET JOE BLACK craze.
    Often I will listen to the same CD over and over again. For days. Even weeks if it’s helping the story to flow. But sometimes I just like to listen to the hum of my PC, though my muse despises the sound of clacking computer keys.
    If I need to write gut wrenching emotion, I always listen to REMEMBER by Josh Groban (on the soundtrack from the movie TROY). That song rips my heart out.
    –the littlest wenchling off to learn more about brain music

    Reply
  35. Love that picture of you Susan Sarah. I bet if you’d not been standing down hill from the piper, you would have looked taller. *g*
    I listen to tween music while driving. If you sneaked a peek at the collection of CD’s tucked in my visor, you’d find Jessie McCartney, AJ & Ally, Jo-Jo and Zoe Girl. It’s actually pretty good stuff. My daughter hates that I like her music. Ah, well…
    I use to like to listen to hard core classical music when I wrote. Then the Harry Potter CDs. Then I moved on to a bit of New Age. Diane Arkenstone’s LIQUID BLUE is really nice. Right now I’m on a MEET JOE BLACK craze.
    Often I will listen to the same CD over and over again. For days. Even weeks if it’s helping the story to flow. But sometimes I just like to listen to the hum of my PC, though my muse despises the sound of clacking computer keys.
    If I need to write gut wrenching emotion, I always listen to REMEMBER by Josh Groban (on the soundtrack from the movie TROY). That song rips my heart out.
    –the littlest wenchling off to learn more about brain music

    Reply
  36. Love that picture of you Susan Sarah. I bet if you’d not been standing down hill from the piper, you would have looked taller. *g*
    I listen to tween music while driving. If you sneaked a peek at the collection of CD’s tucked in my visor, you’d find Jessie McCartney, AJ & Ally, Jo-Jo and Zoe Girl. It’s actually pretty good stuff. My daughter hates that I like her music. Ah, well…
    I use to like to listen to hard core classical music when I wrote. Then the Harry Potter CDs. Then I moved on to a bit of New Age. Diane Arkenstone’s LIQUID BLUE is really nice. Right now I’m on a MEET JOE BLACK craze.
    Often I will listen to the same CD over and over again. For days. Even weeks if it’s helping the story to flow. But sometimes I just like to listen to the hum of my PC, though my muse despises the sound of clacking computer keys.
    If I need to write gut wrenching emotion, I always listen to REMEMBER by Josh Groban (on the soundtrack from the movie TROY). That song rips my heart out.
    –the littlest wenchling off to learn more about brain music

    Reply
  37. Ag wrote… “notwithstanding the 17thC Welsh Quakers of Pennsylvania”
    Hey Ag, I’m one those! My maternal grand-mother and great-grandmother grew up in Delta, PA. Worked the coal and slate mines and ran the railroad. (well, their husbands did.) They were a bunch of hard liv’n people.

    Reply
  38. Ag wrote… “notwithstanding the 17thC Welsh Quakers of Pennsylvania”
    Hey Ag, I’m one those! My maternal grand-mother and great-grandmother grew up in Delta, PA. Worked the coal and slate mines and ran the railroad. (well, their husbands did.) They were a bunch of hard liv’n people.

    Reply
  39. Ag wrote… “notwithstanding the 17thC Welsh Quakers of Pennsylvania”
    Hey Ag, I’m one those! My maternal grand-mother and great-grandmother grew up in Delta, PA. Worked the coal and slate mines and ran the railroad. (well, their husbands did.) They were a bunch of hard liv’n people.

    Reply
  40. Nina, are you descended from the 17thC Quaker immigrants, mainly from North Wales, who settled in Penn’s Welsh Tract west of Philadelphia, or the other wave of later (19thC) Welsh immigrants who came to find work in the PA coalfields? They were mainly from South Wales – from the coalmining areas of Glamorgan. Two distinct waves of immigration.
    I’m not sure where Delta is. The area I know is around Philly itself, Bryn Mawr, Haverford etc. Still full of Welsh place-names.
    😉

