More on covers

This might be interesting to some of you. As soon as Loretta mentioned the black wellies, I guessed.

When they do photo shoots for cover art, they often use the same shoot for many covers. Heck, they sometimes slip up and use the identical picture, but not too often.

In a comment under “Worst Covers” Loretta mentioned her novel, The Lion’s Daughetr. (Ecxellent book, of course.) The cover’s over on the right under reissues, but I’m adding it here, too, for easy comparison.

Lionsdaugh

Now, consider the step back of my novel, Skylark.

Sksb300

This is a view before they put the quote box on and switched the flowers for a letter, which was a minor improvement, but not much consolation. My NAL covers have mostly been very good, but this one was just straight out weird, especially as this is Sir Stephen Ball, my intellectual Rogue, a lawyer and Member of Parliament. Standing on a heathy headland flashing his unlikely pecs at the world? I don’t think so!.
Askman

Apart from resemblance and plausibility problems, and the pecs that look as if they might give birth to aliens, in how many ways is this guy dressed wrongly for the Regency? Find the (deliberate) mistakes.

Jo 🙂

27 thoughts on “More on covers”

  1. wow! I’ve been reading the threads on book covers. Never knew so much did (and didn’t) go into them.
    Here’s a book cover from a readers perspective…
    Once upon a time an HR Analyst found herself on a business trip. Lonely was she. The trip had been extended, her chocolate had run out and the book she brought was finished. Hungry for companionship, she paid a visit to an unnamed drug store. Chocolate was on her list. A book? A book was not. “No,” she thought, “there are no books here. Not good ones. Not for one as sophisticated as me.” She wandered the aisles, finding what she sought, a one pound Mr. Good Bar. Ahhh… heaven. But not quite. A book. She needed a book. But that was surely out of reach. Borders, Barnes and Nobel, her favorite racks of books were far, far away. She turned the corner, cash at the ready, and there it was. A castle nestled up against the sky. It was beautiful. The long windy road inviting her in. Mary Jo Putney, it said. A Kiss of Fate. She reached for it then paused. Such books were for the lonely. The desperate. But it beckoned in silent promise. What would her sophisticates say if they knew? But she was alone. How would they know? A quick peek around the endcap confirmed no one was around. At least no one she knew. Not that there would be. She was far from home. The book magically found her hands and she turned it over. “Not to be missed,” it said. She gazed at the castled again. It was beautiful. Serene. If her luggage was searched, she wouldn’t blush when the handlers found it. Tucked secretively under the barred peanuts and chocolate, she handed it to the cashier, who didn’t lift an eye. Still, she would not take it home. Leave it at the hotel, was her plan.
    Hours passed. The food laden room service tray was cold. All had fallen silent. The world was in slumber. Yet her light still burned, the pages magically turning as she lived in the castle in the sky.
    Lest ye doubt… this is a true story.
    Nina

    Reply
  2. wow! I’ve been reading the threads on book covers. Never knew so much did (and didn’t) go into them.
    Here’s a book cover from a readers perspective…
    Once upon a time an HR Analyst found herself on a business trip. Lonely was she. The trip had been extended, her chocolate had run out and the book she brought was finished. Hungry for companionship, she paid a visit to an unnamed drug store. Chocolate was on her list. A book? A book was not. “No,” she thought, “there are no books here. Not good ones. Not for one as sophisticated as me.” She wandered the aisles, finding what she sought, a one pound Mr. Good Bar. Ahhh… heaven. But not quite. A book. She needed a book. But that was surely out of reach. Borders, Barnes and Nobel, her favorite racks of books were far, far away. She turned the corner, cash at the ready, and there it was. A castle nestled up against the sky. It was beautiful. The long windy road inviting her in. Mary Jo Putney, it said. A Kiss of Fate. She reached for it then paused. Such books were for the lonely. The desperate. But it beckoned in silent promise. What would her sophisticates say if they knew? But she was alone. How would they know? A quick peek around the endcap confirmed no one was around. At least no one she knew. Not that there would be. She was far from home. The book magically found her hands and she turned it over. “Not to be missed,” it said. She gazed at the castled again. It was beautiful. Serene. If her luggage was searched, she wouldn’t blush when the handlers found it. Tucked secretively under the barred peanuts and chocolate, she handed it to the cashier, who didn’t lift an eye. Still, she would not take it home. Leave it at the hotel, was her plan.
    Hours passed. The food laden room service tray was cold. All had fallen silent. The world was in slumber. Yet her light still burned, the pages magically turning as she lived in the castle in the sky.
    Lest ye doubt… this is a true story.
    Nina

