Men and the Sea

by Mary Jo

A few days ago, the Mayhem Consultant and I watched a movie we both loved: The Finest HoursDVDFinest Hours.   Based on the book by the same name by Michael J. Tougias and Casey Sherman), it's the true story of an insanely brave Coast Guard rescue that took place in a vicious nor'easter storm that took place off Cape Cod in 1952.  (Released in January 2016, the movie didn't make much impact, but it deserves to be seen.)

The storm was so violent that it broke two tanker ships in half near Cape Cod.  Both were cheaply built WWII vessels that should have been retired after the war, but weren't.  One Coast Guard rescue team went out for the SS Fort Mercer and managed to save a number of the crew.  Then it was discovered that a second tanker, the SS Pendleton, had also broken in half nearby.  The front half of the ship sank immediately, taking the captain, the radios, and most of the officers.



FinestHoursBookThe rear section stayed afloat with 33 crewmen aboard.  But was rescue even possible in such conditions?  The closest Coast Guard station was at Chatham, but the "bar"–the dangerously shifting shoals at the mouth of the harbor, would have to be crossed.  It was difficult to cross in good weather and pretty much suicidal under such weather conditions.

But they had to try.  Four young men took out a 36 foot rescue boat.  The boat was designed to right itself in overturned by waves, but other than that, it was a VERY small boat going into a nightmarish ocean.  It was captained by Bernard Webber.  Not yet 24 years old, a veteran of the WWII Merchant Marine, Bernie was the oldest and most experienced of the crew. (!!!)

There are three interwoven strands of story: the crew in the shattered Pendleton ActualLiveboattrying to stay afloat, Bernie and his crew looking for the wreck when their compass had been destroyed by a near fatal wave, and the friends and family ashore.  I wouldn't have watched this movie if I thought it ended badly, but describing it as a rescue story encouraged me, and it was a great, powerful story.  I heartily recommend it. (That's a picture of the actual lifeboat on the right.  Designed to hold 12 people, it returned home with 36 men on it.)

Part of the fun of the movies is that quiet Bernie, who follows the rules, is played by Chris Pine, who also plays the swashbuckling Captain James Kirk of the Star Trek rebooted movies. <G>

Watching The Finest Hours got me to thinking about men and the sea.  Britain is an island, of course, and the sea is part of the British DNA.  The Royal Navy made Britain the world power that it became.  (A favorite quote of mine is the British admiral who said during the Napoleonic wars that he couldn't promise the French would not come, but he promised that they would not come by sea.  And he was right.    <G>)

BritishFrigateMen of the sea are not uncommon in our romances.  My second book, Lady of Fortune, has a hero who was a naval captain. (Yes, that book will be e-pubbed eventually!)  I've had characters who made fortunes in shipping, the hero of The Bartered Bride was a Yankee sea captain in the China tea trade, and in the book I'm writing now, I'm cultivating a secondary character who is a blockade runner to star in a book of his own.  The sea surrounds us!

It's easy to write about dashing sailors in our books and I do research, of course.  But nothing made me as aware of the power and danger of the oceans as watching The Finest Hours. A lot of the scary sailing scenes were done by CGI, but they really gave a sense of how dangerous and terrifying the ocean can be.  The movie was also released in 3-D and Imax, which would have been so intense that I would have hidden under my seat. <G>  

Do you have favorite romances that feature ships and sailors?  (A female ship's captain would be fine, too. <G>)  What would you suggest?

Mary Jo, bidding goodnight to all the ships at seaโ€ฆ

270 thoughts on “Men and the Sea”

  1. The story sounds fascinating, and I will certainly keep an eye out for it.
    One thing: you wrote, “a 36″ rescue boat.” In American, that refers to a boat that is 36 inches long. Does that notation indicate 36 feet in British English?

    Reply
  2. The story sounds fascinating, and I will certainly keep an eye out for it.
    One thing: you wrote, “a 36″ rescue boat.” In American, that refers to a boat that is 36 inches long. Does that notation indicate 36 feet in British English?

    Reply
  3. The story sounds fascinating, and I will certainly keep an eye out for it.
    One thing: you wrote, “a 36″ rescue boat.” In American, that refers to a boat that is 36 inches long. Does that notation indicate 36 feet in British English?

    Reply
  4. The story sounds fascinating, and I will certainly keep an eye out for it.
    One thing: you wrote, “a 36″ rescue boat.” In American, that refers to a boat that is 36 inches long. Does that notation indicate 36 feet in British English?

    Reply
  5. The story sounds fascinating, and I will certainly keep an eye out for it.
    One thing: you wrote, “a 36″ rescue boat.” In American, that refers to a boat that is 36 inches long. Does that notation indicate 36 feet in British English?

    Reply
  6. Whoops, typo!!!! It should be a 36 foot boat, and I’ve made that correction. (I make a lot of typos, alas.)
    The DVD of the movie has been released–I got it from Netflix. It really is a compelling story. With a happy ending. *G*

    Reply
  7. Whoops, typo!!!! It should be a 36 foot boat, and I’ve made that correction. (I make a lot of typos, alas.)
    The DVD of the movie has been released–I got it from Netflix. It really is a compelling story. With a happy ending. *G*

    Reply
  8. Whoops, typo!!!! It should be a 36 foot boat, and I’ve made that correction. (I make a lot of typos, alas.)
    The DVD of the movie has been released–I got it from Netflix. It really is a compelling story. With a happy ending. *G*

    Reply
  9. Whoops, typo!!!! It should be a 36 foot boat, and I’ve made that correction. (I make a lot of typos, alas.)
    The DVD of the movie has been released–I got it from Netflix. It really is a compelling story. With a happy ending. *G*

    Reply
  10. Whoops, typo!!!! It should be a 36 foot boat, and I’ve made that correction. (I make a lot of typos, alas.)
    The DVD of the movie has been released–I got it from Netflix. It really is a compelling story. With a happy ending. *G*

    Reply
  11. Romance at sea? Many of Johanna Lindsey’s novels. I must confess I don’t remember their titles, I could look them up, but there are too many of them. My favourite ones are those ‘starring’ Georgie and Gabby, two bold heroines.
    When I was a child, I liked Captain Blood, but I used to twist the action in my mind so the heroine could become captain of a pirate ship and be brought in front of the governor at the end only to discover he’s the former Captain Blood.
    I also love the book about the ugly duchess (by Eloisa James), where the male character runs away after marriage and becomes a privateer.
    But probably the best book about a ship and its crew is Toate panzele sus! (All Sails Up), by Radu Tudoran. It is not a romance novel per se, but it includes a love story between the captain Anton Lupan and a beautiful girl called Adnana. The book was such a success that they made a TV series inspired by it – a really good one. ๐Ÿ™‚

    Reply
  12. Romance at sea? Many of Johanna Lindsey’s novels. I must confess I don’t remember their titles, I could look them up, but there are too many of them. My favourite ones are those ‘starring’ Georgie and Gabby, two bold heroines.
    When I was a child, I liked Captain Blood, but I used to twist the action in my mind so the heroine could become captain of a pirate ship and be brought in front of the governor at the end only to discover he’s the former Captain Blood.
    I also love the book about the ugly duchess (by Eloisa James), where the male character runs away after marriage and becomes a privateer.
    But probably the best book about a ship and its crew is Toate panzele sus! (All Sails Up), by Radu Tudoran. It is not a romance novel per se, but it includes a love story between the captain Anton Lupan and a beautiful girl called Adnana. The book was such a success that they made a TV series inspired by it – a really good one. ๐Ÿ™‚

    Reply
  13. Romance at sea? Many of Johanna Lindsey’s novels. I must confess I don’t remember their titles, I could look them up, but there are too many of them. My favourite ones are those ‘starring’ Georgie and Gabby, two bold heroines.
    When I was a child, I liked Captain Blood, but I used to twist the action in my mind so the heroine could become captain of a pirate ship and be brought in front of the governor at the end only to discover he’s the former Captain Blood.
    I also love the book about the ugly duchess (by Eloisa James), where the male character runs away after marriage and becomes a privateer.
    But probably the best book about a ship and its crew is Toate panzele sus! (All Sails Up), by Radu Tudoran. It is not a romance novel per se, but it includes a love story between the captain Anton Lupan and a beautiful girl called Adnana. The book was such a success that they made a TV series inspired by it – a really good one. ๐Ÿ™‚

    Reply
  14. Romance at sea? Many of Johanna Lindsey’s novels. I must confess I don’t remember their titles, I could look them up, but there are too many of them. My favourite ones are those ‘starring’ Georgie and Gabby, two bold heroines.
    When I was a child, I liked Captain Blood, but I used to twist the action in my mind so the heroine could become captain of a pirate ship and be brought in front of the governor at the end only to discover he’s the former Captain Blood.
    I also love the book about the ugly duchess (by Eloisa James), where the male character runs away after marriage and becomes a privateer.
    But probably the best book about a ship and its crew is Toate panzele sus! (All Sails Up), by Radu Tudoran. It is not a romance novel per se, but it includes a love story between the captain Anton Lupan and a beautiful girl called Adnana. The book was such a success that they made a TV series inspired by it – a really good one. ๐Ÿ™‚

    Reply
  15. Romance at sea? Many of Johanna Lindsey’s novels. I must confess I don’t remember their titles, I could look them up, but there are too many of them. My favourite ones are those ‘starring’ Georgie and Gabby, two bold heroines.
    When I was a child, I liked Captain Blood, but I used to twist the action in my mind so the heroine could become captain of a pirate ship and be brought in front of the governor at the end only to discover he’s the former Captain Blood.
    I also love the book about the ugly duchess (by Eloisa James), where the male character runs away after marriage and becomes a privateer.
    But probably the best book about a ship and its crew is Toate panzele sus! (All Sails Up), by Radu Tudoran. It is not a romance novel per se, but it includes a love story between the captain Anton Lupan and a beautiful girl called Adnana. The book was such a success that they made a TV series inspired by it – a really good one. ๐Ÿ™‚

    Reply
  16. Stories like “The Finest Hours” reinforce my feeling that an emergency is when you are in water over your head and out of sight of land. I sailed with my DH for 25 years by sheer teeth gritting. Finally told him I was done a couple of years ago. He has found kayaking a nice substitute.I’d rather be inside in the cool reading something deliciously romantic.

