Mary Jo Putney’s NOT ALWAYS A SAINT

Anne here, interviewing Mary Jo Putney about NOT ALWAYS A SAINT, the latest in her wonderful "Lost Lords" series. Mary Jo sent me an early copy which I thoroughly enjoyed.   NotAlwaysASaint0415_200

The critics agree. Romantic Times gave it a 4.5 Stars Top Pick  and said: “a beautifully crafted, emotionally intense love story. With her signature strong, unconventional characters, beautiful prose and incredible feeling, readers are gifted an unforgettable story that is heart and soul stirring.”

Library Journal, gave it a starred review and said: "A caring heroine with a sordid past who doubts her self-worth and a hero plagued by soul-destroying guilt find love and redemption in a captivating romance that is graced with impeccable character development, flawless prose, and several surprising twists."


Anne: The hero of NOT ALWAYS A SAINT is Daniel, who was the brother of the heroine of NOT QUITE A WIFE.  The heroine, Jessie, is a new character, so let us begin with her. At the start of the story, the recently widowed Jessie is in need of a hasty and convenient marriage. And in our last interview you described Daniel and Jessie thus: "He's the saint, she's the wicked woman. <G>" So tell us about Jessie.  

MJP:  Jessie is one of my occasional heroines who is so gorgeous that her beauty has been a curse on her life since she was born.  She was bullied and abused and exploited and had to make hard choices to survive.  Marriage to a kind older man gave her a safe haven and a beloved daughter.  Now to protect young Beth, she faces more hard choices.  She needs a husband powerful enough to keep them safe, but for a lot of good reasons, it shouldn’t be Daniel Herbert!  

Anne: Your hero, Daniel, goes from a busy and useful life as a doctor to the poor and needy, to being suddenly elevated to the peerage. He is delighted to be a lord, of course. . .

MJP:  Ha!  As you know, he hates the idea. <G>  He has a good and fulfilling life as a healer and he has no desire to be bogged down with the responsibilities of estate management and a seat in Parliament.  He decides he needs a nice, down to earth wife who is skilled in estate management and can do all the boring work so he can continue with his passion for healing.  No high maintenance beauties need apply.  Then he sees Jessie, and his world turns upside down.   

Anne: As is often the case in your stories, there is a sub-plot that highlights a social issue you feel strongly about, in this case violence toward women. In the 19th century, husbands had all the rights, didn't they?  

MJP: Yes, in 19th century Britain, ‘man and wife were one, and that one was the husband.’ Jessie has a very real fear that the horrible nephew of her late husband will be able to get custody of Beth, which is why she needs a husband who is strong and completely trustworthy—and she needs to find such a man fast.  Not an easy task!  

51WeH48g9wL._SL300_Anne: No indeed. It's coming out as an audio book as well — with another lovely cover. Would you give us a brief taste of NOT ALWAYS A SAINT, please?  

MJP: Daniel has just arrived in London and is unenthusiastically attending a large, noisy reception for the purpose of meeting as many people as possible in a short time.  He’s ready to leave when:    

           Daniel started to turn back to Laurel and Kirkland, then paused, his gaze caught by the profile of a woman standing near the exit, mostly surrounded by men.  Her glossy dark hair was knotted up to reveal her graceful neck and the ivory perfection of her features.  But there were other lovely women here.  As he tried to analyze why she caught his attention, she turned a little, bringing her face into the warm light of a chandelier.            
        Coup de foudre.  A lightning strike burned through him, paralyzing every fiber of his being.  She was truly beautiful, with striking light eyes edged in darkness and a lithe figure that would shatter a stone saint, but what made her stunning was more than physical beauty.  She radiated mystery and sensuality.  And danger.            
        She looked like original sin–and he craved that promise of reckless passion as intensely as Adam had craved Eve's apple.            
        As his heart hammered in his chest, he knew that he was officially insane.  How could the sight of a woman he'd never met affect him so?  Then she turned her head further as if she felt his stare, and their gazes locked.
        Lightning struck again, swift and fierce, setting his heart afire and searing through his veins.  She was exactly the sort of woman he didn't need, yet he wanted her.            
        Insane.   

Anne: Delicious! Several other of the "lost lords" also appear in the story, which is always a pleasure for readers of a series. Do you have a favorite?  

MJP:  I love them all!  Perhaps I have a special fondness for James, Lord Kirkland, the enigmatic spymaster and fixer for his friends.  He was the hero of my previous book, Not Quite a Wife, wherein he and his long estranged wife, Laurel, rebuilt their marriage.  Laurel is Daniel’s sister and Kirkland is a long time friend, so it’s natural that Daniel stays with them when he comes to London to sort out his new life.  Some of the Lost Lords character appear briefly, but they don’t have major roles.   MJPnotebook

Anne: I thought it was very cool that your gorgeous cover for NOT ALWAYS A SAINT was used as the cover for the official conference notebook at the recent Romance Writers of Australia conference. Kensington did you proud there.

MJP: They certainly did. I was delighted to see it.

