Mr. Darcy

Hi, here's Jo, about to be a bit iconoclastic about our Fitzwilliam Darcy. And even about Colin Firth. You have been warned!

I can't remember when I first read Pride and Predjudice,  but it was in my teens. I adored it, but looking back it wasn't about Darcy at all. For me it was a Cinderella story and Darcy was the placeholder for the Prince. The Prince in this context is the prize, the gold medal, the goblet. He's set up as the local prize, and as unattainable.

For many readers (and viewers) Darcy clearly is that other character, the Romantic Hero. He stirs romantic emotions and dreams and makes the heart beat faster. This is fine, but it's not like that for me.

Which is Darcy for you? Or do you disagree with my analysis entirely?
Darcyrintoul

Of the recent screen Darcys, I prefer David Rintoul, though none have hit the spot for me, perhaps because they were all supposed to be Romantic Hero Darcy rather that Prince Darcy. Prince Darcy would put all the emphasis on his wealth, status, and unreachablity. Romantic Darcy requires some dash and earthiness that undermines that. Colin Firth is a great actor and could have done Prince Darcy perfectly, but instead we see him fencing — fencing! — and emerging bedraggled from a lake.

MdgcI've been thinking about this because I was sent a review copy of an amusing book, Mr. Darcy's Guide to Courtship, by of course Fitzwilliam Darcy, "as dictated to Miss Emily Brand." This is a nicely presented volume on heavy cream paper with greyscale period illustrations and some new drawings that fit in perfectly. It has a period feel without losing readability and would make an excellent gift for an Austen fan.

It's more of a dipping book than one to read straight through, but the dips are tasty. The book draws on period resources, most of them pre-Regency, and there are plenty of Austen references and devices, such as the "ludicrous examples of studied compliments' of Mr. Collins."

 Darcy lays out the appropriate behaviours for gentlemen and ladies, but primarily for the gentlemen, on "Making Oneself Ageeable", "Selecting a Bride" etc, and even has as "Ask Darcy" section at the end. This is Darcy before he meets Elizabeth Bennet, haughty, cynical and wry. Right at the beginning it says, "There are some errata in this book, but the Author says he is too busy and important to give you a note of them." You see — Prince Darcy.

This book is delightful as a pastime, but there are period details, literary references and wry depths that reward repeat visits.

Mr. Darcy's Guide to Courtship, from Old House Books.

Seduction in Silk is out now, so if you don't have your copy, make haste! Readers in the UK now have a UK e-book edition (with an odd cover, I must say) but for a print edition must go for the moment to The Book Depository, which ships book free.

Cheers,

Jo

 

90 thoughts on “Mr. Darcy”

  1. I have toagree with all your comments, bith about Darcy and about the Guide to Courtship. I do have an objection to having seduction mentioned on the cover as courtship and seduction are two different things. The Guide is cleverly done and enjoyable .
    In the novel P &P, Darcy is much more the Prince than he is in the movies. The images from the movies are so powerful and persuasive that they often overwhelm what is in the books. Though I enjoyed the fencing scene and think it prefectly plausible for that time and age, Darcy doesn’t fence in the book. He doesn’t fight a duel nor emerge out of the mist like a Heathcliffe or Lancelot

  2. I have toagree with all your comments, bith about Darcy and about the Guide to Courtship. I do have an objection to having seduction mentioned on the cover as courtship and seduction are two different things. The Guide is cleverly done and enjoyable .
    In the novel P &P, Darcy is much more the Prince than he is in the movies. The images from the movies are so powerful and persuasive that they often overwhelm what is in the books. Though I enjoyed the fencing scene and think it prefectly plausible for that time and age, Darcy doesn’t fence in the book. He doesn’t fight a duel nor emerge out of the mist like a Heathcliffe or Lancelot

  3. I have toagree with all your comments, bith about Darcy and about the Guide to Courtship. I do have an objection to having seduction mentioned on the cover as courtship and seduction are two different things. The Guide is cleverly done and enjoyable .
    In the novel P &P, Darcy is much more the Prince than he is in the movies. The images from the movies are so powerful and persuasive that they often overwhelm what is in the books. Though I enjoyed the fencing scene and think it prefectly plausible for that time and age, Darcy doesn’t fence in the book. He doesn’t fight a duel nor emerge out of the mist like a Heathcliffe or Lancelot