    Reply
  17. Stories like “The Finest Hours” reinforce my feeling that an emergency is when you are in water over your head and out of sight of land. I sailed with my DH for 25 years by sheer teeth gritting. Finally told him I was done a couple of years ago. He has found kayaking a nice substitute.I’d rather be inside in the cool reading something deliciously romantic.

    Reply
  18. Stories like “The Finest Hours” reinforce my feeling that an emergency is when you are in water over your head and out of sight of land. I sailed with my DH for 25 years by sheer teeth gritting. Finally told him I was done a couple of years ago. He has found kayaking a nice substitute.I’d rather be inside in the cool reading something deliciously romantic.

    Reply
  19. Stories like “The Finest Hours” reinforce my feeling that an emergency is when you are in water over your head and out of sight of land. I sailed with my DH for 25 years by sheer teeth gritting. Finally told him I was done a couple of years ago. He has found kayaking a nice substitute.I’d rather be inside in the cool reading something deliciously romantic.

    Reply
  20. Stories like “The Finest Hours” reinforce my feeling that an emergency is when you are in water over your head and out of sight of land. I sailed with my DH for 25 years by sheer teeth gritting. Finally told him I was done a couple of years ago. He has found kayaking a nice substitute.I’d rather be inside in the cool reading something deliciously romantic.

    Reply
  21. Oana-Maria, I LOVE your variation on Captain Blood! Toate panzanele sus! sounds very good, but I don’t think it ever made it to the Engliah language market, alas. It’s nice when good books are filmed well. *G*

    Reply
  22. Oana-Maria, I LOVE your variation on Captain Blood! Toate panzanele sus! sounds very good, but I don’t think it ever made it to the Engliah language market, alas. It’s nice when good books are filmed well. *G*

    Reply
  23. Oana-Maria, I LOVE your variation on Captain Blood! Toate panzanele sus! sounds very good, but I don’t think it ever made it to the Engliah language market, alas. It’s nice when good books are filmed well. *G*

    Reply
  24. Oana-Maria, I LOVE your variation on Captain Blood! Toate panzanele sus! sounds very good, but I don’t think it ever made it to the Engliah language market, alas. It’s nice when good books are filmed well. *G*

    Reply
  25. Oana-Maria, I LOVE your variation on Captain Blood! Toate panzanele sus! sounds very good, but I don’t think it ever made it to the Engliah language market, alas. It’s nice when good books are filmed well. *G*

    Reply
  26. Kathy K, you get major credit for putting up with sailing for a quarter century when you hated it! After 25 years, it was time for a change. The movie is good, though, especially when safely seen on dry land. *G*

    Reply
  27. Kathy K, you get major credit for putting up with sailing for a quarter century when you hated it! After 25 years, it was time for a change. The movie is good, though, especially when safely seen on dry land. *G*

    Reply
  28. Kathy K, you get major credit for putting up with sailing for a quarter century when you hated it! After 25 years, it was time for a change. The movie is good, though, especially when safely seen on dry land. *G*

    Reply
  29. Kathy K, you get major credit for putting up with sailing for a quarter century when you hated it! After 25 years, it was time for a change. The movie is good, though, especially when safely seen on dry land. *G*

    Reply
  30. Kathy K, you get major credit for putting up with sailing for a quarter century when you hated it! After 25 years, it was time for a change. The movie is good, though, especially when safely seen on dry land. *G*

    Reply
  31. One of the first books I ever read was a children’s version of the acton on Lake Erie (with a boy hero, of course). Unfortunately, I don’t remember it’s name. Put it certainly involves Admiral Perry.
    And then there was Captains Courageous. And Kidnapped! Other than these “boy’s” stories, I haven’t read much about the sea. I read one Sabitini as a young woman, enjoyed it, but never looked for any more. I do read sea romances from time to time, but don’t seek them out, and seldoe retrieve one because I find myself dwelling on it and decide to go visit.
    In real life, I sometime suffer motion sickness. I wonder if there’s a connection!

    Reply
  32. One of the first books I ever read was a children’s version of the acton on Lake Erie (with a boy hero, of course). Unfortunately, I don’t remember it’s name. Put it certainly involves Admiral Perry.
    And then there was Captains Courageous. And Kidnapped! Other than these “boy’s” stories, I haven’t read much about the sea. I read one Sabitini as a young woman, enjoyed it, but never looked for any more. I do read sea romances from time to time, but don’t seek them out, and seldoe retrieve one because I find myself dwelling on it and decide to go visit.
    In real life, I sometime suffer motion sickness. I wonder if there’s a connection!

    Reply
  33. One of the first books I ever read was a children’s version of the acton on Lake Erie (with a boy hero, of course). Unfortunately, I don’t remember it’s name. Put it certainly involves Admiral Perry.
    And then there was Captains Courageous. And Kidnapped! Other than these “boy’s” stories, I haven’t read much about the sea. I read one Sabitini as a young woman, enjoyed it, but never looked for any more. I do read sea romances from time to time, but don’t seek them out, and seldoe retrieve one because I find myself dwelling on it and decide to go visit.
    In real life, I sometime suffer motion sickness. I wonder if there’s a connection!

    Reply
  34. One of the first books I ever read was a children’s version of the acton on Lake Erie (with a boy hero, of course). Unfortunately, I don’t remember it’s name. Put it certainly involves Admiral Perry.
    And then there was Captains Courageous. And Kidnapped! Other than these “boy’s” stories, I haven’t read much about the sea. I read one Sabitini as a young woman, enjoyed it, but never looked for any more. I do read sea romances from time to time, but don’t seek them out, and seldoe retrieve one because I find myself dwelling on it and decide to go visit.
    In real life, I sometime suffer motion sickness. I wonder if there’s a connection!

    Reply
  35. One of the first books I ever read was a children’s version of the acton on Lake Erie (with a boy hero, of course). Unfortunately, I don’t remember it’s name. Put it certainly involves Admiral Perry.
    And then there was Captains Courageous. And Kidnapped! Other than these “boy’s” stories, I haven’t read much about the sea. I read one Sabitini as a young woman, enjoyed it, but never looked for any more. I do read sea romances from time to time, but don’t seek them out, and seldoe retrieve one because I find myself dwelling on it and decide to go visit.
    In real life, I sometime suffer motion sickness. I wonder if there’s a connection!

    Reply
  36. I agree with Kathy K. I am not a sailor. But, when Mr Wonderful and I were a couple, we had boats….several boats. He had been in the Navy, he loved fishing, so the natural thing to him was to get boats. We had everything from a canoe on up. I always sat in the boat envisioning my body sinking like a stone never to be seen again.
    As for wonderful stories about the sea, I think stories about the explorers who found new worlds would be interesting. They truly were sailing into unknown seas.

    Reply
  37. I agree with Kathy K. I am not a sailor. But, when Mr Wonderful and I were a couple, we had boats….several boats. He had been in the Navy, he loved fishing, so the natural thing to him was to get boats. We had everything from a canoe on up. I always sat in the boat envisioning my body sinking like a stone never to be seen again.
    As for wonderful stories about the sea, I think stories about the explorers who found new worlds would be interesting. They truly were sailing into unknown seas.

    Reply
  38. I agree with Kathy K. I am not a sailor. But, when Mr Wonderful and I were a couple, we had boats….several boats. He had been in the Navy, he loved fishing, so the natural thing to him was to get boats. We had everything from a canoe on up. I always sat in the boat envisioning my body sinking like a stone never to be seen again.
    As for wonderful stories about the sea, I think stories about the explorers who found new worlds would be interesting. They truly were sailing into unknown seas.

    Reply
  39. I agree with Kathy K. I am not a sailor. But, when Mr Wonderful and I were a couple, we had boats….several boats. He had been in the Navy, he loved fishing, so the natural thing to him was to get boats. We had everything from a canoe on up. I always sat in the boat envisioning my body sinking like a stone never to be seen again.
    As for wonderful stories about the sea, I think stories about the explorers who found new worlds would be interesting. They truly were sailing into unknown seas.

    Reply
  40. I agree with Kathy K. I am not a sailor. But, when Mr Wonderful and I were a couple, we had boats….several boats. He had been in the Navy, he loved fishing, so the natural thing to him was to get boats. We had everything from a canoe on up. I always sat in the boat envisioning my body sinking like a stone never to be seen again.
    As for wonderful stories about the sea, I think stories about the explorers who found new worlds would be interesting. They truly were sailing into unknown seas.

