MJP Interview—Once a Rebel

Anne here, and today I'm interviewing Mary Jo Putney about her new book, Once a Rebel which I was lucky enough to read in advance (one of the perks of being a word wench.) The second in Mary Jo's "Rogues Redeemed" series, Once a Rebel will be released on August 29.  OnceARebelMM

Publishers Weekly called it: “A page-turner tale…As these two appealing characters discover how friendship can change into romance, Putney completes their story with plenty of detail and cameos from historical figures.

Kirkus said: Putney’s continued foray into the new setting of the United States in the early 19th century is a welcome addition to the historical romance shelf. . .  Though suspense and adventure drive this story forward, the love at its center sets it apart.

Anne: Mary Jo, in Once a Rebel your hero, Richard (aka Lord George Gordon Audley) appeared briefly in Once a Soldier and was the most difficult student to ever attend the Westerfield Academy (for boys of good birth and bad behavior.) Tell us about him.

OnceASoldier Final - smallerMJP:
Anne, Gordon had actually appeared in three of my Lost Lords books: Not Quite a Wife and Not Always a Saint as well as Once a SoldierHe has a tough and dangerous vibe and his former classmates regarded him warily, but he's very good at coming through in a pinch.

So how did he become the man he is?  I often say rather random things about minor characters, and when they turn into promising hero material, I have to weave those threads into the fellow's life.  For example, Gordon was described to his old classmates as "someone you'll recognize, though you knew him under a different name."  He's also known as "Lady Agnes Westerfield's one failure."  Clearly he has a checkered past! 

Naturally I gave him a fairly dreadful childhood.  My characters often have that because it gives me something to work with.  Hence Lord George Gordon Richard Augustus Audley was the third and most worthless son of a marquess.  Despised by his father and harassed by his older brothers, he is one angry and rebellious young man.

Luckily his closest childhood friend is his neighbor, Callista Brooke.  She also had a difficult childhood, but their friendship and mutual trust kept them sane. Then they were brutally separated–and Gordon started a difficult and dangerous journey that ultimately brought him around the world and back to the one woman who owns his heart. 

Anne: The heroine of the book was his childhood best friend, Callie, who was lost to him after a disastrous youthful attempt to save her from a forced marriage. When they meet again, it's quite the dramatic—and romantic—reunion. Tell us about Callie.

MJP: Like Gordon, Callie chafed against the restrictions of a bullying father, who leaped at the chance to marry her off to an older Jamaican planter.  Alone in an alien land, over the years she creates a family for herself.  She's used to carrying responsibility–perhaps too much so.  But she's brave and beautiful and with her, Gordon starts to become the kind, amusing man he was meant to be.

Battle of North PointAnne: Once a Rebel includes several incidents from the War of 1812; the burning of Washington, the Battle of Baltimore, the shooting of the British General Ross and the creation of The Star Spangled Banner among others. Writing a book set in your home town and weaving a love story through some very real historical events — what were some of the difficulties of that?

15 star flagMJP: One of the challenges is that there's so much great research material available!  Since much of this story took place on my doorstep, I figured I'd really better get it right. <G>  I wanted to include the two big events of the 1814 campaign in the Chesapeake: the burning of Washington and the Battle of Baltimore, which includes the bombardment of Fort McHenry, which stopped the relentless advance of the British military machine. 

The war had been a mess, with huge mistakes made by both sides, especially the Americans.   Successfully standing up to the Royal Navy, the most powerful naval force in the world, changed everything and led to a peace treaty that essentially ended the war as a stalemate, and helped cement an American national identity.  (A Canadian one, too.)    It was complicated to sort through the historical possibilities and weave them around my characters and their developing relationship. Ft McHenry_bombardement_1814

Anne: In Once a Rebel you also explore the challenge of divided loyalties; some characters are torn between American and British identities, others dealing with split families, adoption and the race/slavery issue. 

MJP: Gordon and Callie are British born and bred, but both also have strong connections with the fledgling United States and they don't want the country to lose and perhaps be carved up by Britain.  Abolition and was a hot topic then, too.  Britain had banned the slave trade in 1807, but actually making slavery illegal was many years in the future.  I'm a firm believer that real history lends richness and power to fiction, but it needs to be done through the characters. And since this is romance, I want my story to be overall positive and have a happy ending.  Gordon and Callie get that, but it's a lot of hard work!

Anne: Would you care to share a little of Once a Rebel with us?

MJP: Gordon and Callie have just escaped a dangerous situation and they're trying to get some (platonic) rest before facing what comes next:

            "If you decide to marry and settle down, your wit, handsome face, title, and a moderate fortune will make it easy to find a wife who can be both friend and lover."

            "Finding a good mate is the most difficult thing on earth, I suspect," he said pensively.  "My title isn't much use since it's merely courtesy.  You didn't seem to be very impressed by becoming Lady George Audley."

            She chuckled.  "I was too surprised to be impressed.  Besides, I don't like the name Lady George any more than I liked you being Lord George."

            "With luck, you won't have to pretend to be Lady George again." He took her hand casually, his fingers lacing through hers.  "We should be able to get another hour or two of rest before facing the new day, which is apt to be a busy one."

