Memories of Holidays Past

The New Forest Nicola here, just returned from a lovely trip to the South Coast of England and the New Forest. The New Forest is one of my favourite places in the whole of England. Originally set up as a hunting chase by William the Conqueror after his victory at Hastings in 1066, it gets its name from being a "new" forest as opposed to the old Saxon hunting grounds. It is a hugely atmospheric, mystical and historical place and very inspiring for a writer.

Memories

Until last year I thought that I had never been to the New Forest as a child but then I turned up Nicola7 some black and white photographs from my very first holiday. My mother confirmed that we had stayed in Lyndhurst in the New Forest and also at Mudeford, a seaside town nearby. Here I am on the beach! I don't remember the holiday at all except for one tiny memory of how the sand felt between my toes! But I do wonder whether my love of that part of the coast and of the Forest springs from those very earliest memories and impressions.

Children of the New Forest We never returned to the New Forest for holidays during my childhood. Instead my love of the place was fostered by the book "Children of the New Forest" by Frederick Marryat. For those who have never come across it, this is a classic children's book set during the period of the English Civil War. It features four children who are orphaned when their father is killed fighting for King Charles I and tells the tales of their adventures in the Forest. I loved it when it I was young and it's still on my bookshelf today.

Sightseeing

On my recent trip I visited lots of places that feature in the book and also places I IMG_5651 went to as a child. Calshot Castle was wonderful, a little moated fort built by Henry VIII in 1539 to defend England against the joint threat from France and the Holy Roman Empire. Calshot was closed on the day we visited but another of Henry's forts, Hurst Castle, was open. It is situated at the end of a mile and a half shingle spit. We walked out to it and got a boat back. In storms the shingle can move hundreds of feet but the castle has never been washed away. It was garrisoned in the Napoleonic Wars and extended in the later 19th century and also used during the Second World War. It was quite a thought to stand on the walls and imagine England's defenders occupying this castle for the last 500 years. Here is a photo of Monty and me on the battlements!

IMG_5694

A building that was created for fun rather than fortification was Luttrell's Tower, a Georgian folly that was built in the late 18th century for Temple Luttrell a Member of Parliament who was also a gentleman smuggler. A passageway connected the basement of the tower to the beach, making it very easy to bring the contaband directly into the building. Unfortunately the excisemen started to take an interest in Luttrell and he was forced to flee to France to escape prosecution! These days you can actually stay in the Tower as it is a holiday cottage with a fabulous view out across the sea!

 

 Iconic Landmarks in the Forest

Back in the New Forest we visited a couple of iconic landmarks. The Knightwood IMG_5688 Oak is six hundred years old and is the oldest remaining tree in the New Forest. It's mind-boggling to imagine that this tree was already over a hundred years old when Henry VIII was hunting here. Another famous spot is the Rufus Stone, which marks the spot where King William Rufus, William II, was supposedly fatally shot when on a hunting expedition in the Forest in 1100. William was named Rufus for his high complexion and his red hair, and he had a reputation for being a very unpleasant character indeed. The story goes that the Frenchman Sir Walter Tyrrell, who was the King's best archer, shot at a stag but the arrow struck an oak tree and ricocheted off it straight into the chest of the king, puncturing his lung and killing him on the spot. The question of whether the king's death was an accident or not has never been resolved and is one of the most enduring of British historical mysteries. One thing is for sure – no one was sorry to see him go and his brother, who succeeded as King Henry I, did not even make an attempt to retrieve the body!

If you would like to read more about the history of the New Forest and the places I visited, I will be blogging about it this week on my personal blog here.

Lord of scandal I've thoroughly enjoyed visiting these old haunts and it got me wondering about other places that I haven't visited since I was a child, whether it's good to go back, whether places you love when you are young still measure up later in life or whether's it's better not to try to re-create those memories. What do you think? Is there a place that you used to go for vacations or holidays when you were young and then re-visited many years later? Was it as you remembered or had it changed? Better or worse – or just different? Or is there somewhere you remember from your childhood that you would like to see again? I've unexpectedly received some hardback reprints of my 2008 RITA-nominated book Lord of Scandal so I'm offering a copy to one commenter on this post!

150 thoughts on “Memories of Holidays Past”

  1. Nicola
    The New Forrest sounds like a place I would love to visit maybe one day.
    When we were young my Mum always took us to the Central Coast of NSW for holidays close to the beaches now one of my sisters lives up there so we still visit often and it really is still lovely up there the beaches and the area but yes over the years it is different and I think that a lot of this is because it is more populated now.
    have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  2. Nicola
    The New Forrest sounds like a place I would love to visit maybe one day.
    When we were young my Mum always took us to the Central Coast of NSW for holidays close to the beaches now one of my sisters lives up there so we still visit often and it really is still lovely up there the beaches and the area but yes over the years it is different and I think that a lot of this is because it is more populated now.
    have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  3. Nicola
    The New Forrest sounds like a place I would love to visit maybe one day.
    When we were young my Mum always took us to the Central Coast of NSW for holidays close to the beaches now one of my sisters lives up there so we still visit often and it really is still lovely up there the beaches and the area but yes over the years it is different and I think that a lot of this is because it is more populated now.
    have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  4. Nicola
    The New Forrest sounds like a place I would love to visit maybe one day.
    When we were young my Mum always took us to the Central Coast of NSW for holidays close to the beaches now one of my sisters lives up there so we still visit often and it really is still lovely up there the beaches and the area but yes over the years it is different and I think that a lot of this is because it is more populated now.
    have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  5. Nicola
    The New Forrest sounds like a place I would love to visit maybe one day.
    When we were young my Mum always took us to the Central Coast of NSW for holidays close to the beaches now one of my sisters lives up there so we still visit often and it really is still lovely up there the beaches and the area but yes over the years it is different and I think that a lot of this is because it is more populated now.
    have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  6. My family didn’t take holidays often, and when they did it was usually a visit to my mom’s family in Northern Utah. This entailed a long drive from Los Angeles through Las Vegas and thence northward. My dad did all the driving and much of it was at night to avoid the desert heat in those pre air conditioning days. Every car had a water bag on the front to top up the radiator. One time I specially remember I was sitting up front with my dad while my mother slept in the back seat, late at night on a two lane highway, through the magic darkness. Looking for the next Burma Shave sign. Red eyes of animals near the road. Blazing stars overhead, the full glory of the Milky Way. It seemed like such an adventure, like anything could happen. I was not very close to my father but that one time I was.
    Nowadays it’s all freeway, people drive during the day, and there’s a gas station at every offramp with the same things in the shop that every other gas station has. No Burma Shave signs. No adventure.

    Reply
  7. My family didn’t take holidays often, and when they did it was usually a visit to my mom’s family in Northern Utah. This entailed a long drive from Los Angeles through Las Vegas and thence northward. My dad did all the driving and much of it was at night to avoid the desert heat in those pre air conditioning days. Every car had a water bag on the front to top up the radiator. One time I specially remember I was sitting up front with my dad while my mother slept in the back seat, late at night on a two lane highway, through the magic darkness. Looking for the next Burma Shave sign. Red eyes of animals near the road. Blazing stars overhead, the full glory of the Milky Way. It seemed like such an adventure, like anything could happen. I was not very close to my father but that one time I was.
    Nowadays it’s all freeway, people drive during the day, and there’s a gas station at every offramp with the same things in the shop that every other gas station has. No Burma Shave signs. No adventure.

    Reply
  8. My family didn’t take holidays often, and when they did it was usually a visit to my mom’s family in Northern Utah. This entailed a long drive from Los Angeles through Las Vegas and thence northward. My dad did all the driving and much of it was at night to avoid the desert heat in those pre air conditioning days. Every car had a water bag on the front to top up the radiator. One time I specially remember I was sitting up front with my dad while my mother slept in the back seat, late at night on a two lane highway, through the magic darkness. Looking for the next Burma Shave sign. Red eyes of animals near the road. Blazing stars overhead, the full glory of the Milky Way. It seemed like such an adventure, like anything could happen. I was not very close to my father but that one time I was.
    Nowadays it’s all freeway, people drive during the day, and there’s a gas station at every offramp with the same things in the shop that every other gas station has. No Burma Shave signs. No adventure.