    Reply
  41. Nina, are you descended from the 17thC Quaker immigrants, mainly from North Wales, who settled in Penn’s Welsh Tract west of Philadelphia, or the other wave of later (19thC) Welsh immigrants who came to find work in the PA coalfields? They were mainly from South Wales – from the coalmining areas of Glamorgan. Two distinct waves of immigration.
    I’m not sure where Delta is. The area I know is around Philly itself, Bryn Mawr, Haverford etc. Still full of Welsh place-names.
    😉

    Reply
  42. Nina, are you descended from the 17thC Quaker immigrants, mainly from North Wales, who settled in Penn’s Welsh Tract west of Philadelphia, or the other wave of later (19thC) Welsh immigrants who came to find work in the PA coalfields? They were mainly from South Wales – from the coalmining areas of Glamorgan. Two distinct waves of immigration.
    I’m not sure where Delta is. The area I know is around Philly itself, Bryn Mawr, Haverford etc. Still full of Welsh place-names.
    😉

    Reply
  43. Thanks, Ag. That was fascinating reading.
    My grandmother, who passed on about 30 years ago, told me her family had been in the America’s since the 1700’s. From north or south Wales, I don’t know. She was the third generation to live in Delta, a small town in York County, located in southeast PA. She and her sister (my great aunt) use to talk back and forth in a language they called pig-latin. I asked her once what it was and she told me it was the language of the Welsh. To this day I don’t really know what language they were speaking.
    When I was about 25, I took my great aunt back to the house where she grew up with her sister (my grandmother), her mother and grandmother. I will never forget how moved she was at the sight of the town and how she wept at the grave of her fist husband who died in the mines after they had been married for just a year.
    Unfortunately, that’s all I know. Everyone is gone now who would remember.
    Ya know, I haven’t thought about these things in years. Very refreshing.

    Reply
  44. Thanks, Ag. That was fascinating reading.
    My grandmother, who passed on about 30 years ago, told me her family had been in the America’s since the 1700’s. From north or south Wales, I don’t know. She was the third generation to live in Delta, a small town in York County, located in southeast PA. She and her sister (my great aunt) use to talk back and forth in a language they called pig-latin. I asked her once what it was and she told me it was the language of the Welsh. To this day I don’t really know what language they were speaking.
    When I was about 25, I took my great aunt back to the house where she grew up with her sister (my grandmother), her mother and grandmother. I will never forget how moved she was at the sight of the town and how she wept at the grave of her fist husband who died in the mines after they had been married for just a year.
    Unfortunately, that’s all I know. Everyone is gone now who would remember.
    Ya know, I haven’t thought about these things in years. Very refreshing.

    Reply
  45. Thanks, Ag. That was fascinating reading.
    My grandmother, who passed on about 30 years ago, told me her family had been in the America’s since the 1700’s. From north or south Wales, I don’t know. She was the third generation to live in Delta, a small town in York County, located in southeast PA. She and her sister (my great aunt) use to talk back and forth in a language they called pig-latin. I asked her once what it was and she told me it was the language of the Welsh. To this day I don’t really know what language they were speaking.
    When I was about 25, I took my great aunt back to the house where she grew up with her sister (my grandmother), her mother and grandmother. I will never forget how moved she was at the sight of the town and how she wept at the grave of her fist husband who died in the mines after they had been married for just a year.
    Unfortunately, that’s all I know. Everyone is gone now who would remember.
    Ya know, I haven’t thought about these things in years. Very refreshing.

    Reply
  46. Nina – it sounds as though it might be rewarding for you to do some research on your family history! I can understand why genealogical research is so popular in the USA, where immigrant ancestors are the norm. Welsh ancestors do present one research problem, though, in that the range of surnames so limited that it can be hard to differentiate individuals.
    🙂

    Reply
  47. Nina – it sounds as though it might be rewarding for you to do some research on your family history! I can understand why genealogical research is so popular in the USA, where immigrant ancestors are the norm. Welsh ancestors do present one research problem, though, in that the range of surnames so limited that it can be hard to differentiate individuals.
    🙂

    Reply
  48. Nina – it sounds as though it might be rewarding for you to do some research on your family history! I can understand why genealogical research is so popular in the USA, where immigrant ancestors are the norm. Welsh ancestors do present one research problem, though, in that the range of surnames so limited that it can be hard to differentiate individuals.
    🙂

    Reply

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