Museums and such

Sorry I'm a bit late with this, but I'm traveling. It's also going to be light on pictures because I don;t have a way to insert them right now. I may be able to add them later.

First I attended RomCon in Denver, which was excellent. The events and panels were just structured enough to keep things in line, but also allowed a lot of fun interaction between authors and readers

Then I came up to Canada, to Ottawa, to visit family where I spentost of the time polishing off An Unlikely Countess, which had been a bit delayed by the preparations for a month in North America. It is now with my editor, and I'm very pleased with it. It's set in the Malloren World, and follows on in time from The Secret Duke, but it's not strongly connected to any other book. Though I enjoy writing linked books and find it hard to imagine not doing so, it's very liberating to sometimes start with a completely blank slate

I'll be talking more about the book, of course. It's due out in March 2011.

Now I'm in Toronto, and yesterday I went to the Royal Ontario Museum, the ROM, mostly to see the special exhibit on the Chinese Terracotta Warriors. They only have a few of the actual statues, but there's a lot about the China of that time, about 200 BC. I was particularly interested in the weapons, for the clay warriors carried real weapons, and many were in excellent condition because of the addition of some chromium to the bronze. Its anti-corrosive properties weren't known in the west until, I think, the 19th century.

There's a pictrue of the excavation in China of the warriors. Truly amazing. And in addition to those, they're also discovering musicians, artists, gymnasts and a garden with water birds.

225px-JosiahWedgwood I also spent a little time in another special exhibit there about Josiah Wedgwood, 1730-1795. He's part of my Malloren World, though still early in his career then. He rose from being an apprentice potter to one of the great industrial developers. In he 1760s, when my books are set, he had not yet developed his famous innovations, the black basalt ware, and the blue jasper ware that takes the white raised designs.Basalt

I have a personal connection there. Back in another life I was a careers guidance officer in Staffordshire, and the Potteries, as Stoke on Trent and area are called, was in my region. I lived in Burslem, where Josiah Wedgwood was born, and if I had access to our old photos, I could share pictures of the bottle kilns there, remnants of a former age.As it is, you can see some here.

Punch

Part of my job was to go around workplaces to learn about the work and what would be required of the students leaving school to work there. I visited the modern Wedgwood factory at Barlaston a couple of times, and even tried my hand at molding one of those delicate figures to go on jasper ware. The skilled workers make it look so easy, but I failed completely!

I couldn't help wondering if one of the older workers shown in the accompanying film was someone I'd helped find a job there a long, long time ago.

This is the front left of a gorgeous Georgian waistcoat of the type my better dressed gentlemen might wear.

Wcoat

At the end of the month I'll be at the RWA conference in Orlando, hoping to see some of you there.

Anyone here want to suggest an interesting museum or special exhibit?

Cheers,

Jo

65 thoughts on “Museums and such”

  1. The most “interesting” museum I could suggest it the one near me. Henry Ford Museum and Greenfield Village. I’ve not been to many museums, but as many times as I’ve been to HFMGV, it’s still such an amazing place to go. If you ever get up this way, I’d love to be your docent :o)

    Reply
  2. The most “interesting” museum I could suggest it the one near me. Henry Ford Museum and Greenfield Village. I’ve not been to many museums, but as many times as I’ve been to HFMGV, it’s still such an amazing place to go. If you ever get up this way, I’d love to be your docent :o)

    Reply
  3. The most “interesting” museum I could suggest it the one near me. Henry Ford Museum and Greenfield Village. I’ve not been to many museums, but as many times as I’ve been to HFMGV, it’s still such an amazing place to go. If you ever get up this way, I’d love to be your docent :o)

    Reply
  4. The most “interesting” museum I could suggest it the one near me. Henry Ford Museum and Greenfield Village. I’ve not been to many museums, but as many times as I’ve been to HFMGV, it’s still such an amazing place to go. If you ever get up this way, I’d love to be your docent :o)

    Reply
  5. The most “interesting” museum I could suggest it the one near me. Henry Ford Museum and Greenfield Village. I’ve not been to many museums, but as many times as I’ve been to HFMGV, it’s still such an amazing place to go. If you ever get up this way, I’d love to be your docent :o)

    Reply
  6. I am in awe that you can finish a book while on the road and playing the extrovert all day. Congrats on the completion and enjoy the rest of your visit!
    For Orlando, I recommend you stay inside in the a/c.

    Reply
  7. I am in awe that you can finish a book while on the road and playing the extrovert all day. Congrats on the completion and enjoy the rest of your visit!
    For Orlando, I recommend you stay inside in the a/c.

    Reply
  8. I am in awe that you can finish a book while on the road and playing the extrovert all day. Congrats on the completion and enjoy the rest of your visit!
    For Orlando, I recommend you stay inside in the a/c.