            She covered a yawn.  "That's a good plan.  Sleep well, Richard.  And dream of a suitable wife who is a friend, along with a happy, uneventful life."

            As she drifted off, she heard him murmur, "I don't know if that's possible, Catkin.  Because the only woman I've ever come close to marrying is you."

More at:   http://maryjoputney.com/books/once-a-rebel/

And here's a universal link for Once A Rebel that connects with all the various e-book platforms.

Anne: What's next for you, Mary Jo? What book are you working on now?

MJP: The Rogues Redeemed series is a spin off of my Lost Lords, and the set-up and the beginning of Book 1, Once a Soldier, had five British men locked in a cellar in Portugal in the middle of a French invasion and sentenced to face a firing squad in the morning.  In the course of long night where they work together to escape, they bond and decide to keep in touch.  The heroes of these first two books appeared in the Lost Lords series, but Hawkins, the hero of the next book, Once a Scoundrel, was new and something of a mystery.  In Once a Rebel, we find that Hawkins is a sea captain. Things happen. <G> 

Anne: Sounds like fun. Thanks for answering my questions, Mary Jo. And for the advance read of Once A Rebel.

MJP: Thanks for interviewing me, Anne!  I'll be giving away a copy of Once a Rebel to one commenter between now and Tuesday midnight.

 

285 thoughts on “MJP Interview—Once a Rebel”

  1. Sounds intriguing.
    Silly to say, perhaps, but reading classic regencies, it can be so easy to forget what was going on on the U.S.side of the world.

    Reply
  2. Sounds intriguing.
    Silly to say, perhaps, but reading classic regencies, it can be so easy to forget what was going on on the U.S.side of the world.

    Reply
  3. Sounds intriguing.
    Silly to say, perhaps, but reading classic regencies, it can be so easy to forget what was going on on the U.S.side of the world.

    Reply
  4. Sounds intriguing.
    Silly to say, perhaps, but reading classic regencies, it can be so easy to forget what was going on on the U.S.side of the world.

    Reply
  5. Sounds intriguing.
    Silly to say, perhaps, but reading classic regencies, it can be so easy to forget what was going on on the U.S.side of the world.

    Reply
  6. I’m so excited for this book! I’ve been waiting for it ever since I binge-read the Lost Lords series and Once a Soldier. Add in the fact that it’s set in the US at a fascinating time in history – it’s sure to be a winner.

    Reply
  7. I’m so excited for this book! I’ve been waiting for it ever since I binge-read the Lost Lords series and Once a Soldier. Add in the fact that it’s set in the US at a fascinating time in history – it’s sure to be a winner.

    Reply
  8. I’m so excited for this book! I’ve been waiting for it ever since I binge-read the Lost Lords series and Once a Soldier. Add in the fact that it’s set in the US at a fascinating time in history – it’s sure to be a winner.

    Reply
  9. I’m so excited for this book! I’ve been waiting for it ever since I binge-read the Lost Lords series and Once a Soldier. Add in the fact that it’s set in the US at a fascinating time in history – it’s sure to be a winner.

    Reply
  10. I’m so excited for this book! I’ve been waiting for it ever since I binge-read the Lost Lords series and Once a Soldier. Add in the fact that it’s set in the US at a fascinating time in history – it’s sure to be a winner.

    Reply
  11. Congratulations on another winner, Mary Jo!
    I definitely agree that the history must come through the characters. In one of my stories, I used a real event (the Fenian invasion of Canada), and had my hero wash up on a Canadian island with strong ties to Britain. Since he had amnesia, I had him find out about the invasion before he remembered his own part in it. It was great fun, especially when weaving both Irish and Canadian history!
    Looking forward to reading this one!

    Reply
  12. Congratulations on another winner, Mary Jo!
    I definitely agree that the history must come through the characters. In one of my stories, I used a real event (the Fenian invasion of Canada), and had my hero wash up on a Canadian island with strong ties to Britain. Since he had amnesia, I had him find out about the invasion before he remembered his own part in it. It was great fun, especially when weaving both Irish and Canadian history!
    Looking forward to reading this one!

    Reply
  13. Congratulations on another winner, Mary Jo!
    I definitely agree that the history must come through the characters. In one of my stories, I used a real event (the Fenian invasion of Canada), and had my hero wash up on a Canadian island with strong ties to Britain. Since he had amnesia, I had him find out about the invasion before he remembered his own part in it. It was great fun, especially when weaving both Irish and Canadian history!
    Looking forward to reading this one!

    Reply
  14. Congratulations on another winner, Mary Jo!
    I definitely agree that the history must come through the characters. In one of my stories, I used a real event (the Fenian invasion of Canada), and had my hero wash up on a Canadian island with strong ties to Britain. Since he had amnesia, I had him find out about the invasion before he remembered his own part in it. It was great fun, especially when weaving both Irish and Canadian history!
    Looking forward to reading this one!

    Reply
  15. Congratulations on another winner, Mary Jo!
    I definitely agree that the history must come through the characters. In one of my stories, I used a real event (the Fenian invasion of Canada), and had my hero wash up on a Canadian island with strong ties to Britain. Since he had amnesia, I had him find out about the invasion before he remembered his own part in it. It was great fun, especially when weaving both Irish and Canadian history!
    Looking forward to reading this one!