    Reply
  41. The TV series was made in the ’70s, during Ceausescu’s regime, so no, it was unlikely to reach the English language market. I think you can watch the episodes on youtube, but I’m not sure you’d understand much without any English subtitles. ๐Ÿ™
    I can tell you what happens, though. :p
    I don’t remember all the details, so I’ll improvise a little… The story begins with two young men, best friends, in love with the sea, who want to sail around the world. They’re pretty enthusiastic about it. The even find a ship, Martha, and they buy it. They rename it L’Esperance (one of the two young men is French; the other one is Romanian). The Frenchman, Pierre Vaillant, takes L’Esperance on a voyage (to make some money for the big adventure? ) and his friend waits for him to return. He waits and waits… and the Frenchman doesn’t come back. The Romanian captain, Anton Lupan, grows restless and worried. He is sure his friend wouldn’t have gone on the big voyage without him. He starts investigating and no one seems to know anything about Vaillant. Desperate, Lupan decides to go to sea himself and look for Vaillant. He finds a wreck and – with the help of a group of good men – he rebuilds the ship, calling it Speranta (Romanian for L’Esperance/Hope). When the ship is ready, he goes around to do the necessary paperwork and in a hotel he hears someone mention Vaillant’s name. The receptionist tells him that Mr Vaillant has indeed been their guest, but he has just left = Lupan has just missed him. He can’t even begin to understand his friend’s behaviour, but he trusts him completely, he can’t believe Vaillant would have betrayed their friendship. He just needs to find him and he is sure he’ll explain.

    Reply
  42. The TV series was made in the ’70s, during Ceausescu’s regime, so no, it was unlikely to reach the English language market. I think you can watch the episodes on youtube, but I’m not sure you’d understand much without any English subtitles. ๐Ÿ™
    I can tell you what happens, though. :p
    I don’t remember all the details, so I’ll improvise a little… The story begins with two young men, best friends, in love with the sea, who want to sail around the world. They’re pretty enthusiastic about it. The even find a ship, Martha, and they buy it. They rename it L’Esperance (one of the two young men is French; the other one is Romanian). The Frenchman, Pierre Vaillant, takes L’Esperance on a voyage (to make some money for the big adventure? ) and his friend waits for him to return. He waits and waits… and the Frenchman doesn’t come back. The Romanian captain, Anton Lupan, grows restless and worried. He is sure his friend wouldn’t have gone on the big voyage without him. He starts investigating and no one seems to know anything about Vaillant. Desperate, Lupan decides to go to sea himself and look for Vaillant. He finds a wreck and – with the help of a group of good men – he rebuilds the ship, calling it Speranta (Romanian for L’Esperance/Hope). When the ship is ready, he goes around to do the necessary paperwork and in a hotel he hears someone mention Vaillant’s name. The receptionist tells him that Mr Vaillant has indeed been their guest, but he has just left = Lupan has just missed him. He can’t even begin to understand his friend’s behaviour, but he trusts him completely, he can’t believe Vaillant would have betrayed their friendship. He just needs to find him and he is sure he’ll explain.

    Reply
  43. The TV series was made in the ’70s, during Ceausescu’s regime, so no, it was unlikely to reach the English language market. I think you can watch the episodes on youtube, but I’m not sure you’d understand much without any English subtitles. ๐Ÿ™
    I can tell you what happens, though. :p
    I don’t remember all the details, so I’ll improvise a little… The story begins with two young men, best friends, in love with the sea, who want to sail around the world. They’re pretty enthusiastic about it. The even find a ship, Martha, and they buy it. They rename it L’Esperance (one of the two young men is French; the other one is Romanian). The Frenchman, Pierre Vaillant, takes L’Esperance on a voyage (to make some money for the big adventure? ) and his friend waits for him to return. He waits and waits… and the Frenchman doesn’t come back. The Romanian captain, Anton Lupan, grows restless and worried. He is sure his friend wouldn’t have gone on the big voyage without him. He starts investigating and no one seems to know anything about Vaillant. Desperate, Lupan decides to go to sea himself and look for Vaillant. He finds a wreck and – with the help of a group of good men – he rebuilds the ship, calling it Speranta (Romanian for L’Esperance/Hope). When the ship is ready, he goes around to do the necessary paperwork and in a hotel he hears someone mention Vaillant’s name. The receptionist tells him that Mr Vaillant has indeed been their guest, but he has just left = Lupan has just missed him. He can’t even begin to understand his friend’s behaviour, but he trusts him completely, he can’t believe Vaillant would have betrayed their friendship. He just needs to find him and he is sure he’ll explain.

    Reply
  44. The TV series was made in the ’70s, during Ceausescu’s regime, so no, it was unlikely to reach the English language market. I think you can watch the episodes on youtube, but I’m not sure you’d understand much without any English subtitles. ๐Ÿ™
    I can tell you what happens, though. :p
    I don’t remember all the details, so I’ll improvise a little… The story begins with two young men, best friends, in love with the sea, who want to sail around the world. They’re pretty enthusiastic about it. The even find a ship, Martha, and they buy it. They rename it L’Esperance (one of the two young men is French; the other one is Romanian). The Frenchman, Pierre Vaillant, takes L’Esperance on a voyage (to make some money for the big adventure? ) and his friend waits for him to return. He waits and waits… and the Frenchman doesn’t come back. The Romanian captain, Anton Lupan, grows restless and worried. He is sure his friend wouldn’t have gone on the big voyage without him. He starts investigating and no one seems to know anything about Vaillant. Desperate, Lupan decides to go to sea himself and look for Vaillant. He finds a wreck and – with the help of a group of good men – he rebuilds the ship, calling it Speranta (Romanian for L’Esperance/Hope). When the ship is ready, he goes around to do the necessary paperwork and in a hotel he hears someone mention Vaillant’s name. The receptionist tells him that Mr Vaillant has indeed been their guest, but he has just left = Lupan has just missed him. He can’t even begin to understand his friend’s behaviour, but he trusts him completely, he can’t believe Vaillant would have betrayed their friendship. He just needs to find him and he is sure he’ll explain.

    Reply
  45. The TV series was made in the ’70s, during Ceausescu’s regime, so no, it was unlikely to reach the English language market. I think you can watch the episodes on youtube, but I’m not sure you’d understand much without any English subtitles. ๐Ÿ™
    I can tell you what happens, though. :p
    I don’t remember all the details, so I’ll improvise a little… The story begins with two young men, best friends, in love with the sea, who want to sail around the world. They’re pretty enthusiastic about it. The even find a ship, Martha, and they buy it. They rename it L’Esperance (one of the two young men is French; the other one is Romanian). The Frenchman, Pierre Vaillant, takes L’Esperance on a voyage (to make some money for the big adventure? ) and his friend waits for him to return. He waits and waits… and the Frenchman doesn’t come back. The Romanian captain, Anton Lupan, grows restless and worried. He is sure his friend wouldn’t have gone on the big voyage without him. He starts investigating and no one seems to know anything about Vaillant. Desperate, Lupan decides to go to sea himself and look for Vaillant. He finds a wreck and – with the help of a group of good men – he rebuilds the ship, calling it Speranta (Romanian for L’Esperance/Hope). When the ship is ready, he goes around to do the necessary paperwork and in a hotel he hears someone mention Vaillant’s name. The receptionist tells him that Mr Vaillant has indeed been their guest, but he has just left = Lupan has just missed him. He can’t even begin to understand his friend’s behaviour, but he trusts him completely, he can’t believe Vaillant would have betrayed their friendship. He just needs to find him and he is sure he’ll explain.

    Reply
  46. I highly recommend Donna Thorland’s “The Rebel Pirate” (the heroine is the rebel; the hero is an officer in the British Navy). I was captured by the very first sentence “The gold was Spanish, the chest was French, the ship was American, and the captain was dead.”
    And I love Elizabeth Essex’s books with naval heroes. The first one takes place mostly at sea, “Almost a Scandal”.
    Except for authors Darlene Marshall and Katherine Bone, that I know of, pirates seem to have fallen out of favor. There were a lot more old-school romances featuring pirates a few decades ago. imho, they have not all aged well.

    Reply
  47. I highly recommend Donna Thorland’s “The Rebel Pirate” (the heroine is the rebel; the hero is an officer in the British Navy). I was captured by the very first sentence “The gold was Spanish, the chest was French, the ship was American, and the captain was dead.”
    And I love Elizabeth Essex’s books with naval heroes. The first one takes place mostly at sea, “Almost a Scandal”.
    Except for authors Darlene Marshall and Katherine Bone, that I know of, pirates seem to have fallen out of favor. There were a lot more old-school romances featuring pirates a few decades ago. imho, they have not all aged well.

    Reply
  48. I highly recommend Donna Thorland’s “The Rebel Pirate” (the heroine is the rebel; the hero is an officer in the British Navy). I was captured by the very first sentence “The gold was Spanish, the chest was French, the ship was American, and the captain was dead.”
    And I love Elizabeth Essex’s books with naval heroes. The first one takes place mostly at sea, “Almost a Scandal”.
    Except for authors Darlene Marshall and Katherine Bone, that I know of, pirates seem to have fallen out of favor. There were a lot more old-school romances featuring pirates a few decades ago. imho, they have not all aged well.

    Reply
  49. I highly recommend Donna Thorland’s “The Rebel Pirate” (the heroine is the rebel; the hero is an officer in the British Navy). I was captured by the very first sentence “The gold was Spanish, the chest was French, the ship was American, and the captain was dead.”
    And I love Elizabeth Essex’s books with naval heroes. The first one takes place mostly at sea, “Almost a Scandal”.
    Except for authors Darlene Marshall and Katherine Bone, that I know of, pirates seem to have fallen out of favor. There were a lot more old-school romances featuring pirates a few decades ago. imho, they have not all aged well.

    Reply
  50. I highly recommend Donna Thorland’s “The Rebel Pirate” (the heroine is the rebel; the hero is an officer in the British Navy). I was captured by the very first sentence “The gold was Spanish, the chest was French, the ship was American, and the captain was dead.”
    And I love Elizabeth Essex’s books with naval heroes. The first one takes place mostly at sea, “Almost a Scandal”.
    Except for authors Darlene Marshall and Katherine Bone, that I know of, pirates seem to have fallen out of favor. There were a lot more old-school romances featuring pirates a few decades ago. imho, they have not all aged well.