    Reply
  9. I am in awe that you can finish a book while on the road and playing the extrovert all day. Congrats on the completion and enjoy the rest of your visit!
    For Orlando, I recommend you stay inside in the a/c.

    Reply
  10. I am in awe that you can finish a book while on the road and playing the extrovert all day. Congrats on the completion and enjoy the rest of your visit!
    For Orlando, I recommend you stay inside in the a/c.

    Reply
  11. I’ve been to the working museum in the Potteries, which confirmed what I’d learned in ceramic production design as an industrial design student, and gave me splendid research for THe Rake and The Reformer. Loved the bottle kin. What fun to think that you might have placed some of those workers!
    Best museum exhibits? The Walters Museum here in Baltimore had a fabulous one on the history of jewelry last years. The jewelry exhibited was stunning, and looking at it could even be considered research. *g*

    Reply
  12. I’ve been to the working museum in the Potteries, which confirmed what I’d learned in ceramic production design as an industrial design student, and gave me splendid research for THe Rake and The Reformer. Loved the bottle kin. What fun to think that you might have placed some of those workers!
    Best museum exhibits? The Walters Museum here in Baltimore had a fabulous one on the history of jewelry last years. The jewelry exhibited was stunning, and looking at it could even be considered research. *g*

    Reply
  13. I’ve been to the working museum in the Potteries, which confirmed what I’d learned in ceramic production design as an industrial design student, and gave me splendid research for THe Rake and The Reformer. Loved the bottle kin. What fun to think that you might have placed some of those workers!
    Best museum exhibits? The Walters Museum here in Baltimore had a fabulous one on the history of jewelry last years. The jewelry exhibited was stunning, and looking at it could even be considered research. *g*

    Reply
  14. I’ve been to the working museum in the Potteries, which confirmed what I’d learned in ceramic production design as an industrial design student, and gave me splendid research for THe Rake and The Reformer. Loved the bottle kin. What fun to think that you might have placed some of those workers!
    Best museum exhibits? The Walters Museum here in Baltimore had a fabulous one on the history of jewelry last years. The jewelry exhibited was stunning, and looking at it could even be considered research. *g*

    Reply
  15. I’ve been to the working museum in the Potteries, which confirmed what I’d learned in ceramic production design as an industrial design student, and gave me splendid research for THe Rake and The Reformer. Loved the bottle kin. What fun to think that you might have placed some of those workers!
    Best museum exhibits? The Walters Museum here in Baltimore had a fabulous one on the history of jewelry last years. The jewelry exhibited was stunning, and looking at it could even be considered research. *g*

    Reply
  16. Wow, needle work is superb the gentlemen’s waistcoat shown above. Just give me a antique white skirt or pair of slacks and I wear it today, LOL!

    Reply
  17. Wow, needle work is superb the gentlemen’s waistcoat shown above. Just give me a antique white skirt or pair of slacks and I wear it today, LOL!

    Reply
  18. Wow, needle work is superb the gentlemen’s waistcoat shown above. Just give me a antique white skirt or pair of slacks and I wear it today, LOL!

    Reply
  19. Wow, needle work is superb the gentlemen’s waistcoat shown above. Just give me a antique white skirt or pair of slacks and I wear it today, LOL!

    Reply
  20. Wow, needle work is superb the gentlemen’s waistcoat shown above. Just give me a antique white skirt or pair of slacks and I wear it today, LOL!

    Reply
  21. Suggestion for Orlando, besides the usual WDW or Universal(Harry Potter), what about the Morse Museum? It is said to house “The world’s most comprehensive collection of works by Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848-1933).”
    Refer to link for more info http://www.morsemuseum.org/. *R*

    Reply
  22. Suggestion for Orlando, besides the usual WDW or Universal(Harry Potter), what about the Morse Museum? It is said to house “The world’s most comprehensive collection of works by Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848-1933).”
    Refer to link for more info http://www.morsemuseum.org/. *R*

    Reply
  23. Suggestion for Orlando, besides the usual WDW or Universal(Harry Potter), what about the Morse Museum? It is said to house “The world’s most comprehensive collection of works by Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848-1933).”
    Refer to link for more info http://www.morsemuseum.org/. *R*

    Reply
  24. Suggestion for Orlando, besides the usual WDW or Universal(Harry Potter), what about the Morse Museum? It is said to house “The world’s most comprehensive collection of works by Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848-1933).”
    Refer to link for more info http://www.morsemuseum.org/. *R*

    Reply
  25. Suggestion for Orlando, besides the usual WDW or Universal(Harry Potter), what about the Morse Museum? It is said to house “The world’s most comprehensive collection of works by Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848-1933).”
    Refer to link for more info http://www.morsemuseum.org/. *R*

    Reply
  26. Use a dictionary and grammar guide constantly. Keep a small English dictionary with you at all time. When you see a new word, look it up. Think about the word – use it, in your mind, in a sentence.