  4. I have toagree with all your comments, bith about Darcy and about the Guide to Courtship. I do have an objection to having seduction mentioned on the cover as courtship and seduction are two different things. The Guide is cleverly done and enjoyable .
    In the novel P &P, Darcy is much more the Prince than he is in the movies. The images from the movies are so powerful and persuasive that they often overwhelm what is in the books. Though I enjoyed the fencing scene and think it prefectly plausible for that time and age, Darcy doesn’t fence in the book. He doesn’t fight a duel nor emerge out of the mist like a Heathcliffe or Lancelot

  5. I have toagree with all your comments, bith about Darcy and about the Guide to Courtship. I do have an objection to having seduction mentioned on the cover as courtship and seduction are two different things. The Guide is cleverly done and enjoyable .
    In the novel P &P, Darcy is much more the Prince than he is in the movies. The images from the movies are so powerful and persuasive that they often overwhelm what is in the books. Though I enjoyed the fencing scene and think it prefectly plausible for that time and age, Darcy doesn’t fence in the book. He doesn’t fight a duel nor emerge out of the mist like a Heathcliffe or Lancelot

  6. I actually bid on and won a copy of Mr. Darcy’s Guide to Courtship at the Beau Monde silent auction during the Beau Monde mini conference in Atlanta. And I concur it is more of a “dipping” book which I have enjoyed reading in snippets. The back cover description of the author “Mr. Fitzwilliam Darcy is a wealthy landowner and, according to his own testimony, the most eligible bachelor in Derbyshire – ” definitely indicates the Prince persona!
    I would have to agree as written in P&P he is very much the lord of all he surveys and set up as more the brass ring, so to speak. Then again, I think a story told by a woman in the POV of a woman would portray him as such. Objectifying a man! What a modern concept! LOL

  7. I actually bid on and won a copy of Mr. Darcy’s Guide to Courtship at the Beau Monde silent auction during the Beau Monde mini conference in Atlanta. And I concur it is more of a “dipping” book which I have enjoyed reading in snippets. The back cover description of the author “Mr. Fitzwilliam Darcy is a wealthy landowner and, according to his own testimony, the most eligible bachelor in Derbyshire – ” definitely indicates the Prince persona!
    I would have to agree as written in P&P he is very much the lord of all he surveys and set up as more the brass ring, so to speak. Then again, I think a story told by a woman in the POV of a woman would portray him as such. Objectifying a man! What a modern concept! LOL

  8. I actually bid on and won a copy of Mr. Darcy’s Guide to Courtship at the Beau Monde silent auction during the Beau Monde mini conference in Atlanta. And I concur it is more of a “dipping” book which I have enjoyed reading in snippets. The back cover description of the author “Mr. Fitzwilliam Darcy is a wealthy landowner and, according to his own testimony, the most eligible bachelor in Derbyshire – ” definitely indicates the Prince persona!
    I would have to agree as written in P&P he is very much the lord of all he surveys and set up as more the brass ring, so to speak. Then again, I think a story told by a woman in the POV of a woman would portray him as such. Objectifying a man! What a modern concept! LOL

  9. I actually bid on and won a copy of Mr. Darcy’s Guide to Courtship at the Beau Monde silent auction during the Beau Monde mini conference in Atlanta. And I concur it is more of a “dipping” book which I have enjoyed reading in snippets. The back cover description of the author “Mr. Fitzwilliam Darcy is a wealthy landowner and, according to his own testimony, the most eligible bachelor in Derbyshire – ” definitely indicates the Prince persona!
    I would have to agree as written in P&P he is very much the lord of all he surveys and set up as more the brass ring, so to speak. Then again, I think a story told by a woman in the POV of a woman would portray him as such. Objectifying a man! What a modern concept! LOL

