More on Corsets

From Loretta:

I thought this late comment from Ingrid was so interesting that it needed to be brought up front for your perusal:

Ballerina "I’ve only just discovered this blog and was reading back. I can’t
resist making a very late comment, even though no one will read it.
I just wanted to say that it’s perfectly possible to raise your arms
above your head without lifting your shoulders, you just can’t have
your arms skimming your ears. The method is taught all over the world in ballet classes. Just look at a photograph of a ballet dancer (male or female) with one or two arms above his or her head, the shoulders
are never raised. Ballet teachers also like to explain posture by telling pupils to imagine themselves wearing a corset. One aspect of this is bringing your breastbone forward and up, and your shoulder blades together, which is exactly what the 18th-century corset does."

As soon as I have another six or ten cups of coffee, we will return to our regularly scheduled programming.

3 thoughts on “More on Corsets”

  1. This is fascinating!! And of course now I’m sitting here at the computer, trying to do it with my very un-balletic arms….
    I think part of the challenge with arm-lifting in 18th century clothes lies not so much in the corset as with how closely the sleeves are set into the bodice. There is very little extra fabric or “give” (let alone lycra!), and the sleeves themselves were designed to encourage a certain posture and presentation. There were even little horizontal tucks in the crook of the elbow to encourage a woman to stand with her arms slightly, gracefully bent and not dangling downward.
    But thanks to Ingrid, I’m now trying to imagine the lifted arm and the lowered shoulder. 🙂
    Susan/Miranda, whose mind wandered off like this even without six cups of coffee…

    Reply
  2. This is fascinating!! And of course now I’m sitting here at the computer, trying to do it with my very un-balletic arms….
    I think part of the challenge with arm-lifting in 18th century clothes lies not so much in the corset as with how closely the sleeves are set into the bodice. There is very little extra fabric or “give” (let alone lycra!), and the sleeves themselves were designed to encourage a certain posture and presentation. There were even little horizontal tucks in the crook of the elbow to encourage a woman to stand with her arms slightly, gracefully bent and not dangling downward.
    But thanks to Ingrid, I’m now trying to imagine the lifted arm and the lowered shoulder. 🙂
    Susan/Miranda, whose mind wandered off like this even without six cups of coffee…

    Reply
  3. This is fascinating!! And of course now I’m sitting here at the computer, trying to do it with my very un-balletic arms….
    I think part of the challenge with arm-lifting in 18th century clothes lies not so much in the corset as with how closely the sleeves are set into the bodice. There is very little extra fabric or “give” (let alone lycra!), and the sleeves themselves were designed to encourage a certain posture and presentation. There were even little horizontal tucks in the crook of the elbow to encourage a woman to stand with her arms slightly, gracefully bent and not dangling downward.
    But thanks to Ingrid, I’m now trying to imagine the lifted arm and the lowered shoulder. 🙂
    Susan/Miranda, whose mind wandered off like this even without six cups of coffee…

    Reply

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