    Reply
  3. wow! I’ve been reading the threads on book covers. Never knew so much did (and didn’t) go into them.
    Here’s a book cover from a readers perspective…
    Once upon a time an HR Analyst found herself on a business trip. Lonely was she. The trip had been extended, her chocolate had run out and the book she brought was finished. Hungry for companionship, she paid a visit to an unnamed drug store. Chocolate was on her list. A book? A book was not. “No,” she thought, “there are no books here. Not good ones. Not for one as sophisticated as me.” She wandered the aisles, finding what she sought, a one pound Mr. Good Bar. Ahhh… heaven. But not quite. A book. She needed a book. But that was surely out of reach. Borders, Barnes and Nobel, her favorite racks of books were far, far away. She turned the corner, cash at the ready, and there it was. A castle nestled up against the sky. It was beautiful. The long windy road inviting her in. Mary Jo Putney, it said. A Kiss of Fate. She reached for it then paused. Such books were for the lonely. The desperate. But it beckoned in silent promise. What would her sophisticates say if they knew? But she was alone. How would they know? A quick peek around the endcap confirmed no one was around. At least no one she knew. Not that there would be. She was far from home. The book magically found her hands and she turned it over. “Not to be missed,” it said. She gazed at the castled again. It was beautiful. Serene. If her luggage was searched, she wouldn’t blush when the handlers found it. Tucked secretively under the barred peanuts and chocolate, she handed it to the cashier, who didn’t lift an eye. Still, she would not take it home. Leave it at the hotel, was her plan.
    Hours passed. The food laden room service tray was cold. All had fallen silent. The world was in slumber. Yet her light still burned, the pages magically turning as she lived in the castle in the sky.
    Lest ye doubt… this is a true story.
    Nina

    Reply
  4. Hmm, wouldn’t the belt have been different? And the sleeves look like they may be gathered with elastic. But I can’t spot any glaringly obvious irregularities. Although, something doesn’t seem right with the front of the pants. Wouldn’t there have been buttons or some sort of flap closure?
    Showing my ignorance here.

    Reply
  5. Hmm, wouldn’t the belt have been different? And the sleeves look like they may be gathered with elastic. But I can’t spot any glaringly obvious irregularities. Although, something doesn’t seem right with the front of the pants. Wouldn’t there have been buttons or some sort of flap closure?
    Showing my ignorance here.

    Reply
  6. Hmm, wouldn’t the belt have been different? And the sleeves look like they may be gathered with elastic. But I can’t spot any glaringly obvious irregularities. Although, something doesn’t seem right with the front of the pants. Wouldn’t there have been buttons or some sort of flap closure?
    Showing my ignorance here.

    Reply
  7. Off the top of my head…
    1. Shouldn’t he be wearing suspenders instead of a belt?
    2. The shirt shouldn’t unbutton all the way like that, I’m almost sure–those shirts were pullovers with a few buttons at the neck opening, right?
    Of course, there’s the whole issue of him standing about in the open in a state of undress, but at least he’s not entirely shirtless with a cloak billowing out behind him…

    Reply
  8. Off the top of my head…
    1. Shouldn’t he be wearing suspenders instead of a belt?
    2. The shirt shouldn’t unbutton all the way like that, I’m almost sure–those shirts were pullovers with a few buttons at the neck opening, right?
    Of course, there’s the whole issue of him standing about in the open in a state of undress, but at least he’s not entirely shirtless with a cloak billowing out behind him…