    Reply
  9. My family didn’t take holidays often, and when they did it was usually a visit to my mom’s family in Northern Utah. This entailed a long drive from Los Angeles through Las Vegas and thence northward. My dad did all the driving and much of it was at night to avoid the desert heat in those pre air conditioning days. Every car had a water bag on the front to top up the radiator. One time I specially remember I was sitting up front with my dad while my mother slept in the back seat, late at night on a two lane highway, through the magic darkness. Looking for the next Burma Shave sign. Red eyes of animals near the road. Blazing stars overhead, the full glory of the Milky Way. It seemed like such an adventure, like anything could happen. I was not very close to my father but that one time I was.
    Nowadays it’s all freeway, people drive during the day, and there’s a gas station at every offramp with the same things in the shop that every other gas station has. No Burma Shave signs. No adventure.

    Reply
  10. My family didn’t take holidays often, and when they did it was usually a visit to my mom’s family in Northern Utah. This entailed a long drive from Los Angeles through Las Vegas and thence northward. My dad did all the driving and much of it was at night to avoid the desert heat in those pre air conditioning days. Every car had a water bag on the front to top up the radiator. One time I specially remember I was sitting up front with my dad while my mother slept in the back seat, late at night on a two lane highway, through the magic darkness. Looking for the next Burma Shave sign. Red eyes of animals near the road. Blazing stars overhead, the full glory of the Milky Way. It seemed like such an adventure, like anything could happen. I was not very close to my father but that one time I was.
    Nowadays it’s all freeway, people drive during the day, and there’s a gas station at every offramp with the same things in the shop that every other gas station has. No Burma Shave signs. No adventure.

    Reply
  11. Loved this blog Nicola. Also liked the book Children of the New Forest. I haven’t really visited the area, just been through it but it looks so lovely.
    When I was a young girl I used to come to Fleetwood … the town where I now live… things have changed but much of the town is as I remember it. Of course we have lost the cinemas and, tragically, our lovely pier. I had so many happy times here. I think that is why I wanted to come and live here.
    We have lost the big boat that went to Ireland just before Christmas, and the fishing industry has practically died. Will Fleetwood ever be a bustling port again? who knows, but you can’t take the heart out of the town and that’s why it’s so special.

    Reply
  12. Loved this blog Nicola. Also liked the book Children of the New Forest. I haven’t really visited the area, just been through it but it looks so lovely.
    When I was a young girl I used to come to Fleetwood … the town where I now live… things have changed but much of the town is as I remember it. Of course we have lost the cinemas and, tragically, our lovely pier. I had so many happy times here. I think that is why I wanted to come and live here.
    We have lost the big boat that went to Ireland just before Christmas, and the fishing industry has practically died. Will Fleetwood ever be a bustling port again? who knows, but you can’t take the heart out of the town and that’s why it’s so special.

    Reply
  13. Loved this blog Nicola. Also liked the book Children of the New Forest. I haven’t really visited the area, just been through it but it looks so lovely.
    When I was a young girl I used to come to Fleetwood … the town where I now live… things have changed but much of the town is as I remember it. Of course we have lost the cinemas and, tragically, our lovely pier. I had so many happy times here. I think that is why I wanted to come and live here.
    We have lost the big boat that went to Ireland just before Christmas, and the fishing industry has practically died. Will Fleetwood ever be a bustling port again? who knows, but you can’t take the heart out of the town and that’s why it’s so special.

    Reply
  14. Loved this blog Nicola. Also liked the book Children of the New Forest. I haven’t really visited the area, just been through it but it looks so lovely.
    When I was a young girl I used to come to Fleetwood … the town where I now live… things have changed but much of the town is as I remember it. Of course we have lost the cinemas and, tragically, our lovely pier. I had so many happy times here. I think that is why I wanted to come and live here.
    We have lost the big boat that went to Ireland just before Christmas, and the fishing industry has practically died. Will Fleetwood ever be a bustling port again? who knows, but you can’t take the heart out of the town and that’s why it’s so special.

    Reply
  15. Loved this blog Nicola. Also liked the book Children of the New Forest. I haven’t really visited the area, just been through it but it looks so lovely.
    When I was a young girl I used to come to Fleetwood … the town where I now live… things have changed but much of the town is as I remember it. Of course we have lost the cinemas and, tragically, our lovely pier. I had so many happy times here. I think that is why I wanted to come and live here.
    We have lost the big boat that went to Ireland just before Christmas, and the fishing industry has practically died. Will Fleetwood ever be a bustling port again? who knows, but you can’t take the heart out of the town and that’s why it’s so special.

    Reply
  16. Hi Helen! It’s often the case with the seaside, isn’t it, that the quiet places that one knew as a child can become busier with visitors or property development. It must have been wonderful to have the run of those beaches as a child!
    Janice, what an amazing trip you describe. There’s something about travelling through the night that I still find exciting even now as a grown up. Sad that all those magical elements from your journey have gone now, though.

    Reply
  17. Hi Helen! It’s often the case with the seaside, isn’t it, that the quiet places that one knew as a child can become busier with visitors or property development. It must have been wonderful to have the run of those beaches as a child!
    Janice, what an amazing trip you describe. There’s something about travelling through the night that I still find exciting even now as a grown up. Sad that all those magical elements from your journey have gone now, though.

    Reply
  18. Hi Helen! It’s often the case with the seaside, isn’t it, that the quiet places that one knew as a child can become busier with visitors or property development. It must have been wonderful to have the run of those beaches as a child!
    Janice, what an amazing trip you describe. There’s something about travelling through the night that I still find exciting even now as a grown up. Sad that all those magical elements from your journey have gone now, though.

    Reply
  19. Hi Helen! It’s often the case with the seaside, isn’t it, that the quiet places that one knew as a child can become busier with visitors or property development. It must have been wonderful to have the run of those beaches as a child!
    Janice, what an amazing trip you describe. There’s something about travelling through the night that I still find exciting even now as a grown up. Sad that all those magical elements from your journey have gone now, though.

    Reply
  20. Hi Helen! It’s often the case with the seaside, isn’t it, that the quiet places that one knew as a child can become busier with visitors or property development. It must have been wonderful to have the run of those beaches as a child!
    Janice, what an amazing trip you describe. There’s something about travelling through the night that I still find exciting even now as a grown up. Sad that all those magical elements from your journey have gone now, though.

    Reply
  21. Margaret, pageturner, I’m glad that you both enjoyed the book as well! When I got home I took my copy out again for another read.
    Margaret, you must have seen so many changes in Fleetwood over the years but it’s interesting that despite the loss of the industry and the changing nature of the town it hasn’t lost its heart. That’s a realyt tribute to the nature of the people, I think.
    Pageturner, there are lots and lots of glades of trees in the New Forest even though it isn’t all “forest” and I love all the open heathland too. I’m sure you would find it magical if you visited. I hope you get the chance!

    Reply
  22. Margaret, pageturner, I’m glad that you both enjoyed the book as well! When I got home I took my copy out again for another read.
    Margaret, you must have seen so many changes in Fleetwood over the years but it’s interesting that despite the loss of the industry and the changing nature of the town it hasn’t lost its heart. That’s a realyt tribute to the nature of the people, I think.
    Pageturner, there are lots and lots of glades of trees in the New Forest even though it isn’t all “forest” and I love all the open heathland too. I’m sure you would find it magical if you visited. I hope you get the chance!