Anne: Who's next in the series? Anyone we know, or someone new?  

MJP:  Yes and no.  <G> Technically, the book I just finished, Once a Soldier, is first in a new series called Rogues Redeemed, but it’s a direct spin-off of the Lost Lords, and the hero is Will Masterson, who was in the Lost Lords series from the very first book.  However, he was a serving officer in Spain since he only showed up directly in two of the books.  Now, though, Napoleon has abdicated, the wars are over (or so everyone thinks, Waterloo is a year away), and Will is heading home via Portugal.  On the way, things happen.  <G>  As they do!  People have been asking for Will’s story for years, and I’m sooo happy to finally have written it.        

Anne: As are all your fans, including me. Mary Jo will be giving away a copy of NOT ALWAYS A SAINT to someone who leaves a comment or an answer to this question: Who is your favorite rogue in fiction? (Mary Jo is in New Zealand at the moment, so might not be able to respond to comments)

285 thoughts on “Mary Jo Putney’s NOT ALWAYS A SAINT”

  1. I pre-ordered the book months ago and I’ve my gorgeous copy waiting for me on my bedside table – Mary Jo is one of my favourites.
    As for rogues, I’ve always thought it was a shame that Captain Wickham from Pride and Prejudice was never redeemed!

    Reply
  2. I pre-ordered the book months ago and I’ve my gorgeous copy waiting for me on my bedside table – Mary Jo is one of my favourites.
    As for rogues, I’ve always thought it was a shame that Captain Wickham from Pride and Prejudice was never redeemed!

    Reply
  3. I pre-ordered the book months ago and I’ve my gorgeous copy waiting for me on my bedside table – Mary Jo is one of my favourites.
    As for rogues, I’ve always thought it was a shame that Captain Wickham from Pride and Prejudice was never redeemed!

    Reply
  4. I pre-ordered the book months ago and I’ve my gorgeous copy waiting for me on my bedside table – Mary Jo is one of my favourites.
    As for rogues, I’ve always thought it was a shame that Captain Wickham from Pride and Prejudice was never redeemed!

    Reply
  5. I pre-ordered the book months ago and I’ve my gorgeous copy waiting for me on my bedside table – Mary Jo is one of my favourites.
    As for rogues, I’ve always thought it was a shame that Captain Wickham from Pride and Prejudice was never redeemed!

    Reply
  6. Jamie from Outlander is my favorite! But I adore Mary Jo’s books!! Always fun to read and I get swept along in her storytelling!

    Reply
  7. Jamie from Outlander is my favorite! But I adore Mary Jo’s books!! Always fun to read and I get swept along in her storytelling!

    Reply
  8. Jamie from Outlander is my favorite! But I adore Mary Jo’s books!! Always fun to read and I get swept along in her storytelling!

    Reply
  9. Jamie from Outlander is my favorite! But I adore Mary Jo’s books!! Always fun to read and I get swept along in her storytelling!

    Reply
  10. Jamie from Outlander is my favorite! But I adore Mary Jo’s books!! Always fun to read and I get swept along in her storytelling!

    Reply
  11. sounds awesome. As a strong modern woman, I love that you are addressing the issue back then of the men holding all the cards.

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  12. sounds awesome. As a strong modern woman, I love that you are addressing the issue back then of the men holding all the cards.

    Reply
  13. sounds awesome. As a strong modern woman, I love that you are addressing the issue back then of the men holding all the cards.

    Reply
  14. sounds awesome. As a strong modern woman, I love that you are addressing the issue back then of the men holding all the cards.

    Reply
  15. sounds awesome. As a strong modern woman, I love that you are addressing the issue back then of the men holding all the cards.

    Reply
  16. Favorite rogue…..so many to choose from I can’t even narrow it down. I can say that whoever (or whatever) you want to write about next, I will be delighted to read.
    I don’t currently have a copy of Not Always a Saint so I would LOVE to win it.

    Reply
  17. Favorite rogue…..so many to choose from I can’t even narrow it down. I can say that whoever (or whatever) you want to write about next, I will be delighted to read.
    I don’t currently have a copy of Not Always a Saint so I would LOVE to win it.

    Reply
  18. Favorite rogue…..so many to choose from I can’t even narrow it down. I can say that whoever (or whatever) you want to write about next, I will be delighted to read.
    I don’t currently have a copy of Not Always a Saint so I would LOVE to win it.

    Reply
  19. Favorite rogue…..so many to choose from I can’t even narrow it down. I can say that whoever (or whatever) you want to write about next, I will be delighted to read.
    I don’t currently have a copy of Not Always a Saint so I would LOVE to win it.

    Reply
  20. Favorite rogue…..so many to choose from I can’t even narrow it down. I can say that whoever (or whatever) you want to write about next, I will be delighted to read.
    I don’t currently have a copy of Not Always a Saint so I would LOVE to win it.