  10. I actually bid on and won a copy of Mr. Darcy’s Guide to Courtship at the Beau Monde silent auction during the Beau Monde mini conference in Atlanta. And I concur it is more of a “dipping” book which I have enjoyed reading in snippets. The back cover description of the author “Mr. Fitzwilliam Darcy is a wealthy landowner and, according to his own testimony, the most eligible bachelor in Derbyshire – ” definitely indicates the Prince persona!
    I would have to agree as written in P&P he is very much the lord of all he surveys and set up as more the brass ring, so to speak. Then again, I think a story told by a woman in the POV of a woman would portray him as such. Objectifying a man! What a modern concept! LOL

  11. There is a lot of the prince in Darcy alright. Afterall Elizabeth admits only somewhat in jest that she started to like him when she saw Pemberley’s grounds. There is no doubt that Darcy will always do what’s best for those he cares for and that’s appealing no matter the age. He certainly acts the part of the white knight for elizabeth’s family. For a Georgian/ Recency woman, to turn that down is ridiculous (or the man in question would have to be truly repulsive physically). But, he is also the mysterious stranger, the romantic leading man that was (likely always has been) so appealing to women everywhere. Let’s face it, midieval love ballads, love poems in many old cultures all suggest that romantic love is not new. It just became more acceptable as the primary reason for partnership in recent western history.

  12. There is a lot of the prince in Darcy alright. Afterall Elizabeth admits only somewhat in jest that she started to like him when she saw Pemberley’s grounds. There is no doubt that Darcy will always do what’s best for those he cares for and that’s appealing no matter the age. He certainly acts the part of the white knight for elizabeth’s family. For a Georgian/ Recency woman, to turn that down is ridiculous (or the man in question would have to be truly repulsive physically). But, he is also the mysterious stranger, the romantic leading man that was (likely always has been) so appealing to women everywhere. Let’s face it, midieval love ballads, love poems in many old cultures all suggest that romantic love is not new. It just became more acceptable as the primary reason for partnership in recent western history.

  13. There is a lot of the prince in Darcy alright. Afterall Elizabeth admits only somewhat in jest that she started to like him when she saw Pemberley’s grounds. There is no doubt that Darcy will always do what’s best for those he cares for and that’s appealing no matter the age. He certainly acts the part of the white knight for elizabeth’s family. For a Georgian/ Recency woman, to turn that down is ridiculous (or the man in question would have to be truly repulsive physically). But, he is also the mysterious stranger, the romantic leading man that was (likely always has been) so appealing to women everywhere. Let’s face it, midieval love ballads, love poems in many old cultures all suggest that romantic love is not new. It just became more acceptable as the primary reason for partnership in recent western history.

  14. There is a lot of the prince in Darcy alright. Afterall Elizabeth admits only somewhat in jest that she started to like him when she saw Pemberley’s grounds. There is no doubt that Darcy will always do what’s best for those he cares for and that’s appealing no matter the age. He certainly acts the part of the white knight for elizabeth’s family. For a Georgian/ Recency woman, to turn that down is ridiculous (or the man in question would have to be truly repulsive physically). But, he is also the mysterious stranger, the romantic leading man that was (likely always has been) so appealing to women everywhere. Let’s face it, midieval love ballads, love poems in many old cultures all suggest that romantic love is not new. It just became more acceptable as the primary reason for partnership in recent western history.

  15. There is a lot of the prince in Darcy alright. Afterall Elizabeth admits only somewhat in jest that she started to like him when she saw Pemberley’s grounds. There is no doubt that Darcy will always do what’s best for those he cares for and that’s appealing no matter the age. He certainly acts the part of the white knight for elizabeth’s family. For a Georgian/ Recency woman, to turn that down is ridiculous (or the man in question would have to be truly repulsive physically). But, he is also the mysterious stranger, the romantic leading man that was (likely always has been) so appealing to women everywhere. Let’s face it, midieval love ballads, love poems in many old cultures all suggest that romantic love is not new. It just became more acceptable as the primary reason for partnership in recent western history.