    Reply
  16. Amy J, it was a big, complicated world there! Less than 5 miles from me is a gorgeous Regency mansion called the Hampton House, https://www.nps.gov/hamp/index.htm, which could have been inhabited by characters from an English Regency story. (Except for the slave quarters. To its credit, the Park Service doesn’t try to whitewash that part of the place’s history.)

    Reply
  17. Amy J, it was a big, complicated world there! Less than 5 miles from me is a gorgeous Regency mansion called the Hampton House, https://www.nps.gov/hamp/index.htm, which could have been inhabited by characters from an English Regency story. (Except for the slave quarters. To its credit, the Park Service doesn’t try to whitewash that part of the place’s history.)

    Reply
  18. Amy J, it was a big, complicated world there! Less than 5 miles from me is a gorgeous Regency mansion called the Hampton House, https://www.nps.gov/hamp/index.htm, which could have been inhabited by characters from an English Regency story. (Except for the slave quarters. To its credit, the Park Service doesn’t try to whitewash that part of the place’s history.)

    Reply
  19. Amy J, it was a big, complicated world there! Less than 5 miles from me is a gorgeous Regency mansion called the Hampton House, https://www.nps.gov/hamp/index.htm, which could have been inhabited by characters from an English Regency story. (Except for the slave quarters. To its credit, the Park Service doesn’t try to whitewash that part of the place’s history.)

    Reply
  20. Amy J, it was a big, complicated world there! Less than 5 miles from me is a gorgeous Regency mansion called the Hampton House, https://www.nps.gov/hamp/index.htm, which could have been inhabited by characters from an English Regency story. (Except for the slave quarters. To its credit, the Park Service doesn’t try to whitewash that part of the place’s history.)

    Reply
  21. I have been waiting for this since we first met Gordon in the two lost lords stories. Can’t wait until tomorrow! (Well, of course I CAN, but the two-year-old me with the harmonica that you see as me on Facebook, certainly doesn’t WANT to wait!)

    Reply
  22. I have been waiting for this since we first met Gordon in the two lost lords stories. Can’t wait until tomorrow! (Well, of course I CAN, but the two-year-old me with the harmonica that you see as me on Facebook, certainly doesn’t WANT to wait!)

    Reply
  23. I have been waiting for this since we first met Gordon in the two lost lords stories. Can’t wait until tomorrow! (Well, of course I CAN, but the two-year-old me with the harmonica that you see as me on Facebook, certainly doesn’t WANT to wait!)

    Reply
  24. I have been waiting for this since we first met Gordon in the two lost lords stories. Can’t wait until tomorrow! (Well, of course I CAN, but the two-year-old me with the harmonica that you see as me on Facebook, certainly doesn’t WANT to wait!)

    Reply
  25. I have been waiting for this since we first met Gordon in the two lost lords stories. Can’t wait until tomorrow! (Well, of course I CAN, but the two-year-old me with the harmonica that you see as me on Facebook, certainly doesn’t WANT to wait!)

    Reply
  26. Friends to lovers is one of my favorite plot lines. I’ve been waiting for this one. Good luck with everything. Love your writing.

    Reply
  27. Friends to lovers is one of my favorite plot lines. I’ve been waiting for this one. Good luck with everything. Love your writing.

    Reply
  28. Friends to lovers is one of my favorite plot lines. I’ve been waiting for this one. Good luck with everything. Love your writing.

    Reply
  29. Friends to lovers is one of my favorite plot lines. I’ve been waiting for this one. Good luck with everything. Love your writing.

    Reply
  30. Friends to lovers is one of my favorite plot lines. I’ve been waiting for this one. Good luck with everything. Love your writing.

    Reply
  31. Whoops! Looks like I can’t post until tomorrow…which is wierd, since you already have some reviews. But it’s written, and ready to go, and I’ll put it up on Goodreads at least (if I can).
    Cheers, Faith

    Reply
  32. Whoops! Looks like I can’t post until tomorrow…which is wierd, since you already have some reviews. But it’s written, and ready to go, and I’ll put it up on Goodreads at least (if I can).
    Cheers, Faith

    Reply
  33. Whoops! Looks like I can’t post until tomorrow…which is wierd, since you already have some reviews. But it’s written, and ready to go, and I’ll put it up on Goodreads at least (if I can).
    Cheers, Faith

    Reply
  34. Whoops! Looks like I can’t post until tomorrow…which is wierd, since you already have some reviews. But it’s written, and ready to go, and I’ll put it up on Goodreads at least (if I can).
    Cheers, Faith

    Reply
  35. Whoops! Looks like I can’t post until tomorrow…which is wierd, since you already have some reviews. But it’s written, and ready to go, and I’ll put it up on Goodreads at least (if I can).
    Cheers, Faith

    Reply
  36. I’m yet another who is eager to read your latest book, MaryJo — thanks for sharing all of these tidbits. And best wishes with the writing of Once a Scoundrel; I’ve been enjoying reading what’s become of all those cellar dwellers.