    Reply
  27. Use a dictionary and grammar guide constantly. Keep a small English dictionary with you at all time. When you see a new word, look it up. Think about the word – use it, in your mind, in a sentence.

    Reply
  28. Use a dictionary and grammar guide constantly. Keep a small English dictionary with you at all time. When you see a new word, look it up. Think about the word – use it, in your mind, in a sentence.

    Reply
  29. Use a dictionary and grammar guide constantly. Keep a small English dictionary with you at all time. When you see a new word, look it up. Think about the word – use it, in your mind, in a sentence.

    Reply
  30. Use a dictionary and grammar guide constantly. Keep a small English dictionary with you at all time. When you see a new word, look it up. Think about the word – use it, in your mind, in a sentence.

    Reply
  31. thanks for the comments and suggestions. The Morse Museum could be possible and it looks lovely!
    I don’t think the Henry Ford will be on our route south, though.
    Yes, I love that emboidery, and those sorts of clothes. Part of the reason I write Georgian as well as Regency. Regency men’s wear was too dull,
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  32. thanks for the comments and suggestions. The Morse Museum could be possible and it looks lovely!
    I don’t think the Henry Ford will be on our route south, though.
    Yes, I love that emboidery, and those sorts of clothes. Part of the reason I write Georgian as well as Regency. Regency men’s wear was too dull,
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  33. thanks for the comments and suggestions. The Morse Museum could be possible and it looks lovely!
    I don’t think the Henry Ford will be on our route south, though.
    Yes, I love that emboidery, and those sorts of clothes. Part of the reason I write Georgian as well as Regency. Regency men’s wear was too dull,
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  34. thanks for the comments and suggestions. The Morse Museum could be possible and it looks lovely!
    I don’t think the Henry Ford will be on our route south, though.
    Yes, I love that emboidery, and those sorts of clothes. Part of the reason I write Georgian as well as Regency. Regency men’s wear was too dull,
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  35. thanks for the comments and suggestions. The Morse Museum could be possible and it looks lovely!
    I don’t think the Henry Ford will be on our route south, though.
    Yes, I love that emboidery, and those sorts of clothes. Part of the reason I write Georgian as well as Regency. Regency men’s wear was too dull,
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  36. Jo, my absolute favorite museum is the McCord Museum of Canadian History in Montreal. Aside from the wonderful old clothes, silver, and authentic Native American artifacts, they have travelling exhibitions. Some of my favorites were “Shades of Beauty” (parasols), “Cut and Paste” (the composite photographs of William Nottman), and most recently, “Being Irish O’Quebec,” about the coming of the Irish to Canada, which really resonated with me as I’d only just returned from Ireland a month before I saw that exhibit.

    Reply
  37. Jo, my absolute favorite museum is the McCord Museum of Canadian History in Montreal. Aside from the wonderful old clothes, silver, and authentic Native American artifacts, they have travelling exhibitions. Some of my favorites were “Shades of Beauty” (parasols), “Cut and Paste” (the composite photographs of William Nottman), and most recently, “Being Irish O’Quebec,” about the coming of the Irish to Canada, which really resonated with me as I’d only just returned from Ireland a month before I saw that exhibit.

    Reply
  38. Jo, my absolute favorite museum is the McCord Museum of Canadian History in Montreal. Aside from the wonderful old clothes, silver, and authentic Native American artifacts, they have travelling exhibitions. Some of my favorites were “Shades of Beauty” (parasols), “Cut and Paste” (the composite photographs of William Nottman), and most recently, “Being Irish O’Quebec,” about the coming of the Irish to Canada, which really resonated with me as I’d only just returned from Ireland a month before I saw that exhibit.

    Reply
  39. Jo, my absolute favorite museum is the McCord Museum of Canadian History in Montreal. Aside from the wonderful old clothes, silver, and authentic Native American artifacts, they have travelling exhibitions. Some of my favorites were “Shades of Beauty” (parasols), “Cut and Paste” (the composite photographs of William Nottman), and most recently, “Being Irish O’Quebec,” about the coming of the Irish to Canada, which really resonated with me as I’d only just returned from Ireland a month before I saw that exhibit.