  16. Nancy, yes, “seduction” in the publisher’s preamble to the title is an off note. As for fencing, by the Regency it was a quaint form of exercise. Of course P&P was written a little earlier, but still, boxing would be more appropriate. And I’m pretty sure that fencing for duels had completely disappeared by then.
    Jo

  17. Nancy, yes, “seduction” in the publisher’s preamble to the title is an off note. As for fencing, by the Regency it was a quaint form of exercise. Of course P&P was written a little earlier, but still, boxing would be more appropriate. And I’m pretty sure that fencing for duels had completely disappeared by then.
    Jo

  18. Nancy, yes, “seduction” in the publisher’s preamble to the title is an off note. As for fencing, by the Regency it was a quaint form of exercise. Of course P&P was written a little earlier, but still, boxing would be more appropriate. And I’m pretty sure that fencing for duels had completely disappeared by then.
    Jo

  19. Nancy, yes, “seduction” in the publisher’s preamble to the title is an off note. As for fencing, by the Regency it was a quaint form of exercise. Of course P&P was written a little earlier, but still, boxing would be more appropriate. And I’m pretty sure that fencing for duels had completely disappeared by then.
    Jo

  20. Nancy, yes, “seduction” in the publisher’s preamble to the title is an off note. As for fencing, by the Regency it was a quaint form of exercise. Of course P&P was written a little earlier, but still, boxing would be more appropriate. And I’m pretty sure that fencing for duels had completely disappeared by then.
    Jo

  21. Dee, I agree that romance is not new, and excellent point about him being the mysterious stranger. I still don’t think he ever is the Romantic Hero in the books, however. Only on the screen.
    Jo

  22. Dee, I agree that romance is not new, and excellent point about him being the mysterious stranger. I still don’t think he ever is the Romantic Hero in the books, however. Only on the screen.
    Jo

  23. Dee, I agree that romance is not new, and excellent point about him being the mysterious stranger. I still don’t think he ever is the Romantic Hero in the books, however. Only on the screen.
    Jo

  24. Dee, I agree that romance is not new, and excellent point about him being the mysterious stranger. I still don’t think he ever is the Romantic Hero in the books, however. Only on the screen.
    Jo

  25. Dee, I agree that romance is not new, and excellent point about him being the mysterious stranger. I still don’t think he ever is the Romantic Hero in the books, however. Only on the screen.
    Jo

  26. Oops, meant to add: I think Rintoul portrays Darcy the best though I personally find him unattractive with that profile of his during the lengthy letter scene as he walks away- he looks like a monkey… But, I prefer his Darcy to the tortured Firth and the shy Macfadyen. I like all the adaptions though for different elements (why yes, I am in Austen Addicts Anonymous). And, except for the goofy Heathcliff scene and the swan reflecting pool, I liked Macfadyen best but then I am partial to socially awkward geeks. 😉

  27. Oops, meant to add: I think Rintoul portrays Darcy the best though I personally find him unattractive with that profile of his during the lengthy letter scene as he walks away- he looks like a monkey… But, I prefer his Darcy to the tortured Firth and the shy Macfadyen. I like all the adaptions though for different elements (why yes, I am in Austen Addicts Anonymous). And, except for the goofy Heathcliff scene and the swan reflecting pool, I liked Macfadyen best but then I am partial to socially awkward geeks. 😉

  28. Oops, meant to add: I think Rintoul portrays Darcy the best though I personally find him unattractive with that profile of his during the lengthy letter scene as he walks away- he looks like a monkey… But, I prefer his Darcy to the tortured Firth and the shy Macfadyen. I like all the adaptions though for different elements (why yes, I am in Austen Addicts Anonymous). And, except for the goofy Heathcliff scene and the swan reflecting pool, I liked Macfadyen best but then I am partial to socially awkward geeks. 😉

  29. Oops, meant to add: I think Rintoul portrays Darcy the best though I personally find him unattractive with that profile of his during the lengthy letter scene as he walks away- he looks like a monkey… But, I prefer his Darcy to the tortured Firth and the shy Macfadyen. I like all the adaptions though for different elements (why yes, I am in Austen Addicts Anonymous). And, except for the goofy Heathcliff scene and the swan reflecting pool, I liked Macfadyen best but then I am partial to socially awkward geeks. 😉