    Reply
  37. I’m yet another who is eager to read your latest book, MaryJo — thanks for sharing all of these tidbits. And best wishes with the writing of Once a Scoundrel; I’ve been enjoying reading what’s become of all those cellar dwellers.

    Reply
  38. I’m yet another who is eager to read your latest book, MaryJo — thanks for sharing all of these tidbits. And best wishes with the writing of Once a Scoundrel; I’ve been enjoying reading what’s become of all those cellar dwellers.

    Reply
  39. I’m yet another who is eager to read your latest book, MaryJo — thanks for sharing all of these tidbits. And best wishes with the writing of Once a Scoundrel; I’ve been enjoying reading what’s become of all those cellar dwellers.

    Reply
  40. I’m yet another who is eager to read your latest book, MaryJo — thanks for sharing all of these tidbits. And best wishes with the writing of Once a Scoundrel; I’ve been enjoying reading what’s become of all those cellar dwellers.

    Reply
  41. Fascinating interview. I love knowing some of the extras that go into a book. It is always fun to recognize a character seen in other books by the same author.
    Thanks for this chance to win.

    Reply
  42. Fascinating interview. I love knowing some of the extras that go into a book. It is always fun to recognize a character seen in other books by the same author.
    Thanks for this chance to win.

    Reply
  43. Fascinating interview. I love knowing some of the extras that go into a book. It is always fun to recognize a character seen in other books by the same author.
    Thanks for this chance to win.

    Reply
  44. Fascinating interview. I love knowing some of the extras that go into a book. It is always fun to recognize a character seen in other books by the same author.
    Thanks for this chance to win.

    Reply
  45. Fascinating interview. I love knowing some of the extras that go into a book. It is always fun to recognize a character seen in other books by the same author.
    Thanks for this chance to win.

    Reply
  46. I loved the Lost Lords and now loving the Rogues Redeemed. I love the cellar/met in the war and what happened to them and how they help each other. Can’t get enough of the Westerfield Academy friendships.

    Reply
  47. I loved the Lost Lords and now loving the Rogues Redeemed. I love the cellar/met in the war and what happened to them and how they help each other. Can’t get enough of the Westerfield Academy friendships.

    Reply
  48. I loved the Lost Lords and now loving the Rogues Redeemed. I love the cellar/met in the war and what happened to them and how they help each other. Can’t get enough of the Westerfield Academy friendships.

    Reply
  49. I loved the Lost Lords and now loving the Rogues Redeemed. I love the cellar/met in the war and what happened to them and how they help each other. Can’t get enough of the Westerfield Academy friendships.

    Reply
  50. I loved the Lost Lords and now loving the Rogues Redeemed. I love the cellar/met in the war and what happened to them and how they help each other. Can’t get enough of the Westerfield Academy friendships.

    Reply
  51. I have loved all of the Mary Jo Putney books – especially the Lost Lords. Looking forward to reading all of the Redeemed Rogues.

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  52. I have loved all of the Mary Jo Putney books – especially the Lost Lords. Looking forward to reading all of the Redeemed Rogues.

    Reply
  53. I have loved all of the Mary Jo Putney books – especially the Lost Lords. Looking forward to reading all of the Redeemed Rogues.

    Reply
  54. I have loved all of the Mary Jo Putney books – especially the Lost Lords. Looking forward to reading all of the Redeemed Rogues.

    Reply
  55. I have loved all of the Mary Jo Putney books – especially the Lost Lords. Looking forward to reading all of the Redeemed Rogues.

    Reply
  56. As always, am impatiently waiting for your next. And your next! Lol. I love both your rogues and the strong women they bond with. But what I’ve always loved most is your history and wonderful attention to the surrounding details. I immerse myself in your worlds, and wind up flying through them! Can’t wait to see what Once A Rebel brings! Hugs!

    Reply
  57. As always, am impatiently waiting for your next. And your next! Lol. I love both your rogues and the strong women they bond with. But what I’ve always loved most is your history and wonderful attention to the surrounding details. I immerse myself in your worlds, and wind up flying through them! Can’t wait to see what Once A Rebel brings! Hugs!

    Reply
  58. As always, am impatiently waiting for your next. And your next! Lol. I love both your rogues and the strong women they bond with. But what I’ve always loved most is your history and wonderful attention to the surrounding details. I immerse myself in your worlds, and wind up flying through them! Can’t wait to see what Once A Rebel brings! Hugs!

    Reply
  59. As always, am impatiently waiting for your next. And your next! Lol. I love both your rogues and the strong women they bond with. But what I’ve always loved most is your history and wonderful attention to the surrounding details. I immerse myself in your worlds, and wind up flying through them! Can’t wait to see what Once A Rebel brings! Hugs!

    Reply
  60. As always, am impatiently waiting for your next. And your next! Lol. I love both your rogues and the strong women they bond with. But what I’ve always loved most is your history and wonderful attention to the surrounding details. I immerse myself in your worlds, and wind up flying through them! Can’t wait to see what Once A Rebel brings! Hugs!

    Reply
  61. All of Mary Jo’s books are well written and well researched, and her characters pull you into the story. Thanks for another excellent adventure!

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  62. All of Mary Jo’s books are well written and well researched, and her characters pull you into the story. Thanks for another excellent adventure!