    Reply
  21. Already ordered it; just love Mary Jo’s deep, rich historicals!
    I have to admit though, that when I read the header “Mary Jo Putney’s NOT ALWAYS A SAINT,” my first thought was, “Well, yes, I knew that…” 😉 (I can say that because MJ knows I adore her.)

    Reply
  22. Already ordered it; just love Mary Jo’s deep, rich historicals!
    I have to admit though, that when I read the header “Mary Jo Putney’s NOT ALWAYS A SAINT,” my first thought was, “Well, yes, I knew that…” 😉 (I can say that because MJ knows I adore her.)

    Reply
  23. Already ordered it; just love Mary Jo’s deep, rich historicals!
    I have to admit though, that when I read the header “Mary Jo Putney’s NOT ALWAYS A SAINT,” my first thought was, “Well, yes, I knew that…” 😉 (I can say that because MJ knows I adore her.)

    Reply
  24. Already ordered it; just love Mary Jo’s deep, rich historicals!
    I have to admit though, that when I read the header “Mary Jo Putney’s NOT ALWAYS A SAINT,” my first thought was, “Well, yes, I knew that…” 😉 (I can say that because MJ knows I adore her.)

    Reply
  25. Already ordered it; just love Mary Jo’s deep, rich historicals!
    I have to admit though, that when I read the header “Mary Jo Putney’s NOT ALWAYS A SAINT,” my first thought was, “Well, yes, I knew that…” 😉 (I can say that because MJ knows I adore her.)

    Reply
  26. I do like a rogue who has honour, so yes, he likes swiving women, but he’s never struck or forced himself on a woman.

    Reply
  27. I do like a rogue who has honour, so yes, he likes swiving women, but he’s never struck or forced himself on a woman.

    Reply
  28. I do like a rogue who has honour, so yes, he likes swiving women, but he’s never struck or forced himself on a woman.

    Reply
  29. I do like a rogue who has honour, so yes, he likes swiving women, but he’s never struck or forced himself on a woman.

    Reply
  30. I do like a rogue who has honour, so yes, he likes swiving women, but he’s never struck or forced himself on a woman.

    Reply
  31. I have a lot of favorite Rogues. Many of them from Mary Jo Putney! I’ve been waiting with bated breath for Daniel’s story!! Now I’m just waiting for payday!! 😀

    Reply
  32. I have a lot of favorite Rogues. Many of them from Mary Jo Putney! I’ve been waiting with bated breath for Daniel’s story!! Now I’m just waiting for payday!! 😀

    Reply
  33. I have a lot of favorite Rogues. Many of them from Mary Jo Putney! I’ve been waiting with bated breath for Daniel’s story!! Now I’m just waiting for payday!! 😀

    Reply
  34. I have a lot of favorite Rogues. Many of them from Mary Jo Putney! I’ve been waiting with bated breath for Daniel’s story!! Now I’m just waiting for payday!! 😀

    Reply
  35. I have a lot of favorite Rogues. Many of them from Mary Jo Putney! I’ve been waiting with bated breath for Daniel’s story!! Now I’m just waiting for payday!! 😀

    Reply
  36. I don’t know how to define favorite. If that means a rogue that is so memorable that I think of him months or years later, it would have to be Sebastian from Lisa Klepas Wallflower series. His own book Devil In Winter, and getting to know him in depth caused Mr to fall a little in love with him. He really was a surprise.

    Reply
  37. I don’t know how to define favorite. If that means a rogue that is so memorable that I think of him months or years later, it would have to be Sebastian from Lisa Klepas Wallflower series. His own book Devil In Winter, and getting to know him in depth caused Mr to fall a little in love with him. He really was a surprise.

    Reply
  38. I don’t know how to define favorite. If that means a rogue that is so memorable that I think of him months or years later, it would have to be Sebastian from Lisa Klepas Wallflower series. His own book Devil In Winter, and getting to know him in depth caused Mr to fall a little in love with him. He really was a surprise.

    Reply
  39. I don’t know how to define favorite. If that means a rogue that is so memorable that I think of him months or years later, it would have to be Sebastian from Lisa Klepas Wallflower series. His own book Devil In Winter, and getting to know him in depth caused Mr to fall a little in love with him. He really was a surprise.

    Reply
  40. I don’t know how to define favorite. If that means a rogue that is so memorable that I think of him months or years later, it would have to be Sebastian from Lisa Klepas Wallflower series. His own book Devil In Winter, and getting to know him in depth caused Mr to fall a little in love with him. He really was a surprise.

    Reply
  41. I don’t have a favorite rogue because I’m not sure how I define a rogue. All the men in your Company of Rogues and the related stories would probably count, but how can I pick a favorite? Because of the title: Not Always a Rogue, I guess Rob Carmichael counts. I certainly reread all those books.
    Again, from other authors, I’m not sure how to define a rogue, but if any of my favorite authors have written about rogues, their characters probably have gone on my list of favorite books.
    I have finished “Not Always a Saint” and I thoroughly enjoyed it.