  30. Oops, meant to add: I think Rintoul portrays Darcy the best though I personally find him unattractive with that profile of his during the lengthy letter scene as he walks away- he looks like a monkey… But, I prefer his Darcy to the tortured Firth and the shy Macfadyen. I like all the adaptions though for different elements (why yes, I am in Austen Addicts Anonymous). And, except for the goofy Heathcliff scene and the swan reflecting pool, I liked Macfadyen best but then I am partial to socially awkward geeks. 😉

  31. I agree Jo, Mr Darcy is the Prince. I have always thought he knows who he is, where he has been and where he is going. The romantic heroe, on the other hand, has to look good to everyone. Whoops, this is a bit convoluted!
    Received your latest book in the mail yesterday from Book Depository. The front cover is beautiful, and the dress is to die for.

  32. I agree Jo, Mr Darcy is the Prince. I have always thought he knows who he is, where he has been and where he is going. The romantic heroe, on the other hand, has to look good to everyone. Whoops, this is a bit convoluted!
    Received your latest book in the mail yesterday from Book Depository. The front cover is beautiful, and the dress is to die for.

  33. I agree Jo, Mr Darcy is the Prince. I have always thought he knows who he is, where he has been and where he is going. The romantic heroe, on the other hand, has to look good to everyone. Whoops, this is a bit convoluted!
    Received your latest book in the mail yesterday from Book Depository. The front cover is beautiful, and the dress is to die for.

  34. I agree Jo, Mr Darcy is the Prince. I have always thought he knows who he is, where he has been and where he is going. The romantic heroe, on the other hand, has to look good to everyone. Whoops, this is a bit convoluted!
    Received your latest book in the mail yesterday from Book Depository. The front cover is beautiful, and the dress is to die for.

  35. I agree Jo, Mr Darcy is the Prince. I have always thought he knows who he is, where he has been and where he is going. The romantic heroe, on the other hand, has to look good to everyone. Whoops, this is a bit convoluted!
    Received your latest book in the mail yesterday from Book Depository. The front cover is beautiful, and the dress is to die for.

  36. To me, Darcy is neither of your alternatives of Prince or Romantic Hero. He’s a real person with faults and foibles as well as strengths of character. He has much more dimension than a mere Prince or Romantic Hero. Much as I love genre romance, I sometimes find its conventions stifling. I read and reread Austen, finding new depth each time.

  37. To me, Darcy is neither of your alternatives of Prince or Romantic Hero. He’s a real person with faults and foibles as well as strengths of character. He has much more dimension than a mere Prince or Romantic Hero. Much as I love genre romance, I sometimes find its conventions stifling. I read and reread Austen, finding new depth each time.

  38. To me, Darcy is neither of your alternatives of Prince or Romantic Hero. He’s a real person with faults and foibles as well as strengths of character. He has much more dimension than a mere Prince or Romantic Hero. Much as I love genre romance, I sometimes find its conventions stifling. I read and reread Austen, finding new depth each time.

  39. To me, Darcy is neither of your alternatives of Prince or Romantic Hero. He’s a real person with faults and foibles as well as strengths of character. He has much more dimension than a mere Prince or Romantic Hero. Much as I love genre romance, I sometimes find its conventions stifling. I read and reread Austen, finding new depth each time.

  40. To me, Darcy is neither of your alternatives of Prince or Romantic Hero. He’s a real person with faults and foibles as well as strengths of character. He has much more dimension than a mere Prince or Romantic Hero. Much as I love genre romance, I sometimes find its conventions stifling. I read and reread Austen, finding new depth each time.

  41. I think films and books are always two seperate beings.Colin Firth as Darcy is the complete romantic hero but when we actually read the book we imagine our own version with probably different mannerisms etc.I admit to being dubious of film versions of books I have read,obviously things have to be left out but why do they always have to put something in?I suppose it comes under the heading artistic license.
    My copy of Seduction in Silk has just arrived from the book depository and I am looking forward to getting my nose into it ! The ironing will just have to wait.