    Reply
  23. Margaret, pageturner, I’m glad that you both enjoyed the book as well! When I got home I took my copy out again for another read.
    Margaret, you must have seen so many changes in Fleetwood over the years but it’s interesting that despite the loss of the industry and the changing nature of the town it hasn’t lost its heart. That’s a realyt tribute to the nature of the people, I think.
    Pageturner, there are lots and lots of glades of trees in the New Forest even though it isn’t all “forest” and I love all the open heathland too. I’m sure you would find it magical if you visited. I hope you get the chance!

    Reply
  24. Margaret, pageturner, I’m glad that you both enjoyed the book as well! When I got home I took my copy out again for another read.
    Margaret, you must have seen so many changes in Fleetwood over the years but it’s interesting that despite the loss of the industry and the changing nature of the town it hasn’t lost its heart. That’s a realyt tribute to the nature of the people, I think.
    Pageturner, there are lots and lots of glades of trees in the New Forest even though it isn’t all “forest” and I love all the open heathland too. I’m sure you would find it magical if you visited. I hope you get the chance!

    Reply
  25. Margaret, pageturner, I’m glad that you both enjoyed the book as well! When I got home I took my copy out again for another read.
    Margaret, you must have seen so many changes in Fleetwood over the years but it’s interesting that despite the loss of the industry and the changing nature of the town it hasn’t lost its heart. That’s a realyt tribute to the nature of the people, I think.
    Pageturner, there are lots and lots of glades of trees in the New Forest even though it isn’t all “forest” and I love all the open heathland too. I’m sure you would find it magical if you visited. I hope you get the chance!

    Reply
  26. I really enjoyed your post Nicola and your pictures. It’s sad to go back to some of the places we visited when I was a child, many,many years ago. lol They aren’t the quaint happy and clean places they were. They are over run now with so many tourists or look shabbier then I could ever imagine. All the cozy and family oriented locations just aren’t that anymore. So I’ll stay with the memories of when we were all there together. 🙂
    Carol L
    Lucky4750@aol.com

    Reply
  27. I really enjoyed your post Nicola and your pictures. It’s sad to go back to some of the places we visited when I was a child, many,many years ago. lol They aren’t the quaint happy and clean places they were. They are over run now with so many tourists or look shabbier then I could ever imagine. All the cozy and family oriented locations just aren’t that anymore. So I’ll stay with the memories of when we were all there together. 🙂
    Carol L
    Lucky4750@aol.com

    Reply
  28. I really enjoyed your post Nicola and your pictures. It’s sad to go back to some of the places we visited when I was a child, many,many years ago. lol They aren’t the quaint happy and clean places they were. They are over run now with so many tourists or look shabbier then I could ever imagine. All the cozy and family oriented locations just aren’t that anymore. So I’ll stay with the memories of when we were all there together. 🙂
    Carol L
    Lucky4750@aol.com

    Reply
  29. I really enjoyed your post Nicola and your pictures. It’s sad to go back to some of the places we visited when I was a child, many,many years ago. lol They aren’t the quaint happy and clean places they were. They are over run now with so many tourists or look shabbier then I could ever imagine. All the cozy and family oriented locations just aren’t that anymore. So I’ll stay with the memories of when we were all there together. 🙂
    Carol L
    Lucky4750@aol.com

    Reply
  30. I really enjoyed your post Nicola and your pictures. It’s sad to go back to some of the places we visited when I was a child, many,many years ago. lol They aren’t the quaint happy and clean places they were. They are over run now with so many tourists or look shabbier then I could ever imagine. All the cozy and family oriented locations just aren’t that anymore. So I’ll stay with the memories of when we were all there together. 🙂
    Carol L
    Lucky4750@aol.com

    Reply
  31. When I was a kid, my family would load into our station wagon, hitch on the camper and take a 2 week driving trip. There were 4 of us kids – my sister and I loved the trips, but my older brother (who was a teenager even that first year) thought they were torture. Starting from Virginia, we visited every state east of the Mississippi and 3 provinces of Canada in 5 or 6 trips. The farthest Northwest was Mackinac Island, Michigan, where no cars were allowed and we rented tandem bikes. I’d love to visit it again.
    Great post by the way. Adding the New Forest to the list of places I want to visit… It’s quite a long list.

    Reply
  32. When I was a kid, my family would load into our station wagon, hitch on the camper and take a 2 week driving trip. There were 4 of us kids – my sister and I loved the trips, but my older brother (who was a teenager even that first year) thought they were torture. Starting from Virginia, we visited every state east of the Mississippi and 3 provinces of Canada in 5 or 6 trips. The farthest Northwest was Mackinac Island, Michigan, where no cars were allowed and we rented tandem bikes. I’d love to visit it again.
    Great post by the way. Adding the New Forest to the list of places I want to visit… It’s quite a long list.

    Reply
  33. When I was a kid, my family would load into our station wagon, hitch on the camper and take a 2 week driving trip. There were 4 of us kids – my sister and I loved the trips, but my older brother (who was a teenager even that first year) thought they were torture. Starting from Virginia, we visited every state east of the Mississippi and 3 provinces of Canada in 5 or 6 trips. The farthest Northwest was Mackinac Island, Michigan, where no cars were allowed and we rented tandem bikes. I’d love to visit it again.
    Great post by the way. Adding the New Forest to the list of places I want to visit… It’s quite a long list.

    Reply
  34. When I was a kid, my family would load into our station wagon, hitch on the camper and take a 2 week driving trip. There were 4 of us kids – my sister and I loved the trips, but my older brother (who was a teenager even that first year) thought they were torture. Starting from Virginia, we visited every state east of the Mississippi and 3 provinces of Canada in 5 or 6 trips. The farthest Northwest was Mackinac Island, Michigan, where no cars were allowed and we rented tandem bikes. I’d love to visit it again.
    Great post by the way. Adding the New Forest to the list of places I want to visit… It’s quite a long list.

    Reply
  35. When I was a kid, my family would load into our station wagon, hitch on the camper and take a 2 week driving trip. There were 4 of us kids – my sister and I loved the trips, but my older brother (who was a teenager even that first year) thought they were torture. Starting from Virginia, we visited every state east of the Mississippi and 3 provinces of Canada in 5 or 6 trips. The farthest Northwest was Mackinac Island, Michigan, where no cars were allowed and we rented tandem bikes. I’d love to visit it again.
    Great post by the way. Adding the New Forest to the list of places I want to visit… It’s quite a long list.

    Reply
  36. When I was young (10&under) my family generally either went to the jersey shore or to Ohio to visit an amusement park (Cedar Point) & my aunt’s family. We’d alternate years between going east or west. My dad was firm beleiver in getting away for a week each summer for a family vacation. While they were nothing fancy I do remember the fun of them. I haven’t been back to either location since I’ve been an adult. I prob wouldn’t recognize the anything familiar about the Jersey shore town now (way too many years have gone by and age dims the memories) but I suspect I could still enjoy Cedar Point but it would be different — I’m a little calmer (age again) about amusement parks & it wouldn’t be quite the same without my brother to ride with or draging mom & dad about from ride to ride :).

    Reply
  37. When I was young (10&under) my family generally either went to the jersey shore or to Ohio to visit an amusement park (Cedar Point) & my aunt’s family. We’d alternate years between going east or west. My dad was firm beleiver in getting away for a week each summer for a family vacation. While they were nothing fancy I do remember the fun of them. I haven’t been back to either location since I’ve been an adult. I prob wouldn’t recognize the anything familiar about the Jersey shore town now (way too many years have gone by and age dims the memories) but I suspect I could still enjoy Cedar Point but it would be different — I’m a little calmer (age again) about amusement parks & it wouldn’t be quite the same without my brother to ride with or draging mom & dad about from ride to ride :).