    Reply
  63. All of Mary Jo’s books are well written and well researched, and her characters pull you into the story. Thanks for another excellent adventure!

    Reply
  64. All of Mary Jo’s books are well written and well researched, and her characters pull you into the story. Thanks for another excellent adventure!

    Reply
  65. All of Mary Jo’s books are well written and well researched, and her characters pull you into the story. Thanks for another excellent adventure!

    Reply
  66. Love the idea of a romance set in the US and the 1812s. We need more settings than England, something MJP has done many times with great success.

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  67. Love the idea of a romance set in the US and the 1812s. We need more settings than England, something MJP has done many times with great success.

    Reply
  68. Love the idea of a romance set in the US and the 1812s. We need more settings than England, something MJP has done many times with great success.

    Reply
  69. Love the idea of a romance set in the US and the 1812s. We need more settings than England, something MJP has done many times with great success.

    Reply
  70. Love the idea of a romance set in the US and the 1812s. We need more settings than England, something MJP has done many times with great success.

    Reply
  71. folks should know that if we had lost the battle of Baltimore at fort mchenry we’d all be speaking English here today

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  72. folks should know that if we had lost the battle of Baltimore at fort mchenry we’d all be speaking English here today

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  73. folks should know that if we had lost the battle of Baltimore at fort mchenry we’d all be speaking English here today

    Reply
  74. folks should know that if we had lost the battle of Baltimore at fort mchenry we’d all be speaking English here today

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  75. folks should know that if we had lost the battle of Baltimore at fort mchenry we’d all be speaking English here today

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  76. Ditto, ditto, ditto everything that everyone has said. Grin.
    I too have been anxiously awaiting your new release for many reasons as well as to see how you wrap the story in American History….
    Thanks for all the HUNDRED’s of Thousands of words you have written… I’ll have to go back and read the cellar scene again to refresh my memory of who was there.

    Reply
  77. Ditto, ditto, ditto everything that everyone has said. Grin.
    I too have been anxiously awaiting your new release for many reasons as well as to see how you wrap the story in American History….
    Thanks for all the HUNDRED’s of Thousands of words you have written… I’ll have to go back and read the cellar scene again to refresh my memory of who was there.

    Reply
  78. Ditto, ditto, ditto everything that everyone has said. Grin.
    I too have been anxiously awaiting your new release for many reasons as well as to see how you wrap the story in American History….
    Thanks for all the HUNDRED’s of Thousands of words you have written… I’ll have to go back and read the cellar scene again to refresh my memory of who was there.

    Reply
  79. Ditto, ditto, ditto everything that everyone has said. Grin.
    I too have been anxiously awaiting your new release for many reasons as well as to see how you wrap the story in American History….
    Thanks for all the HUNDRED’s of Thousands of words you have written… I’ll have to go back and read the cellar scene again to refresh my memory of who was there.

    Reply
  80. Ditto, ditto, ditto everything that everyone has said. Grin.
    I too have been anxiously awaiting your new release for many reasons as well as to see how you wrap the story in American History….
    Thanks for all the HUNDRED’s of Thousands of words you have written… I’ll have to go back and read the cellar scene again to refresh my memory of who was there.

    Reply
  81. Sounds as though it will be as wonderful as the others you have written. Writing about the British in America at a time of war is tricky as Americans are taught in school to side with the Americans but the English characters are supposed to have some loyalty to their country. A very unnecessary war. It will be interesting to read what decisions Richard and Callie make. I can see from your brief description that neither have a strong tie to family. Just the sort to make good settlors of the west ( It is warmer than Canada.)

    Reply
  82. Sounds as though it will be as wonderful as the others you have written. Writing about the British in America at a time of war is tricky as Americans are taught in school to side with the Americans but the English characters are supposed to have some loyalty to their country. A very unnecessary war. It will be interesting to read what decisions Richard and Callie make. I can see from your brief description that neither have a strong tie to family. Just the sort to make good settlors of the west ( It is warmer than Canada.)

    Reply
  83. Sounds as though it will be as wonderful as the others you have written. Writing about the British in America at a time of war is tricky as Americans are taught in school to side with the Americans but the English characters are supposed to have some loyalty to their country. A very unnecessary war. It will be interesting to read what decisions Richard and Callie make. I can see from your brief description that neither have a strong tie to family. Just the sort to make good settlors of the west ( It is warmer than Canada.)

    Reply
  84. Sounds as though it will be as wonderful as the others you have written. Writing about the British in America at a time of war is tricky as Americans are taught in school to side with the Americans but the English characters are supposed to have some loyalty to their country. A very unnecessary war. It will be interesting to read what decisions Richard and Callie make. I can see from your brief description that neither have a strong tie to family. Just the sort to make good settlors of the west ( It is warmer than Canada.)

    Reply
  85. Sounds as though it will be as wonderful as the others you have written. Writing about the British in America at a time of war is tricky as Americans are taught in school to side with the Americans but the English characters are supposed to have some loyalty to their country. A very unnecessary war. It will be interesting to read what decisions Richard and Callie make. I can see from your brief description that neither have a strong tie to family. Just the sort to make good settlors of the west ( It is warmer than Canada.)