    Reply
  51. Internet glitches or something – what I’m trying to post keeps disappearing. ๐Ÿ™
    So… I’ll try again.
    Lupan starts looking for Vaillant from port to port, taking Speranta on her first sea voyage. Lots of adventures for the new crew. They will cross the Atlantic and follow the South American coast towards the south, reaching the Strait of Magellan.
    Lupan is a noble character and a great captain, but I’ve always liked the rest of the crew better. :p Especially Ismail, the cook, who is (obviously) Turkish and can’t speak Romanian very well. Whenever the ship happens to be under attack, his weapon of choice (to crack skulls) is a skillet. Then there’s Gherasim, the first mate, a strong, trustworthy man who is a father figure for the others. There are also two cousins, one of whom is a ladies man (the other one is in love with… his gun), and an orphan boy, accompanied by his faithful dog.
    And at some point the guys rescue a beautiful girl called Adnana and decide to take her to her family, but – as along the way love blossoms between her and the captain – she will re-join the crew after a while. ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Reply
  52. Internet glitches or something – what I’m trying to post keeps disappearing. ๐Ÿ™
    So… I’ll try again.
    Lupan starts looking for Vaillant from port to port, taking Speranta on her first sea voyage. Lots of adventures for the new crew. They will cross the Atlantic and follow the South American coast towards the south, reaching the Strait of Magellan.
    Lupan is a noble character and a great captain, but I’ve always liked the rest of the crew better. :p Especially Ismail, the cook, who is (obviously) Turkish and can’t speak Romanian very well. Whenever the ship happens to be under attack, his weapon of choice (to crack skulls) is a skillet. Then there’s Gherasim, the first mate, a strong, trustworthy man who is a father figure for the others. There are also two cousins, one of whom is a ladies man (the other one is in love with… his gun), and an orphan boy, accompanied by his faithful dog.
    And at some point the guys rescue a beautiful girl called Adnana and decide to take her to her family, but – as along the way love blossoms between her and the captain – she will re-join the crew after a while. ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Reply
  53. Internet glitches or something – what I’m trying to post keeps disappearing. ๐Ÿ™
    So… I’ll try again.
    Lupan starts looking for Vaillant from port to port, taking Speranta on her first sea voyage. Lots of adventures for the new crew. They will cross the Atlantic and follow the South American coast towards the south, reaching the Strait of Magellan.
    Lupan is a noble character and a great captain, but I’ve always liked the rest of the crew better. :p Especially Ismail, the cook, who is (obviously) Turkish and can’t speak Romanian very well. Whenever the ship happens to be under attack, his weapon of choice (to crack skulls) is a skillet. Then there’s Gherasim, the first mate, a strong, trustworthy man who is a father figure for the others. There are also two cousins, one of whom is a ladies man (the other one is in love with… his gun), and an orphan boy, accompanied by his faithful dog.
    And at some point the guys rescue a beautiful girl called Adnana and decide to take her to her family, but – as along the way love blossoms between her and the captain – she will re-join the crew after a while. ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Reply
  54. Internet glitches or something – what I’m trying to post keeps disappearing. ๐Ÿ™
    So… I’ll try again.
    Lupan starts looking for Vaillant from port to port, taking Speranta on her first sea voyage. Lots of adventures for the new crew. They will cross the Atlantic and follow the South American coast towards the south, reaching the Strait of Magellan.
    Lupan is a noble character and a great captain, but I’ve always liked the rest of the crew better. :p Especially Ismail, the cook, who is (obviously) Turkish and can’t speak Romanian very well. Whenever the ship happens to be under attack, his weapon of choice (to crack skulls) is a skillet. Then there’s Gherasim, the first mate, a strong, trustworthy man who is a father figure for the others. There are also two cousins, one of whom is a ladies man (the other one is in love with… his gun), and an orphan boy, accompanied by his faithful dog.
    And at some point the guys rescue a beautiful girl called Adnana and decide to take her to her family, but – as along the way love blossoms between her and the captain – she will re-join the crew after a while. ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Reply
  55. Internet glitches or something – what I’m trying to post keeps disappearing. ๐Ÿ™
    So… I’ll try again.
    Lupan starts looking for Vaillant from port to port, taking Speranta on her first sea voyage. Lots of adventures for the new crew. They will cross the Atlantic and follow the South American coast towards the south, reaching the Strait of Magellan.
    Lupan is a noble character and a great captain, but I’ve always liked the rest of the crew better. :p Especially Ismail, the cook, who is (obviously) Turkish and can’t speak Romanian very well. Whenever the ship happens to be under attack, his weapon of choice (to crack skulls) is a skillet. Then there’s Gherasim, the first mate, a strong, trustworthy man who is a father figure for the others. There are also two cousins, one of whom is a ladies man (the other one is in love with… his gun), and an orphan boy, accompanied by his faithful dog.
    And at some point the guys rescue a beautiful girl called Adnana and decide to take her to her family, but – as along the way love blossoms between her and the captain – she will re-join the crew after a while. ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Reply
  56. Lupan eventually has to fight some pirates and finds out that the leader of the pirates has been using Vaillant’s name all along!
    His friend seems to have perished while L’Esperance was burning down in a pirate attack. There isn’t much hope left for him to have miraculously survived, but Anton Lupan realizes that he has new friends, he can pursue new dreams, have new adventures, and – if at some point he may feel the need to settle down and start a family – he has the lovely Adnana by his side.
    So the end of the book shows that there’s always hope for new beginnings.

    Reply
  57. Lupan eventually has to fight some pirates and finds out that the leader of the pirates has been using Vaillant’s name all along!
    His friend seems to have perished while L’Esperance was burning down in a pirate attack. There isn’t much hope left for him to have miraculously survived, but Anton Lupan realizes that he has new friends, he can pursue new dreams, have new adventures, and – if at some point he may feel the need to settle down and start a family – he has the lovely Adnana by his side.
    So the end of the book shows that there’s always hope for new beginnings.

    Reply
  58. Lupan eventually has to fight some pirates and finds out that the leader of the pirates has been using Vaillant’s name all along!
    His friend seems to have perished while L’Esperance was burning down in a pirate attack. There isn’t much hope left for him to have miraculously survived, but Anton Lupan realizes that he has new friends, he can pursue new dreams, have new adventures, and – if at some point he may feel the need to settle down and start a family – he has the lovely Adnana by his side.
    So the end of the book shows that there’s always hope for new beginnings.

    Reply
  59. Lupan eventually has to fight some pirates and finds out that the leader of the pirates has been using Vaillant’s name all along!
    His friend seems to have perished while L’Esperance was burning down in a pirate attack. There isn’t much hope left for him to have miraculously survived, but Anton Lupan realizes that he has new friends, he can pursue new dreams, have new adventures, and – if at some point he may feel the need to settle down and start a family – he has the lovely Adnana by his side.
    So the end of the book shows that there’s always hope for new beginnings.

    Reply
  60. Lupan eventually has to fight some pirates and finds out that the leader of the pirates has been using Vaillant’s name all along!
    His friend seems to have perished while L’Esperance was burning down in a pirate attack. There isn’t much hope left for him to have miraculously survived, but Anton Lupan realizes that he has new friends, he can pursue new dreams, have new adventures, and – if at some point he may feel the need to settle down and start a family – he has the lovely Adnana by his side.
    So the end of the book shows that there’s always hope for new beginnings.