    Reply
  38. When I was young (10&under) my family generally either went to the jersey shore or to Ohio to visit an amusement park (Cedar Point) & my aunt’s family. We’d alternate years between going east or west. My dad was firm beleiver in getting away for a week each summer for a family vacation. While they were nothing fancy I do remember the fun of them. I haven’t been back to either location since I’ve been an adult. I prob wouldn’t recognize the anything familiar about the Jersey shore town now (way too many years have gone by and age dims the memories) but I suspect I could still enjoy Cedar Point but it would be different — I’m a little calmer (age again) about amusement parks & it wouldn’t be quite the same without my brother to ride with or draging mom & dad about from ride to ride :).

    Reply
  39. When I was young (10&under) my family generally either went to the jersey shore or to Ohio to visit an amusement park (Cedar Point) & my aunt’s family. We’d alternate years between going east or west. My dad was firm beleiver in getting away for a week each summer for a family vacation. While they were nothing fancy I do remember the fun of them. I haven’t been back to either location since I’ve been an adult. I prob wouldn’t recognize the anything familiar about the Jersey shore town now (way too many years have gone by and age dims the memories) but I suspect I could still enjoy Cedar Point but it would be different — I’m a little calmer (age again) about amusement parks & it wouldn’t be quite the same without my brother to ride with or draging mom & dad about from ride to ride :).

    Reply
  40. When I was young (10&under) my family generally either went to the jersey shore or to Ohio to visit an amusement park (Cedar Point) & my aunt’s family. We’d alternate years between going east or west. My dad was firm beleiver in getting away for a week each summer for a family vacation. While they were nothing fancy I do remember the fun of them. I haven’t been back to either location since I’ve been an adult. I prob wouldn’t recognize the anything familiar about the Jersey shore town now (way too many years have gone by and age dims the memories) but I suspect I could still enjoy Cedar Point but it would be different — I’m a little calmer (age again) about amusement parks & it wouldn’t be quite the same without my brother to ride with or draging mom & dad about from ride to ride :).

    Reply
  41. Going back to my grandparents’ place in Virginia as an adult was an interesting experience. In many ways, it was like journeying back in time as many things hadn’t changed from when I was a kid. It brought back a lot of memories.

    Reply
  42. Going back to my grandparents’ place in Virginia as an adult was an interesting experience. In many ways, it was like journeying back in time as many things hadn’t changed from when I was a kid. It brought back a lot of memories.

    Reply
  43. Going back to my grandparents’ place in Virginia as an adult was an interesting experience. In many ways, it was like journeying back in time as many things hadn’t changed from when I was a kid. It brought back a lot of memories.

    Reply
  44. Going back to my grandparents’ place in Virginia as an adult was an interesting experience. In many ways, it was like journeying back in time as many things hadn’t changed from when I was a kid. It brought back a lot of memories.

    Reply
  45. Going back to my grandparents’ place in Virginia as an adult was an interesting experience. In many ways, it was like journeying back in time as many things hadn’t changed from when I was a kid. It brought back a lot of memories.

    Reply
  46. My Dad was one for fishing so many of our holidays, when we were young, were spent at various lakes in California’s high and low desert and at beaches and piers. My sisters and I, and sometimes friends would be along, would assume the roles of great explorers, pirates, native american guides, and fictional characters we’d read about, and search far and wide for treasures and found new lands. We had to be selective regarding the treasures we got to keep, but it was a lot of fun.

    Reply
  47. My Dad was one for fishing so many of our holidays, when we were young, were spent at various lakes in California’s high and low desert and at beaches and piers. My sisters and I, and sometimes friends would be along, would assume the roles of great explorers, pirates, native american guides, and fictional characters we’d read about, and search far and wide for treasures and found new lands. We had to be selective regarding the treasures we got to keep, but it was a lot of fun.

    Reply
  48. My Dad was one for fishing so many of our holidays, when we were young, were spent at various lakes in California’s high and low desert and at beaches and piers. My sisters and I, and sometimes friends would be along, would assume the roles of great explorers, pirates, native american guides, and fictional characters we’d read about, and search far and wide for treasures and found new lands. We had to be selective regarding the treasures we got to keep, but it was a lot of fun.

    Reply
  49. My Dad was one for fishing so many of our holidays, when we were young, were spent at various lakes in California’s high and low desert and at beaches and piers. My sisters and I, and sometimes friends would be along, would assume the roles of great explorers, pirates, native american guides, and fictional characters we’d read about, and search far and wide for treasures and found new lands. We had to be selective regarding the treasures we got to keep, but it was a lot of fun.

    Reply
  50. My Dad was one for fishing so many of our holidays, when we were young, were spent at various lakes in California’s high and low desert and at beaches and piers. My sisters and I, and sometimes friends would be along, would assume the roles of great explorers, pirates, native american guides, and fictional characters we’d read about, and search far and wide for treasures and found new lands. We had to be selective regarding the treasures we got to keep, but it was a lot of fun.

    Reply
  51. I think you’re right, Carol – sometimes it can be sad to see places you have such happy memories of if they are spoiled in some way. Better to leave them as you remember them!
    Julie, that sounds like an amazing experience! When I was a child I used to wish that we would do adventurous holidays like that!

    Reply
  52. I think you’re right, Carol – sometimes it can be sad to see places you have such happy memories of if they are spoiled in some way. Better to leave them as you remember them!
    Julie, that sounds like an amazing experience! When I was a child I used to wish that we would do adventurous holidays like that!

    Reply
  53. I think you’re right, Carol – sometimes it can be sad to see places you have such happy memories of if they are spoiled in some way. Better to leave them as you remember them!
    Julie, that sounds like an amazing experience! When I was a child I used to wish that we would do adventurous holidays like that!

    Reply
  54. I think you’re right, Carol – sometimes it can be sad to see places you have such happy memories of if they are spoiled in some way. Better to leave them as you remember them!
    Julie, that sounds like an amazing experience! When I was a child I used to wish that we would do adventurous holidays like that!

    Reply
  55. I think you’re right, Carol – sometimes it can be sad to see places you have such happy memories of if they are spoiled in some way. Better to leave them as you remember them!
    Julie, that sounds like an amazing experience! When I was a child I used to wish that we would do adventurous holidays like that!

    Reply
  56. Donna Ann, I would think there could be a lot of fun in going back to Cedar Point as an adult. My dh has a real longing to re-visit one of the amusement parks he went to as a child! So far I’ve refused to go with him as the rides give me motion sickness. Now that was something that didn’t happen to me as a child!
    Margay, it must have been interesting to realise that a lot of the things about the trip to your grandparents’ place hadn’t changed. When so much changes so quickly these days, that’s quite unusual and very refreshing.

    Reply
  57. Donna Ann, I would think there could be a lot of fun in going back to Cedar Point as an adult. My dh has a real longing to re-visit one of the amusement parks he went to as a child! So far I’ve refused to go with him as the rides give me motion sickness. Now that was something that didn’t happen to me as a child!
    Margay, it must have been interesting to realise that a lot of the things about the trip to your grandparents’ place hadn’t changed. When so much changes so quickly these days, that’s quite unusual and very refreshing.

    Reply
  58. Donna Ann, I would think there could be a lot of fun in going back to Cedar Point as an adult. My dh has a real longing to re-visit one of the amusement parks he went to as a child! So far I’ve refused to go with him as the rides give me motion sickness. Now that was something that didn’t happen to me as a child!
    Margay, it must have been interesting to realise that a lot of the things about the trip to your grandparents’ place hadn’t changed. When so much changes so quickly these days, that’s quite unusual and very refreshing.

    Reply
  59. Donna Ann, I would think there could be a lot of fun in going back to Cedar Point as an adult. My dh has a real longing to re-visit one of the amusement parks he went to as a child! So far I’ve refused to go with him as the rides give me motion sickness. Now that was something that didn’t happen to me as a child!
    Margay, it must have been interesting to realise that a lot of the things about the trip to your grandparents’ place hadn’t changed. When so much changes so quickly these days, that’s quite unusual and very refreshing.

