Midweek reindogs

Cat_243_dover_27 From Mary Jo:

Who knew how many cool ways dogs could be dressed?  Though  the Reindog Parade is sponsored by the Cincinnati SPCA and is to promote pet adoptions, in fact most animal rescue groups won’t allow adoptions over the holidays because they don’t want people to make an impulse decision to take home a cute little puppy or kitten, but not really be suited to pet ownership.  When my darling Pandora died in her 21st year, it was December  23rd, and I couldn’t adopt Grady and Lacey from the SPCA until January 3rd.  But it was worth it–they’re primo-grade kitties. 

Here are some more cuties: 

Rd07

And in complete contrast, here’s a long and lean fellow:

Rd11

Mary Jo, thinking that pets return joy a thousand-fold

12 thoughts on “Midweek reindogs”

  1. Mary Jo, I love your reindog series! And yes, pets bring joy a thousand fold even when you subtract all of their annoying little habits.
    Last night my family (12 of us) went to Hershey Park’s CandyLane light display located in Hershey, Pennsylvania. And Drake (our 7 month old German Shepard puppy in Seeing Eye training) went with us. So many came up to pet him — little kids, newly weds, the elderly in wheel chairs — each with their own pet story to tell. It was so much fun.

    Reply
  2. Mary Jo, I love your reindog series! And yes, pets bring joy a thousand fold even when you subtract all of their annoying little habits.
    Last night my family (12 of us) went to Hershey Park’s CandyLane light display located in Hershey, Pennsylvania. And Drake (our 7 month old German Shepard puppy in Seeing Eye training) went with us. So many came up to pet him — little kids, newly weds, the elderly in wheel chairs — each with their own pet story to tell. It was so much fun.

    Reply
  3. Mary Jo, I love your reindog series! And yes, pets bring joy a thousand fold even when you subtract all of their annoying little habits.
    Last night my family (12 of us) went to Hershey Park’s CandyLane light display located in Hershey, Pennsylvania. And Drake (our 7 month old German Shepard puppy in Seeing Eye training) went with us. So many came up to pet him — little kids, newly weds, the elderly in wheel chairs — each with their own pet story to tell. It was so much fun.

    Reply
  4. Mary Jo, I love your reindog series! And yes, pets bring joy a thousand fold even when you subtract all of their annoying little habits.
    Last night my family (12 of us) went to Hershey Park’s CandyLane light display located in Hershey, Pennsylvania. And Drake (our 7 month old German Shepard puppy in Seeing Eye training) went with us. So many came up to pet him — little kids, newly weds, the elderly in wheel chairs — each with their own pet story to tell. It was so much fun.

    Reply
  5. Mary Jo, I also had a cat who lived to 20 years — my Harrie-cat, who started life as a tiny feral kitten, who a friend had asked me to catch for her. I caught this tiny scratching, biting fistful of fear, and then learned of the fate my friend had planned for her, so I took the kitten home. She dived straight under the couch and stayed there, sneaking out to eat and not use the sand box.
    After 3 days, she got lonely and decided my dog (a border collie cross, and also a rescue dog) was its mother. I spent the next few days laughing as this tiny determined kitten stalked my disconcerted dog, trying to snuggle up her. Eventually Bessie-dog decided the kitten was a kind of puppy and ended up washing her. The sight of that damp, spiky happy kitten playing with my dog was a joy to behold. Bessie washed that cat every day for the rest of her life. They both lived past 20 years.
    Bess died first and a few years later I got a pup who thought cats were creatures to be chased, and pounced with delight on Harrie. Swat! Small puppy learned that elderly cat owned house and puppy’s role was to be a hot water bottle for said cat.
    They’re a joy, all right.

    Reply
  6. Mary Jo, I also had a cat who lived to 20 years — my Harrie-cat, who started life as a tiny feral kitten, who a friend had asked me to catch for her. I caught this tiny scratching, biting fistful of fear, and then learned of the fate my friend had planned for her, so I took the kitten home. She dived straight under the couch and stayed there, sneaking out to eat and not use the sand box.
    After 3 days, she got lonely and decided my dog (a border collie cross, and also a rescue dog) was its mother. I spent the next few days laughing as this tiny determined kitten stalked my disconcerted dog, trying to snuggle up her. Eventually Bessie-dog decided the kitten was a kind of puppy and ended up washing her. The sight of that damp, spiky happy kitten playing with my dog was a joy to behold. Bessie washed that cat every day for the rest of her life. They both lived past 20 years.
    Bess died first and a few years later I got a pup who thought cats were creatures to be chased, and pounced with delight on Harrie. Swat! Small puppy learned that elderly cat owned house and puppy’s role was to be a hot water bottle for said cat.
    They’re a joy, all right.