    Reply
  86. I’m at a point in my life where there’s not a moment to sit and read even for a minute during the day and I fall asleep with a book in my hand after two minutes of trying to read at night. So my dog and I look forward to listening to Once A Rebel. I’m far more patient with him stopping to smell every piece of grass when I’m listening to a great book, and since I’ve loved all your others, I know I’ll (we’ll!) love this one, too.

    Reply
  87. I’m at a point in my life where there’s not a moment to sit and read even for a minute during the day and I fall asleep with a book in my hand after two minutes of trying to read at night. So my dog and I look forward to listening to Once A Rebel. I’m far more patient with him stopping to smell every piece of grass when I’m listening to a great book, and since I’ve loved all your others, I know I’ll (we’ll!) love this one, too.

    Reply
  88. I’m at a point in my life where there’s not a moment to sit and read even for a minute during the day and I fall asleep with a book in my hand after two minutes of trying to read at night. So my dog and I look forward to listening to Once A Rebel. I’m far more patient with him stopping to smell every piece of grass when I’m listening to a great book, and since I’ve loved all your others, I know I’ll (we’ll!) love this one, too.

    Reply
  89. I’m at a point in my life where there’s not a moment to sit and read even for a minute during the day and I fall asleep with a book in my hand after two minutes of trying to read at night. So my dog and I look forward to listening to Once A Rebel. I’m far more patient with him stopping to smell every piece of grass when I’m listening to a great book, and since I’ve loved all your others, I know I’ll (we’ll!) love this one, too.

    Reply
  90. I’m at a point in my life where there’s not a moment to sit and read even for a minute during the day and I fall asleep with a book in my hand after two minutes of trying to read at night. So my dog and I look forward to listening to Once A Rebel. I’m far more patient with him stopping to smell every piece of grass when I’m listening to a great book, and since I’ve loved all your others, I know I’ll (we’ll!) love this one, too.

    Reply
  91. Oh, I’ve sooooo been looking forward to this one, as EVERY one of course. Yes, but this new spin-off took off with a bang sigh….. Sounding like a broken record here to be yet again gushing over your writing Mary Jo, but….thumbs up, fist pumping the air, squeeee….YES YES YES! This one sounds so good. I love friends to lovers stories. And the history. So many books show the protagonists on one side or the other, with the other side the enemy, period. I’ve always thought ‘yes, but what about the other side?’ War makes a great fiction setting. But we all agree war stinks, I assume.

    Reply
  92. Oh, I’ve sooooo been looking forward to this one, as EVERY one of course. Yes, but this new spin-off took off with a bang sigh….. Sounding like a broken record here to be yet again gushing over your writing Mary Jo, but….thumbs up, fist pumping the air, squeeee….YES YES YES! This one sounds so good. I love friends to lovers stories. And the history. So many books show the protagonists on one side or the other, with the other side the enemy, period. I’ve always thought ‘yes, but what about the other side?’ War makes a great fiction setting. But we all agree war stinks, I assume.

    Reply
  93. Oh, I’ve sooooo been looking forward to this one, as EVERY one of course. Yes, but this new spin-off took off with a bang sigh….. Sounding like a broken record here to be yet again gushing over your writing Mary Jo, but….thumbs up, fist pumping the air, squeeee….YES YES YES! This one sounds so good. I love friends to lovers stories. And the history. So many books show the protagonists on one side or the other, with the other side the enemy, period. I’ve always thought ‘yes, but what about the other side?’ War makes a great fiction setting. But we all agree war stinks, I assume.

    Reply
  94. Oh, I’ve sooooo been looking forward to this one, as EVERY one of course. Yes, but this new spin-off took off with a bang sigh….. Sounding like a broken record here to be yet again gushing over your writing Mary Jo, but….thumbs up, fist pumping the air, squeeee….YES YES YES! This one sounds so good. I love friends to lovers stories. And the history. So many books show the protagonists on one side or the other, with the other side the enemy, period. I’ve always thought ‘yes, but what about the other side?’ War makes a great fiction setting. But we all agree war stinks, I assume.

    Reply
  95. Oh, I’ve sooooo been looking forward to this one, as EVERY one of course. Yes, but this new spin-off took off with a bang sigh….. Sounding like a broken record here to be yet again gushing over your writing Mary Jo, but….thumbs up, fist pumping the air, squeeee….YES YES YES! This one sounds so good. I love friends to lovers stories. And the history. So many books show the protagonists on one side or the other, with the other side the enemy, period. I’ve always thought ‘yes, but what about the other side?’ War makes a great fiction setting. But we all agree war stinks, I assume.

    Reply
  96. I hope you and your dog enjoy the audio, Margaret. *G* I just checked with me editor this morning and the Audible version of the book will be released “soon,” and the CD version a little later.

    Reply
  97. I hope you and your dog enjoy the audio, Margaret. *G* I just checked with me editor this morning and the Audible version of the book will be released “soon,” and the CD version a little later.

    Reply
  98. I hope you and your dog enjoy the audio, Margaret. *G* I just checked with me editor this morning and the Audible version of the book will be released “soon,” and the CD version a little later.