    Reply
  42. I don’t have a favorite rogue because I’m not sure how I define a rogue. All the men in your Company of Rogues and the related stories would probably count, but how can I pick a favorite? Because of the title: Not Always a Rogue, I guess Rob Carmichael counts. I certainly reread all those books.
    Again, from other authors, I’m not sure how to define a rogue, but if any of my favorite authors have written about rogues, their characters probably have gone on my list of favorite books.
    I have finished “Not Always a Saint” and I thoroughly enjoyed it.

    Reply
  43. I don’t have a favorite rogue because I’m not sure how I define a rogue. All the men in your Company of Rogues and the related stories would probably count, but how can I pick a favorite? Because of the title: Not Always a Rogue, I guess Rob Carmichael counts. I certainly reread all those books.
    Again, from other authors, I’m not sure how to define a rogue, but if any of my favorite authors have written about rogues, their characters probably have gone on my list of favorite books.
    I have finished “Not Always a Saint” and I thoroughly enjoyed it.

    Reply
  44. I don’t have a favorite rogue because I’m not sure how I define a rogue. All the men in your Company of Rogues and the related stories would probably count, but how can I pick a favorite? Because of the title: Not Always a Rogue, I guess Rob Carmichael counts. I certainly reread all those books.
    Again, from other authors, I’m not sure how to define a rogue, but if any of my favorite authors have written about rogues, their characters probably have gone on my list of favorite books.
    I have finished “Not Always a Saint” and I thoroughly enjoyed it.

    Reply
  45. I don’t have a favorite rogue because I’m not sure how I define a rogue. All the men in your Company of Rogues and the related stories would probably count, but how can I pick a favorite? Because of the title: Not Always a Rogue, I guess Rob Carmichael counts. I certainly reread all those books.
    Again, from other authors, I’m not sure how to define a rogue, but if any of my favorite authors have written about rogues, their characters probably have gone on my list of favorite books.
    I have finished “Not Always a Saint” and I thoroughly enjoyed it.

    Reply
  46. Oh, Reggie, without doubt.
    He and Alys were the only ones I brought with me from the US on my recent move to the UK, just as he was one of only four who came when I moved there in 1998. Still mourning the 3,000 roms I had to leave behind this July. /pets Rake and the Reformer

    Reply
  47. Oh, Reggie, without doubt.
    He and Alys were the only ones I brought with me from the US on my recent move to the UK, just as he was one of only four who came when I moved there in 1998. Still mourning the 3,000 roms I had to leave behind this July. /pets Rake and the Reformer

    Reply
  48. Oh, Reggie, without doubt.
    He and Alys were the only ones I brought with me from the US on my recent move to the UK, just as he was one of only four who came when I moved there in 1998. Still mourning the 3,000 roms I had to leave behind this July. /pets Rake and the Reformer

    Reply
  49. Oh, Reggie, without doubt.
    He and Alys were the only ones I brought with me from the US on my recent move to the UK, just as he was one of only four who came when I moved there in 1998. Still mourning the 3,000 roms I had to leave behind this July. /pets Rake and the Reformer

    Reply
  50. Oh, Reggie, without doubt.
    He and Alys were the only ones I brought with me from the US on my recent move to the UK, just as he was one of only four who came when I moved there in 1998. Still mourning the 3,000 roms I had to leave behind this July. /pets Rake and the Reformer

    Reply
  51. If a Rogue includes someone outside the Regency upper class, my favorite rogue would be Scotland Yard inspector Drew Merriken from Simone St. James’s An Inquiry into Love and Death.

    Reply
  52. If a Rogue includes someone outside the Regency upper class, my favorite rogue would be Scotland Yard inspector Drew Merriken from Simone St. James’s An Inquiry into Love and Death.

    Reply
  53. If a Rogue includes someone outside the Regency upper class, my favorite rogue would be Scotland Yard inspector Drew Merriken from Simone St. James’s An Inquiry into Love and Death.

    Reply
  54. If a Rogue includes someone outside the Regency upper class, my favorite rogue would be Scotland Yard inspector Drew Merriken from Simone St. James’s An Inquiry into Love and Death.

    Reply
  55. If a Rogue includes someone outside the Regency upper class, my favorite rogue would be Scotland Yard inspector Drew Merriken from Simone St. James’s An Inquiry into Love and Death.

    Reply
  56. I found the lost lords through my local library (digital) and I just had to have my own copies so that I had books ready to go when I wanted something to read. Unfortuantely, as soon as I open a new book, I can not put it down 🙂 oh, well. I enjoyed Not always a Saint and look forward to the continuation of the series

    Reply
  57. I found the lost lords through my local library (digital) and I just had to have my own copies so that I had books ready to go when I wanted something to read. Unfortuantely, as soon as I open a new book, I can not put it down 🙂 oh, well. I enjoyed Not always a Saint and look forward to the continuation of the series

    Reply
  58. I found the lost lords through my local library (digital) and I just had to have my own copies so that I had books ready to go when I wanted something to read. Unfortuantely, as soon as I open a new book, I can not put it down 🙂 oh, well. I enjoyed Not always a Saint and look forward to the continuation of the series