    Reply
  40. Jo, my absolute favorite museum is the McCord Museum of Canadian History in Montreal. Aside from the wonderful old clothes, silver, and authentic Native American artifacts, they have travelling exhibitions. Some of my favorites were “Shades of Beauty” (parasols), “Cut and Paste” (the composite photographs of William Nottman), and most recently, “Being Irish O’Quebec,” about the coming of the Irish to Canada, which really resonated with me as I’d only just returned from Ireland a month before I saw that exhibit.

    Reply
  41. Hi Jo, I can’t believe how close our lives have come – I grew up in Stafford and my dad worked at Wedgwood for a while. I have been to the shop and museum many times. Now I live close to Ottawa!
    My favourite museum has to be the V&A in London, especially the room with the plaster casts of buildings. They also have some beautiful costumes. Next would be Althorp and the Diana Exhibition. I loved seeing all those dresses from the iconic photographs.
    Finally the International Spy Museum in Washington DC is a rare treat.

    Reply
  42. Hi Jo, I can’t believe how close our lives have come – I grew up in Stafford and my dad worked at Wedgwood for a while. I have been to the shop and museum many times. Now I live close to Ottawa!
    My favourite museum has to be the V&A in London, especially the room with the plaster casts of buildings. They also have some beautiful costumes. Next would be Althorp and the Diana Exhibition. I loved seeing all those dresses from the iconic photographs.
    Finally the International Spy Museum in Washington DC is a rare treat.

    Reply
  43. Hi Jo, I can’t believe how close our lives have come – I grew up in Stafford and my dad worked at Wedgwood for a while. I have been to the shop and museum many times. Now I live close to Ottawa!
    My favourite museum has to be the V&A in London, especially the room with the plaster casts of buildings. They also have some beautiful costumes. Next would be Althorp and the Diana Exhibition. I loved seeing all those dresses from the iconic photographs.
    Finally the International Spy Museum in Washington DC is a rare treat.

    Reply
  44. Hi Jo, I can’t believe how close our lives have come – I grew up in Stafford and my dad worked at Wedgwood for a while. I have been to the shop and museum many times. Now I live close to Ottawa!
    My favourite museum has to be the V&A in London, especially the room with the plaster casts of buildings. They also have some beautiful costumes. Next would be Althorp and the Diana Exhibition. I loved seeing all those dresses from the iconic photographs.
    Finally the International Spy Museum in Washington DC is a rare treat.

    Reply
  45. Hi Jo, I can’t believe how close our lives have come – I grew up in Stafford and my dad worked at Wedgwood for a while. I have been to the shop and museum many times. Now I live close to Ottawa!
    My favourite museum has to be the V&A in London, especially the room with the plaster casts of buildings. They also have some beautiful costumes. Next would be Althorp and the Diana Exhibition. I loved seeing all those dresses from the iconic photographs.
    Finally the International Spy Museum in Washington DC is a rare treat.

    Reply
  46. “I am in awe that you can finish a book while on the road and playing the extrovert all day. Congrats on the completion and enjoy the rest of your visit!”
    Exactly what Pat wrote above. Wow.
    I love visiting houses that have been converted into museums. You get a chance to see how they lived (or even better still live in their public rooms). Some part voyeurism, perhaps? My most memorable such trip was to Alnwick in Northumberland.

    Reply
  47. “I am in awe that you can finish a book while on the road and playing the extrovert all day. Congrats on the completion and enjoy the rest of your visit!”
    Exactly what Pat wrote above. Wow.
    I love visiting houses that have been converted into museums. You get a chance to see how they lived (or even better still live in their public rooms). Some part voyeurism, perhaps? My most memorable such trip was to Alnwick in Northumberland.

    Reply
  48. “I am in awe that you can finish a book while on the road and playing the extrovert all day. Congrats on the completion and enjoy the rest of your visit!”
    Exactly what Pat wrote above. Wow.
    I love visiting houses that have been converted into museums. You get a chance to see how they lived (or even better still live in their public rooms). Some part voyeurism, perhaps? My most memorable such trip was to Alnwick in Northumberland.

    Reply
  49. “I am in awe that you can finish a book while on the road and playing the extrovert all day. Congrats on the completion and enjoy the rest of your visit!”
    Exactly what Pat wrote above. Wow.
    I love visiting houses that have been converted into museums. You get a chance to see how they lived (or even better still live in their public rooms). Some part voyeurism, perhaps? My most memorable such trip was to Alnwick in Northumberland.

    Reply
  50. “I am in awe that you can finish a book while on the road and playing the extrovert all day. Congrats on the completion and enjoy the rest of your visit!”
    Exactly what Pat wrote above. Wow.
    I love visiting houses that have been converted into museums. You get a chance to see how they lived (or even better still live in their public rooms). Some part voyeurism, perhaps? My most memorable such trip was to Alnwick in Northumberland.

    Reply

Leave a Comment