  42. I think films and books are always two seperate beings.Colin Firth as Darcy is the complete romantic hero but when we actually read the book we imagine our own version with probably different mannerisms etc.I admit to being dubious of film versions of books I have read,obviously things have to be left out but why do they always have to put something in?I suppose it comes under the heading artistic license.
    My copy of Seduction in Silk has just arrived from the book depository and I am looking forward to getting my nose into it ! The ironing will just have to wait.

  43. I think films and books are always two seperate beings.Colin Firth as Darcy is the complete romantic hero but when we actually read the book we imagine our own version with probably different mannerisms etc.I admit to being dubious of film versions of books I have read,obviously things have to be left out but why do they always have to put something in?I suppose it comes under the heading artistic license.
    My copy of Seduction in Silk has just arrived from the book depository and I am looking forward to getting my nose into it ! The ironing will just have to wait.

  44. I think films and books are always two seperate beings.Colin Firth as Darcy is the complete romantic hero but when we actually read the book we imagine our own version with probably different mannerisms etc.I admit to being dubious of film versions of books I have read,obviously things have to be left out but why do they always have to put something in?I suppose it comes under the heading artistic license.
    My copy of Seduction in Silk has just arrived from the book depository and I am looking forward to getting my nose into it ! The ironing will just have to wait.

  45. I think films and books are always two seperate beings.Colin Firth as Darcy is the complete romantic hero but when we actually read the book we imagine our own version with probably different mannerisms etc.I admit to being dubious of film versions of books I have read,obviously things have to be left out but why do they always have to put something in?I suppose it comes under the heading artistic license.
    My copy of Seduction in Silk has just arrived from the book depository and I am looking forward to getting my nose into it ! The ironing will just have to wait.

  46. “Prince Darcy would put all the emphasis on his wealth, status, and unreachablity.”
    I’m not quite sure if I understand the difference between Romantic Hero Darcy and Prince Darcy, unless it is the above of the further unattainability of Prince Darcy. But that very unattainability took the intervention of a Fairy Godmother and magic to achieve the match, which P & P lacks. In fact, P & P had an *anti*-Fairy Godmother in the form of Lady Catherine.
    I always read and understood Cinderella to be more about the transformation of the heroine, which I don’t get in P & P. Elizabeth Bennett began the novel as the strong one of the family, and continued throughout to guide and direct her flighty family through their trials.
    As an adult, I see Cinderella as a symbolic story of women finding their own inner Prince Charming, and being the heroines of their own story.

  47. “Prince Darcy would put all the emphasis on his wealth, status, and unreachablity.”
    I’m not quite sure if I understand the difference between Romantic Hero Darcy and Prince Darcy, unless it is the above of the further unattainability of Prince Darcy. But that very unattainability took the intervention of a Fairy Godmother and magic to achieve the match, which P & P lacks. In fact, P & P had an *anti*-Fairy Godmother in the form of Lady Catherine.
    I always read and understood Cinderella to be more about the transformation of the heroine, which I don’t get in P & P. Elizabeth Bennett began the novel as the strong one of the family, and continued throughout to guide and direct her flighty family through their trials.
    As an adult, I see Cinderella as a symbolic story of women finding their own inner Prince Charming, and being the heroines of their own story.

  48. “Prince Darcy would put all the emphasis on his wealth, status, and unreachablity.”
    I’m not quite sure if I understand the difference between Romantic Hero Darcy and Prince Darcy, unless it is the above of the further unattainability of Prince Darcy. But that very unattainability took the intervention of a Fairy Godmother and magic to achieve the match, which P & P lacks. In fact, P & P had an *anti*-Fairy Godmother in the form of Lady Catherine.
    I always read and understood Cinderella to be more about the transformation of the heroine, which I don’t get in P & P. Elizabeth Bennett began the novel as the strong one of the family, and continued throughout to guide and direct her flighty family through their trials.
    As an adult, I see Cinderella as a symbolic story of women finding their own inner Prince Charming, and being the heroines of their own story.