    Reply
  59. I found the lost lords through my local library (digital) and I just had to have my own copies so that I had books ready to go when I wanted something to read. Unfortuantely, as soon as I open a new book, I can not put it down 🙂 oh, well. I enjoyed Not always a Saint and look forward to the continuation of the series

    Reply
  60. I found the lost lords through my local library (digital) and I just had to have my own copies so that I had books ready to go when I wanted something to read. Unfortuantely, as soon as I open a new book, I can not put it down 🙂 oh, well. I enjoyed Not always a Saint and look forward to the continuation of the series

    Reply
  61. Of your books Mary Jo I would choose Reggie as the most wonderfully redeemed rogue, but Grey Sommers also gets my vote. What a high price you made him pay for his redemption! “No Longer a Gentleman” is a fabulous book. But my all time favourite rogue, (although they were not called that then) is Justin Alastair, Duke of Avon, who was a truly wicked man before being redeemed by his love for Leonie. Must be fifty years since I first read “These Old Shades” and I’ve read it many times since.
    “Not Always a Saint” dropped into my kindle a few days ago and I read it straight away. Wonderful book, thank you.
    Thanks Anne for a great interview.

    Reply
  62. Of your books Mary Jo I would choose Reggie as the most wonderfully redeemed rogue, but Grey Sommers also gets my vote. What a high price you made him pay for his redemption! “No Longer a Gentleman” is a fabulous book. But my all time favourite rogue, (although they were not called that then) is Justin Alastair, Duke of Avon, who was a truly wicked man before being redeemed by his love for Leonie. Must be fifty years since I first read “These Old Shades” and I’ve read it many times since.
    “Not Always a Saint” dropped into my kindle a few days ago and I read it straight away. Wonderful book, thank you.
    Thanks Anne for a great interview.

    Reply
  63. Of your books Mary Jo I would choose Reggie as the most wonderfully redeemed rogue, but Grey Sommers also gets my vote. What a high price you made him pay for his redemption! “No Longer a Gentleman” is a fabulous book. But my all time favourite rogue, (although they were not called that then) is Justin Alastair, Duke of Avon, who was a truly wicked man before being redeemed by his love for Leonie. Must be fifty years since I first read “These Old Shades” and I’ve read it many times since.
    “Not Always a Saint” dropped into my kindle a few days ago and I read it straight away. Wonderful book, thank you.
    Thanks Anne for a great interview.

    Reply
  64. Of your books Mary Jo I would choose Reggie as the most wonderfully redeemed rogue, but Grey Sommers also gets my vote. What a high price you made him pay for his redemption! “No Longer a Gentleman” is a fabulous book. But my all time favourite rogue, (although they were not called that then) is Justin Alastair, Duke of Avon, who was a truly wicked man before being redeemed by his love for Leonie. Must be fifty years since I first read “These Old Shades” and I’ve read it many times since.
    “Not Always a Saint” dropped into my kindle a few days ago and I read it straight away. Wonderful book, thank you.
    Thanks Anne for a great interview.

    Reply
  65. Of your books Mary Jo I would choose Reggie as the most wonderfully redeemed rogue, but Grey Sommers also gets my vote. What a high price you made him pay for his redemption! “No Longer a Gentleman” is a fabulous book. But my all time favourite rogue, (although they were not called that then) is Justin Alastair, Duke of Avon, who was a truly wicked man before being redeemed by his love for Leonie. Must be fifty years since I first read “These Old Shades” and I’ve read it many times since.
    “Not Always a Saint” dropped into my kindle a few days ago and I read it straight away. Wonderful book, thank you.
    Thanks Anne for a great interview.

    Reply
  66. There are so many wonderful rogues, I can’t pick a favorite, but just to name one at random, Elliot, the Marquis of Rannoch from Liz Carlyle’s “My False Heart”.

    Reply
  67. There are so many wonderful rogues, I can’t pick a favorite, but just to name one at random, Elliot, the Marquis of Rannoch from Liz Carlyle’s “My False Heart”.

    Reply
  68. There are so many wonderful rogues, I can’t pick a favorite, but just to name one at random, Elliot, the Marquis of Rannoch from Liz Carlyle’s “My False Heart”.

    Reply
  69. There are so many wonderful rogues, I can’t pick a favorite, but just to name one at random, Elliot, the Marquis of Rannoch from Liz Carlyle’s “My False Heart”.

    Reply
  70. There are so many wonderful rogues, I can’t pick a favorite, but just to name one at random, Elliot, the Marquis of Rannoch from Liz Carlyle’s “My False Heart”.

    Reply
  71. Jo Beverley has a company of rogues– none of whom fit my definition of real rogues.
    I can’t be sympathetic to Laurel in Not Quite a wife. Kirkland deserves better. She would have crumpled into dust if faced with the problems of some of the heroines of Mary Jo’s other books such as the Burning Point and Spiral Path. Or even faced with something like MAriah and Judith faced.