    Reply
  61. A lot of Carla Kelley’s early Regencies, like Beau Crusoe and Marrying the Captain, featured seafaring men, and they have a special place on my bookshelf. In her usual way, she didn’t make handsome, mustachioed, laughing pirates, but men with leathery skin and brusque manner, sometimes older, who’d held the line for Britain at sea in unbelievably harsh conditions, and for years and years.
    I have a soft spot for the military anyway thanks to my family’s Navy and Marine background, but I have a special soft spot for Kelly’s crusty admirals and damaged captains.
    I’m going to try to watch that movie tonight, Mary Jo. Sounds like something I’ll love!
    Speaking of depicting the overwhelming might and danger of the vast ocean, who’s seen The Guardian with Kevin Costner and Ashton Kutcher? I found it very moving, and another worthy homage to seafaring men.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  62. A lot of Carla Kelley’s early Regencies, like Beau Crusoe and Marrying the Captain, featured seafaring men, and they have a special place on my bookshelf. In her usual way, she didn’t make handsome, mustachioed, laughing pirates, but men with leathery skin and brusque manner, sometimes older, who’d held the line for Britain at sea in unbelievably harsh conditions, and for years and years.
    I have a soft spot for the military anyway thanks to my family’s Navy and Marine background, but I have a special soft spot for Kelly’s crusty admirals and damaged captains.
    I’m going to try to watch that movie tonight, Mary Jo. Sounds like something I’ll love!
    Speaking of depicting the overwhelming might and danger of the vast ocean, who’s seen The Guardian with Kevin Costner and Ashton Kutcher? I found it very moving, and another worthy homage to seafaring men.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  63. A lot of Carla Kelley’s early Regencies, like Beau Crusoe and Marrying the Captain, featured seafaring men, and they have a special place on my bookshelf. In her usual way, she didn’t make handsome, mustachioed, laughing pirates, but men with leathery skin and brusque manner, sometimes older, who’d held the line for Britain at sea in unbelievably harsh conditions, and for years and years.
    I have a soft spot for the military anyway thanks to my family’s Navy and Marine background, but I have a special soft spot for Kelly’s crusty admirals and damaged captains.
    I’m going to try to watch that movie tonight, Mary Jo. Sounds like something I’ll love!
    Speaking of depicting the overwhelming might and danger of the vast ocean, who’s seen The Guardian with Kevin Costner and Ashton Kutcher? I found it very moving, and another worthy homage to seafaring men.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  64. A lot of Carla Kelley’s early Regencies, like Beau Crusoe and Marrying the Captain, featured seafaring men, and they have a special place on my bookshelf. In her usual way, she didn’t make handsome, mustachioed, laughing pirates, but men with leathery skin and brusque manner, sometimes older, who’d held the line for Britain at sea in unbelievably harsh conditions, and for years and years.
    I have a soft spot for the military anyway thanks to my family’s Navy and Marine background, but I have a special soft spot for Kelly’s crusty admirals and damaged captains.
    I’m going to try to watch that movie tonight, Mary Jo. Sounds like something I’ll love!
    Speaking of depicting the overwhelming might and danger of the vast ocean, who’s seen The Guardian with Kevin Costner and Ashton Kutcher? I found it very moving, and another worthy homage to seafaring men.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  65. A lot of Carla Kelley’s early Regencies, like Beau Crusoe and Marrying the Captain, featured seafaring men, and they have a special place on my bookshelf. In her usual way, she didn’t make handsome, mustachioed, laughing pirates, but men with leathery skin and brusque manner, sometimes older, who’d held the line for Britain at sea in unbelievably harsh conditions, and for years and years.
    I have a soft spot for the military anyway thanks to my family’s Navy and Marine background, but I have a special soft spot for Kelly’s crusty admirals and damaged captains.
    I’m going to try to watch that movie tonight, Mary Jo. Sounds like something I’ll love!
    Speaking of depicting the overwhelming might and danger of the vast ocean, who’s seen The Guardian with Kevin Costner and Ashton Kutcher? I found it very moving, and another worthy homage to seafaring men.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  66. Do shipwreck stories count? I was never a fan of seafaring tales. I find the sea untterly horrifying, but I have always loved the story Swiss Family Robinson. They aren’t exactly at sea, but the sea plays a role in the story. As an adult, the stories are quite funny in that they are completely unrealistic, but I loved the adventure and resourcefulness (almost miraculous resourcefulness) of the whole family. It was truly, truly amazing the amount they were able to salvage! And the helpful wildlife! No wild animals I’ve ever met were so willing to cooperate with humans. One scene that stood out was the boys riding ostriches! Anyway, not exactly sailing stories, but close!

    Reply
  67. Do shipwreck stories count? I was never a fan of seafaring tales. I find the sea untterly horrifying, but I have always loved the story Swiss Family Robinson. They aren’t exactly at sea, but the sea plays a role in the story. As an adult, the stories are quite funny in that they are completely unrealistic, but I loved the adventure and resourcefulness (almost miraculous resourcefulness) of the whole family. It was truly, truly amazing the amount they were able to salvage! And the helpful wildlife! No wild animals I’ve ever met were so willing to cooperate with humans. One scene that stood out was the boys riding ostriches! Anyway, not exactly sailing stories, but close!

    Reply
  68. Do shipwreck stories count? I was never a fan of seafaring tales. I find the sea untterly horrifying, but I have always loved the story Swiss Family Robinson. They aren’t exactly at sea, but the sea plays a role in the story. As an adult, the stories are quite funny in that they are completely unrealistic, but I loved the adventure and resourcefulness (almost miraculous resourcefulness) of the whole family. It was truly, truly amazing the amount they were able to salvage! And the helpful wildlife! No wild animals I’ve ever met were so willing to cooperate with humans. One scene that stood out was the boys riding ostriches! Anyway, not exactly sailing stories, but close!

    Reply
  69. Do shipwreck stories count? I was never a fan of seafaring tales. I find the sea untterly horrifying, but I have always loved the story Swiss Family Robinson. They aren’t exactly at sea, but the sea plays a role in the story. As an adult, the stories are quite funny in that they are completely unrealistic, but I loved the adventure and resourcefulness (almost miraculous resourcefulness) of the whole family. It was truly, truly amazing the amount they were able to salvage! And the helpful wildlife! No wild animals I’ve ever met were so willing to cooperate with humans. One scene that stood out was the boys riding ostriches! Anyway, not exactly sailing stories, but close!

    Reply
  70. Do shipwreck stories count? I was never a fan of seafaring tales. I find the sea untterly horrifying, but I have always loved the story Swiss Family Robinson. They aren’t exactly at sea, but the sea plays a role in the story. As an adult, the stories are quite funny in that they are completely unrealistic, but I loved the adventure and resourcefulness (almost miraculous resourcefulness) of the whole family. It was truly, truly amazing the amount they were able to salvage! And the helpful wildlife! No wild animals I’ve ever met were so willing to cooperate with humans. One scene that stood out was the boys riding ostriches! Anyway, not exactly sailing stories, but close!

    Reply
  71. I too have read a couple of Carla Kelley books that had seafaring men as heroes. I love her stuff, but I’ve learned it’s a good idea to keep a box of Kleenex handy while reading them (smile).

    Reply
  72. I too have read a couple of Carla Kelley books that had seafaring men as heroes. I love her stuff, but I’ve learned it’s a good idea to keep a box of Kleenex handy while reading them (smile).

    Reply
  73. I too have read a couple of Carla Kelley books that had seafaring men as heroes. I love her stuff, but I’ve learned it’s a good idea to keep a box of Kleenex handy while reading them (smile).

    Reply
  74. I too have read a couple of Carla Kelley books that had seafaring men as heroes. I love her stuff, but I’ve learned it’s a good idea to keep a box of Kleenex handy while reading them (smile).

    Reply
  75. I too have read a couple of Carla Kelley books that had seafaring men as heroes. I love her stuff, but I’ve learned it’s a good idea to keep a box of Kleenex handy while reading them (smile).

    Reply
  76. Jana, I LOVE Swiss Family Robinson! I read it over and over as a kid. Like you, I really liked their ingenuity, and didn’t even have problems with the ostrich riding. *G* There’s just something about an island….

    Reply
  77. Jana, I LOVE Swiss Family Robinson! I read it over and over as a kid. Like you, I really liked their ingenuity, and didn’t even have problems with the ostrich riding. *G* There’s just something about an island….

    Reply
  78. Jana, I LOVE Swiss Family Robinson! I read it over and over as a kid. Like you, I really liked their ingenuity, and didn’t even have problems with the ostrich riding. *G* There’s just something about an island….

    Reply
  79. Jana, I LOVE Swiss Family Robinson! I read it over and over as a kid. Like you, I really liked their ingenuity, and didn’t even have problems with the ostrich riding. *G* There’s just something about an island….

    Reply
  80. Jana, I LOVE Swiss Family Robinson! I read it over and over as a kid. Like you, I really liked their ingenuity, and didn’t even have problems with the ostrich riding. *G* There’s just something about an island….

    Reply
  81. When I was about 14, I fell in hopeless love with Errol Flynn’s “Sea Hawk” which is, IMO, SOOOO much better than “Captain Blood.” I saw a couple of months ago on Turner Classic Movies and it has held up very, very well. I think it’s based on a Sabatini book, like “Captain Blood” too, but has a lot more romance AND you get to see Elizabeth I AND a pet monkey, reportedly owned by Errol himself! Wonderful, wonderful, exciting (and romantic!) movie. Well worth tracking down.

    Reply
  82. When I was about 14, I fell in hopeless love with Errol Flynn’s “Sea Hawk” which is, IMO, SOOOO much better than “Captain Blood.” I saw a couple of months ago on Turner Classic Movies and it has held up very, very well. I think it’s based on a Sabatini book, like “Captain Blood” too, but has a lot more romance AND you get to see Elizabeth I AND a pet monkey, reportedly owned by Errol himself! Wonderful, wonderful, exciting (and romantic!) movie. Well worth tracking down.

    Reply
  83. When I was about 14, I fell in hopeless love with Errol Flynn’s “Sea Hawk” which is, IMO, SOOOO much better than “Captain Blood.” I saw a couple of months ago on Turner Classic Movies and it has held up very, very well. I think it’s based on a Sabatini book, like “Captain Blood” too, but has a lot more romance AND you get to see Elizabeth I AND a pet monkey, reportedly owned by Errol himself! Wonderful, wonderful, exciting (and romantic!) movie. Well worth tracking down.

    Reply
  84. When I was about 14, I fell in hopeless love with Errol Flynn’s “Sea Hawk” which is, IMO, SOOOO much better than “Captain Blood.” I saw a couple of months ago on Turner Classic Movies and it has held up very, very well. I think it’s based on a Sabatini book, like “Captain Blood” too, but has a lot more romance AND you get to see Elizabeth I AND a pet monkey, reportedly owned by Errol himself! Wonderful, wonderful, exciting (and romantic!) movie. Well worth tracking down.

    Reply
  85. When I was about 14, I fell in hopeless love with Errol Flynn’s “Sea Hawk” which is, IMO, SOOOO much better than “Captain Blood.” I saw a couple of months ago on Turner Classic Movies and it has held up very, very well. I think it’s based on a Sabatini book, like “Captain Blood” too, but has a lot more romance AND you get to see Elizabeth I AND a pet monkey, reportedly owned by Errol himself! Wonderful, wonderful, exciting (and romantic!) movie. Well worth tracking down.

    Reply
  86. My goodness, thanks for the compliments, fellow writers and readers. I’m pretty much sold on Richard Woodman’s Napoleonic stories about Nathaniel Drinkwater, and his rise from midshipman to admiral. I think they’re even better than the Hornblower stories, because they’re far more technical. He’s led me into the interesting world of Trinity House, which I am currently using in a Christmas novella. Trinity House was the domain of lighthouse tenders, and mariners who taught navigation, especially for the fickle North Sea routes. Good stuff, and not well known.