    Reply
  60. Donna Ann, I would think there could be a lot of fun in going back to Cedar Point as an adult. My dh has a real longing to re-visit one of the amusement parks he went to as a child! So far I’ve refused to go with him as the rides give me motion sickness. Now that was something that didn’t happen to me as a child!
    Margay, it must have been interesting to realise that a lot of the things about the trip to your grandparents’ place hadn’t changed. When so much changes so quickly these days, that’s quite unusual and very refreshing.

    Reply
  61. This topic filled me with an irresistible urge to reread E. B. White’s famous essay “Once More to the Lake.”
    My favorite vacations as a child were visits to my dad’s extended family, farmers all. The trip was not a long one, only a few hundred miles, but it was a different world to me. From the breakfast table filled with more dishes than our dinner table held to a sky filled with more stars than I could imagine, from the stories of my great-great grandfather’s arrival in this country to sound sleep in my great-grandmother’s featherbed, it was marvelous, in the true sense of that word. My father’s aunts and uncles are dead now, as are most of his generation of cousins. The family land has been sold, and my generation and those that came after are scattered in classrooms, business offices, medical practices, and pulpits across the country and beyond. But memory is kinder than reality and allows me to return to those scenes from time to time.

    Reply
  62. This topic filled me with an irresistible urge to reread E. B. White’s famous essay “Once More to the Lake.”
    My favorite vacations as a child were visits to my dad’s extended family, farmers all. The trip was not a long one, only a few hundred miles, but it was a different world to me. From the breakfast table filled with more dishes than our dinner table held to a sky filled with more stars than I could imagine, from the stories of my great-great grandfather’s arrival in this country to sound sleep in my great-grandmother’s featherbed, it was marvelous, in the true sense of that word. My father’s aunts and uncles are dead now, as are most of his generation of cousins. The family land has been sold, and my generation and those that came after are scattered in classrooms, business offices, medical practices, and pulpits across the country and beyond. But memory is kinder than reality and allows me to return to those scenes from time to time.

    Reply
  63. This topic filled me with an irresistible urge to reread E. B. White’s famous essay “Once More to the Lake.”
    My favorite vacations as a child were visits to my dad’s extended family, farmers all. The trip was not a long one, only a few hundred miles, but it was a different world to me. From the breakfast table filled with more dishes than our dinner table held to a sky filled with more stars than I could imagine, from the stories of my great-great grandfather’s arrival in this country to sound sleep in my great-grandmother’s featherbed, it was marvelous, in the true sense of that word. My father’s aunts and uncles are dead now, as are most of his generation of cousins. The family land has been sold, and my generation and those that came after are scattered in classrooms, business offices, medical practices, and pulpits across the country and beyond. But memory is kinder than reality and allows me to return to those scenes from time to time.

    Reply
  64. This topic filled me with an irresistible urge to reread E. B. White’s famous essay “Once More to the Lake.”
    My favorite vacations as a child were visits to my dad’s extended family, farmers all. The trip was not a long one, only a few hundred miles, but it was a different world to me. From the breakfast table filled with more dishes than our dinner table held to a sky filled with more stars than I could imagine, from the stories of my great-great grandfather’s arrival in this country to sound sleep in my great-grandmother’s featherbed, it was marvelous, in the true sense of that word. My father’s aunts and uncles are dead now, as are most of his generation of cousins. The family land has been sold, and my generation and those that came after are scattered in classrooms, business offices, medical practices, and pulpits across the country and beyond. But memory is kinder than reality and allows me to return to those scenes from time to time.

    Reply
  65. This topic filled me with an irresistible urge to reread E. B. White’s famous essay “Once More to the Lake.”
    My favorite vacations as a child were visits to my dad’s extended family, farmers all. The trip was not a long one, only a few hundred miles, but it was a different world to me. From the breakfast table filled with more dishes than our dinner table held to a sky filled with more stars than I could imagine, from the stories of my great-great grandfather’s arrival in this country to sound sleep in my great-grandmother’s featherbed, it was marvelous, in the true sense of that word. My father’s aunts and uncles are dead now, as are most of his generation of cousins. The family land has been sold, and my generation and those that came after are scattered in classrooms, business offices, medical practices, and pulpits across the country and beyond. But memory is kinder than reality and allows me to return to those scenes from time to time.

    Reply
  66. Wow, the New Forest sounds amazing would love to visit someday. My family never took trips win I was young except for the occassional fishing trip or camping trip but they were not far trips. We lived in the country anyway so this was not a big deal. My parents hated the city so we never went there it was hard to do much traveling with 6 kids anyway! My husband and I try to give our little girls more travel adventures by taking them to more excitng places and hopefully when they are older have some good memories! Thanks for the great post and for sharing today!

    Reply
  67. Wow, the New Forest sounds amazing would love to visit someday. My family never took trips win I was young except for the occassional fishing trip or camping trip but they were not far trips. We lived in the country anyway so this was not a big deal. My parents hated the city so we never went there it was hard to do much traveling with 6 kids anyway! My husband and I try to give our little girls more travel adventures by taking them to more excitng places and hopefully when they are older have some good memories! Thanks for the great post and for sharing today!

    Reply
  68. Wow, the New Forest sounds amazing would love to visit someday. My family never took trips win I was young except for the occassional fishing trip or camping trip but they were not far trips. We lived in the country anyway so this was not a big deal. My parents hated the city so we never went there it was hard to do much traveling with 6 kids anyway! My husband and I try to give our little girls more travel adventures by taking them to more excitng places and hopefully when they are older have some good memories! Thanks for the great post and for sharing today!

    Reply
  69. Wow, the New Forest sounds amazing would love to visit someday. My family never took trips win I was young except for the occassional fishing trip or camping trip but they were not far trips. We lived in the country anyway so this was not a big deal. My parents hated the city so we never went there it was hard to do much traveling with 6 kids anyway! My husband and I try to give our little girls more travel adventures by taking them to more excitng places and hopefully when they are older have some good memories! Thanks for the great post and for sharing today!

    Reply
  70. Wow, the New Forest sounds amazing would love to visit someday. My family never took trips win I was young except for the occassional fishing trip or camping trip but they were not far trips. We lived in the country anyway so this was not a big deal. My parents hated the city so we never went there it was hard to do much traveling with 6 kids anyway! My husband and I try to give our little girls more travel adventures by taking them to more excitng places and hopefully when they are older have some good memories! Thanks for the great post and for sharing today!

    Reply
  71. Hi. Is the New Forest a national park or under private ownership? How large is it? I’ve heard of it, but never have visited.
    Diane in the Pacific Northwest of USA, a long way away from the New Forest.

    Reply
  72. Hi. Is the New Forest a national park or under private ownership? How large is it? I’ve heard of it, but never have visited.
    Diane in the Pacific Northwest of USA, a long way away from the New Forest.

    Reply
  73. Hi. Is the New Forest a national park or under private ownership? How large is it? I’ve heard of it, but never have visited.
    Diane in the Pacific Northwest of USA, a long way away from the New Forest.

    Reply
  74. Hi. Is the New Forest a national park or under private ownership? How large is it? I’ve heard of it, but never have visited.
    Diane in the Pacific Northwest of USA, a long way away from the New Forest.

    Reply
  75. Hi. Is the New Forest a national park or under private ownership? How large is it? I’ve heard of it, but never have visited.
    Diane in the Pacific Northwest of USA, a long way away from the New Forest.

    Reply
  76. Thank you for the mention of “Once More to the Lake,” Janga. I’ve enjoyed reading it and it was wonderfully evocative, like your mention of the memories of your childhood vacations.
    Johanna, I’m glad that you enjoyed the post. Thank you! I love that you are both taking your little girls on exciting travel adventures. I’m sure they will have lots of happy memories. I think children can derive excitement from all kinds of trips; I know that as a child I was completely wrapped up in the journey we made to Somerset each year. It was only a hundred miles or so from home but we travelled on the old Roman road, the Fosse Way, because my mother didn’t like the motorways. That felt pretty special to me, mile upon mile of old, straight road! And the cottage we stayed in had stone mushrooms in the garden. It felt magical out there of an evening!