  49. “Prince Darcy would put all the emphasis on his wealth, status, and unreachablity.”
    I’m not quite sure if I understand the difference between Romantic Hero Darcy and Prince Darcy, unless it is the above of the further unattainability of Prince Darcy. But that very unattainability took the intervention of a Fairy Godmother and magic to achieve the match, which P & P lacks. In fact, P & P had an *anti*-Fairy Godmother in the form of Lady Catherine.
    I always read and understood Cinderella to be more about the transformation of the heroine, which I don’t get in P & P. Elizabeth Bennett began the novel as the strong one of the family, and continued throughout to guide and direct her flighty family through their trials.
    As an adult, I see Cinderella as a symbolic story of women finding their own inner Prince Charming, and being the heroines of their own story.

  50. “Prince Darcy would put all the emphasis on his wealth, status, and unreachablity.”
    I’m not quite sure if I understand the difference between Romantic Hero Darcy and Prince Darcy, unless it is the above of the further unattainability of Prince Darcy. But that very unattainability took the intervention of a Fairy Godmother and magic to achieve the match, which P & P lacks. In fact, P & P had an *anti*-Fairy Godmother in the form of Lady Catherine.
    I always read and understood Cinderella to be more about the transformation of the heroine, which I don’t get in P & P. Elizabeth Bennett began the novel as the strong one of the family, and continued throughout to guide and direct her flighty family through their trials.
    As an adult, I see Cinderella as a symbolic story of women finding their own inner Prince Charming, and being the heroines of their own story.

  51. I agree that Darcy is the Prince at the beginning of the book, but for me he turns into the Romantic Hero when Lizzie doesn’t fall into his princely arms, and he actually has to make some effort to please her. Nothing like a bit of grovelling, is there?
    And I love Rintoul too, and the cartoons at the beginning of each episode, and Mr Collins. Actually I love all of that version.

  52. I agree that Darcy is the Prince at the beginning of the book, but for me he turns into the Romantic Hero when Lizzie doesn’t fall into his princely arms, and he actually has to make some effort to please her. Nothing like a bit of grovelling, is there?
    And I love Rintoul too, and the cartoons at the beginning of each episode, and Mr Collins. Actually I love all of that version.

  53. I agree that Darcy is the Prince at the beginning of the book, but for me he turns into the Romantic Hero when Lizzie doesn’t fall into his princely arms, and he actually has to make some effort to please her. Nothing like a bit of grovelling, is there?
    And I love Rintoul too, and the cartoons at the beginning of each episode, and Mr Collins. Actually I love all of that version.

  54. I agree that Darcy is the Prince at the beginning of the book, but for me he turns into the Romantic Hero when Lizzie doesn’t fall into his princely arms, and he actually has to make some effort to please her. Nothing like a bit of grovelling, is there?
    And I love Rintoul too, and the cartoons at the beginning of each episode, and Mr Collins. Actually I love all of that version.

  55. I agree that Darcy is the Prince at the beginning of the book, but for me he turns into the Romantic Hero when Lizzie doesn’t fall into his princely arms, and he actually has to make some effort to please her. Nothing like a bit of grovelling, is there?
    And I love Rintoul too, and the cartoons at the beginning of each episode, and Mr Collins. Actually I love all of that version.

  56. Oh I so wanted to read Mr. Darcy’s Guide to Courtship when I saw it a few months back! They wouldn’t let me review it but now I should get my hands on it!

  57. Oh I so wanted to read Mr. Darcy’s Guide to Courtship when I saw it a few months back! They wouldn’t let me review it but now I should get my hands on it!

  58. Oh I so wanted to read Mr. Darcy’s Guide to Courtship when I saw it a few months back! They wouldn’t let me review it but now I should get my hands on it!

  59. Oh I so wanted to read Mr. Darcy’s Guide to Courtship when I saw it a few months back! They wouldn’t let me review it but now I should get my hands on it!

  60. Oh I so wanted to read Mr. Darcy’s Guide to Courtship when I saw it a few months back! They wouldn’t let me review it but now I should get my hands on it!

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