    Reply
  7. Mary Jo, I also had a cat who lived to 20 years — my Harrie-cat, who started life as a tiny feral kitten, who a friend had asked me to catch for her. I caught this tiny scratching, biting fistful of fear, and then learned of the fate my friend had planned for her, so I took the kitten home. She dived straight under the couch and stayed there, sneaking out to eat and not use the sand box.
    After 3 days, she got lonely and decided my dog (a border collie cross, and also a rescue dog) was its mother. I spent the next few days laughing as this tiny determined kitten stalked my disconcerted dog, trying to snuggle up her. Eventually Bessie-dog decided the kitten was a kind of puppy and ended up washing her. The sight of that damp, spiky happy kitten playing with my dog was a joy to behold. Bessie washed that cat every day for the rest of her life. They both lived past 20 years.
    Bess died first and a few years later I got a pup who thought cats were creatures to be chased, and pounced with delight on Harrie. Swat! Small puppy learned that elderly cat owned house and puppy’s role was to be a hot water bottle for said cat.
    They’re a joy, all right.

    Reply
  8. Mary Jo, I also had a cat who lived to 20 years — my Harrie-cat, who started life as a tiny feral kitten, who a friend had asked me to catch for her. I caught this tiny scratching, biting fistful of fear, and then learned of the fate my friend had planned for her, so I took the kitten home. She dived straight under the couch and stayed there, sneaking out to eat and not use the sand box.
    After 3 days, she got lonely and decided my dog (a border collie cross, and also a rescue dog) was its mother. I spent the next few days laughing as this tiny determined kitten stalked my disconcerted dog, trying to snuggle up her. Eventually Bessie-dog decided the kitten was a kind of puppy and ended up washing her. The sight of that damp, spiky happy kitten playing with my dog was a joy to behold. Bessie washed that cat every day for the rest of her life. They both lived past 20 years.
    Bess died first and a few years later I got a pup who thought cats were creatures to be chased, and pounced with delight on Harrie. Swat! Small puppy learned that elderly cat owned house and puppy’s role was to be a hot water bottle for said cat.
    They’re a joy, all right.

    Reply
  9. From MJP:
    Nina, what wonderful training for Drake! I’m sure it’s hard to let the dogs you’ve trained go when the time comes, but at least you know they’re alive and well and bringing new dimensions to the lives of their new partners.
    Anne, what a wonderful story about Harrie-cat! You were certainly rewarded for rescuing her furry little rear end. She sounds great. My Pandora was a tabby with thumbs, a perfect little lady cat who was lost, rescued, and advertised as free to good home. A perfect lady, except when another cat ventured onto her turf, in which case she turned into a furry buzzsaw. 🙂
    Animals lovers, like readers, are lucky people.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  10. From MJP:
    Nina, what wonderful training for Drake! I’m sure it’s hard to let the dogs you’ve trained go when the time comes, but at least you know they’re alive and well and bringing new dimensions to the lives of their new partners.
    Anne, what a wonderful story about Harrie-cat! You were certainly rewarded for rescuing her furry little rear end. She sounds great. My Pandora was a tabby with thumbs, a perfect little lady cat who was lost, rescued, and advertised as free to good home. A perfect lady, except when another cat ventured onto her turf, in which case she turned into a furry buzzsaw. 🙂
    Animals lovers, like readers, are lucky people.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  11. From MJP:
    Nina, what wonderful training for Drake! I’m sure it’s hard to let the dogs you’ve trained go when the time comes, but at least you know they’re alive and well and bringing new dimensions to the lives of their new partners.
    Anne, what a wonderful story about Harrie-cat! You were certainly rewarded for rescuing her furry little rear end. She sounds great. My Pandora was a tabby with thumbs, a perfect little lady cat who was lost, rescued, and advertised as free to good home. A perfect lady, except when another cat ventured onto her turf, in which case she turned into a furry buzzsaw. 🙂
    Animals lovers, like readers, are lucky people.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  12. From MJP:
    Nina, what wonderful training for Drake! I’m sure it’s hard to let the dogs you’ve trained go when the time comes, but at least you know they’re alive and well and bringing new dimensions to the lives of their new partners.
    Anne, what a wonderful story about Harrie-cat! You were certainly rewarded for rescuing her furry little rear end. She sounds great. My Pandora was a tabby with thumbs, a perfect little lady cat who was lost, rescued, and advertised as free to good home. A perfect lady, except when another cat ventured onto her turf, in which case she turned into a furry buzzsaw. 🙂
    Animals lovers, like readers, are lucky people.
    Mary Jo

    Reply

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