    Reply
  87. My goodness, thanks for the compliments, fellow writers and readers. I’m pretty much sold on Richard Woodman’s Napoleonic stories about Nathaniel Drinkwater, and his rise from midshipman to admiral. I think they’re even better than the Hornblower stories, because they’re far more technical. He’s led me into the interesting world of Trinity House, which I am currently using in a Christmas novella. Trinity House was the domain of lighthouse tenders, and mariners who taught navigation, especially for the fickle North Sea routes. Good stuff, and not well known.

    Reply
  88. My goodness, thanks for the compliments, fellow writers and readers. I’m pretty much sold on Richard Woodman’s Napoleonic stories about Nathaniel Drinkwater, and his rise from midshipman to admiral. I think they’re even better than the Hornblower stories, because they’re far more technical. He’s led me into the interesting world of Trinity House, which I am currently using in a Christmas novella. Trinity House was the domain of lighthouse tenders, and mariners who taught navigation, especially for the fickle North Sea routes. Good stuff, and not well known.

    Reply
  89. My goodness, thanks for the compliments, fellow writers and readers. I’m pretty much sold on Richard Woodman’s Napoleonic stories about Nathaniel Drinkwater, and his rise from midshipman to admiral. I think they’re even better than the Hornblower stories, because they’re far more technical. He’s led me into the interesting world of Trinity House, which I am currently using in a Christmas novella. Trinity House was the domain of lighthouse tenders, and mariners who taught navigation, especially for the fickle North Sea routes. Good stuff, and not well known.

    Reply
  90. My goodness, thanks for the compliments, fellow writers and readers. I’m pretty much sold on Richard Woodman’s Napoleonic stories about Nathaniel Drinkwater, and his rise from midshipman to admiral. I think they’re even better than the Hornblower stories, because they’re far more technical. He’s led me into the interesting world of Trinity House, which I am currently using in a Christmas novella. Trinity House was the domain of lighthouse tenders, and mariners who taught navigation, especially for the fickle North Sea routes. Good stuff, and not well known.

    Reply
  91. Hello there, Carla Kelly. Lovely to meet you…and to be able to than you for all your wonderful books, and your special heroes, and the many worlds you’ve opened for me.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  92. Hello there, Carla Kelly. Lovely to meet you…and to be able to than you for all your wonderful books, and your special heroes, and the many worlds you’ve opened for me.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  93. Hello there, Carla Kelly. Lovely to meet you…and to be able to than you for all your wonderful books, and your special heroes, and the many worlds you’ve opened for me.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  94. Hello there, Carla Kelly. Lovely to meet you…and to be able to than you for all your wonderful books, and your special heroes, and the many worlds you’ve opened for me.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  95. Hello there, Carla Kelly. Lovely to meet you…and to be able to than you for all your wonderful books, and your special heroes, and the many worlds you’ve opened for me.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  96. If we’re going to talk about pirate movies let’s not forget “The Buccaneer” with Yul Brynner and “The Crimson Pirate” with Burt Lancaster. I remember watching the latter on TV as a kid, in the middle of the night with the volume turned down so my parents wouldn’t catch me at it.

    Reply
  97. If we’re going to talk about pirate movies let’s not forget “The Buccaneer” with Yul Brynner and “The Crimson Pirate” with Burt Lancaster. I remember watching the latter on TV as a kid, in the middle of the night with the volume turned down so my parents wouldn’t catch me at it.

    Reply
  98. If we’re going to talk about pirate movies let’s not forget “The Buccaneer” with Yul Brynner and “The Crimson Pirate” with Burt Lancaster. I remember watching the latter on TV as a kid, in the middle of the night with the volume turned down so my parents wouldn’t catch me at it.

    Reply
  99. If we’re going to talk about pirate movies let’s not forget “The Buccaneer” with Yul Brynner and “The Crimson Pirate” with Burt Lancaster. I remember watching the latter on TV as a kid, in the middle of the night with the volume turned down so my parents wouldn’t catch me at it.

    Reply
  100. If we’re going to talk about pirate movies let’s not forget “The Buccaneer” with Yul Brynner and “The Crimson Pirate” with Burt Lancaster. I remember watching the latter on TV as a kid, in the middle of the night with the volume turned down so my parents wouldn’t catch me at it.

    Reply
  101. Wonderful post, Mary Jo. I had heard the movie was good, and now will be sure to track it down.
    As for seafaring books, Patrick O’Brien’s Aubrey and Maturin books are a wonderful series about war, friendshipโ€”and yes, a little romance too, though there are no real HEAs. O’Brien writes truly lyrical prose about the ships and the sea.

    Reply
  102. Wonderful post, Mary Jo. I had heard the movie was good, and now will be sure to track it down.
    As for seafaring books, Patrick O’Brien’s Aubrey and Maturin books are a wonderful series about war, friendshipโ€”and yes, a little romance too, though there are no real HEAs. O’Brien writes truly lyrical prose about the ships and the sea.

    Reply
  103. Wonderful post, Mary Jo. I had heard the movie was good, and now will be sure to track it down.
    As for seafaring books, Patrick O’Brien’s Aubrey and Maturin books are a wonderful series about war, friendshipโ€”and yes, a little romance too, though there are no real HEAs. O’Brien writes truly lyrical prose about the ships and the sea.

    Reply
  104. Wonderful post, Mary Jo. I had heard the movie was good, and now will be sure to track it down.
    As for seafaring books, Patrick O’Brien’s Aubrey and Maturin books are a wonderful series about war, friendshipโ€”and yes, a little romance too, though there are no real HEAs. O’Brien writes truly lyrical prose about the ships and the sea.

    Reply
  105. Wonderful post, Mary Jo. I had heard the movie was good, and now will be sure to track it down.
    As for seafaring books, Patrick O’Brien’s Aubrey and Maturin books are a wonderful series about war, friendshipโ€”and yes, a little romance too, though there are no real HEAs. O’Brien writes truly lyrical prose about the ships and the sea.

    Reply
  106. Andrea, I read the first Patrick O’Brien book and I could understand why people love them, but it told me WAAAAAY more than I wanted to know about handling a sailing ship and sea battled. To be honest, the description of Aubrey as “blond and fattish” on the first or second page of the book had stayed with me, and not in a good way. *G*

    Reply
  107. Andrea, I read the first Patrick O’Brien book and I could understand why people love them, but it told me WAAAAAY more than I wanted to know about handling a sailing ship and sea battled. To be honest, the description of Aubrey as “blond and fattish” on the first or second page of the book had stayed with me, and not in a good way. *G*

    Reply
  108. Andrea, I read the first Patrick O’Brien book and I could understand why people love them, but it told me WAAAAAY more than I wanted to know about handling a sailing ship and sea battled. To be honest, the description of Aubrey as “blond and fattish” on the first or second page of the book had stayed with me, and not in a good way. *G*

    Reply
  109. Andrea, I read the first Patrick O’Brien book and I could understand why people love them, but it told me WAAAAAY more than I wanted to know about handling a sailing ship and sea battled. To be honest, the description of Aubrey as “blond and fattish” on the first or second page of the book had stayed with me, and not in a good way. *G*

    Reply
  110. Andrea, I read the first Patrick O’Brien book and I could understand why people love them, but it told me WAAAAAY more than I wanted to know about handling a sailing ship and sea battled. To be honest, the description of Aubrey as “blond and fattish” on the first or second page of the book had stayed with me, and not in a good way. *G*

    Reply
  111. Well, given the fact that they couldn’t find Pierre’s body, one can still hope he’s alive somewhere (perhaps badly burnt or suffering from memory loss or something :p) – but I doubt it: no miracles happening in the book or in the TV series, anyway.
    Sorry I couldn’t tell you more about the crew’s adventures – which are really worth telling; my comments were too long already. But now, knowing the basic storyline, perhaps you could watch the series on youtube after all. (I remember watching Russian movies when I was little – without knowing the language. I probably know less than… ten words in Russian. And to think that some people believe Romanian to be a Russian dialect! There are Russian influences, but the main vocabulary is based on Latin. Even though we use the Russian ‘da’ as ‘yes’.)

    Reply
  112. Well, given the fact that they couldn’t find Pierre’s body, one can still hope he’s alive somewhere (perhaps badly burnt or suffering from memory loss or something :p) – but I doubt it: no miracles happening in the book or in the TV series, anyway.
    Sorry I couldn’t tell you more about the crew’s adventures – which are really worth telling; my comments were too long already. But now, knowing the basic storyline, perhaps you could watch the series on youtube after all. (I remember watching Russian movies when I was little – without knowing the language. I probably know less than… ten words in Russian. And to think that some people believe Romanian to be a Russian dialect! There are Russian influences, but the main vocabulary is based on Latin. Even though we use the Russian ‘da’ as ‘yes’.)

    Reply
  113. Well, given the fact that they couldn’t find Pierre’s body, one can still hope he’s alive somewhere (perhaps badly burnt or suffering from memory loss or something :p) – but I doubt it: no miracles happening in the book or in the TV series, anyway.
    Sorry I couldn’t tell you more about the crew’s adventures – which are really worth telling; my comments were too long already. But now, knowing the basic storyline, perhaps you could watch the series on youtube after all. (I remember watching Russian movies when I was little – without knowing the language. I probably know less than… ten words in Russian. And to think that some people believe Romanian to be a Russian dialect! There are Russian influences, but the main vocabulary is based on Latin. Even though we use the Russian ‘da’ as ‘yes’.)