    Reply
  72. Jo Beverley has a company of rogues– none of whom fit my definition of real rogues.
    I can’t be sympathetic to Laurel in Not Quite a wife. Kirkland deserves better. She would have crumpled into dust if faced with the problems of some of the heroines of Mary Jo’s other books such as the Burning Point and Spiral Path. Or even faced with something like MAriah and Judith faced.

    Reply
  73. Jo Beverley has a company of rogues– none of whom fit my definition of real rogues.
    I can’t be sympathetic to Laurel in Not Quite a wife. Kirkland deserves better. She would have crumpled into dust if faced with the problems of some of the heroines of Mary Jo’s other books such as the Burning Point and Spiral Path. Or even faced with something like MAriah and Judith faced.

    Reply
  74. Jo Beverley has a company of rogues– none of whom fit my definition of real rogues.
    I can’t be sympathetic to Laurel in Not Quite a wife. Kirkland deserves better. She would have crumpled into dust if faced with the problems of some of the heroines of Mary Jo’s other books such as the Burning Point and Spiral Path. Or even faced with something like MAriah and Judith faced.

    Reply
  75. Jo Beverley has a company of rogues– none of whom fit my definition of real rogues.
    I can’t be sympathetic to Laurel in Not Quite a wife. Kirkland deserves better. She would have crumpled into dust if faced with the problems of some of the heroines of Mary Jo’s other books such as the Burning Point and Spiral Path. Or even faced with something like MAriah and Judith faced.

    Reply
  76. I devoured this one! Was held in thrall just like Daniel! Visiting with all the Lost Lords was terrific. And as for the cover spectacular! kjund 🙂

    Reply
  77. I devoured this one! Was held in thrall just like Daniel! Visiting with all the Lost Lords was terrific. And as for the cover spectacular! kjund 🙂

    Reply
  78. I devoured this one! Was held in thrall just like Daniel! Visiting with all the Lost Lords was terrific. And as for the cover spectacular! kjund 🙂

    Reply
  79. I devoured this one! Was held in thrall just like Daniel! Visiting with all the Lost Lords was terrific. And as for the cover spectacular! kjund 🙂

    Reply
  80. I devoured this one! Was held in thrall just like Daniel! Visiting with all the Lost Lords was terrific. And as for the cover spectacular! kjund 🙂

    Reply
  81. My favorite Rogue is Henry Crawford in Jane Austen’s Mansfield Park. He was certainly a Rogue and not ashamed of it.

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  82. My favorite Rogue is Henry Crawford in Jane Austen’s Mansfield Park. He was certainly a Rogue and not ashamed of it.

    Reply
  83. My favorite Rogue is Henry Crawford in Jane Austen’s Mansfield Park. He was certainly a Rogue and not ashamed of it.

    Reply
  84. My favorite Rogue is Henry Crawford in Jane Austen’s Mansfield Park. He was certainly a Rogue and not ashamed of it.

    Reply
  85. My favorite Rogue is Henry Crawford in Jane Austen’s Mansfield Park. He was certainly a Rogue and not ashamed of it.

    Reply
  86. Reggie is honored, but joins you in morning all those left behind romances. Still–the UK! And now you can get ebook versions of your favorites, which make them much easier the next time you move!
    Mary Jo in New Zealand

    Reply
  87. Reggie is honored, but joins you in morning all those left behind romances. Still–the UK! And now you can get ebook versions of your favorites, which make them much easier the next time you move!
    Mary Jo in New Zealand

    Reply
  88. Reggie is honored, but joins you in morning all those left behind romances. Still–the UK! And now you can get ebook versions of your favorites, which make them much easier the next time you move!
    Mary Jo in New Zealand

    Reply
  89. Reggie is honored, but joins you in morning all those left behind romances. Still–the UK! And now you can get ebook versions of your favorites, which make them much easier the next time you move!
    Mary Jo in New Zealand

    Reply
  90. Reggie is honored, but joins you in morning all those left behind romances. Still–the UK! And now you can get ebook versions of your favorites, which make them much easier the next time you move!
    Mary Jo in New Zealand

    Reply
  91. Pamela B (are you the Pamela B I met in Melbourne last week?)–
    Reggie thanks you, Grey says he wasn’t really a rogue, just a high maintenance charmer, and Avon–was REALLY a rogue, and a benchmark for all others!

    Reply
  92. Pamela B (are you the Pamela B I met in Melbourne last week?)–
    Reggie thanks you, Grey says he wasn’t really a rogue, just a high maintenance charmer, and Avon–was REALLY a rogue, and a benchmark for all others!

    Reply
  93. Pamela B (are you the Pamela B I met in Melbourne last week?)–
    Reggie thanks you, Grey says he wasn’t really a rogue, just a high maintenance charmer, and Avon–was REALLY a rogue, and a benchmark for all others!

    Reply
  94. Pamela B (are you the Pamela B I met in Melbourne last week?)–
    Reggie thanks you, Grey says he wasn’t really a rogue, just a high maintenance charmer, and Avon–was REALLY a rogue, and a benchmark for all others!