    Reply
  99. I hope you and your dog enjoy the audio, Margaret. *G* I just checked with me editor this morning and the Audible version of the book will be released “soon,” and the CD version a little later.

    Reply
  100. I hope you and your dog enjoy the audio, Margaret. *G* I just checked with me editor this morning and the Audible version of the book will be released “soon,” and the CD version a little later.

    Reply
  101. I’m with you and most others, Michelle–war stinks. I think one of the keys to this story was the deep friendship Gordon and Callie developed as children, and how it laid a foundation of trust that never faltered. THey were never enemies. But that doesn’t mean there aren’t issues to be sorted out!

    Reply
  102. I’m with you and most others, Michelle–war stinks. I think one of the keys to this story was the deep friendship Gordon and Callie developed as children, and how it laid a foundation of trust that never faltered. THey were never enemies. But that doesn’t mean there aren’t issues to be sorted out!

    Reply
  103. I’m with you and most others, Michelle–war stinks. I think one of the keys to this story was the deep friendship Gordon and Callie developed as children, and how it laid a foundation of trust that never faltered. THey were never enemies. But that doesn’t mean there aren’t issues to be sorted out!

    Reply
  104. I’m with you and most others, Michelle–war stinks. I think one of the keys to this story was the deep friendship Gordon and Callie developed as children, and how it laid a foundation of trust that never faltered. THey were never enemies. But that doesn’t mean there aren’t issues to be sorted out!

    Reply
  105. I’m with you and most others, Michelle–war stinks. I think one of the keys to this story was the deep friendship Gordon and Callie developed as children, and how it laid a foundation of trust that never faltered. THey were never enemies. But that doesn’t mean there aren’t issues to be sorted out!

    Reply
  106. It’s another winner! Thank you, Mary Jo. I too loved the American connection and getting a full story for “Lady Agnes Westerfield’s one failure.” And I also loved seeing more of Laurel and Kirkland. Now I eagerly await Hawkins’s story.

    Reply
  107. It’s another winner! Thank you, Mary Jo. I too loved the American connection and getting a full story for “Lady Agnes Westerfield’s one failure.” And I also loved seeing more of Laurel and Kirkland. Now I eagerly await Hawkins’s story.

    Reply
  108. It’s another winner! Thank you, Mary Jo. I too loved the American connection and getting a full story for “Lady Agnes Westerfield’s one failure.” And I also loved seeing more of Laurel and Kirkland. Now I eagerly await Hawkins’s story.

    Reply
  109. It’s another winner! Thank you, Mary Jo. I too loved the American connection and getting a full story for “Lady Agnes Westerfield’s one failure.” And I also loved seeing more of Laurel and Kirkland. Now I eagerly await Hawkins’s story.

    Reply
  110. It’s another winner! Thank you, Mary Jo. I too loved the American connection and getting a full story for “Lady Agnes Westerfield’s one failure.” And I also loved seeing more of Laurel and Kirkland. Now I eagerly await Hawkins’s story.

    Reply
  111. I remember seeing some old movies about the War of 1812, but haven’t read a historical romance set during it – I love to learn about history while reading a good book!

    Reply
  112. I remember seeing some old movies about the War of 1812, but haven’t read a historical romance set during it – I love to learn about history while reading a good book!

    Reply
  113. I remember seeing some old movies about the War of 1812, but haven’t read a historical romance set during it – I love to learn about history while reading a good book!

    Reply
  114. I remember seeing some old movies about the War of 1812, but haven’t read a historical romance set during it – I love to learn about history while reading a good book!

    Reply
  115. I remember seeing some old movies about the War of 1812, but haven’t read a historical romance set during it – I love to learn about history while reading a good book!

    Reply
  116. You mentioned the setting as the War of 1812, and I’ve been trying to remember some other regencies with that setting, or at least in which it was a factor, that I’ve read and liked at the time. I came up with three:
    DIAMOND IN DISGUISE – Elizabeth Hewitt
    AN ENGLISH ALLIANCE – Dawn Lindsay
    THE SECOND LADY SOUTHVALE – Sandra Heath
    Time to dig them out for a reread 🙂

    Reply
  117. You mentioned the setting as the War of 1812, and I’ve been trying to remember some other regencies with that setting, or at least in which it was a factor, that I’ve read and liked at the time. I came up with three:
    DIAMOND IN DISGUISE – Elizabeth Hewitt
    AN ENGLISH ALLIANCE – Dawn Lindsay
    THE SECOND LADY SOUTHVALE – Sandra Heath
    Time to dig them out for a reread 🙂

    Reply
  118. You mentioned the setting as the War of 1812, and I’ve been trying to remember some other regencies with that setting, or at least in which it was a factor, that I’ve read and liked at the time. I came up with three:
    DIAMOND IN DISGUISE – Elizabeth Hewitt
    AN ENGLISH ALLIANCE – Dawn Lindsay
    THE SECOND LADY SOUTHVALE – Sandra Heath
    Time to dig them out for a reread 🙂

    Reply
  119. You mentioned the setting as the War of 1812, and I’ve been trying to remember some other regencies with that setting, or at least in which it was a factor, that I’ve read and liked at the time. I came up with three:
    DIAMOND IN DISGUISE – Elizabeth Hewitt
    AN ENGLISH ALLIANCE – Dawn Lindsay
    THE SECOND LADY SOUTHVALE – Sandra Heath
    Time to dig them out for a reread 🙂