    Reply
  114. Well, given the fact that they couldn’t find Pierre’s body, one can still hope he’s alive somewhere (perhaps badly burnt or suffering from memory loss or something :p) – but I doubt it: no miracles happening in the book or in the TV series, anyway.
    Sorry I couldn’t tell you more about the crew’s adventures – which are really worth telling; my comments were too long already. But now, knowing the basic storyline, perhaps you could watch the series on youtube after all. (I remember watching Russian movies when I was little – without knowing the language. I probably know less than… ten words in Russian. And to think that some people believe Romanian to be a Russian dialect! There are Russian influences, but the main vocabulary is based on Latin. Even though we use the Russian ‘da’ as ‘yes’.)

    Reply
  115. Well, given the fact that they couldn’t find Pierre’s body, one can still hope he’s alive somewhere (perhaps badly burnt or suffering from memory loss or something :p) – but I doubt it: no miracles happening in the book or in the TV series, anyway.
    Sorry I couldn’t tell you more about the crew’s adventures – which are really worth telling; my comments were too long already. But now, knowing the basic storyline, perhaps you could watch the series on youtube after all. (I remember watching Russian movies when I was little – without knowing the language. I probably know less than… ten words in Russian. And to think that some people believe Romanian to be a Russian dialect! There are Russian influences, but the main vocabulary is based on Latin. Even though we use the Russian ‘da’ as ‘yes’.)

    Reply
  116. There was a funny sailing lexicon we got several years ago that defined sailing as going slowly in circles at great expense while getting wet and sick. I hate to say it, but that’s pretty accurate. It’s better if you can afford to keep the boat in wet slip. Then you can step on, uncover the sails and go. But lately we’ve had the boat “on the hard,” which means in a parking lot. It takes about an hour to get everything set up, back it into the water and get started while you are avoiding people in a narrow canal. After your sail, in which many life-threatening adventures may occur, you have to reverse the process to put the boat away. It’s an awful lot of work for not much fun. A boat 25 feet long like hours really needs to have at least 2 aboard, so now she is for sale, since the crew-first mate has mutinied.

    Reply
  117. There was a funny sailing lexicon we got several years ago that defined sailing as going slowly in circles at great expense while getting wet and sick. I hate to say it, but that’s pretty accurate. It’s better if you can afford to keep the boat in wet slip. Then you can step on, uncover the sails and go. But lately we’ve had the boat “on the hard,” which means in a parking lot. It takes about an hour to get everything set up, back it into the water and get started while you are avoiding people in a narrow canal. After your sail, in which many life-threatening adventures may occur, you have to reverse the process to put the boat away. It’s an awful lot of work for not much fun. A boat 25 feet long like hours really needs to have at least 2 aboard, so now she is for sale, since the crew-first mate has mutinied.

    Reply
  118. There was a funny sailing lexicon we got several years ago that defined sailing as going slowly in circles at great expense while getting wet and sick. I hate to say it, but that’s pretty accurate. It’s better if you can afford to keep the boat in wet slip. Then you can step on, uncover the sails and go. But lately we’ve had the boat “on the hard,” which means in a parking lot. It takes about an hour to get everything set up, back it into the water and get started while you are avoiding people in a narrow canal. After your sail, in which many life-threatening adventures may occur, you have to reverse the process to put the boat away. It’s an awful lot of work for not much fun. A boat 25 feet long like hours really needs to have at least 2 aboard, so now she is for sale, since the crew-first mate has mutinied.

    Reply
  119. There was a funny sailing lexicon we got several years ago that defined sailing as going slowly in circles at great expense while getting wet and sick. I hate to say it, but that’s pretty accurate. It’s better if you can afford to keep the boat in wet slip. Then you can step on, uncover the sails and go. But lately we’ve had the boat “on the hard,” which means in a parking lot. It takes about an hour to get everything set up, back it into the water and get started while you are avoiding people in a narrow canal. After your sail, in which many life-threatening adventures may occur, you have to reverse the process to put the boat away. It’s an awful lot of work for not much fun. A boat 25 feet long like hours really needs to have at least 2 aboard, so now she is for sale, since the crew-first mate has mutinied.

    Reply
  120. There was a funny sailing lexicon we got several years ago that defined sailing as going slowly in circles at great expense while getting wet and sick. I hate to say it, but that’s pretty accurate. It’s better if you can afford to keep the boat in wet slip. Then you can step on, uncover the sails and go. But lately we’ve had the boat “on the hard,” which means in a parking lot. It takes about an hour to get everything set up, back it into the water and get started while you are avoiding people in a narrow canal. After your sail, in which many life-threatening adventures may occur, you have to reverse the process to put the boat away. It’s an awful lot of work for not much fun. A boat 25 feet long like hours really needs to have at least 2 aboard, so now she is for sale, since the crew-first mate has mutinied.

    Reply
  121. Kathy K, that’s both funny and tragic. I hope your dh can find a friend with a boat who wants him to crew. Possibly the friend is another guy whose crew-first mate has mutinied.
    In my experience, there’s a lot of boredom and small boats, along with sunburn and work. I leave it to others. But I like watching small boats skimming the water.

    Reply
  122. Kathy K, that’s both funny and tragic. I hope your dh can find a friend with a boat who wants him to crew. Possibly the friend is another guy whose crew-first mate has mutinied.
    In my experience, there’s a lot of boredom and small boats, along with sunburn and work. I leave it to others. But I like watching small boats skimming the water.

    Reply
  123. Kathy K, that’s both funny and tragic. I hope your dh can find a friend with a boat who wants him to crew. Possibly the friend is another guy whose crew-first mate has mutinied.
    In my experience, there’s a lot of boredom and small boats, along with sunburn and work. I leave it to others. But I like watching small boats skimming the water.

    Reply
  124. Kathy K, that’s both funny and tragic. I hope your dh can find a friend with a boat who wants him to crew. Possibly the friend is another guy whose crew-first mate has mutinied.
    In my experience, there’s a lot of boredom and small boats, along with sunburn and work. I leave it to others. But I like watching small boats skimming the water.

    Reply
  125. Kathy K, that’s both funny and tragic. I hope your dh can find a friend with a boat who wants him to crew. Possibly the friend is another guy whose crew-first mate has mutinied.
    In my experience, there’s a lot of boredom and small boats, along with sunburn and work. I leave it to others. But I like watching small boats skimming the water.

    Reply
  126. Lion’s Paw by Robb White. It was a YA book back in the day. Originally published in 1946 but my paperback version is from 1967. I don’t know why it has stuck with me so much but it has. Even though my copy is missing a few pages and got waterlogged in an accident somewhere along the way.
    It is set at the end of WWII. Ben has been living with his uncle because his father went missing 31 months ago and is assumed dead. He and his dad sailed all the time.
    Suddenly his uncle decides to sell his dad’s boat but Ben decides to run away and take the boat with him. He firmly believes that his dad is still alive and the boat is necessary for his dad’s safe return.
    Nick and Penny run away from the orphanage they are in. They head for the ocean as they plan on hiding on a boat and sail away on a boat with friendly people.
    The boat they hide on is Ben’s. He finds them. Then his uncle shows up with a buyer for the boat. He decides it isn’t going to be sold. So in the middle of the night they sail away.
    They have lots of adventures hiding, running, trying to escape capture. They head for the Gulf because Ben believes if they find a Lion’s Paw, his dad will return.
    They find it in the devastated mess inside of the sailboat after a storm beats them almost to pieces. And lo and behold…his dad DID find them right when they found the Lion’s Paw.
    So there IS a HEA ending, but not a romance one. Because Ben’s dad says he wants to adopt Penny and Nick.
    Funny how certain books just stick with you and you keep them no matter what condition they are in.

    Reply
  127. Lion’s Paw by Robb White. It was a YA book back in the day. Originally published in 1946 but my paperback version is from 1967. I don’t know why it has stuck with me so much but it has. Even though my copy is missing a few pages and got waterlogged in an accident somewhere along the way.
    It is set at the end of WWII. Ben has been living with his uncle because his father went missing 31 months ago and is assumed dead. He and his dad sailed all the time.
    Suddenly his uncle decides to sell his dad’s boat but Ben decides to run away and take the boat with him. He firmly believes that his dad is still alive and the boat is necessary for his dad’s safe return.
    Nick and Penny run away from the orphanage they are in. They head for the ocean as they plan on hiding on a boat and sail away on a boat with friendly people.
    The boat they hide on is Ben’s. He finds them. Then his uncle shows up with a buyer for the boat. He decides it isn’t going to be sold. So in the middle of the night they sail away.
    They have lots of adventures hiding, running, trying to escape capture. They head for the Gulf because Ben believes if they find a Lion’s Paw, his dad will return.
    They find it in the devastated mess inside of the sailboat after a storm beats them almost to pieces. And lo and behold…his dad DID find them right when they found the Lion’s Paw.
    So there IS a HEA ending, but not a romance one. Because Ben’s dad says he wants to adopt Penny and Nick.
    Funny how certain books just stick with you and you keep them no matter what condition they are in.