    Reply
  95. Pamela B (are you the Pamela B I met in Melbourne last week?)–
    Reggie thanks you, Grey says he wasn’t really a rogue, just a high maintenance charmer, and Avon–was REALLY a rogue, and a benchmark for all others!

    Reply
  96. Nancy–
    Readers are entitled to their opinions, but I disagree about Laurel. Her strength was that of healing and compassion, but she was also equal to any challenge that came her way, including facing done a gang of ruthless slavers to rescue a girl being dragged back into slavery. And when necessary, was able to commit an act of violence to save someone she loved. (Possibly if she’d watched tv all her life and had seen 10K murders on screen, she would have been more inured to the sight of violence. Different times then.)

    Reply
  97. Nancy–
    Readers are entitled to their opinions, but I disagree about Laurel. Her strength was that of healing and compassion, but she was also equal to any challenge that came her way, including facing done a gang of ruthless slavers to rescue a girl being dragged back into slavery. And when necessary, was able to commit an act of violence to save someone she loved. (Possibly if she’d watched tv all her life and had seen 10K murders on screen, she would have been more inured to the sight of violence. Different times then.)

    Reply
  98. Nancy–
    Readers are entitled to their opinions, but I disagree about Laurel. Her strength was that of healing and compassion, but she was also equal to any challenge that came her way, including facing done a gang of ruthless slavers to rescue a girl being dragged back into slavery. And when necessary, was able to commit an act of violence to save someone she loved. (Possibly if she’d watched tv all her life and had seen 10K murders on screen, she would have been more inured to the sight of violence. Different times then.)

    Reply
  99. Nancy–
    Readers are entitled to their opinions, but I disagree about Laurel. Her strength was that of healing and compassion, but she was also equal to any challenge that came her way, including facing done a gang of ruthless slavers to rescue a girl being dragged back into slavery. And when necessary, was able to commit an act of violence to save someone she loved. (Possibly if she’d watched tv all her life and had seen 10K murders on screen, she would have been more inured to the sight of violence. Different times then.)

    Reply
  100. Nancy–
    Readers are entitled to their opinions, but I disagree about Laurel. Her strength was that of healing and compassion, but she was also equal to any challenge that came her way, including facing done a gang of ruthless slavers to rescue a girl being dragged back into slavery. And when necessary, was able to commit an act of violence to save someone she loved. (Possibly if she’d watched tv all her life and had seen 10K murders on screen, she would have been more inured to the sight of violence. Different times then.)

    Reply
  101. Mary Jo already knows I loved this book, but then that’s my usual response to a book by MJP. Since I have far too many favorite rogues from historical romance over the past thirty years to choose one, I’ll go with the first rogue who totally captured my heart–Heyer’s Damerel.

    Reply
  102. Mary Jo already knows I loved this book, but then that’s my usual response to a book by MJP. Since I have far too many favorite rogues from historical romance over the past thirty years to choose one, I’ll go with the first rogue who totally captured my heart–Heyer’s Damerel.

    Reply
  103. Mary Jo already knows I loved this book, but then that’s my usual response to a book by MJP. Since I have far too many favorite rogues from historical romance over the past thirty years to choose one, I’ll go with the first rogue who totally captured my heart–Heyer’s Damerel.

    Reply
  104. Mary Jo already knows I loved this book, but then that’s my usual response to a book by MJP. Since I have far too many favorite rogues from historical romance over the past thirty years to choose one, I’ll go with the first rogue who totally captured my heart–Heyer’s Damerel.

    Reply
  105. Mary Jo already knows I loved this book, but then that’s my usual response to a book by MJP. Since I have far too many favorite rogues from historical romance over the past thirty years to choose one, I’ll go with the first rogue who totally captured my heart–Heyer’s Damerel.

    Reply
  106. Janga and Anne, I love Jasper Damerel too, but I think I am going to have to give the title of my ultimate favourite rogue to Vere Mallory, Duke of Ainswood in Loretta Chase’s The Last Hellion 🙂

    Reply
  107. Janga and Anne, I love Jasper Damerel too, but I think I am going to have to give the title of my ultimate favourite rogue to Vere Mallory, Duke of Ainswood in Loretta Chase’s The Last Hellion 🙂

    Reply
  108. Janga and Anne, I love Jasper Damerel too, but I think I am going to have to give the title of my ultimate favourite rogue to Vere Mallory, Duke of Ainswood in Loretta Chase’s The Last Hellion 🙂

    Reply
  109. Janga and Anne, I love Jasper Damerel too, but I think I am going to have to give the title of my ultimate favourite rogue to Vere Mallory, Duke of Ainswood in Loretta Chase’s The Last Hellion 🙂

    Reply
  110. Janga and Anne, I love Jasper Damerel too, but I think I am going to have to give the title of my ultimate favourite rogue to Vere Mallory, Duke of Ainswood in Loretta Chase’s The Last Hellion 🙂

    Reply
  111. Yes, Mary Jo, I’m the one from Melbourne! Fabulous to meet you in person, and Anne also. Best part of the Writers Festival.