    Reply
  77. Thank you for the mention of “Once More to the Lake,” Janga. I’ve enjoyed reading it and it was wonderfully evocative, like your mention of the memories of your childhood vacations.
    Johanna, I’m glad that you enjoyed the post. Thank you! I love that you are both taking your little girls on exciting travel adventures. I’m sure they will have lots of happy memories. I think children can derive excitement from all kinds of trips; I know that as a child I was completely wrapped up in the journey we made to Somerset each year. It was only a hundred miles or so from home but we travelled on the old Roman road, the Fosse Way, because my mother didn’t like the motorways. That felt pretty special to me, mile upon mile of old, straight road! And the cottage we stayed in had stone mushrooms in the garden. It felt magical out there of an evening!

    Reply
  78. Thank you for the mention of “Once More to the Lake,” Janga. I’ve enjoyed reading it and it was wonderfully evocative, like your mention of the memories of your childhood vacations.
    Johanna, I’m glad that you enjoyed the post. Thank you! I love that you are both taking your little girls on exciting travel adventures. I’m sure they will have lots of happy memories. I think children can derive excitement from all kinds of trips; I know that as a child I was completely wrapped up in the journey we made to Somerset each year. It was only a hundred miles or so from home but we travelled on the old Roman road, the Fosse Way, because my mother didn’t like the motorways. That felt pretty special to me, mile upon mile of old, straight road! And the cottage we stayed in had stone mushrooms in the garden. It felt magical out there of an evening!

    Reply
  79. Thank you for the mention of “Once More to the Lake,” Janga. I’ve enjoyed reading it and it was wonderfully evocative, like your mention of the memories of your childhood vacations.
    Johanna, I’m glad that you enjoyed the post. Thank you! I love that you are both taking your little girls on exciting travel adventures. I’m sure they will have lots of happy memories. I think children can derive excitement from all kinds of trips; I know that as a child I was completely wrapped up in the journey we made to Somerset each year. It was only a hundred miles or so from home but we travelled on the old Roman road, the Fosse Way, because my mother didn’t like the motorways. That felt pretty special to me, mile upon mile of old, straight road! And the cottage we stayed in had stone mushrooms in the garden. It felt magical out there of an evening!

    Reply
  80. Thank you for the mention of “Once More to the Lake,” Janga. I’ve enjoyed reading it and it was wonderfully evocative, like your mention of the memories of your childhood vacations.
    Johanna, I’m glad that you enjoyed the post. Thank you! I love that you are both taking your little girls on exciting travel adventures. I’m sure they will have lots of happy memories. I think children can derive excitement from all kinds of trips; I know that as a child I was completely wrapped up in the journey we made to Somerset each year. It was only a hundred miles or so from home but we travelled on the old Roman road, the Fosse Way, because my mother didn’t like the motorways. That felt pretty special to me, mile upon mile of old, straight road! And the cottage we stayed in had stone mushrooms in the garden. It felt magical out there of an evening!

    Reply
  81. Hi Diane! The New Forest is a National Park and is run by the Forestry Commission alongside a number of other public organisations like the National Trust. It is apparently just under 219 square miles and is the largest area of “forest” left in England. It dwarfs other forests such as Savernake, which is my local forest and is the only one left in private hands. There’s a very special atmosphere about these ancient places and all the historic sites and the wonderful wildlife make it well worth visiting in my opinion – and perhaps a great setting for a book?

    Reply
  82. Hi Diane! The New Forest is a National Park and is run by the Forestry Commission alongside a number of other public organisations like the National Trust. It is apparently just under 219 square miles and is the largest area of “forest” left in England. It dwarfs other forests such as Savernake, which is my local forest and is the only one left in private hands. There’s a very special atmosphere about these ancient places and all the historic sites and the wonderful wildlife make it well worth visiting in my opinion – and perhaps a great setting for a book?

    Reply
  83. Hi Diane! The New Forest is a National Park and is run by the Forestry Commission alongside a number of other public organisations like the National Trust. It is apparently just under 219 square miles and is the largest area of “forest” left in England. It dwarfs other forests such as Savernake, which is my local forest and is the only one left in private hands. There’s a very special atmosphere about these ancient places and all the historic sites and the wonderful wildlife make it well worth visiting in my opinion – and perhaps a great setting for a book?

    Reply
  84. Hi Diane! The New Forest is a National Park and is run by the Forestry Commission alongside a number of other public organisations like the National Trust. It is apparently just under 219 square miles and is the largest area of “forest” left in England. It dwarfs other forests such as Savernake, which is my local forest and is the only one left in private hands. There’s a very special atmosphere about these ancient places and all the historic sites and the wonderful wildlife make it well worth visiting in my opinion – and perhaps a great setting for a book?

    Reply
  85. Hi Diane! The New Forest is a National Park and is run by the Forestry Commission alongside a number of other public organisations like the National Trust. It is apparently just under 219 square miles and is the largest area of “forest” left in England. It dwarfs other forests such as Savernake, which is my local forest and is the only one left in private hands. There’s a very special atmosphere about these ancient places and all the historic sites and the wonderful wildlife make it well worth visiting in my opinion – and perhaps a great setting for a book?

    Reply
  86. Hello Nicola!
    Family vacations meant roadtrips in the behemoth Chrysler Town and Country station wagon. I passed the long drives reading my books. My dad didn’t like stopping at Mc Donald’s so we ate at coffee shops along the way. Memories of bright orange, turquoise and pink Naugehyde booths, the smell of coffee and pancake syrup, and waitresses with big hair are ingrained in my memory. 🙂

    Reply
  87. Hello Nicola!
    Family vacations meant roadtrips in the behemoth Chrysler Town and Country station wagon. I passed the long drives reading my books. My dad didn’t like stopping at Mc Donald’s so we ate at coffee shops along the way. Memories of bright orange, turquoise and pink Naugehyde booths, the smell of coffee and pancake syrup, and waitresses with big hair are ingrained in my memory. 🙂

    Reply
  88. Hello Nicola!
    Family vacations meant roadtrips in the behemoth Chrysler Town and Country station wagon. I passed the long drives reading my books. My dad didn’t like stopping at Mc Donald’s so we ate at coffee shops along the way. Memories of bright orange, turquoise and pink Naugehyde booths, the smell of coffee and pancake syrup, and waitresses with big hair are ingrained in my memory. 🙂

    Reply
  89. Hello Nicola!
    Family vacations meant roadtrips in the behemoth Chrysler Town and Country station wagon. I passed the long drives reading my books. My dad didn’t like stopping at Mc Donald’s so we ate at coffee shops along the way. Memories of bright orange, turquoise and pink Naugehyde booths, the smell of coffee and pancake syrup, and waitresses with big hair are ingrained in my memory. 🙂

    Reply
  90. Hello Nicola!
    Family vacations meant roadtrips in the behemoth Chrysler Town and Country station wagon. I passed the long drives reading my books. My dad didn’t like stopping at Mc Donald’s so we ate at coffee shops along the way. Memories of bright orange, turquoise and pink Naugehyde booths, the smell of coffee and pancake syrup, and waitresses with big hair are ingrained in my memory. 🙂

    Reply
  91. Camping, fishing, and hunting were the only vacations at my house growing up. I love the outdoors, but I wish there could have been roadtrips. I love traveling, but the only way I get to do it is through the books I read. Maybe someday.

    Reply
  92. Camping, fishing, and hunting were the only vacations at my house growing up. I love the outdoors, but I wish there could have been roadtrips. I love traveling, but the only way I get to do it is through the books I read. Maybe someday.