    Reply
  9. Off the top of my head…
    1. Shouldn’t he be wearing suspenders instead of a belt?
    2. The shirt shouldn’t unbutton all the way like that, I’m almost sure–those shirts were pullovers with a few buttons at the neck opening, right?
    Of course, there’s the whole issue of him standing about in the open in a state of undress, but at least he’s not entirely shirtless with a cloak billowing out behind him…

    Reply
  10. I know, it’s a male bodice ripper! The heroine has already come along and ripped his shirt down the front, stripped off his coat, and his waistcoat, but she couldn’t figure out where the trouser buttons went.
    And Nina P, I hope you’re flashing that fantastic book proudly everywhere you go these days! People need to be educated on how well written these books are, and how much fun!
    Pat

    Reply
  11. I know, it’s a male bodice ripper! The heroine has already come along and ripped his shirt down the front, stripped off his coat, and his waistcoat, but she couldn’t figure out where the trouser buttons went.
    And Nina P, I hope you’re flashing that fantastic book proudly everywhere you go these days! People need to be educated on how well written these books are, and how much fun!
    Pat

    Reply
  12. I know, it’s a male bodice ripper! The heroine has already come along and ripped his shirt down the front, stripped off his coat, and his waistcoat, but she couldn’t figure out where the trouser buttons went.
    And Nina P, I hope you’re flashing that fantastic book proudly everywhere you go these days! People need to be educated on how well written these books are, and how much fun!
    Pat

    Reply
  13. Male boddice ripper. That explains these shirts!
    Yes, the cuffs do look elasticated, don’t they.
    The belt is wrong, and the boots, and as pointed out, they didn’t have a fly back then — if there is a fly in those pants — but a flap fastened with buttons at either side. The breeches and trousers also had a nifty adjustable gather at the back. Sort of like elasticated pants today. Great for after one of those long banquets with multiple bottles of booze, I’d think.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  14. Male boddice ripper. That explains these shirts!
    Yes, the cuffs do look elasticated, don’t they.
    The belt is wrong, and the boots, and as pointed out, they didn’t have a fly back then — if there is a fly in those pants — but a flap fastened with buttons at either side. The breeches and trousers also had a nifty adjustable gather at the back. Sort of like elasticated pants today. Great for after one of those long banquets with multiple bottles of booze, I’d think.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  15. Male boddice ripper. That explains these shirts!
    Yes, the cuffs do look elasticated, don’t they.
    The belt is wrong, and the boots, and as pointed out, they didn’t have a fly back then — if there is a fly in those pants — but a flap fastened with buttons at either side. The breeches and trousers also had a nifty adjustable gather at the back. Sort of like elasticated pants today. Great for after one of those long banquets with multiple bottles of booze, I’d think.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  16. Pat: You know it! I tell everyone about WW and all of you.
    Sequel to “The Castle in the Sky”
    The book never found a room at the hotel, as the woman had planed, for she took it with her, tucked proudly under her arm. It use to sit on her shelf, displayed next to its mate, Stolen Magic. But alas, it is gone, her castle in the sky. Off to play host to anther reader who swore that Romance reads had no place in this world. Her mind too was changed, changed in the castle in the sky.
    Keep writing Word Wenches. The world needs more of what you have.

    Reply
  17. Pat: You know it! I tell everyone about WW and all of you.
    Sequel to “The Castle in the Sky”
    The book never found a room at the hotel, as the woman had planed, for she took it with her, tucked proudly under her arm. It use to sit on her shelf, displayed next to its mate, Stolen Magic. But alas, it is gone, her castle in the sky. Off to play host to anther reader who swore that Romance reads had no place in this world. Her mind too was changed, changed in the castle in the sky.
    Keep writing Word Wenches. The world needs more of what you have.

    Reply
  18. Pat: You know it! I tell everyone about WW and all of you.
    Sequel to “The Castle in the Sky”
    The book never found a room at the hotel, as the woman had planed, for she took it with her, tucked proudly under her arm. It use to sit on her shelf, displayed next to its mate, Stolen Magic. But alas, it is gone, her castle in the sky. Off to play host to anther reader who swore that Romance reads had no place in this world. Her mind too was changed, changed in the castle in the sky.
    Keep writing Word Wenches. The world needs more of what you have.

    Reply

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