    Reply
  112. Yes, Mary Jo, I’m the one from Melbourne! Fabulous to meet you in person, and Anne also. Best part of the Writers Festival.

    Reply
  113. Yes, Mary Jo, I’m the one from Melbourne! Fabulous to meet you in person, and Anne also. Best part of the Writers Festival.

    Reply
  114. Yes, Mary Jo, I’m the one from Melbourne! Fabulous to meet you in person, and Anne also. Best part of the Writers Festival.

    Reply
  115. Yes, Mary Jo, I’m the one from Melbourne! Fabulous to meet you in person, and Anne also. Best part of the Writers Festival.

    Reply
  116. My favourite is also Damerel in Venetia although Justin Alastair the duke of Avon runs him a close second. However the way Damerel was redeemed by his love of Venetia was wonderful and the dialogue between them was just so witty.

    Reply
  117. My favourite is also Damerel in Venetia although Justin Alastair the duke of Avon runs him a close second. However the way Damerel was redeemed by his love of Venetia was wonderful and the dialogue between them was just so witty.

    Reply
  118. My favourite is also Damerel in Venetia although Justin Alastair the duke of Avon runs him a close second. However the way Damerel was redeemed by his love of Venetia was wonderful and the dialogue between them was just so witty.

    Reply
  119. My favourite is also Damerel in Venetia although Justin Alastair the duke of Avon runs him a close second. However the way Damerel was redeemed by his love of Venetia was wonderful and the dialogue between them was just so witty.

    Reply
  120. My favourite is also Damerel in Venetia although Justin Alastair the duke of Avon runs him a close second. However the way Damerel was redeemed by his love of Venetia was wonderful and the dialogue between them was just so witty.

    Reply
  121. Not sure of the definition of “rogue.” One that comes to mind is Sebastian St. Cyr, although I don’t appreciate the high body count in the books.

    Reply
  122. Not sure of the definition of “rogue.” One that comes to mind is Sebastian St. Cyr, although I don’t appreciate the high body count in the books.

    Reply
  123. Not sure of the definition of “rogue.” One that comes to mind is Sebastian St. Cyr, although I don’t appreciate the high body count in the books.

    Reply
  124. Not sure of the definition of “rogue.” One that comes to mind is Sebastian St. Cyr, although I don’t appreciate the high body count in the books.

    Reply
  125. Not sure of the definition of “rogue.” One that comes to mind is Sebastian St. Cyr, although I don’t appreciate the high body count in the books.

    Reply
  126. I absolutely love Georgette Heyer and yes Damerel would also be my favourite rogue. Never truely a bad boy I loved the way the book ended.

    Reply
  127. I absolutely love Georgette Heyer and yes Damerel would also be my favourite rogue. Never truely a bad boy I loved the way the book ended.

    Reply
  128. I absolutely love Georgette Heyer and yes Damerel would also be my favourite rogue. Never truely a bad boy I loved the way the book ended.

    Reply
  129. I absolutely love Georgette Heyer and yes Damerel would also be my favourite rogue. Never truely a bad boy I loved the way the book ended.

    Reply
  130. I absolutely love Georgette Heyer and yes Damerel would also be my favourite rogue. Never truely a bad boy I loved the way the book ended.

    Reply
  131. Favorite rogue—Reggie, Reggie, a hundred times Reggie. Not to be boring, since the article is about Mary Jo and it’s her book, with the obvious title– “the Rake”. What’s the difference between a Rake and a Rogue anyway???
    I didn’t write this immediately– thought that many would say the same. Hope it’s not too late.

    Reply
  132. Favorite rogue—Reggie, Reggie, a hundred times Reggie. Not to be boring, since the article is about Mary Jo and it’s her book, with the obvious title– “the Rake”. What’s the difference between a Rake and a Rogue anyway???
    I didn’t write this immediately– thought that many would say the same. Hope it’s not too late.

    Reply
  133. Favorite rogue—Reggie, Reggie, a hundred times Reggie. Not to be boring, since the article is about Mary Jo and it’s her book, with the obvious title– “the Rake”. What’s the difference between a Rake and a Rogue anyway???
    I didn’t write this immediately– thought that many would say the same. Hope it’s not too late.

    Reply
  134. Favorite rogue—Reggie, Reggie, a hundred times Reggie. Not to be boring, since the article is about Mary Jo and it’s her book, with the obvious title– “the Rake”. What’s the difference between a Rake and a Rogue anyway???
    I didn’t write this immediately– thought that many would say the same. Hope it’s not too late.

    Reply
  135. Favorite rogue—Reggie, Reggie, a hundred times Reggie. Not to be boring, since the article is about Mary Jo and it’s her book, with the obvious title– “the Rake”. What’s the difference between a Rake and a Rogue anyway???
    I didn’t write this immediately– thought that many would say the same. Hope it’s not too late.

    Reply

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