    Reply
  93. Camping, fishing, and hunting were the only vacations at my house growing up. I love the outdoors, but I wish there could have been roadtrips. I love traveling, but the only way I get to do it is through the books I read. Maybe someday.

    Reply
  94. Camping, fishing, and hunting were the only vacations at my house growing up. I love the outdoors, but I wish there could have been roadtrips. I love traveling, but the only way I get to do it is through the books I read. Maybe someday.

    Reply
  95. Camping, fishing, and hunting were the only vacations at my house growing up. I love the outdoors, but I wish there could have been roadtrips. I love traveling, but the only way I get to do it is through the books I read. Maybe someday.

    Reply
  96. Ah, Nicola, yet one more place to add to my list of places to see before they put me to bed with a shovel. At this rate my trip to England will have to last for years! Thank you for the lovely post. I can see the places you mention in my mind’s eye. Lovely!
    The first time I watched the 2005 version of Pride and Prejudice I had this strange sense of deja vu. The view of the house and then the view of the entrance hall with that lovely black and white floor. I finally figured out that I had been there !! I looked back through my treasure box from our years in England and realized I had visited Chatsworth when I was nine! (Some 43 odd years ago!)
    Another place I visited and loved and didn’t remember until I saw a television special years later was Longleat. I remember a seal jumping into the boat with us when we went out onto the lake to see the island where the monkeys lived. Isn’t it odd the things you remember?

    Reply
  97. Ah, Nicola, yet one more place to add to my list of places to see before they put me to bed with a shovel. At this rate my trip to England will have to last for years! Thank you for the lovely post. I can see the places you mention in my mind’s eye. Lovely!
    The first time I watched the 2005 version of Pride and Prejudice I had this strange sense of deja vu. The view of the house and then the view of the entrance hall with that lovely black and white floor. I finally figured out that I had been there !! I looked back through my treasure box from our years in England and realized I had visited Chatsworth when I was nine! (Some 43 odd years ago!)
    Another place I visited and loved and didn’t remember until I saw a television special years later was Longleat. I remember a seal jumping into the boat with us when we went out onto the lake to see the island where the monkeys lived. Isn’t it odd the things you remember?

    Reply
  98. Ah, Nicola, yet one more place to add to my list of places to see before they put me to bed with a shovel. At this rate my trip to England will have to last for years! Thank you for the lovely post. I can see the places you mention in my mind’s eye. Lovely!
    The first time I watched the 2005 version of Pride and Prejudice I had this strange sense of deja vu. The view of the house and then the view of the entrance hall with that lovely black and white floor. I finally figured out that I had been there !! I looked back through my treasure box from our years in England and realized I had visited Chatsworth when I was nine! (Some 43 odd years ago!)
    Another place I visited and loved and didn’t remember until I saw a television special years later was Longleat. I remember a seal jumping into the boat with us when we went out onto the lake to see the island where the monkeys lived. Isn’t it odd the things you remember?

    Reply
  99. Ah, Nicola, yet one more place to add to my list of places to see before they put me to bed with a shovel. At this rate my trip to England will have to last for years! Thank you for the lovely post. I can see the places you mention in my mind’s eye. Lovely!
    The first time I watched the 2005 version of Pride and Prejudice I had this strange sense of deja vu. The view of the house and then the view of the entrance hall with that lovely black and white floor. I finally figured out that I had been there !! I looked back through my treasure box from our years in England and realized I had visited Chatsworth when I was nine! (Some 43 odd years ago!)
    Another place I visited and loved and didn’t remember until I saw a television special years later was Longleat. I remember a seal jumping into the boat with us when we went out onto the lake to see the island where the monkeys lived. Isn’t it odd the things you remember?

    Reply
  100. Ah, Nicola, yet one more place to add to my list of places to see before they put me to bed with a shovel. At this rate my trip to England will have to last for years! Thank you for the lovely post. I can see the places you mention in my mind’s eye. Lovely!
    The first time I watched the 2005 version of Pride and Prejudice I had this strange sense of deja vu. The view of the house and then the view of the entrance hall with that lovely black and white floor. I finally figured out that I had been there !! I looked back through my treasure box from our years in England and realized I had visited Chatsworth when I was nine! (Some 43 odd years ago!)
    Another place I visited and loved and didn’t remember until I saw a television special years later was Longleat. I remember a seal jumping into the boat with us when we went out onto the lake to see the island where the monkeys lived. Isn’t it odd the things you remember?

    Reply
  101. Hi Jennifer! I loved your description of the road trip. How interesting that so many of our experiences were defined by what our parents didn’t like about travel – my mother not driving on motorways, your dad not wanting to stop at McDonalds!
    Linda, I love vicariously travelling through other people’s stories! We never went fishing, hunting or camping (another thing that my mother disliked!) So they all have a certain mystery for me.

    Reply
  102. Hi Jennifer! I loved your description of the road trip. How interesting that so many of our experiences were defined by what our parents didn’t like about travel – my mother not driving on motorways, your dad not wanting to stop at McDonalds!
    Linda, I love vicariously travelling through other people’s stories! We never went fishing, hunting or camping (another thing that my mother disliked!) So they all have a certain mystery for me.

    Reply
  103. Hi Jennifer! I loved your description of the road trip. How interesting that so many of our experiences were defined by what our parents didn’t like about travel – my mother not driving on motorways, your dad not wanting to stop at McDonalds!
    Linda, I love vicariously travelling through other people’s stories! We never went fishing, hunting or camping (another thing that my mother disliked!) So they all have a certain mystery for me.

    Reply
  104. Hi Jennifer! I loved your description of the road trip. How interesting that so many of our experiences were defined by what our parents didn’t like about travel – my mother not driving on motorways, your dad not wanting to stop at McDonalds!
    Linda, I love vicariously travelling through other people’s stories! We never went fishing, hunting or camping (another thing that my mother disliked!) So they all have a certain mystery for me.

    Reply
  105. Hi Jennifer! I loved your description of the road trip. How interesting that so many of our experiences were defined by what our parents didn’t like about travel – my mother not driving on motorways, your dad not wanting to stop at McDonalds!
    Linda, I love vicariously travelling through other people’s stories! We never went fishing, hunting or camping (another thing that my mother disliked!) So they all have a certain mystery for me.

    Reply
  106. Louisa, glad to have added to your list, LOL! Fascinating that you recognised Chatsworth even though you were only nine at the time. I love the way we can not think about things for years and then something will jog our memories and it will be vivid and alive to us again.

    Reply
  107. Louisa, glad to have added to your list, LOL! Fascinating that you recognised Chatsworth even though you were only nine at the time. I love the way we can not think about things for years and then something will jog our memories and it will be vivid and alive to us again.

    Reply
  108. Louisa, glad to have added to your list, LOL! Fascinating that you recognised Chatsworth even though you were only nine at the time. I love the way we can not think about things for years and then something will jog our memories and it will be vivid and alive to us again.

    Reply
  109. Louisa, glad to have added to your list, LOL! Fascinating that you recognised Chatsworth even though you were only nine at the time. I love the way we can not think about things for years and then something will jog our memories and it will be vivid and alive to us again.

    Reply
  110. Louisa, glad to have added to your list, LOL! Fascinating that you recognised Chatsworth even though you were only nine at the time. I love the way we can not think about things for years and then something will jog our memories and it will be vivid and alive to us again.

    Reply
  111. Nicola, I haven’t traveled through England much, and not at all through southern England. So this was fun for me to read.
    Janga wrote, “But memory is kinder than reality and allows me to return to those scenes from time to time.”
    Yes, this is very true. I have such fond memories of my grandmother’s house where three families would cram in a three-bedroom house with one bathroom, where we had to eat in shifts, because there wasn’t room for everyone to do so at the same time. I’m sure the reality was tiresome, but I only remember the overcrowding and the fun!!!