    Reply
  120. You mentioned the setting as the War of 1812, and I’ve been trying to remember some other regencies with that setting, or at least in which it was a factor, that I’ve read and liked at the time. I came up with three:
    DIAMOND IN DISGUISE – Elizabeth Hewitt
    AN ENGLISH ALLIANCE – Dawn Lindsay
    THE SECOND LADY SOUTHVALE – Sandra Heath
    Time to dig them out for a reread 🙂

    Reply
  121. I loved all the Lost Lords, and I am looking forward to reading a book by Mary Jo set in the U.S.
    The War of 1812 seems to have been a sad waste of life all around, including the last big battle in New Orleans, which took place after a treaty was signed.

    Reply
  122. I loved all the Lost Lords, and I am looking forward to reading a book by Mary Jo set in the U.S.
    The War of 1812 seems to have been a sad waste of life all around, including the last big battle in New Orleans, which took place after a treaty was signed.

    Reply
  123. I loved all the Lost Lords, and I am looking forward to reading a book by Mary Jo set in the U.S.
    The War of 1812 seems to have been a sad waste of life all around, including the last big battle in New Orleans, which took place after a treaty was signed.

    Reply
  124. I loved all the Lost Lords, and I am looking forward to reading a book by Mary Jo set in the U.S.
    The War of 1812 seems to have been a sad waste of life all around, including the last big battle in New Orleans, which took place after a treaty was signed.

    Reply
  125. I loved all the Lost Lords, and I am looking forward to reading a book by Mary Jo set in the U.S.
    The War of 1812 seems to have been a sad waste of life all around, including the last big battle in New Orleans, which took place after a treaty was signed.

    Reply
  126. Went back and read the cellar dwellers scene in Once a Soldier. When I put it back on the shelf, I picked up the book next to it (Not Always a Saint) and lo and behold….Gordon was in that one. Now I’m all prepped and ready for reading Once a Rebel when I get a copy of it. Grin.

    Reply
  127. Went back and read the cellar dwellers scene in Once a Soldier. When I put it back on the shelf, I picked up the book next to it (Not Always a Saint) and lo and behold….Gordon was in that one. Now I’m all prepped and ready for reading Once a Rebel when I get a copy of it. Grin.

    Reply
  128. Went back and read the cellar dwellers scene in Once a Soldier. When I put it back on the shelf, I picked up the book next to it (Not Always a Saint) and lo and behold….Gordon was in that one. Now I’m all prepped and ready for reading Once a Rebel when I get a copy of it. Grin.

    Reply
  129. Went back and read the cellar dwellers scene in Once a Soldier. When I put it back on the shelf, I picked up the book next to it (Not Always a Saint) and lo and behold….Gordon was in that one. Now I’m all prepped and ready for reading Once a Rebel when I get a copy of it. Grin.

    Reply
  130. Went back and read the cellar dwellers scene in Once a Soldier. When I put it back on the shelf, I picked up the book next to it (Not Always a Saint) and lo and behold….Gordon was in that one. Now I’m all prepped and ready for reading Once a Rebel when I get a copy of it. Grin.

    Reply
  131. I have wanted to know Gordon’s story since reading about him in the Lost Lords books. I was delighted to find he is a Redeemed Rogue. Once a Soldier is already a favorite. However my very favorites are ONE PERFECT ROSE, ANGEL ROGUE, RIVER OF FIRE, THE BARGAIN, AND THE RAKE. Thank you for years of reading pleasure–and many more to come.

    Reply
  132. I have wanted to know Gordon’s story since reading about him in the Lost Lords books. I was delighted to find he is a Redeemed Rogue. Once a Soldier is already a favorite. However my very favorites are ONE PERFECT ROSE, ANGEL ROGUE, RIVER OF FIRE, THE BARGAIN, AND THE RAKE. Thank you for years of reading pleasure–and many more to come.

    Reply
  133. I have wanted to know Gordon’s story since reading about him in the Lost Lords books. I was delighted to find he is a Redeemed Rogue. Once a Soldier is already a favorite. However my very favorites are ONE PERFECT ROSE, ANGEL ROGUE, RIVER OF FIRE, THE BARGAIN, AND THE RAKE. Thank you for years of reading pleasure–and many more to come.

    Reply
  134. I have wanted to know Gordon’s story since reading about him in the Lost Lords books. I was delighted to find he is a Redeemed Rogue. Once a Soldier is already a favorite. However my very favorites are ONE PERFECT ROSE, ANGEL ROGUE, RIVER OF FIRE, THE BARGAIN, AND THE RAKE. Thank you for years of reading pleasure–and many more to come.

    Reply
  135. I have wanted to know Gordon’s story since reading about him in the Lost Lords books. I was delighted to find he is a Redeemed Rogue. Once a Soldier is already a favorite. However my very favorites are ONE PERFECT ROSE, ANGEL ROGUE, RIVER OF FIRE, THE BARGAIN, AND THE RAKE. Thank you for years of reading pleasure–and many more to come.

    Reply

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