    Reply
  128. Lion’s Paw by Robb White. It was a YA book back in the day. Originally published in 1946 but my paperback version is from 1967. I don’t know why it has stuck with me so much but it has. Even though my copy is missing a few pages and got waterlogged in an accident somewhere along the way.
    It is set at the end of WWII. Ben has been living with his uncle because his father went missing 31 months ago and is assumed dead. He and his dad sailed all the time.
    Suddenly his uncle decides to sell his dad’s boat but Ben decides to run away and take the boat with him. He firmly believes that his dad is still alive and the boat is necessary for his dad’s safe return.
    Nick and Penny run away from the orphanage they are in. They head for the ocean as they plan on hiding on a boat and sail away on a boat with friendly people.
    The boat they hide on is Ben’s. He finds them. Then his uncle shows up with a buyer for the boat. He decides it isn’t going to be sold. So in the middle of the night they sail away.
    They have lots of adventures hiding, running, trying to escape capture. They head for the Gulf because Ben believes if they find a Lion’s Paw, his dad will return.
    They find it in the devastated mess inside of the sailboat after a storm beats them almost to pieces. And lo and behold…his dad DID find them right when they found the Lion’s Paw.
    So there IS a HEA ending, but not a romance one. Because Ben’s dad says he wants to adopt Penny and Nick.
    Funny how certain books just stick with you and you keep them no matter what condition they are in.

    Reply
  129. Lion’s Paw by Robb White. It was a YA book back in the day. Originally published in 1946 but my paperback version is from 1967. I don’t know why it has stuck with me so much but it has. Even though my copy is missing a few pages and got waterlogged in an accident somewhere along the way.
    It is set at the end of WWII. Ben has been living with his uncle because his father went missing 31 months ago and is assumed dead. He and his dad sailed all the time.
    Suddenly his uncle decides to sell his dad’s boat but Ben decides to run away and take the boat with him. He firmly believes that his dad is still alive and the boat is necessary for his dad’s safe return.
    Nick and Penny run away from the orphanage they are in. They head for the ocean as they plan on hiding on a boat and sail away on a boat with friendly people.
    The boat they hide on is Ben’s. He finds them. Then his uncle shows up with a buyer for the boat. He decides it isn’t going to be sold. So in the middle of the night they sail away.
    They have lots of adventures hiding, running, trying to escape capture. They head for the Gulf because Ben believes if they find a Lion’s Paw, his dad will return.
    They find it in the devastated mess inside of the sailboat after a storm beats them almost to pieces. And lo and behold…his dad DID find them right when they found the Lion’s Paw.
    So there IS a HEA ending, but not a romance one. Because Ben’s dad says he wants to adopt Penny and Nick.
    Funny how certain books just stick with you and you keep them no matter what condition they are in.

    Reply
  130. Lion’s Paw by Robb White. It was a YA book back in the day. Originally published in 1946 but my paperback version is from 1967. I don’t know why it has stuck with me so much but it has. Even though my copy is missing a few pages and got waterlogged in an accident somewhere along the way.
    It is set at the end of WWII. Ben has been living with his uncle because his father went missing 31 months ago and is assumed dead. He and his dad sailed all the time.
    Suddenly his uncle decides to sell his dad’s boat but Ben decides to run away and take the boat with him. He firmly believes that his dad is still alive and the boat is necessary for his dad’s safe return.
    Nick and Penny run away from the orphanage they are in. They head for the ocean as they plan on hiding on a boat and sail away on a boat with friendly people.
    The boat they hide on is Ben’s. He finds them. Then his uncle shows up with a buyer for the boat. He decides it isn’t going to be sold. So in the middle of the night they sail away.
    They have lots of adventures hiding, running, trying to escape capture. They head for the Gulf because Ben believes if they find a Lion’s Paw, his dad will return.
    They find it in the devastated mess inside of the sailboat after a storm beats them almost to pieces. And lo and behold…his dad DID find them right when they found the Lion’s Paw.
    So there IS a HEA ending, but not a romance one. Because Ben’s dad says he wants to adopt Penny and Nick.
    Funny how certain books just stick with you and you keep them no matter what condition they are in.

    Reply
  131. New thought about a sea-faring book! C S Lewis “The Dawn Treader” in the Narnia series. I loved it! And I was an adult and the mother of the children with whom I shared these books as they appeared in the stores. It is certainly and very good sea story. But It still appears that most of my “approved” sea stories are of the young adult variety.

    Reply
  132. New thought about a sea-faring book! C S Lewis “The Dawn Treader” in the Narnia series. I loved it! And I was an adult and the mother of the children with whom I shared these books as they appeared in the stores. It is certainly and very good sea story. But It still appears that most of my “approved” sea stories are of the young adult variety.

    Reply
  133. New thought about a sea-faring book! C S Lewis “The Dawn Treader” in the Narnia series. I loved it! And I was an adult and the mother of the children with whom I shared these books as they appeared in the stores. It is certainly and very good sea story. But It still appears that most of my “approved” sea stories are of the young adult variety.

    Reply
  134. New thought about a sea-faring book! C S Lewis “The Dawn Treader” in the Narnia series. I loved it! And I was an adult and the mother of the children with whom I shared these books as they appeared in the stores. It is certainly and very good sea story. But It still appears that most of my “approved” sea stories are of the young adult variety.

    Reply
  135. New thought about a sea-faring book! C S Lewis “The Dawn Treader” in the Narnia series. I loved it! And I was an adult and the mother of the children with whom I shared these books as they appeared in the stores. It is certainly and very good sea story. But It still appears that most of my “approved” sea stories are of the young adult variety.

    Reply
  136. I have nearly picked up that DVD several times at Walmart. Now I will have to have it! I love a good heroic rescue story!
    Some of my very favorite sea-faring books are the historical romances of Andrea Stein. She bases some of her characters and many of her locations on actual people and events. She is a USCG licensed sea captain who has worked as a newspaper editor, taught sailing, and worked with the ski patrol in Colorado so her stories have that exciting flavor of realism and detail to them that some authors miss.
    Really great reads!

    Reply
  137. I have nearly picked up that DVD several times at Walmart. Now I will have to have it! I love a good heroic rescue story!
    Some of my very favorite sea-faring books are the historical romances of Andrea Stein. She bases some of her characters and many of her locations on actual people and events. She is a USCG licensed sea captain who has worked as a newspaper editor, taught sailing, and worked with the ski patrol in Colorado so her stories have that exciting flavor of realism and detail to them that some authors miss.
    Really great reads!

    Reply
  138. I have nearly picked up that DVD several times at Walmart. Now I will have to have it! I love a good heroic rescue story!
    Some of my very favorite sea-faring books are the historical romances of Andrea Stein. She bases some of her characters and many of her locations on actual people and events. She is a USCG licensed sea captain who has worked as a newspaper editor, taught sailing, and worked with the ski patrol in Colorado so her stories have that exciting flavor of realism and detail to them that some authors miss.
    Really great reads!

    Reply
  139. I have nearly picked up that DVD several times at Walmart. Now I will have to have it! I love a good heroic rescue story!
    Some of my very favorite sea-faring books are the historical romances of Andrea Stein. She bases some of her characters and many of her locations on actual people and events. She is a USCG licensed sea captain who has worked as a newspaper editor, taught sailing, and worked with the ski patrol in Colorado so her stories have that exciting flavor of realism and detail to them that some authors miss.
    Really great reads!

    Reply
  140. I have nearly picked up that DVD several times at Walmart. Now I will have to have it! I love a good heroic rescue story!
    Some of my very favorite sea-faring books are the historical romances of Andrea Stein. She bases some of her characters and many of her locations on actual people and events. She is a USCG licensed sea captain who has worked as a newspaper editor, taught sailing, and worked with the ski patrol in Colorado so her stories have that exciting flavor of realism and detail to them that some authors miss.
    Really great reads!

    Reply
  141. Fortune’s Horizon is a great place to start. And her latest novella, Rhum Bay is a great read as well. Her books can all be read as stand-alones, but Rhum Bay is a sequel to Secret Harbor.
    Oh, and a side note. Apparently some of her cover models are actual ski patrol guys with whom she works.

    Reply
  142. Fortune’s Horizon is a great place to start. And her latest novella, Rhum Bay is a great read as well. Her books can all be read as stand-alones, but Rhum Bay is a sequel to Secret Harbor.
    Oh, and a side note. Apparently some of her cover models are actual ski patrol guys with whom she works.

    Reply
  143. Fortune’s Horizon is a great place to start. And her latest novella, Rhum Bay is a great read as well. Her books can all be read as stand-alones, but Rhum Bay is a sequel to Secret Harbor.
    Oh, and a side note. Apparently some of her cover models are actual ski patrol guys with whom she works.

    Reply
  144. Fortune’s Horizon is a great place to start. And her latest novella, Rhum Bay is a great read as well. Her books can all be read as stand-alones, but Rhum Bay is a sequel to Secret Harbor.
    Oh, and a side note. Apparently some of her cover models are actual ski patrol guys with whom she works.

    Reply
  145. Fortune’s Horizon is a great place to start. And her latest novella, Rhum Bay is a great read as well. Her books can all be read as stand-alones, but Rhum Bay is a sequel to Secret Harbor.
    Oh, and a side note. Apparently some of her cover models are actual ski patrol guys with whom she works.

    Reply
  146. I hope you enjoy it! I keep thinking about getting a new, all in one piece copy, but say, hmmm, not right now. After all, so what if I’m missing 5 pages when I’m reading the book. Smile.

    Reply
  147. I hope you enjoy it! I keep thinking about getting a new, all in one piece copy, but say, hmmm, not right now. After all, so what if I’m missing 5 pages when I’m reading the book. Smile.

    Reply
  148. I hope you enjoy it! I keep thinking about getting a new, all in one piece copy, but say, hmmm, not right now. After all, so what if I’m missing 5 pages when I’m reading the book. Smile.

    Reply
  149. I hope you enjoy it! I keep thinking about getting a new, all in one piece copy, but say, hmmm, not right now. After all, so what if I’m missing 5 pages when I’m reading the book. Smile.

    Reply
  150. I hope you enjoy it! I keep thinking about getting a new, all in one piece copy, but say, hmmm, not right now. After all, so what if I’m missing 5 pages when I’m reading the book. Smile.

    Reply

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