    Reply
  112. Nicola, I haven’t traveled through England much, and not at all through southern England. So this was fun for me to read.
    Janga wrote, “But memory is kinder than reality and allows me to return to those scenes from time to time.”
    Yes, this is very true. I have such fond memories of my grandmother’s house where three families would cram in a three-bedroom house with one bathroom, where we had to eat in shifts, because there wasn’t room for everyone to do so at the same time. I’m sure the reality was tiresome, but I only remember the overcrowding and the fun!!!

    Reply
  113. Nicola, I haven’t traveled through England much, and not at all through southern England. So this was fun for me to read.
    Janga wrote, “But memory is kinder than reality and allows me to return to those scenes from time to time.”
    Yes, this is very true. I have such fond memories of my grandmother’s house where three families would cram in a three-bedroom house with one bathroom, where we had to eat in shifts, because there wasn’t room for everyone to do so at the same time. I’m sure the reality was tiresome, but I only remember the overcrowding and the fun!!!

    Reply
  114. Nicola, I haven’t traveled through England much, and not at all through southern England. So this was fun for me to read.
    Janga wrote, “But memory is kinder than reality and allows me to return to those scenes from time to time.”
    Yes, this is very true. I have such fond memories of my grandmother’s house where three families would cram in a three-bedroom house with one bathroom, where we had to eat in shifts, because there wasn’t room for everyone to do so at the same time. I’m sure the reality was tiresome, but I only remember the overcrowding and the fun!!!

    Reply
  115. Nicola, I haven’t traveled through England much, and not at all through southern England. So this was fun for me to read.
    Janga wrote, “But memory is kinder than reality and allows me to return to those scenes from time to time.”
    Yes, this is very true. I have such fond memories of my grandmother’s house where three families would cram in a three-bedroom house with one bathroom, where we had to eat in shifts, because there wasn’t room for everyone to do so at the same time. I’m sure the reality was tiresome, but I only remember the overcrowding and the fun!!!

    Reply
  116. I’m glad that you enjoyed the post, Keira. Thank you! I think it’s both interesting and a saving grace that our memories often present us with the fun rather than the tiresome bits of the past!

    Reply
  117. I’m glad that you enjoyed the post, Keira. Thank you! I think it’s both interesting and a saving grace that our memories often present us with the fun rather than the tiresome bits of the past!

    Reply
  118. I’m glad that you enjoyed the post, Keira. Thank you! I think it’s both interesting and a saving grace that our memories often present us with the fun rather than the tiresome bits of the past!

    Reply
  119. I’m glad that you enjoyed the post, Keira. Thank you! I think it’s both interesting and a saving grace that our memories often present us with the fun rather than the tiresome bits of the past!

    Reply
  120. I’m glad that you enjoyed the post, Keira. Thank you! I think it’s both interesting and a saving grace that our memories often present us with the fun rather than the tiresome bits of the past!

    Reply
  121. Janice’s post brought back memories. I grew up in Arizona, pre-air conditioned cars, and I remember night drives to/from Los Angeles to avoid the heat and traffic. One of my most vivid memories is pulling into a diner around 2 AM, expecting it to be empty at that hour, only to have to wait in line for a table. It was the opening of dove hunting season, and the diner was full of men in hunting gear.
    I now live on the east coast, and I love it here, but I do miss the open roads and open skies of the desert where I grew up.

    Reply
  122. Janice’s post brought back memories. I grew up in Arizona, pre-air conditioned cars, and I remember night drives to/from Los Angeles to avoid the heat and traffic. One of my most vivid memories is pulling into a diner around 2 AM, expecting it to be empty at that hour, only to have to wait in line for a table. It was the opening of dove hunting season, and the diner was full of men in hunting gear.
    I now live on the east coast, and I love it here, but I do miss the open roads and open skies of the desert where I grew up.

    Reply
  123. Janice’s post brought back memories. I grew up in Arizona, pre-air conditioned cars, and I remember night drives to/from Los Angeles to avoid the heat and traffic. One of my most vivid memories is pulling into a diner around 2 AM, expecting it to be empty at that hour, only to have to wait in line for a table. It was the opening of dove hunting season, and the diner was full of men in hunting gear.
    I now live on the east coast, and I love it here, but I do miss the open roads and open skies of the desert where I grew up.

    Reply
  124. Janice’s post brought back memories. I grew up in Arizona, pre-air conditioned cars, and I remember night drives to/from Los Angeles to avoid the heat and traffic. One of my most vivid memories is pulling into a diner around 2 AM, expecting it to be empty at that hour, only to have to wait in line for a table. It was the opening of dove hunting season, and the diner was full of men in hunting gear.
    I now live on the east coast, and I love it here, but I do miss the open roads and open skies of the desert where I grew up.

    Reply
  125. Janice’s post brought back memories. I grew up in Arizona, pre-air conditioned cars, and I remember night drives to/from Los Angeles to avoid the heat and traffic. One of my most vivid memories is pulling into a diner around 2 AM, expecting it to be empty at that hour, only to have to wait in line for a table. It was the opening of dove hunting season, and the diner was full of men in hunting gear.
    I now live on the east coast, and I love it here, but I do miss the open roads and open skies of the desert where I grew up.

    Reply
  126. Your post brings back memories of visiting my uncle’s cabin in Minnesota, Nicola. We drove up for a week every summer for five or six years. It sat by a lake, with grass going down to a little strip of beach and a dock. In back was a woodlot with an endless supply of little toads to catch. (My dad always made sure we let the poor things go!) I haven’t been back in decades, but I remember it vividly: The green trees, the sound of motorboats and the quiet lap of the waves they raised, the tickle of minnows nibbling at my toes, the smell of the Coppertone we slathered ourselves with. Good times!

    Reply
  127. Your post brings back memories of visiting my uncle’s cabin in Minnesota, Nicola. We drove up for a week every summer for five or six years. It sat by a lake, with grass going down to a little strip of beach and a dock. In back was a woodlot with an endless supply of little toads to catch. (My dad always made sure we let the poor things go!) I haven’t been back in decades, but I remember it vividly: The green trees, the sound of motorboats and the quiet lap of the waves they raised, the tickle of minnows nibbling at my toes, the smell of the Coppertone we slathered ourselves with. Good times!

    Reply
  128. Your post brings back memories of visiting my uncle’s cabin in Minnesota, Nicola. We drove up for a week every summer for five or six years. It sat by a lake, with grass going down to a little strip of beach and a dock. In back was a woodlot with an endless supply of little toads to catch. (My dad always made sure we let the poor things go!) I haven’t been back in decades, but I remember it vividly: The green trees, the sound of motorboats and the quiet lap of the waves they raised, the tickle of minnows nibbling at my toes, the smell of the Coppertone we slathered ourselves with. Good times!

    Reply
  129. Your post brings back memories of visiting my uncle’s cabin in Minnesota, Nicola. We drove up for a week every summer for five or six years. It sat by a lake, with grass going down to a little strip of beach and a dock. In back was a woodlot with an endless supply of little toads to catch. (My dad always made sure we let the poor things go!) I haven’t been back in decades, but I remember it vividly: The green trees, the sound of motorboats and the quiet lap of the waves they raised, the tickle of minnows nibbling at my toes, the smell of the Coppertone we slathered ourselves with. Good times!

    Reply
  130. Your post brings back memories of visiting my uncle’s cabin in Minnesota, Nicola. We drove up for a week every summer for five or six years. It sat by a lake, with grass going down to a little strip of beach and a dock. In back was a woodlot with an endless supply of little toads to catch. (My dad always made sure we let the poor things go!) I haven’t been back in decades, but I remember it vividly: The green trees, the sound of motorboats and the quiet lap of the waves they raised, the tickle of minnows nibbling at my toes, the smell of the Coppertone we slathered ourselves with. Good times!

    Reply

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